The End of Animal Farming
A bold yet realistic vision of how technology and social change are creating a food system in which we no longer use animals to produce meat, dairy, or eggs.Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma and Jonathan Safran Foer's Eating Animals brought widespread attention to the disturbing realities of factory farming. The End of Animal Farming pushes this conversation forward by outlining a strategic roadmap to a humane, ethical, and efficient food system in which slaughterhouses are obsolete—where the tastes of even the most die-hard meat eater are satisfied by innovative food technologies like cultured meats and plant-based protein. Social scientist and animal advocate Jacy Reese analyzes the social forces leading us toward the downfall of animal agriculture, the technology making this change possible for the meat-hungry public, and the activism driving consumer demand for plant-based and cultured foods.Reese contextualizes the issue of factory farming—the inhumane system of industrial farming that 95 percent of farmed animals endure—as part of humanity's expanding moral circle. Humanity increasingly treats nonhuman animals, from household pets to orca whales, with respect and kindness, and Reese argues that farmed animals are the next step. Reese applies an analytical lens of "effective altruism," the burgeoning philosophy of using evidence-based research to maximize one's positive impact in the world, in order to better understand which strategies can help expand the moral circle now and in the future.The End of Animal Farming is not a scolding treatise or a prescription for an ascetic diet. Reese invites readers—vegan and non-vegan—to consider one of the most important and transformational social movements of the coming decades.

The End of Animal Farming Details

TitleThe End of Animal Farming
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 6th, 2018
PublisherBeacon Press
ISBN-139780807019450
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Science, Animals, Food and Drink, Vegan, Philosophy, Environment

The End of Animal Farming Review

  • Ben Davidow
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been closely tracking the Clean Meat Revolution, Effective Altruism, and factory farming for years but still learned a ton from this book. Reese is a rigorous thinker and has packed these pages with powerful ideas. This book is a great read for anyone but especially (aspiring) entrepreneurs, scientists, activists and Effective Altruists. The next decade will be monumental in bringing down factory farming and those on the right side of history will prosper while freeing the world from a grea I’ve been closely tracking the Clean Meat Revolution, Effective Altruism, and factory farming for years but still learned a ton from this book. Reese is a rigorous thinker and has packed these pages with powerful ideas. This book is a great read for anyone but especially (aspiring) entrepreneurs, scientists, activists and Effective Altruists. The next decade will be monumental in bringing down factory farming and those on the right side of history will prosper while freeing the world from a great deal of suffering.
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  • Henry Cooksley
    January 1, 1970
    61 key insights and thoughts after reading Jacy Reese’s new book, The End of Animal Farming(Disclaimer - while I am part of the effective altruism community, I have no special incentive to give this a high rating just because I have interacted with the author before. My words are mine alone, although I thank Jenny Burrowes for her comments and suggestions.)1. The scale of animal suffering is in the hundreds of billions killed *every year*. Most of that is unnecessary, which further adds to the t 61 key insights and thoughts after reading Jacy Reese’s new book, The End of Animal Farming(Disclaimer - while I am part of the effective altruism community, I have no special incentive to give this a high rating just because I have interacted with the author before. My words are mine alone, although I thank Jenny Burrowes for her comments and suggestions.)1. The scale of animal suffering is in the hundreds of billions killed *every year*. Most of that is unnecessary, which further adds to the tragedy. However, horror on this sort of scale just doesn’t motivate some people. For them, we need to talk about other things - or the message simply won’t stick.2. Vegetarianism being thought of as bland dates back to the 1800s, where it was suggested as a way to reduce immoral or sexual behaviours. (Other things suggested: enemas, vibration therapy.)3. Plant-based diets are taken more seriously today because they are adopted for the sake of concrete ends, such as the animals themselves, the environment, and the wellbeing of other humans - not just some abstract notion of purity.4. Inefficiency. Ten calories of plant food on average goes to make one calorie of animal food. Ten grams of plant protein becomes two grams of animal protein. From an efficiency standpoint, nothing about our current food industry makes sense. We don’t want the world to be inefficient, do we?5. If we can grow meat from a cell that’s biologically similar at half the cost, why would we need to go to all the trouble of animal farming in the first place? Efficiency is the bottom line, the ‘ace in the hole’ as Reese puts it.6. Reese describes his childhood growing up around farmland in rural Texas. His decision to go vegetarian was a small change that had a great positive impact. This relates to effective altruism more generally. It was not preordained somehow that he would become involved in animal advocacy. It followed from the idea of how to do the most good.7. People often say pets help young children appreciate ‘life and death’. Are they implicitly saying that there is some similarity between the death of a loved animal and the death of a loved human? Where does that similarity end?8. The principle of parsimony says that we should prefer the simplest explanation first, because that’s the best strategy to take when forming and updating our beliefs. We observe pet dogs appearing to enjoy pleasure; elephants and rats appear to show altruistic behaviours; pigs appear to demonstrate object perception and long-term memory, as well as coming when called by name after training; elephants even appear to show grief. Might the simplest explanation be that animals do indeed have some kind of sentience? What is the simplest theory that fits the observations?9. Recognising animal sentience is relatively recent. Only in the 2010s was there scientific agreement on animal experiences of pain; in 2013 an article titled ‘Dogs Are People, Too’ appeared in the New York Times, confirming what many dog owners presumably had known privately for some time.10. We may have progressed past the ‘desperate need for human superiority’. After the film ‘Blackfish’ was released, highlighting the suffering of their orca whales, SeaWorld’s revenues collapsed within a year.11. Contradictions. We experiment with rats to learn about human emotional response, while justifying it by pretending they have no emotional response. Similarly for testing painkillers. We suppose dogs have no sophisticated awareness of the world, while relying on them for help when we lose our ability to see. Are rat brains so different from chicken brains? Are dog brains so different from pig brains?12. Lobbying in the animal food industry is not fundamentally different from that for guns, or for tobacco. Post-war demand slumped, and profits were threatened. Memorable marketing campaigns ensued. Got slogans?13. Sometimes the only way to be taken seriously is to slowly collect a long record of evidence. Then people are more willing to listen.14. Virtual reality headsets are a thing now, and they can be used to help the cause of advocacy. [Sometimes I see certain orgs use a ‘good cop, bad cop’ approach to their advantage. Mercy For Animals (https://mercyforanimals.org/) would be in this category, with their viral video content switching between cute, relatable animal videos and horrific videos of farmed animal suffering.]15. A recent study indicates that 47% of Americans support banning of slaughterhouses in principle. Although promising, the framing of the question matters a lot, so we should treat this insight with caution.16. Veganism does not equal animal advocacy. This is perhaps one of the most important lessons to be learned from the past few decades. 