Storm of Locusts (The Sixth World, #2)
It’s been four weeks since the bloody showdown at Black Mesa, and Maggie Hoskie, Diné monster hunter, is trying to make the best of things. Only her latest bounty hunt has gone sideways, she’s lost her only friend, Kai Arviso, and she’s somehow found herself responsible for a girl with a strange clan power.Then the Goodacre twins show up at Maggie’s door with the news that Kai and the youngest Goodacre, Caleb, have fallen in with a mysterious cult, led by a figure out of Navajo legend called the White Locust. The Goodacres are convinced that Kai’s a true believer, but Maggie suspects there’s more to Kai’s new faith than meets the eye. She vows to track down the White Locust, then rescue Kai and make things right between them.Her search leads her beyond the Walls of Dinétah and straight into the horrors of the Big Water world outside. With the aid of a motley collection of allies, Maggie must battle body harvesters, newborn casino gods and, ultimately, the White Locust himself. But the cult leader is nothing like she suspected, and Kai might not need rescuing after all. When the full scope of the White Locust’s plans are revealed, Maggie’s burgeoning trust in her friends, and herself, will be pushed to the breaking point, and not everyone will survive.

Storm of Locusts (The Sixth World, #2) Details

TitleStorm of Locusts (The Sixth World, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 23rd, 2019
PublisherSaga Press
ISBN-139781534413528
Rating
GenreFantasy, Urban Fantasy, Science Fiction, Dystopia, Fiction, Adult

Storm of Locusts (The Sixth World, #2) Review

  • Elena
    January 1, 1970
    Read for the 2019 WBTM Diversity Reading Challenge: a book written by an indigenous/Native American author.I'm going to steal a line commonly used by professional book critics from prestigious magazines all over the world here: THIS BOOK IS SO BADASS.Beside being gloriously badass, Storm of Locusts also does what so many second installments in a series can't quite manage to do: be a better book than it's predecessor. And I'm not saying it only because I had the distinct - if only slightly self-c Read for the 2019 WBTM Diversity Reading Challenge: a book written by an indigenous/Native American author.I'm going to steal a line commonly used by professional book critics from prestigious magazines all over the world here: THIS BOOK IS SO BADASS.Beside being gloriously badass, Storm of Locusts also does what so many second installments in a series can't quite manage to do: be a better book than it's predecessor. And I'm not saying it only because I had the distinct - if only slightly self-centered - impression that Roanhorse reached over and rummaged into my soul to find that my inmost desire was to read a story about a motley female crew riding guns ablazing through a dangerous apocalyptic wasteland (there's also a moody cat riding shotgun in a sidecar and I totally feel like I haven't had enough of those in my life up until now), following a thin lead about kidnapped comrades and an even thinner hope for redemption and a life-affirming purpose, and decided to make it come true. It's also that the tropey PNR plotline that gave me such a headeache in the previous book is pushed into the background and, when it comes back into play, it does so in a much more organic way, so that it doesn't feel as foreign to the rest of the narrative as it did (to me at least) in Trail of Lightning: it's clear where Roanhorse means to take Maggie now, and why Kai's contribution to her journey does indeed matter. There's also a distinctive lack of Evil Mustache-Twirling Baddies here - in fact, Storm of Locusts resident villain is the only type of Bad Guy that ever truly works for me, the one whose gripes with the world aren't easily dismissable, even when the chosen methods to deal with them are.Like it did in the previous installment, Roanhorse's writing works in perfect synergy with Maggie's no-nonsense attitude and the first person present tense narrative enanches the fast-paced rhythm of the story. Unlike what happened in Trail of Lightning, though, Roanhorse feels now very much in control of the plot: when the characters meander and stray from the path, their little (mis)adventures always add something to the general storyline and to our knowledge of the Sixth World and the characters themselves.The one thing that (still) didn't quite work for me is Maggie's depiction as a "solid bitch": socially awkward, direct to the point of rudeness, clumsy with other people's feelings as much as with her own, abrupt and introverted as she is, I still don't buy into her bitchiness. Besides, terrible as her reputation is, it doesn't prevent random folks from walking up to her to detail in extremely patronizing ways how she should live her life, what her mistakes have been, and generally give her (negative) feedbacks. What good is it to be a famed bitch if it doesn't keep annoying people at bay? Even the bad guys stop whatever evil deeds they're up to for the sake of giving Maggie life lessons! I'm really not a fan of the trope of piling guilt on the MC for dramatic purpose, and this narrative device felt overused here - plus, all of these characters' moral standing is extremely shaky to say the least: you laugh in glee while dropping grenades on partygoers, you hunt down people to sell them as slaves and organ donors, you don't go around pointing fingers, yes? It just isn't polite.A few final words of advice to my fellow Goodreaders: this series is by no means YA and whatever crossover appeal Trail of Lighting had it's definitively gone from Storm of Locusts (unless you're more worried about sex than violence, in which case be Maggie's guest). Also, while I can totally see UF readers enjoying this series (I am, and I do), The Sixth World isn't exactly UF either, for the simple reason that there isn't much "urban" left in Roanhorse's version of the apocalypse. Finally, for those degenerates readers that feel like jumping into a series starting from its second entry: don't. Roanhorse doesn't waste time recapping events from the previous book or repeating essential informations about the Sixth World and her magical take on Dinétah, so do your homework and start from the beginning of Maggie's story - it's hugely bingeable, anyway.So, huh... when is book #3 due? --------------------------------Well. Look at that cover. more about the book hereI mean, Maggie + Rissa + unknown chick sporting a Cindarella dress & rifle combo = and I'm all ready for Rebecca Roanhorse to make me eat my words about female characterization in Trail of Lightning.
