The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (Montague Siblings #2)
In this highly anticipated sequel to the New York Times bestselling The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, Felicity Montague must use all her womanly wits and wiles to achieve her dreams of becoming a doctor—even if she has to scheme her way across Europe to do it. A must-have for fans of Mackenzi Lee’s extraordinary and Stonewall Honor-winning novel.A year after an accidentally whirlwind grand tour with her brother Monty, Felicity Montague has returned to England with two goals in mind—avoid the marriage proposal of a lovestruck suitor from Edinburgh and enroll in medical school. However, her intellect and passion will never be enough in the eyes of the administrators, who see men as the sole guardians of science.But then a window of opportunity opens—a doctor she idolizes is marrying an old friend of hers in Germany. Felicity believes if she could meet this man he could change her future, but she has no money of her own to make the trip. Luckily, a mysterious young woman is willing to pay Felicity’s way, so long as she’s allowed to travel with Felicity disguised as her maid.In spite of her suspicions, Felicity agrees, but once the girl’s true motives are revealed, Felicity becomes part of a perilous quest that leads them from the German countryside to the promenades of Zurich to secrets lurking beneath the Atlantic.

The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (Montague Siblings #2) Details

TitleThe Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (Montague Siblings #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherKatherine Tegen Books
ISBN-139780062795328
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Lgbt

The Lady's Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (Montague Siblings #2) Review

  • Em (RunawayWithDreamthieves)
    January 1, 1970
    You know.....if there are infinite universes with infinite possibilities, then there exists a version of me that’s a part of a science girl gang on a pirate expedition to save sea monsters, and one day, I will consume enough caffeine to vibrate my molecules at a frequency that allows me to pass between realities and retreat into that universe. So, what's this book about? Felicity Montague would offer up everything on the altar of sacrifice, so long as she gets to fulfill her dream of studying me You know.....if there are infinite universes with infinite possibilities, then there exists a version of me that’s a part of a science girl gang on a pirate expedition to save sea monsters, and one day, I will consume enough caffeine to vibrate my molecules at a frequency that allows me to pass between realities and retreat into that universe. So, what's this book about? Felicity Montague would offer up everything on the altar of sacrifice, so long as she gets to fulfill her dream of studying medicine. Her ambition had a stronger pull than all the administrators who talked about her own heart, and how it desired in a way they would judge without learning the shape of it, because she was a woman, and they were men—and entitled ones—and these together made them believe the planets and moons orbited around the single point of their desires. But if being siphoned off once a ring is placed on her finger was Felicity's preordained role on this earth, then she was determined to rewrite it. Felicity Montague intends to make the world shuffle apart to yield more room for her.Enter Simmaa "Sim" Aldajah, a black Muslim Hijabi pirate, who becomes the linchpin in Felicity's plan to sail to Germany and argue her case for a position on an expedition Doctor Platt is undertaking—an eccentric physician who happens to be engaged to Felicity’s estranged childhood friend, Johanna.At least that’s the plan, and things seldom go according to plan. As Sim’s hidden intentions clamor for air and Johanna’s guarded secrets spill out, the three women are thrust into a whirlwind of a quest—as unexpected as it was dangerous—that spans all the way to the Northern coast of Africa and leads them to the unseen secrets of the Atlantic.This book healed the worn-down places around my heart and I love it so much that I'm considering the possibility of giving up personhood to become a full-time abstract concept of pure love.Much like the first book, Lady's Guide's careful exploration of class, intersectional privilege, misogyny, colonialism and racism astonishes with its sensitivity and sophistication. The pace is electric, expertly entwining multiple threads until every character is enmeshed in the denouement. The prose is marvelously wrought, strong, and sure-footed, but it’s the characters that meld magic into a riveting, scintillating whole. Most incredible and moving are their slow maturations: the author allows her characters so much multidimensionality by giving them room to make mistakes and unlearn past prejudices and assumptions and showing growth and change with brilliant and subtle writing, an impressive attention to detail and witty dialogue.Felicity, Sim and Johanna give off enough energy to power an entire room. Individually, their sparks might have flared and faded; collectively, they ignited. They had so much shared gravity they pulled toward them anything they wanted. Together, they survived capture and imprisonment and extortion, and they broke free of every feeling of constraint and stultification before it wore them into dust. They didn’t apologize for their hearts, they didn’t make them tame, and small, but left them wild, spare and limitless. They wanted this painted world that thrilled them even as it frightened them. They wanted to understand the language of the women before them—the women who were denied the means to take up space in the world so they worked new angles for power—even if they would never speak it. And I can already feel the powerful psychic energies of thousands of my fellow sapphic readers collectively swooning at the sight. I’m so happy I can’t wait for you all to drink in that raw sapphic beauty! Her dark eyes meet mine and I look between her and Johanna. In the company of women like this—sharp-edged as raw diamonds but with soft hands and hearts, not strong in spite of anything but powerful because of everything—I feel invincible. Every chink and rut and battering wind has made us tough and brave and impossible to strike down. We are made of mountains—or perhaps temples, with foundations that could outlast time itself. Johanna was both unapologetic and soft, openhearted and fierce and I was in awe of how she remembered to be all these things at once. She’s one of those watery people whose compassion, emotions, and ability to break down the barriers of the people around them are a remedy to this world’s problems, the ones with the beautiful eyes through which everything sparkles, and nothing goes unnoticed. And like Felicity at first, many have inaccurately been led to believe that softness translates to pliancy and docility. But a soft woman doesn’t mean a fragmented woman. Softness is not weakness, it was only the way Johanna’s heart showed itself. It takes great courage to stay delicate in a world this cruel, just as there’s great strength in the gentleness of femininity. I love her and her fondness for pretty dresses and her wanting to pet every dog she passes and how she took by a storm all the men who misguidedly thought they could not have designed a better avenue to power for themselves than a gentle woman. Softness can be an armor, even if it isn’t my armor. Sim. My favorite thing about Sim is all of her. Being the daughter of one of the most fearful pirate commodores had left her ready for whatever the world dishes out her way. No matter how many obstacles