17. Many executives are in fact concerned about factory farming and animal cruelty more generally, but see it as a ‘necessary evil’. One task for animal advocates therefore is to try and change that ‘necessary’ to an ‘unnecessary’ in people’s minds.18. Appealing to economic efficiency is a short circuit to the same end goal. Getting executives to care about their bottom line is easier than getting those same executives to spend money on ethical initiatives.19. There have been over 1000 years of interest in ‘mock meats’, specifically in East Asia.20. Products like the Impossible Burger (https://impossiblefoods.com/) are so close to the taste of an average beef burger that the difference is probably within the general variance of cheap and expensive beef burger products on the market today. This matters.21. There are cultural differences in some parts of the world between ‘plant hunger’ and ‘meat hunger’. At least one language even has a different word for each of the two concepts.22. Look up ‘heme’ (or ‘haem’). It’s the Fe-containing, ‘bloody’, compound thing that makes beef taste beefy. So much so that in some tests, when it was added to chicken, people mistook it for beef. It’s also the key ingredient in the Impossible Burger.23. Some people really love the taste of saturated fat. As (some) plant-based meats get very close to resembling traditional meats, they might need the same health warnings too. The upside: consumers will be able to make the choice for themselves without missing out too much, as there will be a wide range of plant-based meats to choose from, not all of them unhealthy or even bloody.24. Suffering per calorie. Unfortunately, the smaller the animal, the more suffering there is per animal for the same amount of calories. [This is true even with a moderate weighting for levels of sentience.] For 500 calories’ worth of food, suffering can range from many days (fish) to a few days (chicken, eggs) to many hours (pork, beef).25. This leads to a suggested priority: we should find substitutes for chicken meat, eggs, fish, and other products with these ingredients (such as mayo).26. Perhaps the dairy industry feels threatened by the sales of plant-based milks growing to be as large as 10% of their own sales volumes. Their response? Make ‘milk’ a protected term, only referring to the ‘secretions’ of a cow. I guess they have never heard of goat milk, or soy milk? Reese suggests ‘goat juice’ as an alternative, a phrase that is sure to haunt me for the next few days.27. If ‘butter’ becomes a protected term, because non-dairy butter confuses consumers, then I guess I need to stop referring to ‘peanut butter’ and ‘cocoa butter’. Peanut paste anyone?28. If something you consumed was harmful for you, like a cigarette, would you want it to be labelled on store shelves? What about to ‘protect the children’? Now what if that product was a high-cholesterol animal product? Does it get an exception? Why?29. Although ‘fake meat’ is a memorable shortcut to mean plant-based meat [I definitely use it casually in conversation from time to time], overuse of the term ‘fake meat’ could establish that plant-based products should always be viewed as inferior, or second-best.30. Calling something like the Beyond Burger (http://beyondmeat.com/) simply ‘meat’ without qualification suggests to consumers that they can get the same flavour profile, mouth feel, and satisfaction from a plant-based product as from an animal-based product. This is ultimately more helpful for activism than the alternative. This is also why names matter.31. ‘Clean meat’ and ‘cultured meat’ are the terms we’re left with for this concept, and both terms have their upsides and downsides. It really depends on what audience you’re dealing with.32. Learn the Four Ns. Normal. Necessary. Nice. Natural. When surveyed, people tend to associate animal foods with these categories about 80-90% of the time.33. People are pretty easily influenced by what others think - researchers have got people to completely change their opinion of songs just by manipulating what they told them about how many previous downloads that song had prior to them seeing it. Knowing what other people think about a practice, such as our habits when it comes to the food on our table, matters for animal advocacy.34. Celebrity endorsement works. If Ariana Grande* can do it, then it must be something normal! (*Insert your favourite celebrity here.)35. It’s hard to claim that animal foods are necessary for good health when so many professional vegan athletes exist (there are even vegan Olympians). As long as people continue to provide examples, the ‘necessary’ claim becomes steadily weaker over time.36. There is more variety in (vegan) food available now than ever before in human history. Nowadays, vegan food is genuinely nice. The Victorian, puritan conception of these diets has been replaced by global food trends, viral recipe videos, and vegan ‘junk’ food. There really is a vegan dish for everyone.37. There are plenty of examples of things which are ‘natural’ or have a long history, which are horrific and have no place in modern society. I’ll leave you to come up with examples of your own.38. Chickens are 4x larger than they were in the 1960s. Fifteen-year life spans have been reduced to 42 days. ‘Natural’ can really mean anything critics want it to mean.39. On the other hand, naturalness is often meant as a precautionary principle. If some food item has a long history of not being toxic for people, then it probably isn’t toxic for people now. However, our modern animal food processes are anything but natural, which is why people worry so much about cross-contamination and food poisoning in animal products like chicken and beef.40. When talking to people, work out whether they use ‘natural’ as a proxy concept for ‘food safety’. If so, talk about the safety of plant-based foods. 41. The fifth justification for animal farming outside the four Ns is that some animal farming is ‘humane’, therefore animal farming generally can’t be completely wrong. There are problems with this line of reasoning.42. Reese mentions three reasons why the ‘end animal farming’ message should not be replaced by the ‘end factory farming’ message. First, exploitation might be wrong independently of whether suffering occurs. Second, animals raised on so called high-welfare farms still suffer in important ways. This is bad enough even without mentioning the additional environmental harms of these farms over plant-based agriculture. Third, psychological refuge. People often use high-welfare farms to derail the conversation, to get in the ‘thin end of the wedge’. From this point, they can claim that they (of course) only consume high-welfare animal products (which is mostly impossible), and therefore that there is really nothing to worry about.43. A 2017 survey found that 75% of US adults claim that they usually consume ‘humane animal products’, whereas the proportion of non-factory farms in the US is about 1%. This suggests that consumers are uninformed.44. A thought experiment might help us make sense of these concepts. We imagine that humans, in some alternate history, became the ‘happy’ slaves of some different, more advanced species. They raise us and kill us painlessly once we have stopped growing, in order to eat us. Let’s say that we are killed at age 16. Is this bad? We might appeal to our sense of not having had a fair shot at life (a ‘fair innings’) or the chance to experience life to the full. We haven’t been made to suffer, but we also have lose out on many years of potential joy. This loss of potential joy might be relevant to the cause. [For a longer illustration of this kind of situation, albeit in a very different context, I’d recommend looking at the sci-fi novel/film by Kazuo Ishiguro ‘Never Let Me Go’.]45. Scaling up truly humane farming operations to the current level of global demand is practically impossible. To feed everyone over the long term, we need an alternative to animal farming. What’s the best way to bring that world about? At least in part, it means campaigning for the end of animal farming.46. As Reese puts it: “So even if humane animal farming is possible in theory, it seems exceedingly difficult to achieve at a financially accessible global scale.” 