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  • Allison Ruvidich
    January 1, 1970
    Q. Why did I read Trail of Lightning as soon as it came out and not wait for the sequel? WHY DID I DO THIS TO MYSELF???A. Because it was so flipping good.
  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/04/22/...I’ve been running around for the whole of last year telling anyone who would listen that Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse is bar one the best thing to happen to urban fantasy in years. To say I was excited to read the sequel is an understatement. And now that I’ve read it, I am pleased to report that the highly-anticipated Storm of Locusts, like its predecessor, was just as fun and action-packed, while still manag 4.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/04/22/...I’ve been running around for the whole of last year telling anyone who would listen that Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse is bar one the best thing to happen to urban fantasy in years. To say I was excited to read the sequel is an understatement. And now that I’ve read it, I am pleased to report that the highly-anticipated Storm of Locusts, like its predecessor, was just as fun and action-packed, while still managing to feel new and breath fresh life into the genre.Four weeks have passed since the events at Black Mesa that saw Maggie defeat a god and save Dinétah, but her actions have cost her greatly, including her friendship with Kai Arviso, the young medicine man with whom she had fallen in love. Back at home with a lightning sword she’s not quite sure how to use, Maggie tries to make the best out of her situation by once again taking on odd jobs. After all, following the Big Water, there’s always something monstrous that needs to be slain in the Sixth World. So when whispers of a Navajo legend called the White Locust reaches Maggie’s ears, she doesn’t think much of it at first, treating the investigation like any other as she heads out with a crew to look into the rumors. But what they find is much more troubling. Not only is the White Locust real, he has amassed himself a number of followers, creating a dangerous cult. And to his faithful, he grants them delicate diaphanous wings of metal that look disturbingly insectoid, just like his namesake.Worse, Maggie has suddenly become the reluctant guardian of Ben, a teenage girl possessed of a strange clan power, much like herself. Ben seems to look up to Maggie just as much as she seems to fear her, but she is also young and fiery with a thirst for vengeance. So when the twins Rissa and Clive Goodacre come calling with new information on the whereabouts of the White Locust, it is no surprise that the girl wants to tag along. Maggie doesn’t like the idea, but can’t deny that Ben’s power might be useful, for the news the Goodacre siblings bring isn’t good. It appears the cult leader had paid a visit to their home, taken their youngest brother Caleb with him, and that Kai might have been complicit in the abduction. Though Maggie doesn’t want to believe that the man she loves could have been involved, the evidence against him is damning. Determined to get down to the truth, she agrees to help the twins track down the White Locust and get Caleb back—and then perhaps she can also finally confront Kai and clear the air between them.In all the ways that matter, Storm of Locusts is the perfect sequel. All of our favorite characters are back, with a several new faces to join the fun. Once more, we are transported to a world steeped in Native American myths and culture, where indigenous characters and their lives are in the foreground of both the setting and the story. Speaking of which, the plot of Storm of Locusts was a blast, making for a quick read where the action never stopped, and the turns just kept on coming. Overall, the writing also felt tighter and more streamlined, so needless to say, the pages flew by in a frenzy.But Rebecca Roanhorse has not been content to simply retread old ground and rehash the previous book’s ideas. For one, I loved how the gates were literally flung open to the rest of the world in this sequel, with the story taking us beyond the magical walls of Dinétah to see how other survivors of the Big Water have managed to eke out a life in this post-apocalyptic landscape. Readers are treated to a road trip (by land, by water, and even by air) of sorts as we join Maggie on a journey that includes a treacherous route through human trafficking territory, a run-in with an implacable god who still has unfinished business with our protagonist, as well as the eventual confrontation with the mysterious foe known as the White Locust. But amidst all the danger, there are moments of peace and beauty too. Not all of the country had been destroyed when the world went to hell, and we also get to see how pockets of civilization have survived in areas surrounding calm picturesque lakes and the mighty concrete dams on the Colorado River that are still standing.Then there are the characters. Maggie is not the easiest protagonist to like, but she does grow on you after a while. In Storm of Locusts, she’s still as stubborn and combative as ever, but it’s also true that since Kai came along, her edges have softened a little. And now with the introduction of Ben, Maggie has opened up even more, to my delight. Because much like the first book, the plot of this novel is in fact very straightforward and uncomplicated, following a classic quest narrative. Ultimately, it’s the relationships that really drive the story, and in this area, the sequel has greatly outdone its predecessor. I suspect part of this is because romantic element is downplayed, allowing the story to focus on Maggie’s dynamics with Ben, Clive, and Rissa instead. These friendships have defined her personality and motivations in a way that her romance with Kai could not, and I’m glad we were given a chance to explore her character from this angle.Overall, I loved Storm of Locusts. It’s a sequel that took all the best parts of Trail of Lightning and made them even bigger and better, while also adding fresh ideas and new adventures for our protagonists. I’m thrilled with the direction of this series and hope the trend of improvement keeps up! Can’t wait for book three!