were put between her and that moment of attaining her dreams, it stayed. She was stubborn that way, always claiming space that they wouldn’t surrender her, never bowing to the way other people saw her and especially not to the misplaced notion of a woman’s primary role being entirely divorced from her intellect and strength, much less the possibility of taking on a pirate lord’s legacy. And honestly? There are so many people out there who have the potential to love and could love me back and none of them are Sim? I am genuinely so upset?Felicity. I need an extra heart to love Felicity with. She grows so much over the course of this book, from the off-putting, judgmental and slightly haughty girl we met in the first book (though it was more aptly termed "prickly as a cactus" by Sim). Her education on internalized misogyny is a fundamental part of her character arc and serves as the foundation of her growing ability to realize that you can’t advocate for women and still tear women down for being women or hold other women to the arbitrary and restrictive gender roles you’ve been socialized into and further the ingrained sexist stereotype of not being "Like Other Girls". She eventually openly admits that she “often cast herself in the role of the misunderstood and sympathetic heroine” in the stories she told of herself and forgot that outside the mighty walls and wide ramp she’s built around herself, other people exist beyond her impression of them and they were not merely minor players in the drama of her life. And I really loved that. I’m learning there is no one way for life to be lived, no one way to be strong or brave or kind or good. Rather there are many people doing the best they can with the heart they are given and the hand they are dealt. Our best is all we can do, and all we can hold on to is each other. And, zounds, that is more than enough. Felicity is also on the aro-ace spectrum and this book has brought into center stage so many important discussions that made my ace heart feel so incredibly validated! Lady’s Guide challenges the notion that romantic love is the end goal of all forms of love, highlighting the fact that other forms of love can be just as fulfilling. Platonic love and romantic love are not ranks, tiers, or levels. They are not above or below each other. Romance is not a promotion and being content with friendship is not a demotion. Romance is not “more than” a purely platonic relationship. Platonic love and romantic love are concepts that exist on equal terms, side by side. Sometimes, they happen to coincide. Other times, they don’t intersect at all. It’s important to understand that neither is inherently more or less valuable than the other and it's solely up to each and every individual! “And you don’t want anyone with you?” Sim asks, raising her head. “No family?”  “I want friends. Good friends, that make up a different kind of family.”  “That sounds lonely.”  “It wouldn’t be lonely,” I say. “I’d like to be on my own, but not alone.”  “That’s not the sort of lonely I meant.” “Oh.” I’m not sure why I’m blushing, but I feel it swell in my cheeks. “Well, that sort of aloneness doesn’t feel lonely to me.” Lastly, I have to talk about Monty and Percy. They took a layer of ice off my heart. Seeing them again was like picking up midsentence as if I’d been there with them the whole time. I love them so much they’re so cute I want to make a playlist about them. I WANT TO BREAK THEIR DOOR DOWN, STOMP INTO THEIR HOUSE AND give them lots of self-validation and love for their kind souls. I’m still in ruins over the fact that at this very moment—this VERY moment—Percy is alive and smiling and spending some quality time wrapped up in his boyfriend in the home they made together. There were so many instances where I had to stop and squeal or sigh or close my eyes and wrinkle my nose and forehead because they cherish each other so much and they care about Felicity SO MUCH (I swear Percy prematurely ages at least ten years every day just worrying about Felicity's general wellbeing and Felicity referring to him as her "brother" filled the cold hollow inside me!!) “Love has made you terribly soft, you know,” I say to him without looking.  “I do,” he replies. “Isn’t it grand?” This book is a tribute to all the women who—as a result of their strength and perseverance and defiance of gender norms—have all been roundly abused in history as trollops, tramps and tarts. The women who were told not to wander, not to stray, because for women like them—with voyager hearts and roots splat across the earth—the world offers only misery. The women who did not give up their aspirations, who did not lower their eyes and duck their chins, who did not let men’s arrogance drive them away from their ambitions. The women whose hearts did not shrink away from their own desires and whose weathered hands held onto their dreams.I want to grow the kind of bright, fierce heart that lived in these women.  Everyone has heard stories of women like us—cautionary tales, morality plays, warnings of what will befall you if you are a girl too wild for the world, a girl who asks too many questions or wants too much. If you set off into the world alone. Everyone has heard stories of women like us, and we intend to make more of them.   BLOG | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | TUMBLR
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  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    “I don’t know what you’re referencing, madam,” the chairman says, his voice raised over mine.“I’m talking about menstruation, sir!” I shout in return.It’s like I set the hall on fire, manifested a venomous snake from thin air, also set that snake on fire, and then threw it at the board. The men all erupt into protestations and a fair number of horrified gasps. I swear one of them actually swoons at the mention of womanly bleeding. Lee has done it again! I must confess that I wasn't looking forw “I don’t know what you’re referencing, madam,” the chairman says, his voice raised over mine.“I’m talking about menstruation, sir!” I shout in return.It’s like I set the hall on fire, manifested a venomous snake from thin air, also set that snake on fire, and then threw it at the board. The men all erupt into protestations and a fair number of horrified gasps. I swear one of them actually swoons at the mention of womanly bleeding. Lee has done it again! I must confess that I wasn't looking forward to this book as much as The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue for the simple reason that a historical romantic comedy with boys getting drunk and falling for each other seems a hard premise to top. But this hilarious feminist book about the power of friendship may actually have done just that.Felicity Montague wants to be allowed to study medicine and become a physician, but this seems an impossible feat for an 18th-century woman. A unique opportunity arises in the form of Dr Alexander Platt, a pioneer of preventative medicine. She goes to Stuttgart where Platt is all set to marry Johanna-- an old childhood friend of Felicity's before their relationship turned sour.What happens next is unexpected. Felicity finds herself on a journey - not with the esteemed doctor - but with Johanna and Sim, who is Algerian, Muslim, and quite possibly a swashbuckling pirate. “Too many white men,” she replies. Ebrahim laughs. Sim doesn’t. Across the table, she meets my eyes, and some invisible string seems to tighten between us. Lee explores important themes like racism, internalized misogyny, and colonization, but she wraps it all up in a delightful historical comedy. Felicity is somewhere between a smart badass and a socially awkward klutz, which makes her an ideal