47. If you are a small or large farm operation, you are still constrained by economics. With margins already thin in the industry, there is no incentive to go beyond the minimum level of welfare protections if no one else is doing so. Even the fancier ‘upmarket’ brands still have to run a business and still have to keep costs low in order to be profitable.48. [A moral uncertainty argument: let’s say that you are unsure whether or not ‘harm-free’ exploitation is bad. Due to the scale of the problem, with 100s of billions of animals killed every year, if we’re wrong about this, it ends up being really bad - just because of how many animals there are. Is it really worth the risk if we turn out to be wrong?]49. The most important insight from advocacy research: the higher priority of institutional change over individual change.50. Can institutional messaging be seen as too aggressive, or even totalitarian? Perhaps. This is important to bear in mind. Stories, then statistics.51. Try to work with all communities before dismissing or thinking of criticising their contributions. For example: black veganism is a thing, in part because black communities have long highlighted the historical factors leading to differing preferences for animal foods. Unfortunately, not every vegan feels at home in the vegan movement as it currently exists.52. There is such a thing as liberal messaging and conservative messaging. Conservatives often (but not always) value things like loyalty, authority, and sanctity, more than liberals do. Highlighting the concept of oppression might not be as useful as showing how avoiding animal suffering helps to ‘preserve American values’.53. Consider these two statements: ‘America is a nation of animal lovers.’ ‘America is a leader in technology and innovation.’ If you found those relatable, then you might agree in principle with promoting new plant-based food alternatives without necessarily realising it.54. Intersectionality is a real thing: build bridges with other movements.55. Maintain a global scope. Lewis Bollard of Open Philanthropy Project reminds us that about 49% of farmed animals currently live in China. With rising prosperity often comes increased demand for animal products, perhaps as a signal of wealth.56. The Big Four regions to focus on: China, US, EU, India. China and India for sheer size, the US and EU for influence.57. Be careful not to perpetuate racial stereotypes. If a tiny fraction of the Chinese population have regularly consumed dog meat, associating it with the whole nation is just offensive.58. There will always be a case for moral circle expansion, as there has been throughout history. It is naive to think that we are at some final end-stage of moral development. Effective altruism thrives when we are constantly keeping open minds. What about the far future? What about wild animal suffering? What about artificial beings?59. Keeping animal advocacy related to the moral circle means being less open to criticisms relating to changing evidence on health risks or environmental risks, where new (often contradictory) evidence seems to be arising all the time. The immorality of animal suffering is not vulnerable in the same way - it will matter for anyone that takes the time to understand what suffering really means.60. A roadmap to a plant-based future, after the end of animal farming. Replacement of animal products in supply chains, schools, and catering companies, for reasons of cost efficiency and sustainability. For example, switching cheap chicken nuggets in schools with healthier (perhaps even tastier) alternatives. Consumer tastes will take longer to shift. For top-end, luxury markets, wealthier consumers will have more scope to care about their health, ethical sourcing, and cutting-edge ingredients. They might also respond better to celebrity, high-status endorsements.61. Be uncertain in your future predictions. Remember that above all, great value comes from being part of a great community!I really enjoyed reading this, and I hope you’ve learned something from it too. But don’t take my word for it - you can buy the book for yourself as it’s coming out at the end of 2018 (see http://jacyreese.com/ for more details). I hope when you read it that you have the same enjoyable, memorable experience that I did.---(Guide to my rating system)5☆ - A classic. Influential on a 50-year scale and/or something which I have very strong personal feelings for.4☆ - A great book. Influential on a 10-year scale and/or something which I really enjoyed reading.3☆ - A good book. Influential on a 1-year scale and/or something which I liked reading.2☆ - A not-so-good book. Possibly not worth the time to read and/or something which I disliked reading.1☆ - A near-useless book. Probably not worth the time to read and/or something which I really disliked reading.---
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  • Alfredo Parra
    January 1, 1970
    A must-read for anyone interested in the most recent developments and discussions on how we can bring about a world free of animal products. Sober and well-researched.
  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    It's a fascinating read on how everyday people are trying to change the world using innovation to make a difference. It's a new frontier of activism and it's hard to stop reading once you start. It brings hope for a better future!
  • Ricardo Lopes
    January 1, 1970
    As a YouTuber and promoter of science, and having been a vegan for more than 4 years, I have very much appreciated Jacy's book. He shows that he took the painful job of going through the relevant scientific literature in order to deliver a book to the public which, I think, has been longed for. I have been part of vegan groups, many of which I eventually had to distance myself from because, unfortunately, members very rapidly start associating with pseudoscientific movements, and supporting envi As a YouTuber and promoter of science, and having been a vegan for more than 4 years, I have very much appreciated Jacy's book. He shows that he took the painful job of going through the relevant scientific literature in order to deliver a book to the public which, I think, has been longed for. I have been part of vegan groups, many of which I eventually had to distance myself from because, unfortunately, members very rapidly start associating with pseudoscientific movements, and supporting environmental approaches that lack any kind of rigorous evidence to back them up. Jacy didn't do any of that in this magnificent book. He decided not to demonize people who consume animal products, and learned and exposed some of the most relevant aspects of their individual and social psychology. Instead of blaming people, and taking the easy moralistic route of condemnation and simply saying that it's easy to transition to a plant-based diet, he proposed evidence-based solutions to counter the calamity that is animal farming. This book is definitely a must-read!
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  • Rosie Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    This book was fascinating from both an animal advocacy perspective and a food technology perspective. Rigorous and evidence-based, yet entertaining and easy to read. I particularly appreciated the thoughtful analysis of effective and ineffective advocacy strategies. Paints a compelling picture of a future food system without animal cruelty, and I'd recommend it to anyone interested in this possibility.