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  • Dani - Perspective of a Writer
    January 1, 1970
    Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...The BuzzHave you not heard of The Sixth World series by Rebecca Roanhouse? The first book is called Trail of Lightning and it developed a world with some amazing monster hunting action!! Maggie is a serious killer but she wants to change after meeting Kai...The PremiseStorm of Locusts is exactly as advertised in the premise. Actually its amazingly accurate. TBH I missed Kai in this book. He was a welcome bit of softness in the hardness that was Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...The BuzzHave you not heard of The Sixth World series by Rebecca Roanhouse? The first book is called Trail of Lightning and it developed a world with some amazing monster hunting action!! Maggie is a serious killer but she wants to change after meeting Kai...The PremiseStorm of Locusts is exactly as advertised in the premise. Actually its amazingly accurate. TBH I missed Kai in this book. He was a welcome bit of softness in the hardness that was Maggie in Trail of Lightning. This time around we don't get to meet him but for a short time. Actually its fine though. The girl power more than makes up for it! Rissa and Maggie have problems with one another and this is the time to work it all out... It's time for a road trip!And I wasn't disappointed with our trip beyond the Walls of Dinétah ... its a dark, dark world out there. Men like the White Locusts are just the types to take advantage. We meet some new gods, make deals with old ones, blow things up and get involved in some really hinky experiments... Then we have an explosive ending that made the entire trip MORE than worth the wild ride. And we get a tantalizing little taste of what's to come in the 3rd installment of The Sixth World... let's prepare for war!!You love dark protagonists? Brutality is a spice of life for you? You enjoy new cultures? Post apocalyptic intrigues you? Then yeah, you'll need to read Storm of Locusts and the Sixth World series!My ExperienceI was quite shocked with how Storm of Locusts started. I didn't see that loss coming at all. To inherit a young woman... WOW! But I loved it... It's kind of what Maggie needs. She's been with this crappy god jerk, Neizghani, and what she really needs is a family, people who cares if she goes all murderer on them. And this was that start. I did find her relationship with Kai going from 0 to 60 really fast, considering things were only barely heating up in Trail of Lightning but absence does make the heart grow more willing to be frank with ones feelings.I also found the plot a lot tighter in Storm of Locusts. We didn't meander so much. I think the road trip aspect to the story really helped give the plot focus and direction. The author really knows how to write a climax though... its the end that punctuates the story and really makes our journey with Maggie worth it. Because she spends the book struggling with trust, change and her own self worth. She's come a long way from that girl who just indiscriminately killed when attacked. Things aren't always as they seem and believing when you can't see proof isn't easy.Cover & Title grade -> A+The covers for this series are seriously killing me they are so good! This story is all about the girl power and it shows in the cover design. They are not there to fake you out... seriously Maggie and Rissa along with Maggie's new friend, Ben, are going on an extended road trip together. I love the idea and applaud the execution and feel like the cover is the cherry on top. Also Storm of Locusts as the title is seriously so spot on... its scary good!Why should you get on board with The Sixth World series?-The Gods!!The biggest aspect of Navajo culture we get in The Sixth World series is the mythology. It's not straight up culture... its been adapted for this post apocalyptic world that these gods have reappeared in. It's new and creepy cool! To was my favorite this time around...-The Monsters!!In Storm of Locusts we see that in this new world order the weak will be taken in by the strong... sometimes against their will and sometimes totally with free will. Either way these monsters won't treat these people fair... they need a champion and Maggie will have to step up!-The Dinétah!!The clan powers are one of the most fascinating aspects in The Sixth World series. I love how we get a little more glimpse into these powers every book and really open them up and see what they can do. Then with Ben we learn about a totally new power!-Maggie's Found Family!!Storm of Locusts really brought home to me that Maggie is forming relationships, enduring ones. And I love that! Kai, the Goodacres, Ben, Tah, her mutts. Her list is growing... and thus the stakes are getting higher and higher.The WritingA couple obstacles are overcome in a rather convenient way... like our cat bik'edyeeii being in the right place at the right time and our boy Aaron being willing to make a deal. These are contrivances but given some explanation which I really applaud. The proper motivations will make the most convenient meetings all the more believable. A strength in Storm of Locusts though were the way obstacles arose... these have the potential to be just as contrived as the solutions. Not so here! They arise so naturally that they make the solving of them more acceptable! If a problem is believable that is the first step to finding the perfect solution.Honestly I just loved Storm of Locusts and can't scream about it enough! I thought it was a great sequel and an exciting step in Maggie's journey. The Sixth World series is a new urban fantasy that gives us a sense of what it may be like if we were Dinétah after a flood destroys most of the world. It's a perfect melding of culture and fantasy!!⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Authenticity⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Writing Style⋆ ⭐⭐⭐⭐ Plot & Pacing⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ World BuildingThanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review. It has not influenced my opinions.______________________You can find this review and many others on my book blog @ Perspective of a Writer. See my special perspective at the bottom of my reviews under the typewriter...Please like this review if you enjoyed it! *bow* *bow* It helps me out a ton!!
