Under Fire
Veteran White House reporter April Ryan thought she had seen everything in her two decades as a White House correspondent. And then came the Trump administration. In Under Fire, Ryan takes us inside the confusion and chaos of the Trump White House to understand how she and other reporters adjusted to the new normal. She takes us inside the policy debates, the revolving door of personnel appointments, and what it is like when she, as a reporter asking difficult questions, finds herself in the spotlight, becoming part of the story. With the world on edge and a country grappling with a new controversy almost daily, Ryan gives readers a glimpse into current events from her perspective, not only from inside the briefing room but also as a target of those who want to avoid answering probing questions. After reading her new book, readers will have an unprecedented inside view of the Trump White House and what it is like to be a reporter Under Fire.

Under Fire Details

TitleUnder Fire
Author
ReleaseSep 1st, 2018
PublisherRowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN-139781538113363
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Politics, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography Memoir, Biography

Under Fire Review

  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    As far as I'm concerned, if you don't like Ryan's reporting and ethic of hard work, then there's something wrong with you. I have to admit though, this isn't as good as I hoped it be.If you haven't been paying attention, Ryan is a reporter who has been covering the White House for quite a while. She is well spoken, well respected, and intelligent. Spicer told her to stop shaking her head. She is part of what Trump calls the fake news (until he considers it real news, then it's right, except when As far as I'm concerned, if you don't like Ryan's reporting and ethic of hard work, then there's something wrong with you. I have to admit though, this isn't as good as I hoped it be.If you haven't been paying attention, Ryan is a reporter who has been covering the White House for quite a while. She is well spoken, well respected, and intelligent. Spicer told her to stop shaking her head. She is part of what Trump calls the fake news (until he considers it real news, then it's right, except when it's not). This book details her work in the White House Press corp during Trump's first year in Office. So if you are looking at how the Press is responding to Trump's repeated attacks on them and the First Amendent, this is it. It also means that there was, understandably, a push to get this book out. This most likely accounts for the feel that it should have used a bit of tighter editing. For instance,- I do not know if the publisher though only African-Americans would read this so perhaps this point is out of order (I'm white, I'm not show) - when Ryan is detailing Trump's first proclamination about African-American History month, she notes the response in the Black community because of the use of African-American not Black (there was/is a fear of erasing history or imporance). There was concern from the community, and she asked why the change. Spicer notes that Obama used the name; Ryan points out that Regan made the change. So why is Trump using African-American so much worse? I'm not questioning the validity of the response. I just want to know why it is worse. Is it because Trump is more openly racist? But Ryan doesn't say, so it comes off as strange.I understand that this is an attempt, in part, to capture how Ryan talks in book form, but there is an overuse exclamination points, which I will grant is a pet peeve of mine.There is also quite a bit on Ryan's "relationship" with Omarosa. This is understandable. If someone attacks your reputation and ethics, thereby endangering your job, you are going to be furious, but the section goes on for too long. A good editor would have shortened it.Those qualms aside, I am glad that I read this. Ryan is a good read, and there is much in here that sheds light on some things in the news as well as horrifying you with Trump's working hours. It is important because Ryan is reporting when reporters are underfire at home, considering for instance, the work place shooting as well as the death threats that some reporters are getting.
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  • Manuela
    January 1, 1970
    There is a lot of information on 171 pages. I will never understand everything she has experienced, as I am neither a black woman in the US nor a correspondent in the White House. But she has experienced this and it still astonishes me what level of vitriol is heaped on her and her family. It leaves a bad feeling in my mouth but I can understand why she is going back.
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  • Reading in Black & White
    January 1, 1970
    It wasn’t as good as I expected it to be. There were a few gems along the way with the highlights being about Omarosa. Overall, decent book and worth a read.
  • Randal White
    January 1, 1970
    An insider's look at the Trump administration. And, unfortunately, it's worse than we even imagined. Ryan, a reporter with decades of experience, describes the attempted sidelining of her by members of the current administration. She manages to persevere, and continues to try to stand for the under represented people of our nation. I admire her stamina. Her experiences dealing with the dreaded Omarosa Manigault are awful. It must be like being in grade school again, complete with the "mean girls An insider's look at the Trump administration. And, unfortunately, it's worse than we even imagined. Ryan, a reporter with decades of experience, describes the attempted sidelining of her by members of the current administration. She manages to persevere, and continues to try to stand for the under represented people of our nation. I admire her stamina. Her experiences dealing with the dreaded Omarosa Manigault are awful. It must be like being in grade school again, complete with the "mean girls" clique. I wish the author luck, and hope she can find the strength to continue in her White House career.