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  • Amy Bruestle
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I'd like to say that I won this book through a Goodreads Giveaway contest! I am really glad that I was one of the lucky winners too, because honestly, although I would've definitely read this book if it was free, I know I wouldn't spend 30$ to read it...especially when I could get the same information online. HOWEVER....I did win it, which is AWESOME, because Jacy Reese put all the information together in such a neat and organized way, which you wouldn't have, had you found it online First off, I'd like to say that I won this book through a Goodreads Giveaway contest! I am really glad that I was one of the lucky winners too, because honestly, although I would've definitely read this book if it was free, I know I wouldn't spend 30$ to read it...especially when I could get the same information online. HOWEVER....I did win it, which is AWESOME, because Jacy Reese put all the information together in such a neat and organized way, which you wouldn't have, had you found it online yourself. I was hesitant to enter this giveaway because I wasn't sure how much I would enjoy this, or whether or not I would even be able to read the book to the end. But that was no problem at all. Not only did I read the book to the end, but I enjoyed it thoroughly too!The information provided is insane! I LOVE learning new things, especially from reading, and this book taught me SOOOO MUCH! It really makes you think and contemplate new ways of doing things that have previously been done for tons of years the same way. But most of all, it has made me more conscious about the world around me, even just little things too. As far as I'm concerned, any book that has an impact on me that isn't solely emotional - but also impacts my day to day life in a positive way, is a book worth reading! I definitely recommend this book to anyone who has any interest in animal farming, new innovations, food and science, animal free products and food, and just the ways in which the world is changing! You will not be disappointed by any means!! READ THIS BOOK!
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  • Jonathon Tree
    January 1, 1970
    I can't recommend this book enough for anyone who views themselves as open-minded, or anyone interested in our modern food system, environment and social justice, or new technologies.Throughout the book, the author presents a logical and well-structured case for replacing conventional animal farming with non-animal alternatives. It is a compelling and thoughtful look into a rapidly changing and often overlooked area of society, diving headfirst into a new world of animal ethics, food technology, I can't recommend this book enough for anyone who views themselves as open-minded, or anyone interested in our modern food system, environment and social justice, or new technologies.Throughout the book, the author presents a logical and well-structured case for replacing conventional animal farming with non-animal alternatives. It is a compelling and thoughtful look into a rapidly changing and often overlooked area of society, diving headfirst into a new world of animal ethics, food technology, and our own human psychology.Unlike many reads, this is one that is sure to challenge and enlighten, and will likely be looked back on as one of the earliest histories of this nascent movement—should the events predicted by the author come to fruition.
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  • Lila Rieber
    January 1, 1970
    This is not your average vegan book. Despite the moral urgency of the issue of animal farming, Reese is thoughtful and reflective, not preachy. A fascinating book on the history and science of the animal welfare movement, with clear ideas for advocates and ordinary people to help end animal exploitation.
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    This is a quick read with the main focus on the perpetual push toward ending the practice of animal factoring farming. Although the author touches on many important points, I felt this book fell a bit short for me. I have always been an advocate for the protection of animals and have been continually bettering my diet over my lifetime but this book lacked any real insight regarding the government's role with the nature of the manipulation of our food, our health risks, big pharma and to the savi This is a quick read with the main focus on the perpetual push toward ending the practice of animal factoring farming. Although the author touches on many important points, I felt this book fell a bit short for me. I have always been an advocate for the protection of animals and have been continually bettering my diet over my lifetime but this book lacked any real insight regarding the government's role with the nature of the manipulation of our food, our health risks, big pharma and to the saving our planet. Jonathan Safran Foer's book Eating Animals was personally a better pick for me.
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  • Kathryn in FL
    January 1, 1970
    I have read books and watched documentaries on eating to the exclusion of animals, documented studies, etc. This book is one person's views. It wasn't for me, so I feel rating it would be a disservice to those interested in this topic. I do think that the current system will implode and already, most people are priced out of this "market" especially 4 legged creatures.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I want everyone to read this. It focuses on the technology that will end animal farming, rather than the terrible conditions of animal farming, and it’s fascinating.
  • Kirby
    January 1, 1970
    This book was great and so helpful. I've been vegetarian since 2010, and I've gone through periods of feeling frustrated and hopeless about how to make real progress in the field of animal welfare. I'm burned out on reading about the problems with our food system and eating meat, and it's not as easy to find high-quality content on what can be done realistically to address these systemic issues. Even if you eat meat, I think we can all agree that factory farming is truly horrific psycho shit, bu This book was great and so helpful. I've been vegetarian since 2010, and I've gone through periods of feeling frustrated and hopeless about how to make real progress in the field of animal welfare. I'm burned out on reading about the problems with our food system and eating meat, and it's not as easy to find high-quality content on what can be done realistically to address these systemic issues. Even if you eat meat, I think we can all agree that factory farming is truly horrific psycho shit, but it's such a firmly entrenched part of our broken food system that many of us feel powerless in the face of it. This book presents a plan for ending not just factory farming but all animal farming in a clear, pragmatic, strategic manner that focuses on institutional change with long-term effectiveness. This is the sort of practical approach that I have felt myself leaning towards more and more the older I get, not only with regards to animal welfare, but many other political and social causes. Thoughtful planning and effective altruism, not scare tactics and attention-grabbing strategies, can often make a much greater impact and lead to lasting change. The author almost sort of lost me towards the end of the book when he started talking about digital sentience (i.e. robots with feelings) and space exploration, as it seemed sort of thematically and tonally dissonant from the rest of the book, but overall, I thought this was such a persuasive and well-written guide to how we can actually make positive changes in our food system, for the sake of animals, the environment, our health, and our collective morality. Highly recommended to everyone (excellent choice for audio if you're into that).
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  • Mimi Tran
    January 1, 1970
    The End of Animal Farming is a great read. I enjoyed reading it and highly recommend it to anyone who is intellectual curious, regardless of your level of interest in animal welfare or the world’s modern food system. Having read /books and watched documentaries on the scale of animal suffering resulted from factory farming, I appreciated that the author stated right in the beginning of the book: “This is a book about exactly how we can solve those problems”. And author Reese delivered what he pr The End of Animal Farming is a great read. I enjoyed reading it and highly recommend it to anyone who is intellectual curious, regardless of your level of interest in animal welfare or the world’s modern food system. Having read /books and watched documentaries on the scale of animal suffering resulted from factory farming, I appreciated that the author stated right in the beginning of the book: “This is a book about exactly how we can solve those problems”. And author Reese delivered what he promised throughout the entire book. The book began with a logical, compelling argument baked by well-research cases, ranging from history, philosophy to science to argue for the end of animal farming and a new age of alternative non-animal food source. In the next couple chapters, I can’t help but feeling optimistic while reading about the exciting things that are happening in the field of vegan-tech and cellular agriculture. I recall at one point in the book, the author stated that “...by working on technology, we usually are just affecting the speed of progress, but by working on social change, we can affect the direction of progress. Affecting the direction ensures that, in the long run, the welfare of humans and animals is as good as it can be.” With that intention, the last couple chapters changed direction and focused on evidence-based social science and its application to policy and animal advocacy for effective and long lasting social changes. A another big part of why I enjoyed this book so much was how compassionate and humble the author was; and it really showed up in the language and writing throughout the book. After reading The End of Animal Farming, I felt much more hopeful about the future of our food system and optimistic that we could end animal farming for good. At the same time, I gained valuable knowledge that I can use to communicate with friends and family about this important issue.