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  • Lisa Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Trail of Lightning, the first book in Rebecca Roanhorse's The Sixth World series, and Storm of Locusts is an amazing follow-up! Picking up right from where book #1 left off, the story rejoins Maggie after the big fight at Black Mesa, where she battled a Navajo god and seemingly lost her only friend. Now, mere weeks later, she's healing emotionally and physically, when she's called on by a sometimes-ally to help with a bounty hunt that goes badly wrong. After the bloody incident, Maggie h I loved Trail of Lightning, the first book in Rebecca Roanhorse's The Sixth World series, and Storm of Locusts is an amazing follow-up! Picking up right from where book #1 left off, the story rejoins Maggie after the big fight at Black Mesa, where she battled a Navajo god and seemingly lost her only friend. Now, mere weeks later, she's healing emotionally and physically, when she's called on by a sometimes-ally to help with a bounty hunt that goes badly wrong. After the bloody incident, Maggie has a new responsibility, her ally's niece Ben, a teen girl with clan powers of her own.Immediately on the heels of this event comes news that Kai has been kidnapped, and Maggie is soon on the trail of a cult leader whose powers include the ability to summon and control hordes of locusts. Gross. And scary. Storm of Locusts ends up as a road trip/quest kind of book, as Maggie, Ben, and Rissa, sister of the boy kidnapped along with Kai, set out to track their missing friends and get vengeance on the White Locust. For the first time in these books, their search takes them outside the walls of Dinétah and into the greater world beyond the Navajo people's protected lands, where corruption and extreme danger come in many forms, and where despite the strangeness of the new reality, the gods still have powers too.I'm really adoring The Sixth World series, its characters, legends, and world-building, the mix of old traditions and a new post-apocalyptic landscape. Author Rebecca Roanhorse has a magical, masterful touch with her storytelling, creating a people and society that feel real and lived-in. Maggie is a terrific, layered, conflicted heroine, a total win as a lead character. I want much more of her story! The book ends with a final scene that makes it clear that Maggie's troubles are far from over, which is fine with me -- more trouble for Maggie means more excellent stories for us to enjoy.Can't wait for #3!
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    I received an e-ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Review can also be found on *Milky Way of Books*Brace yourselves ladies and gentleman for THIS WAS AN AMAZING RIDE!Trail of Lightning was a big surprise for me this year. I always loved mythology, especially the stories from both the Native Americans and the civilizations in South America. And the first book of the series swept me away in a world where the Tribes have built a Wall after THE apocalypse with the help of their god I received an e-ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Review can also be found on *Milky Way of Books*Brace yourselves ladies and gentleman for THIS WAS AN AMAZING RIDE!Trail of Lightning was a big surprise for me this year. I always loved mythology, especially the stories from both the Native Americans and the civilizations in South America. And the first book of the series swept me away in a world where the Tribes have built a Wall after THE apocalypse with the help of their gods and medicine men and where a young woman Maggie becomes entangled with tricksters and heroes and one silver-eyed man. (by the way, Kai deserves hugs and love! My beautiful, genius man!)In the second book, a series of disturbing events, involving locusts (ugh), lead Maggie, Rissa and Ben, a new character to join forces in order to bring down, a lunatic cult leader, save Dinetah and also Kai. Also, the ladies on the book's cover? I realized from where the scene is inspired from and you really are going to agree with me when you read THAT chapter. It's a testament that humanity can become deranged after everything is lost and every human life has a literal price.The beauty of this book was not only the amazing action, the expanded world building or even the gods. It was Maggie and how she grew as a character, making friends and having allies and trying to lean into them as they helped each other. She matures and becomes far better than the closed-off character she was in the first book.And that made her even more lovable to me. At the same time, every scene with those bugs had me crawling and shivering and wishing I had insect repellant with me every time!There's no doubt that this book is going to be amazing when it will be released next April. It was only I, the mad blogger, who wanted to know the sequel and now has to wait maybe until 2020 until the third book is released! *laughs with tears*
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  • Holly (The Grimdragon)
    January 1, 1970
    "As he stands there, he begins to vibrate. His wings open wider. The lace-like lattice ripples, begins to shimmer and flow, and a thousand locusts drop free, plopping thickly to the floor. They mill over one another before lifting into the air. He opens his mouth, and more pour out from his throat, crawling over his cheeks, his eyes. He raises his arms, and they rise from his hands. Locust song fills the room. Thick and warm and bilious, a physical thing. Like drowning in a vat of molasses."Godd "As he stands there, he begins to vibrate. His wings open wider. The lace-like lattice ripples, begins to shimmer and flow, and a thousand locusts drop free, plopping thickly to the floor. They mill over one another before lifting into the air. He opens his mouth, and more pour out from his throat, crawling over his cheeks, his eyes. He raises his arms, and they rise from his hands. Locust song fills the room. Thick and warm and bilious, a physical thing. Like drowning in a vat of molasses."Goddamn. Tommy Arnold strikes again! LOOK AT THAT BADASS COVER!! I love it even more than Trail of Lightning, which is gorgeous!I read the first installment in the summer of last year and dug the hell out of it! It was this unique, brutal, diverse post-apocalyptic urban fantasy with monsters and magic! It was truly a breath of fresh air.This sequel? Unfortunately, not so much. For the most part, it felt like just another typical urban fantasy novel. Storm of Locusts follows shortly after Trail of Lightning. Maggie is still shook up from the prior events and the fact that she is now in possession of a lightning sword. She is searching for Kai and soon learns that he has fallen in with the mysterious White Locust, a Navajo legend. The White Locust has gained a devout, dangerous following. Along the way, Maggie becomes the guardian to Ben, a teenager with unique clan powers. I'm