heroine to root for and relate to. Along with the two other women, she refuses to play by the rules of the man's world she lives in.Arguably the most interesting part of the novel, which constantly lurks behind all the fun and frivolity, is the challenge to the idea of there being a "right" way to be a woman. Of course, Felicity overtly challenges this by wanting to be a doctor, but Felicity's own prejudice against "feminine" women who like dresses and make-up is also challenged. A woman can be a doctor, a woman can be a wife, a woman can like dresses, a woman can be straight, queer or asexual (as it seems Felicity is) and a woman can be a pirate... and all those are valid expressions of womanhood. You are not a fool, you’re a fighter, and you deserve to be here. You deserve to take up space in this world. There are many laugh-out-loud moments, usually at the expense of old white stuffy men. And there are also many heartwarming "hell yeah" moments between Felicity, Johanna and Sim-- moments that emphasize the power of women who stick together. It's easy to spend so much time laughing and enjoying the story that you don't immediately notice they've been brutally smashing the patriarchy along the way.More, please. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • Mackenzi
    January 1, 1970
    Release date is officially October 2, 2018!
  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    Her dark eyes meet mine and I look between her and Johanna. In the company of women like this—sharp-edged as raw diamonds but with soft hands and hearts, not strong in spite of anything but powerful because of everything—I feel invincible. Every chink and rut and battering wind has made us tough and brave and impossible to strike down. We are made of mountains—or perhaps temples, with foundations that could outlast time itself. 4 1/2 stars. This was lovely. And I want to reread the whole du Her dark eyes meet mine and I look between her and Johanna. In the company of women like this—sharp-edged as raw diamonds but with soft hands and hearts, not strong in spite of anything but powerful because of everything—I feel invincible. Every chink and rut and battering wind has made us tough and brave and impossible to strike down. We are made of mountains—or perhaps temples, with foundations that could outlast time itself. 4 1/2 stars. This was lovely. And I want to reread the whole duology now.So, first of all, Gentleman's Guide To Vice and Virtue was one of my favorite books of last year, and I was really worried this would not live up to it. And it… was missing some of the best qualities of book one, but then had even more new stuff that was better. I will say I think I also was not that scared that everything would turn out all right? like, you know from the beginning that Felicity will turn out all right with her dream just in a different way than expected. and that didn’t make the journey less fun but I guess... there was a lack of tension in the narrative.So no, I didn’t love this on the same level as I loved Gentleman’s Guide, but they’re both very solid books in their own right, and this one does an excellent job of not being fanfiction of the previous novel, but an excellent novel in its own right. all of these new characters have solid arcs and their own personalities and it basically reads like a stand-alone with these two random side characters, not like a direct sequel, which is lovely.]But then there’s so, so much to like about this book. Felicity Montague really did that (found fulfillment in her own life without needing a romantic relationship but with two very close gal pals she loves very much and would die for) Seriously, Felicity Montague’s character arc is so freaking exciting to me, on so many levels. Felicity being acearo and it not being questioned by the narrative at all!! And her having a goal and working so hard to achieve it, the whole book long, because girls can do anything. But she also gets the chance to grow and change and work through her own problematic mindsets.So first of all, I love the entire arc around the not-like-other-girls trope. Can I just say, it is so refreshing to see a book powered by women being friends with each other. The whole arc around Felicity getting over her not like other girls shit with Johanna is so! perfect! It is so refreshing that we get this arc – as you start the book, you sort of think you know what you expect from Johanna, especially in a comedy like this. But no, this book is more concentrated around something far more interesting: the girl gang. The girl gang dynamic at the end is so! perfect! I honestly wish there was more. In general, I really liked that Mackenzi Lee doesn’t shy away from the fact that her lead characters are of a privileged viewpoint. This comes in multiple shades. First of all, there is a lot of focus on Felicity working through her internalized homophobia, which is something that was definitely present - and highly annoying - in book one. But there’s also another shade to this: the narrative around colonialism. So I adored how this book deals with colonialism in a historical setting. It’s great to see unveil, so I’m being vague, but I really loved all the stuff about Sim and her family. They are trying to keep the natural resources of their home safe while also trying to be a part of a global economy that wants them to fail from the start. Sim’s character, by the way? A sapphic hijabi girl? Talented. Brilliant. Incredible. Amazing. Showstopping. Spectacular. In her ignorance, Johanna initially wants to take a role in the world of a colonizer. But the narrative is so quick to criticize those viewpoints, to depict them as wrong and awful [as they are]. And in the end, they have to realize that their white, European experience is not the only one in the world, and they don’t always have the answers. They are not always the saviors in their narrative, and that’s okay. Felicity and Johanna have a right to a role in the world as powerful women… but not in the capacity of colonization and appropriation. That’s Sim’s role, and she will kick ass within it.Listen, it’s just… so fucking good, like so fucking good. I enjoyed reading this so much. Love that “acearo medical student goes on journey with her sapphic hijabi pirate friend and her more-feminine botanist friend” is a thing that I can enjoy in current literature. And I don’t know why you guys have to ask this so much, but yes, there are liberal Monty and Percy cameos. [Was that a question? That shouldn’t be a question. I love them and I would die for them.] Anyway, I absolutely adored this, and I can’t wait to read more by this author.Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • Sabrina The Trash Queen
    January 1, 1970
    1.)The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue - ★★★★1.5.)The Gentleman’s Guide to Getting Lucky - ★★★I’m so ready to see badass Felicity in this book!My book arrives in 2 weeks! Can’t wait. QUEEN 👑
  • ✨ jamieson ✨
    January 1, 1970
    THAT COVER ITS SO GOREGEOUS IM SHAKINGWOW WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE FELICITY FROM GENTLEMANS GUIDE IS GETTING HER OWN STORYAND HELLOOOO PIRATE QUEENS AND SEA MONSTERS I NEEDED THIS YESTERDAY
  •  ✨ Dianna ✨ (mylifeasannaidreading)
    January 1, 1970
    MY GIRL FELICITY LOOKS SO FIIIIINE IN THIS COVER!*you're doing amazing, sweetie*
  • April (Aprilius Maximus)
    January 1, 1970
    "Everyone has heard stories of women like us- cautionary tales, morality plays, warnings of what will befall you if you are a girl too wild for the world, a girl who asks too many questions or wants too much. If you set off into the world alone.Everyone has heard stories of women like us, and now we will make more of them."