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  • Angelina Li
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic book for anyone who wants a clear, level-headed introduction into the world of animal advocacy!
  • Liam Semple
    January 1, 1970
    This is the book the vegan movement needs. The thrust of Reese's vision for the future is this: it is vegan, but it is not meatless. Yes, we will save cute baby cows from slaughter and still be grilling up burgers on the fourth of July. Reese is a student of the effective altruism movement, and that is what makes this book such a compelling and accessible read, regardless of where to fall on the spectrum of "meat is murder" to Ron Swanson. The fact is, there's much reason to be optimistic, so th This is the book the vegan movement needs. The thrust of Reese's vision for the future is this: it is vegan, but it is not meatless. Yes, we will save cute baby cows from slaughter and still be grilling up burgers on the fourth of July. Reese is a student of the effective altruism movement, and that is what makes this book such a compelling and accessible read, regardless of where to fall on the spectrum of "meat is murder" to Ron Swanson. The fact is, there's much reason to be optimistic, so there's little utility in rehashing arguments about the ethics of factory farming, the sustainability of meat, etc. Reese knows how to speak with and sway his opponents, and his facts are all based in actual, referenced, researchable science. Just reading the words "Evidence-Based Social Change" relaxed me and made me feel, rightly, that Reese isn't interested in being right; he's interested in doing right the right way.The End of Animal Farming, beyond making the most compelling and optimistic case for the fully vegan future (which Reese predicts will arrive by 2100), is a model example of activism done right. My only real complaint with this book is that Beacon Press had the gall to charge $27.95 for 164-pages of content. Good as they are, you must be out of your minds.7-8/10
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  • Grady
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Animal farming will end by 2100’Jacy Reese is the Research Director and co-founder of Sentience Institute, a nonprofit think tank researching the most effective strategies for expanding humanity’s moral circle. He previously served as Board Chair and as a researcher at Animal Charity Evaluators. His writing has appeared in Vox, Salon, and Quartz, and he has presented his research to academic and nonprofit audiences in over 20 countries.In his Introduction Jacy not only address the topic at hand ‘Animal farming will end by 2100’Jacy Reese is the Research Director and co-founder of Sentience Institute, a nonprofit think tank researching the most effective strategies for expanding humanity’s moral circle. He previously served as Board Chair and as a researcher at Animal Charity Evaluators. His writing has appeared in Vox, Salon, and Quartz, and he has presented his research to academic and nonprofit audiences in over 20 countries.In his Introduction Jacy not only address the topic at hand but also allows us to sense the humanity of this important world citizen: ‘This is not a book about the problems of animal farming. Scores of compelling books, documentaries, news articles, and scientific papers have detailed the damage animal farming does to public health, agricultural workers, rural communities, the national economy, the global food supply, our air and water, and, of course, farmed animals. This is a book about exactly how we can solve those problems. So much has been written exposing and condemning the animal agriculture industry that technology theorist Tom Chatfield listed “eating meat and factory farming” first in his predictions of what our descendants in centuries to come will deplore about today’s society. Journalist Ezra Klein, author Steven Pinker, business magnate Richard Branson, science educator Bill Nye, and Indian politician Maneka Gandhi have all made similar forecasts, based primarily on concern for farmed animals. In 2017, the BBC even produced the mockumentary “Carnage” based in the vegan world of 2067. It took a critical and humorous look at Britain’s unpleasant history of eating animals. It might seem surprising that the plight of these neglected creatures—by numbers, around 93 percent of farmed animals are chickens and fish—is so compelling an issue, given the fact that humans are still plagued by disease, oppression, war, racial and economic inequality, and other pressing social issues. However, even if we ignore the harms animal farming causes to humans, a bit of reflection exposes a compelling moral urgency. Consider these three facts: First, there are over one hundred billion farmed animals alive at this moment—more than ten times the number of humans. Second, over 90 percent (over 99 percent in the US) of these animals live on industrial, large-scale “factory farms” enduring atrocious cruelty such as intense confinement in tiny cages, brutal mutilation and slaughter methods, and rampant disease and suffering from artificial breeding for excessive production of meat, dairy, and eggs. Third, today we have scientific consensus that these are sentient beings with the capacity to feel great joy and suffering. If we put these facts together, then we see animal farming as more than an abstract system of machinery and livestock. Animal farming is the moral catastrophe of one sentient being with a heartbreaking life story, plus another sentient being . . . plus another . . . plus another . . . plus another . . . more than one hundred billion times. Historian Yuval Noah Harari, author of the books Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind and Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, went so far as to suggest that animal farming is “the worst crime in history.” You might feel cautious about this opposition to all animal farming: If there’s a small percentage of the animal agriculture industry that’s not factory farming, shouldn’t we support that segment instead of abolishing the whole thing? What’s wrong with buying eggs from happy hens? I will share my views on this topic at length in chapter 6, arguing that we should oppose all animal farming, but note that most of this book’s arguments don’t rely on that viewpoint. Food advocates of all viewpoints are still united against the vast majority of modern animal farming, and you could read the rest of this book as The End of Factory Farming with little issue. The future is brighter than you think.In this warm, caring conversational manner Jacy writes the chapters to inspect the following areas – The Expanding Moral Circle, Emptying the Cages, The Rise of Vegan Tech, How Plant-Based Will Take Over, The World’s First Cultured Hamburger, The Psychology of Animal-Free Food, Evidence-Based Social Change, Broadening Horizons, and The Expanding Moral Circle, Revisited. In a book with so much to digest, reliance on the author’s synopsis is helpful – ‘Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma and Jonathan Safran Foer's Eating Animals brought widespread attention to the disturbing realities of factory farming. The End of Animal Farming pushes this conversation forward by outlining a strategic roadmap to a humane, ethical, and efficient food system in which slaughterhouses are obsolete--where the tastes of even the most die-hard meat eater are satisfied by innovative food technologies like cultured meats and plant-based protein. Social scientist and animal advocate Jacy Reese analyzes the social forces leading us toward the downfall of animal agriculture, the technology making this change possible for the meat-hungry public, and the activism driving consumer demand for plant-based and cultured foods. Reese contextualizes the issue of factory farming--the inhumane system of industrial farming that 95 percent of farmed animals endure--as part of humanity's expanding moral circle. Humanity increasingly treats nonhuman animals, from household pets to orca whales, with respect and kindness, and Reese argues that farmed animals are the next step. Reese applies an analytical lens of "effective altruism," the burgeoning philosophy of using evidence-based research to maximize one's positive impact in the world, in order to better understand which strategies can help expand the moral circle now and in the future. The End of Animal Farming is not a scolding treatise or a prescription for an ascetic diet. Reese invites readers--vegan and non-vegan--to consider one of the most important and transformational social movements of the coming decades.’This is a fascinating and important book, one that deserves our immediate attention and thought alteration. Highly Recommended.