not even sure how to review this, to be honest. It was a mixed bag for me. I didn't love it, nor did I absolutely loathe it. It would be easier to write a review if that were the case!There was something different about Storm of Locusts, something I clashed with that wasn't a problem in the first book. I just wasn't fully vibing with it. For sure one of the standout issues was the dialogue. Just one example of the cringey exchanges that took place throughout the book:"You look good," I say stupidly. Because he does. He's taken off his blue jacket and the sleeves of his black button-up shirt are rolled up to his elbows, the collar loose and open despite the cold. His familiar rings glint in the light, the big turquoise one I like so much. Everything about him is elegant, even the way he holds the softly glowing cigarette between his long fingers. "You look good too," he whispers, perfectly sincere."Not like you," I gesture to his party clothes."Your hair got longer," he says."So did yours."I could feel my eyeballs rolling all the way back into my head. As I've gotten older, I have less patience for clunky, boring dialogue. It's a surefire way to throw me out of the story. There just isn't a natural rhythm to it, which is vital for me in enjoying a book. What it comes down to is that the writing seemed off this time around. The conversations were herky jerky, the romantic relationship was lacking depth, the plot bordered on cheesy.. everything I loved about the first book was almost muted. The bones were there, but it was a shell of what it could have been.There were still some delightful scenes and I enjoyed the addition of Ben, as well as the theme of female friendship that develops. Plus I'm still rooting for Maggie! I just didn't connect with this one as much, although it does seem to be setting up for something big in the finale! At least.. I'm hoping that's the case.(Thanks to Saga Press for the copy!)**The quotes above were taken from an ARC & are subject to change upon publication**
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  • Jessica {Litnoob}
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the perfect sequel. It took everything I liked about book one and amped it up ten fold while also fixing some of the things that I found harder to understand in book one.While there still wasn’t a glossary I feel like Roanhorse was much more comfortable giving contextual clues to the words and phrases we see in Navajo that might not roll off the tongue of anyone outside of the community. It helped me to understand better as well as made this language that’s entirely new to me more f This book is the perfect sequel. It took everything I liked about book one and amped it up ten fold while also fixing some of the things that I found harder to understand in book one.While there still wasn’t a glossary I feel like Roanhorse was much more comfortable giving contextual clues to the words and phrases we see in Navajo that might not roll off the tongue of anyone outside of the community. It helped me to understand better as well as made this language that’s entirely new to me more familiar. The character growth and development here was insane and all the arcs for them were believable after the events of book one. Even when we didn’t see why they were being like this right off. Roanhorse does a good job of showing us the fall out and then tackling the why which is my favorite kind of storytelling.The pacing was quick and engaging and those last hundred pages were bananas! Also the new characters were stupid interesting and I can’t wait to see their growth as we face down a book three now. Also eager to see the growth of those we know and love now that all the dynamics have drastically changed.
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  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    It's been four weeks since the battle at Black Mesa, and Maggie is determined she's not going to kill anyone. But her resolve is tested when she's brought along on a job to talk to a mysterious stranger called the White Locust...and all hell breaks loose.Crazy cults, swarms of locusts, and the Mad Max reality of the world outside the Wall all come into play in this dystopian world wracked by the horrors of climate change and the failure of federal government.I enjoyed this sequel a lot more than It's been four weeks since the battle at Black Mesa, and Maggie is determined she's not going to kill anyone. But her resolve is tested when she's brought along on a job to talk to a mysterious stranger called the White Locust...and all hell breaks loose.Crazy cults, swarms of locusts, and the Mad Max reality of the world outside the Wall all come into play in this dystopian world wracked by the horrors of climate change and the failure of federal government.I enjoyed this sequel a lot more than Trail of Lightning, mostly because it had a more solid plot with fewer things that were dropped or disregarded or had little context (or had a lot of emotional context that the reader was told about but not shown). Also, Maggie gets her own family...well, a family in the way that makes sense for Maggie, and begins to realize that lone-wolfing it is not exactly the healthiest thing in the world. And that while it's hard to make yourself vulnerable to other people, having their love and family is precious and gives you purpose.Plus—that ending!Additionally, I enjoyed learning more about this world, in an America that has been destroyed by climate change and is the literal worst case scenario of what's going to happen if we don't take action now to slow things down. There are a lot of ties to what's happening now—massive wildfires and drought on the West Coast, increasingly dangerous hurricanes on the East, a federal government growing ever more incapable to handle/manage these massive disasters, and a president who just doesn't give a shit. I just wish that the timeline was a little more clear—sometimes it seems like the Big Water happened years and years ago before Maggie's birth, and then you realize that it happened when she was 15 and was only like 7-8 years ago and so was relatively recent with all of the changes in Dinétah.Overall, I liked this a lot better than the first one, and I'm curious to see what that exciting epilogue will bring in the next installment in the series.I received this ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Robin (Bridge Four)
    January 1, 1970
    Buddy Read Starting 24Apr19
  • Matthew Galloway
    January 1, 1970
    This is that perfect kind of sequel that feels completely familiar and true to the first novel, but simultaneously feels fresh and different. I love how Roanhorse opens up the world and continues to grow her characters. The character arcs are wonderful and leave the reader excited to see where they go next. To go along with all that is plenty action and adventure, horrors of the apocalypse -- both larger and personal -- and magic.