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  • Angelica
    January 1, 1970
    Last year I had the pleasure to read the first book in this series, The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue. And you know what? It made it to my list of best books I read in 2017. And now, here we are, getting Felicity's side of the story and it was both wonderful and slightly disappointing.The amount of research and dedication that it must have taken Mackenzi Lee to make this book so historically accurate is honestly astounding. There are so many conversations on medicine and just general life Last year I had the pleasure to read the first book in this series, The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue. And you know what? It made it to my list of best books I read in 2017. And now, here we are, getting Felicity's side of the story and it was both wonderful and slightly disappointing.The amount of research and dedication that it must have taken Mackenzi Lee to make this book so historically accurate is honestly astounding. There are so many conversations on medicine and just general life at the time that it's almost like I'm learning a history lesson as I'm reading.  This book deserves a star for the authenticity of the story alone!Then there was everything else that I enjoyed. The characters in this one are such complex beings, full of dreams and passions and the drive with which to achieve them.  Then there is the way that Lee uses these characters to discuss many of the complex social issues that plague the Victorian era, and still plague us today.One of my favorite things about The Gentleman's Guide, was how well it integrated prevalent social issues into the character's lives and developmental arcs, as well as into the story in general. It also managed to wonderfully display the intersectionalities of race and gender and sexual orientation and the privilege that some of those combinations of things may have over other. Best of all, the novel managed to so all of this without sounding preachy or forced, in a way that was extremely respectful and well eloquent. And Lee somehow managed to do so the very same in this novel.My favorite part of the novel and there were many, was a conversation between Felicity and Johanna where the latter argues that there is no 'right way' to be a strong and intelligent woman. That one can like dresses and makeup and still be smart and hard working. I love the point she makes about women discriminating on other women, thinking themselves superior because they view such frivolous interests as a sign of weakness and submissiveness in women. This reminds me of a discussion I had on a similar topic that you should check out:  Discussion Time – My Problem with the Old “Strong Female Characters” in YA Literature, and Why I’m Glad That’s Changing.So, why the three stars? Well, this book is extremely long for apparently no reason. I had a similar problem with book one and it was that the book dragged at certain parts of the story. It felt unnecessary that this book was 500+ pages. There were sections that could have been cut shorter or completely removed as it took the plot way too long to start up and the pacing was extremely off. Where The Gentleman's Guide felt more like a wild, accident-filled adventure, this one felt like a borderline plotless tale that was far more serious than I had expected.I absolutely loved the first book. There was a certain magic to it that I kept expecting to come into play in this one. Sadly, I just didn't feel it as strongly. Overall, I did enjoy it though. And I do recommend it! There are definitely a lot of important topics discussed in this book, and they are wonderfully written. The characters and their complexity are also fantastic. But in my opinion, this did not live up to the expectations set by the previous book.**I received an advance copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.**
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  • Kai
    January 1, 1970
    COUNT ME IN
  • ⚔ Silvia ⚓
    January 1, 1970
    COVER REVEAL!!!!THE COVERS!!!!!!!! THEY MATCH!!!!!!!!!!! I'M IN LOVE___WAITPIRATESGIRL PIRATES SPINOFFI LOVED FELICITY WITH ALL MY HEART I CAN'T WAIT TO READ ABOUT HER AGAIN
  • Grace (BURTSBOOKS)
    January 1, 1970
    I AM SO HYPE. THE BEST PART OF THE GENTLEMEN'S GUIDE IS GETTING HER OWN BOOK THANK THE LORD"Felicity can think of nothing less appealing than giving up her career aspirations to become someone’s wife." - I HAVE NEVER RELATED TO ANYTHING MORE
  • Warda
    January 1, 1970
    Correction: it is actually coming out February 2019. *screams into the void*HOLY COVER! 😍 I NEED TOMORROW TO BE OCTOBER! 😭Please let Monty and Percy make an appearance. I AM FLAILING JUST THINKING ABOUT THEM! 😩😍😍
  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    Excited for this.