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  • Sean
    January 1, 1970
    Full of inspiring ideas about the future of food system. Factory farming is outdated and no longer a logical solution to meeting the rising global food demands. This book sheds light on the transformation that is taking place.
  • Jyot
    January 1, 1970
    "People eat animal products in spite of how they are produced, not because of it.""The proposition of animal consciousness, although treated as common sense by many of us today, is an inherently challenging concept. It threatens our human need to feel unique in the world.""When we arrived we could hear a great tumult of bellowing. 'They must have separated the calves from the cows this morning.' Temple said, and , indeed that was what happened. We saw one cow outside the stockade, roaming, looki "People eat animal products in spite of how they are produced, not because of it.""The proposition of animal consciousness, although treated as common sense by many of us today, is an inherently challenging concept. It threatens our human need to feel unique in the world.""When we arrived we could hear a great tumult of bellowing. 'They must have separated the calves from the cows this morning.' Temple said, and , indeed that was what happened. We saw one cow outside the stockade, roaming, looking for her calf, and bellowing. 'That's not a happy cow,' Temple said. 'That's one sad, upset cow. She wants her baby. Bellowing for it, hunting for it. She'll forget for a while, then start again. It's like grieving, mourning-not much written about it. People don't like to allow them thoughts or feelings.'""It has become increasingly challenging to maintain the contradiction between our treatment of animals and this moral progress. We subject rats to psychological experimentation to better understand the neurological basis of emotions, trying to convince ourselves that the experiments are ethical because the rats have no emotions. We test painkillers of animals, justifying this by telling ourselves that they don't suffer the way we do. We imagine that dogs lack our own sophisticated awareness of the world, but we still use them for guidance when lose our own vision.""To definitely conclude that something is good because it's natural is known to philosophers as an 'appeal to nature,' a well-known logical fallacy. It's simply false that all natural things are good and all unnatural things are bad. Murder, rape, abuse, and many other cruelties have existed through most of our evolutionary history. Indeed, many of the boons of modern civilization such as medicine and natural disaster relief are defenses against the unfavorable natural state of humanity. There may be a lot to appreciate in the natural world, but we have vaccines, refrigerators, toilets,and air-conditioning because they're better solutions to out needs than what nature gave us.""A key aspect of moral outrage is that it seems to make people more willing to break from 'system justification,' the tendency to justify the status quo, often for no other reason than because it is the status quo. This argument makes sense in theory and has some empirical evidence. Given how common system justifications is when people hear 'go vegetarian' messages, feeling an immediate urge to justify their own diet, this could be a very important effect on institutional messages. It could reduce the number of irrational arguments that advocates hear, like the infamous 'Lions eat meat Why can't I?'""More people leaving animals or all animal-based foods off their plates could also lead to substantial spillover benefits. As we mentioned before, there is some empirical evidence that eating animals leads people to think animals have less sophisticated mental capacities, likely due to the cognitive dissonance people experience when they consider that animals have rich mental lives and can't reconcile with eating them."
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  • Jakub Ferencik
    January 1, 1970
    This book goes into my 'favorite' shelf on Goodreads. Jacy Reese writes so clearly it almost hurts. I am jealous of his skill. I don't think I'll be able to write this way for a long time. Much respect in that regard. The arguments that are particularly interesting & - more importantly - new are his discussion on animal rights advocacy that appeals to short-term attention (such as PETA's media focus on animal cruelty & silly animal costumes that get exposure for being scandalous) vs. muc This book goes into my 'favorite' shelf on Goodreads. Jacy Reese writes so clearly it almost hurts. I am jealous of his skill. I don't think I'll be able to write this way for a long time. Much respect in that regard. The arguments that are particularly interesting & - more importantly - new are his discussion on animal rights advocacy that appeals to short-term attention (such as PETA's media focus on animal cruelty & silly animal costumes that get exposure for being scandalous) vs. much needed long-term credibility. Reese also distinguishes between institutionalized messaging (economic advances) vs. individual messaging (i.e., justifying eating meat because of personal choice). Methods such as moral outrage have been proven to be inefficient, it is better to show direct ways that vegetarian/ vegan diets affect the planet. That is done by implementing short & concise messages, such as "End animal farming" or "America needs to eat less meat" & by seeking "collective solutions" like petitions against large companies (via Change.org for example) or op-eds that change the consensus among citizens. Animal rights should've been discussed as a collective issue with tangible solutions rather than that of personal choice in the 70s and in Singer's book that sparked the movement. Reese mentions that making these issues too abstract will lead to what social psychologists call "collapse of compassion" which is low compassion to big problems. An exemplary argument is: a vegetarian diet can save anywhere from 371-582 animals annually, but that is only an infinitesimal percentage of the billions of animals in factory farms (over 99% alive). One should expect to feel overwhelmed & discouraged because of the numbers. Angry advocates are similarly ineffective. Focus not on the negative aspects when defending vegetarianism/ veganism but rather on the positive (health, happiness, goodness, empathy, etc.). Alternatives to angry protests should be "temporarily blocking slaughterhouse trucks" in order to give water to the animals, & participating in peaceful, professional, & respectable protests.Vegans are often misrepresented for being aggressive anarchists, that can & should change in the coming decades. I believe Reese does an exceptional job at outlining how. He concludes his book with pointing out something that advocates should remind themselves of: "If you recognize the moral catastrophe of animal farming, you are a moral pioneer. As you walk with other advocates, you stand on the footsteps of people from every generation, around the world, who have fought for other Copernican leaps in the expansion of humanity's moral circle such as the inclusion of women, people of color, and people who live in distant locations" (163). Great book, Jacy Reese.