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  • Kal ★ Reader Voracious
    January 1, 1970
    While this review is spoiler-free, if you haven't read Trail of Lightning yet, I'd recommend not reading this review or book synopsis as both have spoilers for book 1. "You know much of what you want, Battle Child. Careful it is not your undoing." Friends, when I say that I had high expectations for the second installment in Roanhorse's Sixth World series, I mean it. I was so pleasantly swept away into this world during the first book that I was confident that my expectations for book would be While this review is spoiler-free, if you haven't read Trail of Lightning yet, I'd recommend not reading this review or book synopsis as both have spoilers for book 1. "You know much of what you want, Battle Child. Careful it is not your undoing." Friends, when I say that I had high expectations for the second installment in Roanhorse's Sixth World series, I mean it. I was so pleasantly swept away into this world during the first book that I was confident that my expectations for book would be too high. I have never been so happy to be wrong before: Storm of Locusts is action packed, fast paced, and full of heart. If you're a fan of witty banter and found families, this sequel is definitely for you! "Your paths are far from decided. There will be many trials. Most of you will fail because failure is your nature. But others..." It's four months after the events at the end of the first book, and it begins with four armed men in Maggie's yard. It's her day off, but there's a job she is needed for and a bounty to collect. Things go a bit south and she reluctantly takes in a new charge, but when an angry Clive and Rissa Goodacre appear to ask for her help in tracking down their brother and Kai from a mysterious doomsday cult, their quest takes them beyond the walls of Dinétah.There is a lot of character development in this book, particularly with Maggie herself. She's struggling with her feelings of guilt and betrayal, and letting people get close to her. She wants to be a better person and make it up to Kai, and it is her personal path to redemption that I find particularly compelling. We've all experienced pain and loss, but she's used her pain to fight back for so long that she's become hard. "Life is short, Maggie. Even shorter since the Big Water. Sometimes you just have to take people as they are, not worry about whether they're good for you in the long run." Maggie is learning to not be an island, slowly trying to overcome her feelings of mistrust and abandonment. There is a levity in the banter of those that she has around her. There is definitely a Scooby Gang feeling developing, along with overall character development, in this book. We learn a lot of the backstories of Clive and Rissa, as well as Maggie's new charge Ben (who is my literal favorite). "From the back seat, Ben shouts, 'Get in, losers! We're going to Amangiri!'" I definitely missed Kai's presence in the majority of this book, but really appreciated the strong girl gang power that the book exudes. But just because these female characters are strong doesn't mean that they cannot find usefulness in frilly pink dresses. And Kai's absence and own path to healing in this book feels so incredibly valid for everything that he went through, it makes sense in a heartbreaking way. "Chaos trails him like death trails you." The writing in Storm of Locusts was tighter than in Roanhorse's debut novel. In addition to my much desired character development, this installment expands on what we have learned about Dinétah, Big Water, and the world beyond the Wall. The style is effortless and all-consuming: I read devoured this book in one sitting. I liked that we weren't left hanging for long on whether or not Kai resurrected, but I do wish that we had learned just how Tah survived the fire earlier (although how it is relayed makes perfect sense, I just thought it was going to go unexplained). There are a couple of convenient things that happen to make the plot move along; however, I think think that the character motivations in both Cat and Aaron's cases were well justified. Everything builds nicely to the climax of the book, which has me screaming about needing to wait to see what happens next!Overall, this was an explosive ride from start to finish for me! Trail of Lightning was a big surprise for me in 2018, and this sequel did not disappoint! It is just as action packed and fast-paced, but also is more tightly plotted and full of believable character development. The addition of Ben, as well as some reappearing characters from the first book, were a breath of levity that cuts the tension. The ending is simply an amazing cliffhanger that has me so excited for what comes next!REPRESENTATION: bisexual rep, gay side character, Native American rep (Navajo)CONTENT WARNINGS: attempted rape (challenged), death, loss of loved onesMany thanks to Saga Press for sending me an eARC via Edelweiss for my honest review! Quotes are taken from an unfinished ARC and may not match final publication.Blog | Twitter | Pinterest
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  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable new post-apocalyptic urban fantasy series. The representation of Native American culture and mythology is something I have never seen in fantasy, and this series is so compelling that it really proves we need more of these stories. Personally, I would love to see this series adapted for television, especially with it lending itself so well to a procedural style of storytelling.Unfortunately, I think the writing in this series could be a lot better. It reads as very choppy and the di An enjoyable new post-apocalyptic urban fantasy series. The representation of Native American culture and mythology is something I have never seen in fantasy, and this series is so compelling that it really proves we need more of these stories. Personally, I would love to see this series adapted for television, especially with it lending itself so well to a procedural style of storytelling.Unfortunately, I think the writing in this series could be a lot better. It reads as very choppy and the dialogue is not as witty or humorous as it would like to be, so I can't rate it above a three, though I do think there is a lot of potential in these books.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I've been trying to figure out why I like this book even better than Trail of Lightning and I think a major factor is the development of Maggie's character through her relationships with Rissa and Ben in this book. Kai's great and all, but there's something about friendship between women that allows readers access to a character in a way that just isn't really possible with a romantic relationship. I LOVED this book and am almost mad at myself for getting an eARC through Edelweiss; the wait for I've been trying to figure out why I like this book even better than Trail of Lightning and I think a major factor is the development of Maggie's character through her relationships with Rissa and Ben in this book. Kai's great and all, but there's something about friendship between women that allows readers access to a character in a way that just isn't really possible with a romantic relationship. I LOVED this book and am almost mad at myself for getting an eARC through Edelweiss; the wait for the third book will feel even longer.