  • TheYALibrarian
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest reviewRating 5 StarsWords cannot describe how much I love this series and all of it’s characters. I was completely in love with the first book with its adorable love story between Monty and Percy. Felicity was not the main star in that one but she shone nonetheless. Her courage and strive to become a doctor in a world ruled by men was already so admirable. Now that she got her own story I could not wait to dive in.Felicity is a character that i ARC provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest reviewRating 5 StarsWords cannot describe how much I love this series and all of it’s characters. I was completely in love with the first book with its adorable love story between Monty and Percy. Felicity was not the main star in that one but she shone nonetheless. Her courage and strive to become a doctor in a world ruled by men was already so admirable. Now that she got her own story I could not wait to dive in.Felicity is a character that is after my own heart. She is snarky, sarcastic, and just overall badass. She is a woman I would want to be with her unwavering perseverance and insatiable desire to make a career out of a field she deeply respects and loves. It was unfair that in the age she is living in, women were pretty barred from everything. It didn’t matter how smart you were or if you had any other endearing trait, if you were just a women that was all it took. The impossibility of it all did get to Felicity but she still did not give up and settle for a life she would never be truly living since it would be devoid of any of her dreams. I can’t praise her enough every female MC should take example from how wonderfully this MC was crafted.Johanna is also another female force to be reckoned with. She was able to disguise herself as a dipshit wife-to-be who only cared about dresses and social events. In reality she has a very sharp brain and wit that helped her in her goal of finding out more about her mother who went on several expeditions to places where not many humans have tread on. She was going to marry her mother’s former partner but once she found out his own agenda she fled, taking her mother’s work with her. Her dynamic with Felicity was a match made in heaven with its conflicts but they also had many similarities that really drew them together and mended their broken friendship. Sim is another female protagonist and with her and her own badassery it made these three unstoppable. I could not get over the reveal that she is a commodore of a pirate ship and her father a notorious pirate captain. It added a awesome element for the story I wish there was more time spent on the pirate aspect of the book but eh that’s not a huge enough problem to lower my review.Then there is our beloved Percy and Monty. They are the best big brothers anyone could wish for. Through all of Felicity’s journey they kept an eye on her and traveled across the world to save her when things got really sticky. If that is not pure devotion and loyalty to your family I don’t know what is.I will have to end my review here it’s an ungodly hour and I’m pretty confidant the mote I write the less comprehensive this is. To be continued!
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  • j
    January 1, 1970
    *taps mic**nervously shuffles cue cards*ahem ladies and gentlemenfelicity montague is not straightthank you for coming to my ted talk
  • ambsreads
    January 1, 1970
    i enjoyed it but like honestly it was pretty flat full review to come
  • Kate Mikell
    January 1, 1970
    Y'ALL IT'S EVERYTHING YOU WANT IT TO BE. ♡
  • Kate (GirlReading)
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a delight to read. Having adored The Gentlemen’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, I wasn’t sure how this would match up but I loved it just as much (if not slightly more?) It’s packed with action, friendship and strong, multilayered women.The main aspect of this novel I loved so much was the narrative surrounding Felicity, Johanna and Sim. I adored how different each of them were but how they were all portrayed as equally strong, just in different ways. You have Felicity who’s very goal o This was such a delight to read. Having adored The Gentlemen’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, I wasn’t sure how this would match up but I loved it just as much (if not slightly more?) It’s packed with action, friendship and strong, multilayered women.The main aspect of this novel I loved so much was the narrative surrounding Felicity, Johanna and Sim. I adored how different each of them were but how they were all portrayed as equally strong, just in different ways. You have Felicity who’s very goal orientated and academic, Johanna who’s classically feminine and Sim who’s literally a pirate. However, despite their differences, they all defy stereotypes and prove that you don’t need to wield a sword or be portrayed as emotionless to be a ‘strong female character’. Each of these women show femininity, vulnerability, intelligence and yes, totally kickass and they’re all undoubtedly strong.It was also really refreshing to see the candidness and casualness of Felicity being aroace and Sim being attracted to women. Neither of these things were questioned and it was nice to read about characters who were so sure of themselves. (And, of course, Month & Percy were wonderful as always.) I also want to give a shout out to Max, a hidden star. A dog who kept Felicity company at the buffet table as she avoided a party. As Johanna simply but bluntly put it “Max is a good dog.”Yes, there were times I wanted to scream at the pages, thanks to the infuriating way Felicity and the women in this book were treated and the fact that so much of it was relatable still to this day *sigh*. But it was also so much fun to see those same women, defying the expectations put on them by society and being utter badasses in their own, individual right. All in all, this was an incredibly enjoyable, action packed read, full of witty dialogue and strong, intelligent, multidimensional women and a slobbering dog who has stolen my heart.