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  • Teo 2050
    January 1, 1970
    ContentsReese J (2018) (07:13) End of Animal Farming, The - How Scientists, Entrepreneurs, and Activists Are Building an Animal-Free Food SystemIntroduction– The future is brighter than you think– Effective altruism– Sketching out the road map1. The Expanding Moral Circle– Animal machines– The scientific revolution– If it walks like a duck– Scientific consensus– Popular science– Social forces– Moving forward2. Emptying the Cages– An embedded industry– The biggest impact so far– Animal ag’s big b ContentsReese J (2018) (07:13) End of Animal Farming, The - How Scientists, Entrepreneurs, and Activists Are Building an Animal-Free Food SystemIntroduction– The future is brighter than you think– Effective altruism– Sketching out the road map1. The Expanding Moral Circle– Animal machines– The scientific revolution– If it walks like a duck– Scientific consensus– Popular science– Social forces– Moving forward2. Emptying the Cages– An embedded industry– The biggest impact so far– Animal ag’s big blunder– Stepping outside the echo chamber– Vegans, vegetarians, and reducetarians3. The Rise of Vegan Tech– “Handsome Creek”– Controversy– From tofu to vegan turkey– Plant-based meat– If you can’t beat them, join them4. How Plant-Based Will Take Over– Wrangling an upstart industry– Which products do we prioritize?– “Follow Your Heart” or “follow the impact”– Labeling, marketing, and shelf space– Plant butchers5. The World’s First Cultured Hamburger– New Harvest– The cultured meat arms race– What’s in a name?– The future of cultured meat technology6. The Psychology of Animal-Free Food– The Four N’s– – Normal– – Necessary– – Nice– – Natural– The problems with “humane” animal farming– The wrongness of exploitation– The humane myth– Psychological refuge7. Evidence-Based Social Change– Institutions over individuals– Survey, voting, and lifestyle data– Historical precedent– The collapse of compassion– Moral outrage– Social pressure– But isn’t consumer action a clearer call to action?– Putting it into practice– Trigger events– How over why– Stories, then statistics– Be cautious with confrontation– Historical precedent– Emotional arousal and moral outrage8. Broadening Horizons– Not just for hippies– Inclusive advocacy– Reaching around the globe9. The Expanding Moral Circle, Revisited– Future humans and animals– Wild animals– Bugs– Artificial sentience– Implication: Focus on animal protection– The end of animal farmingAcknowledgmentsNotesBibliographyIndex
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free hardback copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. I was very pleasantly surprised by this book. I went into it expecting horrific tales of animal suffering and continual exhortations to switch to a vegan diet (which I do not currently practice). I read Eating Animals by Jonathan Saffran Foer last year and was left with a continuing sense of helplessness for the state of our food system. Instead, this book is a reasoned approach (in line with the Effective Altruism movement) t I received a free hardback copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. I was very pleasantly surprised by this book. I went into it expecting horrific tales of animal suffering and continual exhortations to switch to a vegan diet (which I do not currently practice). I read Eating Animals by Jonathan Saffran Foer last year and was left with a continuing sense of helplessness for the state of our food system. Instead, this book is a reasoned approach (in line with the Effective Altruism movement) to how to have a greater impact in the fight against factory farming beyond just that of an individual’s dietary choices. The author explores innovations and future paths for plant-based protein, such as the Impossible Burger, and considers other ethical implications beyond the factory farm. He also includes discussions of intersectionality in the movement, and considers situations outside the US/EU cultural landscape. For one example of the book’s discussion focus, why do conferences, airplanes, and other institutions not make the default meal option one that is plant-based? Or why don’t institutions and restaurants use the great new eggless mayonnaises? However, my impression is that he perhaps has underestimated the strength of the food industry giants in our legal system and capitalist culture in some of his arguments. The writing was very readable and I noticed only one very minor typo in the whole book. The research notes were extensive, but there were a few I wished had been presented as footnotes instead, since the typical reader skips the endnotes section of books. The book also includes a bibliography and index. Altogether a recommended thought-provoking read for those interested in dietary ethics, animal welfare, and/or effective altruism.
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  • Jenna Leazott
    January 1, 1970
    I received The End of Animal Farming as part of a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for my honest review.As a vegetarian-becoming-vegan, I've long been interested in the rights of animals. And though I have read and watched plenty of books, documentaries, and more about animal welfare and farming, these mediums often leave me feeling feeling more disparate than before. Yes, I can cut meat and animal products out of my diet, but how else are we going to abolish animal farming?Luckily, Jacy Reese com I received The End of Animal Farming as part of a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for my honest review.As a vegetarian-becoming-vegan, I've long been interested in the rights of animals. And though I have read and watched plenty of books, documentaries, and more about animal welfare and farming, these mediums often leave me feeling feeling more disparate than before. Yes, I can cut meat and animal products out of my diet, but how else are we going to abolish animal farming?Luckily, Jacy Reese comes through with a comprehensive book that both highlights the need for the end of animal farming with anectodes and stories of animal abuse without relying too heavily on them for the book's structure. Though I still am not comfortable with comparing animal abuse to the abuse of humans, particularly as we are still under systems of immense oppression for a countless amount of minority groups, he does bring together good research and solutions for how we can move forward. It gives you a lot more hope for the idea of cultured meat as a viable replacement towards farmed meat, which is both parts exciting and frustrating as we wait for this change to happen.Overall, I really liked this book and would definitely recommend it to anyone who is vegan/vegetarian or interested in becoming vegan/vegetarian. It's also a great resource for current and aspiring advocates for any kind of social change, as Jacy has clearly been involved with advocacy and advocacy impact research for quite some time now.
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  • Kartik Raj
    January 1, 1970
    Jacy Reese's book is a must-read for everyone with any interest in the most important questions and trends in our food system. Reese presents lucid and compelling discussions on topics from biotechnology to human psychology to our moral views of animals and practically everything in between. He gives a grounded yet hopeful outlook of how we will come to create a more compassionate and sustainable food system through technological advances and institutional change.For readers that don't know much Jacy Reese's book is a must-read for everyone with any interest in the most important questions and trends in our food system. Reese presents lucid and compelling discussions on topics from biotechnology to human psychology to our moral views of animals and practically everything in between. He gives a grounded yet hopeful outlook of how we will come to create a more compassionate and sustainable food system through technological advances and institutional change.For readers that don't know much about this topic, Reese's book will give you a comprehensive and accessible overview of the most pressing issues on the topic of animals in agriculture and the most important food innovations happening now.Experienced activists, change-makers, and effective altruists will also find this book helpful in its focus of *how* we can make ourselves more effective in our work to speed up the transformation of our food system. There aren't many books that can be helpful to a general audience and for more specialized readers, but this is one of them.Reese's book reads very quickly; you'll probably make it through the 160-ish pages in a few sittings. However the ideas and arguments presented in the book will make a permanent shift in how you see progress in our food system and in how we treat animals.