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  • rachel
    January 1, 1970
    #1) Trail of Lightning ★★★★☆
  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    To be reviewed over at Fresh Fiction!
  • MeaganCM
    January 1, 1970
    4/23/19 My Copy arrived today!
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)Storm of Locusts is a fabulous sequel to the powerful and action packed Trail of Lightning. The Sixth World is a series that I know I'll be reading and re-reading in the future. There's such a wealth of rich world building, fantasy elements, and character development. Maggie is as clever, sarcastic, and powerful as ever. And in Storm of Locusts she is joined by some other fabulous comr (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)Storm of Locusts is a fabulous sequel to the powerful and action packed Trail of Lightning. The Sixth World is a series that I know I'll be reading and re-reading in the future. There's such a wealth of rich world building, fantasy elements, and character development. Maggie is as clever, sarcastic, and powerful as ever. And in Storm of Locusts she is joined by some other fabulous comrades - Ben (who's bisexual) and Rissa.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Jaclyn
    January 1, 1970
    Just as good as book one!
  • MJ (butchiebooking)
    January 1, 1970
    Trail of Lightning - ?Storm of Locusts - ? Untitled - ?Series score - ?
  • Marta
    January 1, 1970
    This was better than the first volume HOW I ASK WHAT IS THIS SORCERY THE FIRST BOOK WAS ALREADY SO SO SO GOOD AND SHE OUTDID HERSELF. I AM CRYING IN MY ROOM THIS IS EVERYTHING I EVER WANTED.
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    Roanhorse continues to drive a car over my soul, but this time, instead of Maggie's truck, it's a beautiful, sky-blue Mercury Cobra, because of course it is. If Trail of Lightning was raw and dusty and haunting, Storm of Locusts is pounding and jagged and longing. This book is a thousand, thousand beating, hungry wings and it's terrifying but stunning at the same time. Maggie is hunting again in this book, but it's not monsters this time; this time it's searching for something she lost, hunting Roanhorse continues to drive a car over my soul, but this time, instead of Maggie's truck, it's a beautiful, sky-blue Mercury Cobra, because of course it is. If Trail of Lightning was raw and dusty and haunting, Storm of Locusts is pounding and jagged and longing. This book is a thousand, thousand beating, hungry wings and it's terrifying but stunning at the same time. Maggie is hunting again in this book, but it's not monsters this time; this time it's searching for something she lost, hunting it down, come hell or high water, because it taught her what it means to be loved. And god, seeing Maggie, a beautiful, broken, jagged-edged solid bitch learn what it means to be loved? Is like watching a storm roll in across the sky--beautiful and scary and absolutely powerful. The cast of characters expands in this book and every single one of them is real and raw and I love them. Ben, written like an actual teenager, and full of rioting emotions; Rissa, angry and powerful all on her own, and so much better with friends; Aaron--who I did not expect to like--broken and scared and growing. Give me another road trip with these assholes any day; I'll read it all. Also there's more magic, and a lightning sword, a sweetass road trip with a haunted casino and terrible pop songs, and one of the most heart-poundingly intense climaxes I've encountered. There's some really gruesome stuff, because of course there is, and so much blood, and...so many bugs. But who cares? Maggie's there, and she's angry, and she's protective of her people and her People and her world, and I could read twenty books of her and not get tired. If Supernatural is really ending (I'll believe it when I see it, not gonna lie), then it's time for The Sixth World to be everything that it should have been: diverse and beautiful and bloody and jagged-edged longing. (Also, can we talk about how there's been two books in this series that I would definitely classify as, if not proper grimdark, definitely leaning in that direction, without a single sex scene or graphic rape? And, huh how shocking--they're Still amazing books. It's almost like *gasp* we don't need that?? in our dark fantasy!? to make it good? Absolutely wild.)
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  • Stuart Rodriguez
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn’t put down this rip-roaring sequel of a novel. Roanhorse assumes you’re already familiar with the world she created in Trail of Lightning, which allows her to throw you headlong into a pulse-pounding adventure into the post-apocalyptic hinterlands beyond the Navajo Nation’s protective wall. She continues to evolve and explore the wonderful, troubled characters from her first novel, introduces a couple of wonderful new ones, and efficiently sets up the third book while still delivering a I couldn’t put down this rip-roaring sequel of a novel. Roanhorse assumes you’re already familiar with the world she created in Trail of Lightning, which allows her to throw you headlong into a pulse-pounding adventure into the post-apocalyptic hinterlands beyond the Navajo Nation’s protective wall. She continues to evolve and explore the wonderful, troubled characters from her first novel, introduces a couple of wonderful new ones, and efficiently sets up the third book while still delivering a propulsive and captivating story. I’ll be recommending this novel to everyone when it comes out! If you enjoyed Trail of Lightning, read this one as soon as it comes out on April 23rd!
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  • Nadine Jones
    January 1, 1970
    "Caleb"?!?!?!? His siblings are Cletus, Clarissa, and Clive, I was SO sure his name would be Clarence or Clancy ... or Clint, Clay, Clark, Claude, Clem, Clyde, Cliff ...