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  • Steph
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars(view spoiler)[Everyone has heard stories of women like us, and we intend to make more of them. (hide spoiler)]I loved loved loved it so much. I was so happy to see Felicity annihilating men that were in her way and as usual being so outspoken and headstrong. FELICITY MONTAGUE IS A GODDAMN ICON AND NO ONE CAN TELL ME OTHERWISE. I was so glad that Monty and Percy made an appearance in this as well because I missed them so much. The whole concept of this book was awesome, much like the firs 5 stars(view spoiler)[Everyone has heard stories of women like us, and we intend to make more of them. (hide spoiler)]I loved loved loved it so much. I was so happy to see Felicity annihilating men that were in her way and as usual being so outspoken and headstrong. FELICITY MONTAGUE IS A GODDAMN ICON AND NO ONE CAN TELL ME OTHERWISE. I was so glad that Monty and Percy made an appearance in this as well because I missed them so much. The whole concept of this book was awesome, much like the first book it is adventurous and witty. The new characters were refreshing and I absolutely love the girl gang so much. They all had great character development and also representations of each character. The writing as usual is so detailed and so beautifully written. Overall, this book is so important and relatable and I loved every single moment of it, with all the twists and turns. I adored each and every character in this book and I just want another book on Felicity Montague and her gang being ambitious and defying what society tells them to be. I’d also like to point out that this gif is the epitome of Felicity Montague.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    It was just a lovely and empowering story and I loved it. How I had missed Monty and Percy, they were so cute and in love that they managed to warm my cold heart. Felicity was great, I loved her in the first book but in this one she truly had the possibility to shine. She wasn't perfect but she learned from her mistakes, such as thinking that girls who like what are considered frivolous things and parties are less of her. Thankfully Johanna proved her otherwise. Sim was a very interesting charac It was just a lovely and empowering story and I loved it. How I had missed Monty and Percy, they were so cute and in love that they managed to warm my cold heart. Felicity was great, I loved her in the first book but in this one she truly had the possibility to shine. She wasn't perfect but she learned from her mistakes, such as thinking that girls who like what are considered frivolous things and parties are less of her. Thankfully Johanna proved her otherwise. Sim was a very interesting character and I would love to read a book entirely about her. But honestly, I could read about Felicity, Sim and Johanna's adventures forever.
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  • clara
    January 1, 1970
    me: i really shouldn’t start any new books without finishing my 1847295 current reads first, i’m already barely managingalso me: *starts reading this as soon as it comes out* i just,, love my aroace queen felicity too much
  • Ellie (faerieontheshelf)
    January 1, 1970
    5 beautiful, glowing, brilliant stars, for this is one of the most empowering books I’ve read all year; a consideration on misogyny, the patriarchy, and colonialism - but also the beauty of female friendships and the enduring strength and brilliance of women. I will treasure this book dearly for years to come.RTC!*In a move that will shock absolutely no one in this current political climate, I find I really really really want to read a book full of female friendships and women being badass and s 5 beautiful, glowing, brilliant stars, for this is one of the most empowering books I’ve read all year; a consideration on misogyny, the patriarchy, and colonialism - but also the beauty of female friendships and the enduring strength and brilliance of women. I will treasure this book dearly for years to come.RTC!*In a move that will shock absolutely no one in this current political climate, I find I really really really want to read a book full of female friendships and women being badass and shooting things{EDIT:} right so there was no actual use of pistols in this novel and so no shooting of things but that’s a small flaw
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  • Eliza Rapsodia
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 E-ARC received through Edelweiss+ in exhange for a honest reviewREVIEW IN ENGLISHI was so excited to read this one because I enjoyed The gentleman's guide to vice and virtue and I was not surprised when I found out there would be second book narrated from the perspective of Monty's sister, Felicity. In the first book we learned that she is not like other girls of the eighteenth century and in this book we are going to have adventures with her on the continent.In her hopes of becoming a lady 2.5 E-ARC received through Edelweiss+ in exhange for a honest reviewREVIEW IN ENGLISHI was so excited to read this one because I enjoyed The gentleman's guide to vice and virtue and I was not surprised when I found out there would be second book narrated from the perspective of Monty's sister, Felicity. In the first book we learned that she is not like other girls of the eighteenth century and in this book we are going to have adventures with her on the continent.In her hopes of becoming a lady doctor, Felicity Montague is in Scotland trying to get an interview in a hospital. Meanwhile, she got a job in a bakery. But when the young baker ask her to be his wife, she panicked. Because she does not want to be a wife, she wants to study and become a doctor but nobody would pay attention to the pretensions of a woman. But Felicty, as headstrong as she is, is willing to try.I noticed in Monty's book that the plot seems to be going in one direction but it changes into an adventure with a lot of problems. As the previous book, the story is set in the eighteenth century, but there is not much description of the places and the characters do not talk like they supossed to.But this one wasn't as fun as I expected. I was not really into the story, it was like 30% of the book and it cost me horrors to be interested at all. Narrated from Felicity's point of view we will get to know her problems to be taken seriously as an intelligent woman who knows about medicine and then we will travel with her to Stuttgart for the wedding of Johanna Hoffman, who used to be Felicity's friend but they got distanced. But as you can imagine, things are just starting: we will have pirates, investigations and a lot of problems.Pearl is me reading the first quarter of the bookThe female characters of the story are here to stay but they did not grip me that much. Johanna, Sim and Felicity make a great group and each one is well rounded, but I still have not felt a genuine interest in their problems. Felicty's voice is fine but not great although everything around her is valuable and important. The book gives a clear message of female power and value, in which there is no correct way to be a woman and everything resides in what she wants to do with her life and that she has to take the reins of her own destiny: whether you are a mother, a scientist, a writer or even a pirate. And the book also deals with topics such as racism and colonialism and that is one of the most interesting things the book can offer. The relationship of the female characters is great. I appreciate we could get to see another spectrum of the LGBT community (asexuality). I can't say if it's good rep or not but I think it's so important to show it. In the end it was a book that got me entertained, but I wanted more. I do not know if it's a matter of expectations, but for a five hundred page novel I felt the pacing was off and I needed something that made me sit down and keep reading because I saw myself several times being bored and not interested.Will I recommed it? Yes, if you loved the first one. I wanted to love it more but I just couldn't.