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  • Michael Moats
    January 1, 1970
    I am not now nor will I ever be a vegetarian . however, this book has merit. obviously if we are to conquer space we need a food supply that is portable, and easy to maintain. non animal alternatives will be necessary. this book did not address or even mention any downside to abandoning animal farming. one downside is some of the ideas advocated in the book would lead to control of our food being concentrated in the hands of a few corporations. what types of pollution will be created? the conseq I am not now nor will I ever be a vegetarian . however, this book has merit. obviously if we are to conquer space we need a food supply that is portable, and easy to maintain. non animal alternatives will be necessary. this book did not address or even mention any downside to abandoning animal farming. one downside is some of the ideas advocated in the book would lead to control of our food being concentrated in the hands of a few corporations. what types of pollution will be created? the consequences on the environment caused by the inputs needed to produce more plants?the author uses a broad brush to paint all farmers as bad. insinuated that all farmers, either on purpose or inadvertently abuse their animals. I believe this reflects the "disneyfication" of our society. animals are animals. they are not human. they are active members and participants in the natural food chain. we mistakenly attribute human qualities to them. agriculture as we practice it today is unsustainable. that much is obvious. there are many problems that need to be addressed. some types of corporate farming needs to change so we can return to a sustainable system of food production. plant based animal substitutes will play a roll but I doubt they will ever totally replace them.
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  • Antti Värtö
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic book that made me fantasise about quitting my job and starting a cultured meat business.Reese is always polite in his book, but he does not mince words when it comes time to analyze the activists of the past (and, to lesser extent, present). Too often the focus has been on the individual and lifestyle choices: "Go Vegan". But this is a mistake, says Reese. Instead, activists should focus on institutional change. Vegan days in schools. Animal welfare laws. That sort of thinking.Large po Fantastic book that made me fantasise about quitting my job and starting a cultured meat business.Reese is always polite in his book, but he does not mince words when it comes time to analyze the activists of the past (and, to lesser extent, present). Too often the focus has been on the individual and lifestyle choices: "Go Vegan". But this is a mistake, says Reese. Instead, activists should focus on institutional change. Vegan days in schools. Animal welfare laws. That sort of thinking.Large portion of the book is dedicated on companies, that have created plant-based foods that could replace meat, such as Impossible Burger. Other way to end animal farming could be cultured meat, that is created from animal cells. Reese is confident that cultured (or "clean") meat will eventually replace animal farming.Very nice: I'd say must-read for animal rights activists, but much recommended to everyone interested in societal questions.
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  • Na
    January 1, 1970
    Reese makes an utterly optimistic case for the future of animal farming in this book. The future of a meatless society is one that he can almost taste. Philosophically speaking, Reese did not add anything new to the conversation. Where this book adds to the animal advocates library is in the breakdown of corporations and entrepreneurs who are struggling with the advocates to create a meatless society that can satisfy those less inclined to leave their meat behind. However, this is also where the Reese makes an utterly optimistic case for the future of animal farming in this book. The future of a meatless society is one that he can almost taste. Philosophically speaking, Reese did not add anything new to the conversation. Where this book adds to the animal advocates library is in the breakdown of corporations and entrepreneurs who are struggling with the advocates to create a meatless society that can satisfy those less inclined to leave their meat behind. However, this is also where the book falls short. Without taking notes, company and entrepreneurs names get lost in the rattle. Some of the stories stick, but the overall content gets lost in monotony. With that said, this book makes a decent companion for Jonathan Safran Foer’s, Eating Animals. Because of the size of the book, it is not a large time commitment to read, and the reader will most assuredly come out with new information on the future of animal farming.
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  • Shane Hawk
    January 1, 1970
    An important addition to the growing breadth of effective altruism literature.Reese is well-measured and thoughtful throughout his 200ish-page book. I gained a lot of knowledge and insight despite following the movement sporadically.My praise is independent from being a consumer of animal products. I’ve always wrestled with the morality of living the way I do—most humans for that matter. My cognitive dissonance went into overdrive while soaking in this book which is always a telltale sign of a p An important addition to the growing breadth of effective altruism literature.Reese is well-measured and thoughtful throughout his 200ish-page book. I gained a lot of knowledge and insight despite following the movement sporadically.My praise is independent from being a consumer of animal products. I’ve always wrestled with the morality of living the way I do—most humans for that matter. My cognitive dissonance went into overdrive while soaking in this book which is always a telltale sign of a personal favorite and five-star book.Some things covered: empirical studies on animals and sentience, technological feats for plant-based and cell-based meat alternatives, factory farming atrocities, well-rounded arguments for persuading meat eaters to stop and think, religious dietary restrictions, effective altruism, protest tactics, marketing tactics, innovators and their startups.
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    I'm reading more and more vegan or animal-free books. When walking through my local library this bright red book cover caught my attention. I wondered if they would discuss Impossible Foods, a food brand that has created meat, that taste very near the real thing. So much like the real thing many people can't tell the difference. Not only does Jacy dive into this he does a very deep dive in, The End of Animal Farming. There is a lot of work put into this book and polished. Jacy has included many I'm reading more and more vegan or animal-free books. When walking through my local library this bright red book cover caught my attention. I wondered if they would discuss Impossible Foods, a food brand that has created meat, that taste very near the real thing. So much like the real thing many people can't tell the difference. Not only does Jacy dive into this he does a very deep dive in, The End of Animal Farming. There is a lot of work put into this book and polished. Jacy has included many ways that we as individuals can help beyond just changing our diet. -more on the blog.
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  • Vaughn
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free, and I want to start by saying that I believe in the current farming industry. This book is incredibly well researched and does analyze some important growing trends in society and agriculture. I think this is a must read for anyone who is interested in the food or agricultural industries. It is biased but still very informative. As I said earlier, I disagree that animal-free is the way to go, and many animal farms do care deeply for the animals that are their livel I received this book for free, and I want to start by saying that I believe in the current farming industry. This book is incredibly well researched and does analyze some important growing trends in society and agriculture. I think this is a must read for anyone who is interested in the food or agricultural industries. It is biased but still very informative. As I said earlier, I disagree that animal-free is the way to go, and many animal farms do care deeply for the animals that are their livelihood. Still these arguments are familiar to what farmers are already facing in cases.
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