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  • Aimee
    January 1, 1970
    This book was just an ok read for me. I enjoyed the inside look into reporting on the White House and I totally emphatize with April Ryan and her struggle to do honest reporting under these conditions. I personally was expecting a more intimate look inside the White House and what it is really like to be so close to this administration. Instead the author spent most of the book talking about her own personal struggles, especially with Omarosa. I enjoy April Ryan's reporting and will continue to This book was just an ok read for me. I enjoyed the inside look into reporting on the White House and I totally emphatize with April Ryan and her struggle to do honest reporting under these conditions. I personally was expecting a more intimate look inside the White House and what it is really like to be so close to this administration. Instead the author spent most of the book talking about her own personal struggles, especially with Omarosa. I enjoy April Ryan's reporting and will continue to follow her work in the future but I just did not get a lot out of reading this book.
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  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    If you've been paying attention at all, you know this isn't a particularly great time to be a reporter or journalist. The president and his fans are combative and anything that doesn't confirm their bias is met with a derisive "fake news."One of the public faces for this is April Ryan. She's been considered one of the major thorns in the president's side...which is interesting because she's not even really all that rude or demanding. She's a journalist who does her job, meaning she asks question If you've been paying attention at all, you know this isn't a particularly great time to be a reporter or journalist. The president and his fans are combative and anything that doesn't confirm their bias is met with a derisive "fake news."One of the public faces for this is April Ryan. She's been considered one of the major thorns in the president's side...which is interesting because she's not even really all that rude or demanding. She's a journalist who does her job, meaning she asks questions and keeps asking them until they're answered. In this book, she discusses life as a reporter under this administration. (She has two other nonfiction books and one of them discusses her job under other administrations, too. I haven't read that one, but I would like to.)April Ryan's tone is blunt but respectful. She's actually a lot nicer than she probably needs to be, and certainly a lot nicer than I would say the president deserves. (April Ryan is a better person than I am, and I will admit that.)If you're interested in politics, journalism or both, this is a fascinating read. Recommended.
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  • KF-in-Georgia
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a fan of Ryan's. I like the way she handles the White House press conferences and how she deals with Trump-supporters on CNN programs. She's the gutsy reporter who flatly asked Trump if he's a racist. Lest you think she enjoys Trump-baiting, she points out that someone needs to ask the question rather than just making assumptions; no one else was asking the man himself.Includes a long, good chapter on HBCUs--their history and importance.
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  • Lawrence Grey
    January 1, 1970
    Short book that recaps White House reporter April Ryan experience with Trump and how bad things have become in this country. Didn’t think it gave much that wasn’t already out there so just a fair recount but free from the local public library!
  • Westley
    January 1, 1970
    I like April Ryan; she's a good reporter and provides an important perspective. However, I was expecting far more insight from this book. Too many passages are vague and lack detail. I also could have done without the repetitive sections on her feud with Omarosa.
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  • Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    We see it on the news, but reading April Ryan's experience reporting brings the absurdity of the administration into focus. Must read, must hear April Ryan as she continues the work: asking questions to keep those in power accountable.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    A memoir by a White House reporter with over a two decade tenure there. Ryan has endured a great deal of bullshit from 45 and his administration, but she persists, which is a good thing.
  • Katie Bee
    January 1, 1970
    A great book from an experienced, expert reporter. It is if course depressing, given the subject, but it's eloquent and vital.
  • Foggygirl
    January 1, 1970
    An illuminating read from a front line reporter in this oftentimes chaotic and untruthful White House.
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent and easy read. Had the pleasure of meeting the author at a lecture and book signing.
  • Brandy O'Rourke
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this more. I have the greatest admiration for Ryan’s work, her ethic, her persistence. I struggled to hear her voice in this. I look forward to reading other works.
  • Melissa Smith
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a excellent book . I read it 1 day . It talked about her time dealing with Trump White House. It was a quick read.
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