***********************************RESEÑA EN ESPAÑOL Hace un tiempo me puse a leer la primera parte de esta historia The gentleman's guide to vice and virtue y no me sorprendió saber que habría una segunda parte narrada desde la perspectiva de la hermana de Monty, Felicity. En el primer libro supimos que ella no es como las jóvenes de la época del siglo XVIII y en este libro vamos a adentrarnos en sus aventuras en el continente.En sus pretensiones de poder llegar a ser una mujer doctor, Felicity Montague se encuentra en Escocia tratando de presentar una entrevista en un hospital, al tiempo que ha conseguido trabajo en una panadería. Pero cuando el joven panadero le ha propuesto matrimonio, la jovencita ha entrado en pánico. Porque ella no quiere ser la esposa de un panadero, ella quiere seguir estudiando y convertirse en una doctora pero nadie le haría caso a las pretensiones de una mujer y menos una que quiere ser médico. Pero Felicty está dispuesta a intentarlo.Stuttgart. Foto de PexelsUna cosa que noté con el primer libro de la autora es que la trama parece que va a ir en una dirección pero la cosa va cambiando de un momento a otro y uno se encuentra leyendo una historia de aventuras con muchos problemas.  Recuerdo de nuevo que para ser una historia ambientada en el siglo XVIII, no hay mucha descripción de los ambientes y los personajes no tienen la forma de hablar que correspondería, al igual que el anterior libro.Pero con este me ha costado más divertirme, en términos generales. No estuve realmente atrapada por la historia como hasta más del 30% del libro y por eso me costó horrores estar interesada en lo que sucedía. Narrado desde el punto de vista de Felicity iremos conociendo sus problemas para poder ser tomada en serio como una mujer inteligente que sabe de medicina y luego viajaremos con ella hasta Stuttgart para la boda de Johanna Hoffman, una amiga suya de la que se había distanciado hace tiempo. Pero como imaginarán, las cosas aquí no terminan si no que empiezan: tendremos piratas, investigaciones y problemas de por medio.Pearl soy yo leyendo el primer cuarto del libro Los personajes femeninos de la historia toman el protagonismo y hay mérito en ello, pero en mi caso no han llegado a calarme. Johanna, Sim y Felicity hacen un gran grupo y cada una está bien perfilada, pero aún así no he sentido un interés genuino en sus problemas. La voz narrativa de Felicty está bien pero no me interesó del todo, aunque todo lo que le rodea sea valioso e importante. El libro tienen un claro mensaje de empoderamiento femenino, en el que no hay una forma correcta de ser mujer y que todo reside en lo que ella quiere hacer con su vida y así tomar las riendas de su destino: ya sea siendo madre, científica, escritora o hasta pirata. Y el libro también toca temas como el racismo y el colonialismo y es lo más interesante que el libro puede ofrecernos. Creo que la relación de los personajes femeninos ha sido una excelente idea. Igualmente el libro como tal no busca darnos un mensaje más profundo del que uno podría buscarle. He visto algo y es que ha mostrado otro espectro de las comunidad lgbt (la asexualidad) pero no podría opinar si ha sido bien manejada o no. Pero creo que es importante mostrarlo. Al final ha sido un libro que me ha entretenido pero no podría decir más. No sé si es cuestión de expectativas pero para una novela de quinientas páginas me ha hecho falta ese algo que me hiciera continuarla, porque vi varias veces estancada y hasta aburrida. ¿La recomendaría? Si te gustó el primero de la saga, seguro este también lo hará.
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  • Stacee
    January 1, 1970
    I have an insane love for Gentlemen’s Guide, so when I learned Felicity was getting her own story, I was so excited. We even made it a priority for the arc drop at SDCC. Sadly, I’m a little disappointed. I liked Felicity well enough. What I loved the most about her in GG was her sass and wit and while she still has those, the majority of the book we’re in her head. The pages and pages of inner monologue got a little old. Of course the scenes with Monty and Percy were hilarious. And I enjoyed the I have an insane love for Gentlemen’s Guide, so when I learned Felicity was getting her own story, I was so excited. We even made it a priority for the arc drop at SDCC. Sadly, I’m a little disappointed. I liked Felicity well enough. What I loved the most about her in GG was her sass and wit and while she still has those, the majority of the book we’re in her head. The pages and pages of inner monologue got a little old. Of course the scenes with Monty and Percy were hilarious. And I enjoyed the tenacity of Johanna and Sim. Plot wise, it dragged for me. It didn’t feel like an adventure, more like Felicity tagging along on someone else’s journey. I was never captivated by the story and seriously irritated by the same few words used over and over and over again. Overall, it had characters I enjoyed, but I didn’t see the spark I was hoping for. **Huge thanks to Katherine Tegen Books for providing the arc free of charge**
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  • Hollis
    January 1, 1970
    "That's the lie of it all. You have to be better to prove yourself worthy of being equal."THE LADY'S GUIDE TO PETTICOATS AND PIRACY is pretty much the first book I've been unable to tear myself away from in.. a long time. It's funny, it's feminist, it's fun, it's fresh. It's lacking in any real romance and I really loved how Lee handled this element. It isn't absent completely but.. well, I won't spoil it. "You're so determined to become a lady doctor then.""No sir. I'm determined to become a do "That's the lie of it all. You have to be better to prove yourself worthy of being equal."THE LADY'S GUIDE TO PETTICOATS AND PIRACY is pretty much the first book I've been unable to tear myself away from in.. a long time. It's funny, it's feminist, it's fun, it's fresh. It's lacking in any real romance and I really loved how Lee handled this element. It isn't absent completely but.. well, I won't spoil it. "You're so determined to become a lady doctor then.""No sir. I'm determined to become a doctor. The matter of my sex I would prefer to be incidental rather than an amendment."Felicity is a great heroine, a smart, determined, lady and honestly the only bit I disliked about her, and this book, is some of the inner monologue repetition. But though it's repetitive it's more of an affirmation to not let the world, or men, stomp on her or her dreams or the abilities of her lady friends. So it's hard to be too too critical of it. And yet here I am anyway, womp."I'm not going to end up with a permanent mark upon my skin that looks like a penis with a party hat on, am I?""No, that's a different piratical fleet entirely."Though I did love the new characters we meet (lady trio kicking butttt), my favourite bits were definitely when Felicity was reunited and/or interacting with Monty and Percy. God I love those two. This book is the less funny of the two but the Adventure Times Squad is definitely present again and despite a fairly unlikely presence within said adventure, I actually liked this one better than the first in that respect."That hat is idiotic.""I know. Percy made it for me.""I didn't know Percy knew how to knit.""He doesn't."If you loved A GENTLEMAN'S GUIDE TO VICE AND VIRTUE I have no doubt you'll love this one, too.** I received an ARC from Edelweiss and the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. **
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    update 2/16/18FJKASDFJKASDFJK WE GOT A FULL BLURB TOO WE TRULY HAVE BEEN HASHTAG BLESSED ON THIS DAY H O L Y C R A P WHAT AN AMAZING COVER I CAN'T FREAKING BREATHE--12/11/17no offense but I am pretty sure I will literally cease to exist when this is released
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  • Lia
    January 1, 1970
    My heart is full. Review to come.