  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    Storm of Locusts is the result of a series and an author hitting their stride. I devoured this book the day I got it, and it is even better than Trail of Lightning. The plot kicks in almost immediately, and characters, most of whom benefit from being established in the first book, play off one another wonderfully. Of course Maggie is still Maggie, rude, socially inept, and often single-minded to the point of being a little bit dense (her conversation with Tó for example). That’s why I love her- Storm of Locusts is the result of a series and an author hitting their stride. I devoured this book the day I got it, and it is even better than Trail of Lightning. The plot kicks in almost immediately, and characters, most of whom benefit from being established in the first book, play off one another wonderfully. Of course Maggie is still Maggie, rude, socially inept, and often single-minded to the point of being a little bit dense (her conversation with Tó for example). That’s why I love her- however, we also get the payoff of the emotional growth Maggie experienced in the first book, both in her relationship with Kai and the other characters in the series. Seeing her learn to open up to and rely on others, and how others come to trust her in return intersperses the often breakneck speed of the story with some lovely character moments.Honestly my only criticism is that last chapter combined with the fact that I have to wait for the next one
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    I so liked the first book that I wonder if I had higher than normal expectations going into this one because while I liked it, not as much as the first.Maggie came off a bit bitter and hard in this one to me. Sure she helped the others, but only because it was also something she wanted to do. She was backed into a corner with Ben and never seemed to let her forget it. Ben was a hot mess and really when you hear her story that is not surprising. The twins only went to Maggie for help because they I so liked the first book that I wonder if I had higher than normal expectations going into this one because while I liked it, not as much as the first.Maggie came off a bit bitter and hard in this one to me. Sure she helped the others, but only because it was also something she wanted to do. She was backed into a corner with Ben and never seemed to let her forget it. Ben was a hot mess and really when you hear her story that is not surprising. The twins only went to Maggie for help because they had no other options and weren't happy about obtaining Maggie's help. You knew things weren't what they seemed with Kai, so when we found out what was going on with him not a shocker.I did enjoy learning more about the world and what went wrong. With how this one ended I know I'll be checking out the next one.
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  • Kiwi Carlisle
    January 1, 1970
    Rebecca Roanhorse has given us an exciting sequel to Trail of Lightning, one that makes me eager for its sequel, as a good series book should! Once again, Maggie Hoskie, monster slayer, goes out to save the world, and finds it’s not exactly simple. Gods and Holy People walk in human form. Humans choose to become monsters. Others choose to stay human, despite formidable powers that have come to them.In thus Sixth World after a huge flood has remade the earth, everything is different, but the batt Rebecca Roanhorse has given us an exciting sequel to Trail of Lightning, one that makes me eager for its sequel, as a good series book should! Once again, Maggie Hoskie, monster slayer, goes out to save the world, and finds it’s not exactly simple. Gods and Holy People walk in human form. Humans choose to become monsters. Others choose to stay human, despite formidable powers that have come to them.In thus Sixth World after a huge flood has remade the earth, everything is different, but the battle of good and evil goes on. Roanhorse gives us some glimpses of some warriors surviving from our day — water protectors and Alt Rangers in Park Service Uniform, respected by all.Reading the first book is probably a really good idea before you dive into this one, but that’s not really a hardship. These two adventures are a good time and, while they may keep you awake at night finishing them, won’t take you a tremendously long time to read.
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  • Gretchen
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this! The story continues the wondrous, occasionally brutal story of Maggie Hoskie, with a revolving cast of new and returning characters. Terrifying powers and high snark, as well as a Maggie who is a little more firmly settled in her boots, make this enjoyable, though after the very climactic resolution of Trail of Lightning, this one felt a bit like a holding pattern (calm before the storm?) while we gear up for a bigger plot in the next book. If you enjoyed the fast pace, taut acti I enjoyed this! The story continues the wondrous, occasionally brutal story of Maggie Hoskie, with a revolving cast of new and returning characters. Terrifying powers and high snark, as well as a Maggie who is a little more firmly settled in her boots, make this enjoyable, though after the very climactic resolution of Trail of Lightning, this one felt a bit like a holding pattern (calm before the storm?) while we gear up for a bigger plot in the next book. If you enjoyed the fast pace, taut action, and broken swagger of the first book, you'll eat this one up, too.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 StarsThis book does not suffer from second book syndrome. If anything, it is stronger then the first. Both the world and characters are expanded upon and I got more attached to some of these characters. Maggie is such a compelling main character, both with her strength and back story. And, Ben, a new younger character, is welcome in so many ways. We see life outside the res and how they are faring post climate apocalypse. This story had a mission so it was more focused and just as fun as boo 4.5 StarsThis book does not suffer from second book syndrome. If anything, it is stronger then the first. Both the world and characters are expanded upon and I got more attached to some of these characters. Maggie is such a compelling main character, both with her strength and back story. And, Ben, a new younger character, is welcome in so many ways. We see life outside the res and how they are faring post climate apocalypse. This story had a mission so it was more focused and just as fun as book 1. I received an arc from the publisher but all opinions are my own.
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  • Martin Muhr
    January 1, 1970
    The world building fantastic, with incorporations of climate degradation and an ecological post-apocalyptic sandbox.On top of which is a stunning amalgam of Navajo mythologies, which makes the world wonderfully refreshing.Lastly is the plotting, pacing and character development. Top to bottom, this series is fantastic
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