  • Sana
    January 1, 1970
    'That's the lie of it all. You have to be better to prove yourself worthy of being equal.'*WHAT A PRECIOUS, PRECIOUS BOOKFelicity Montague, what a legend. I already loved her (and Percy) (soz Monty, I do like you) the most in The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue but she really shines in her own book especially with the promised asexual rep which is clear in all the ways Felicity is uninterested in physical affection and 'I'd like to be on my own, but not alone.' Opinionated af (LOVE IT WHENE 'That's the lie of it all. You have to be better to prove yourself worthy of being equal.'*WHAT A PRECIOUS, PRECIOUS BOOKFelicity Montague, what a legend. I already loved her (and Percy) (soz Monty, I do like you) the most in The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue but she really shines in her own book especially with the promised asexual rep which is clear in all the ways Felicity is uninterested in physical affection and 'I'd like to be on my own, but not alone.' Opinionated af (LOVE IT WHENEVER SHE GOES OFF) with moments of self-doubt (largely thanks to men, humph), Felicity is hell-bent on studying medicine and becoming a doctor. But first she has to- turn down a proposal in a true Felicity fashion LOL- get rejected by men to study medicine because she's a ~woman- trick a board into seeing her and making all the men hella uncomfortable by mentioning the lack of research on women's issues namely menstruation (LOL they so couldn't handle it and it was glorious)- basically run towards a chance of *maybe* getting to study medicine under her idol which starts her on an epic adventureJohanna Hoffman's goal in life is to be like her mother which really means to be herself because that's who her mother was. She's also a super girly girl which is why it was quite refreshing to see her and Felicity hash it out on the fact that there's nothing wrong with being a girly girl and that it isn't mutually exclusive to being interested in science. Case in point:'You're not better than any other woman because you like philosophy better than parties and don't give a fig about the company of gentlemen, or because you wear boots instead of heels and don't set your hair in curls.'*She's also an animal lover to the extreme, a naturalist like her mother and eventually, quite unwilling to let any man dictate her life. Naturally, I loved her.Sim is another favorite because not only she is a cutthroat pirate from the Barbary States, she's also a firstborn in search of her birthright, a Muslim, Black, a hijabi and possibly queer. She gives off threatening vibes but is also quite soft and reserved. Her dynamic with Felicity is the best because they argue quite a lot but also end up having random heart-to-heart conversations about being a woman, sexuality and what they want out of life.Not only does the book address serious subjects like colonialism (re: 'Why do you say ‘English’ like we’re all wicked? You're pirates! You're not exactly sinless.' 'But we don't come into your countries and drive you out.'* 👀) and exclusion of women from certain professions, it's also rooted in actual history especially in relation to the individual roles of the science girl gang. They have discussions about human anatomy and share their knowledge and I loved it SO much.The best thing is how a petticoat actually does play a very important role in the book so it's such a fitting title. I didn't really mention much of the plot but rest assured, I thoroughly enjoyed all of it. Lastly, YES to all the scenes with the OG trio: Monty, Percy and Felicity and how Felicity is now taller than Monty and petty af about it ahaha. Percy remains precious as hell, ofc BUT THESE STUPID SIBLINGS REALLY DO LOVE EACH OTHER, MY EMOTIONSI adore both of these books so much mainly because they try and improve upon the history in their own ways and I think that's beautifulFavorite quotes: 'The rules of fashion for ladies dictate that anything a man wears, a lady must wear more of; it must be more uncomfortable for her; and it must require at least two people to get her into it, so that she is rendered incapable of an independent existence.'*'Everyone has heard stories of women like us—cautionary tales, morality plays, warnings of what will befall you if you are a girl too wild for the world, a girl who asks too many questions or wants too much. If you set off into the world alone. Everyone has heard stories of women like us, and we intend to make more of them.'*'In the company of women like this—sharp-edged as raw diamonds but with soft hands and hearts, not strong in spite of anything but powerful because of everything—I feel invincible.'**Quotes takes from the eARC and may change upon publication.-------A SCIENCE GIRL GANG, HERE FOR IT
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  • Kaja (red panda) *:・゚✧
    January 1, 1970
    LOOK AT THIS GORGEOUS COVER. AND THE PURPLE FONT. AND GERMAN AMAZON STILL HAS ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE, SO CRYSIS AVERTED FOR NOW????==========================WHAT WHAT WHAT???? CAN I PREORDER THIS BOOK ALREADY?? CAUSE I LIKE REALLY WANT IT???(yes, I'm aware the first book isn't even technically out yet, BUT I DON'T CARE)
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