Mothering A Muslim
What does it mean to be a middle-class Muslim kid in India today? Talking to over a hundred children and their parents across twelve cities, Nazia Erum uncovers stories of religious segregation in classrooms and rampant bullying of Muslim children in many of the country’s top schools.

Mothering A Muslim Details

TitleMothering A Muslim
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 7th, 2018
PublisherJuggernaut Books
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Parenting

Mothering A Muslim Review

  • Chittajit Mitra
    January 1, 1970
    This book starts with the author’s dilemma to name her daughter with a proper Islamic name or something generic as she was worried that the former one might attract undue bullying. With that thought in her mind, she decided to interview several Muslim families across different cities from different strata of society. This book talks about the real stories of kids as young as from kindergarten to college going youngsters who face Islamophobia on a daily basis & how its affecting their lives & This book starts with the author’s dilemma to name her daughter with a proper Islamic name or something generic as she was worried that the former one might attract undue bullying. With that thought in her mind, she decided to interview several Muslim families across different cities from different strata of society. This book talks about the real stories of kids as young as from kindergarten to college going youngsters who face Islamophobia on a daily basis & how its affecting their lives & temperament. It also focuses on a key aspect within the Muslim community where some people are on a constant mission to judge other’s way of practicing Islam. This book surely sums up what’s going wrong in our society & forces you to think about how to improve the situation.Read the full review on Just Another Bookaholic
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  • Tushar Mangl
    January 1, 1970
    Nazia Erum in her debut book goes beyond the bullying lines to expose a much deeper malaise. Bullying or undermining people on the basis of their religion. And it is really a matter of concern that this is happening to kids at a very young age and in cosmopolitan cities and big schools. Also, how schools are seldom taking this problem head-on.Read the entire reviewat my blog
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  • Meera Nair
    January 1, 1970
    Mothering a Muslim by Nazia Erum is a nonfiction that explores the extent of Islamophobia in Indian society by bringing to light horrid instances of bullying and discrimination of Muslim children in schools. As a Muslim mother, Nazia gives voice to the woes of other Muslim women who are caught in the predicament of owning upto their religious identity or hiding it for fear of being considered to be extremists. She reaches out to children, teachers and parents alike, who have been impacted/ invol Mothering a Muslim by Nazia Erum is a nonfiction that explores the extent of Islamophobia in Indian society by bringing to light horrid instances of bullying and discrimination of Muslim children in schools. As a Muslim mother, Nazia gives voice to the woes of other Muslim women who are caught in the predicament of owning upto their religious identity or hiding it for fear of being considered to be extremists. She reaches out to children, teachers and parents alike, who have been impacted/ involved in the misleading stereotypes and negative bias associated with Muslims. Over the course of her book, the author draws from various sources the heartrending conclusion that even today, there’s a great deal of animosity surrounding religious communities and more often than not, innocent children are dragged into the aftermath of a verbal bloodbath.This review will not be a comment on the superiority of any religion, rather it takes into consideration the effect that negative bias has on children. The author’s writing style is punctuated by her desire to get a point across to her readers. She writes in a very collected and matter-of-fact manner. It’s a short book, one that you can finish in less than half a day. Although Nazia incorporates the stories of many families in her narrative, on a molecular level, they are just that – individually recounted instances of bullying and prejudice. Sometimes I wished that they were more seamlessly embedded into a story format. But I understand why it’s important to point out facts pertaining to a prevalent issue in the way she has.The people featured in this book come from all walks of life. The schools mentioned are a good mix of popular and less-heard-of institutions. All of what’s said in this book is very saddening. What bothers me the most is the fact that children, who don’t even understand the basics of politics and power play, get treated harshly by others; and that too on the basis of what they hear in their homes. Bullying is a very sensitive topic and we don’t get into the details as much, but it’s evident from the children’s inability to grasp the reality of their situation. All in all, it’s not a pleasant picture. But it’s one that must be acknowledged for sure, so that we as a society can come together and remedy the evils that threaten to disintegrate us. I would definitely recommend this book to others so that they can get an understanding of one side of the story.What do you get out of it? – A disheartening glance at the complexities of having an Muslim identity in today’s world.Thank you Juggernaut for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rachna
    January 1, 1970
    All of us who have been in the majority and never had to face discrimination or worry about our children being ridiculed, excluded or worse should read this and examine how we are complicit or have actively caused such hurt. It is appalling that so many of our friends and children live in this constant fear. My only criticism of the book is that it should've been more in depth. Although it gives an idea of what the situation is, we need to be aware of how bad the situation is and the urgent need All of us who have been in the majority and never had to face discrimination or worry about our children being ridiculed, excluded or worse should read this and examine how we are complicit or have actively caused such hurt. It is appalling that so many of our friends and children live in this constant fear. My only criticism of the book is that it should've been more in depth. Although it gives an idea of what the situation is, we need to be aware of how bad the situation is and the urgent need to educate and change perspectives
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  • Nitin Vadher
    January 1, 1970
    Why I love to read non-fiction is that it shows the reality, this book Mothering a Muslim is really an alarming, true situation of Muslim’s in Metro and urban area’s of India is perfectly presented by the author. Athithi Devo Bhava is followed by Indians for centuries, but for last 3-5 years situation has changed especially for Muslim’s because of the Gujarat riot and influence of ISIS in India.According to my view we can’t blame the politics, it’s because of the Muslim Jihadist, the whole commu Why I love to read non-fiction is that it shows the reality, this book Mothering a Muslim is really an alarming, true situation of Muslim’s in Metro and urban area’s of India is perfectly presented by the author. Athithi Devo Bhava is followed by Indians for centuries, but for last 3-5 years situation has changed especially for Muslim’s because of the Gujarat riot and influence of ISIS in India.According to my view we can’t blame the politics, it’s because of the Muslim Jihadist, the whole community has to suffer, even urban Muslims’ are afraid of their own peoples for not following their rules. It’s just mentioned by the author on page no 73 that a thirteen year old boy was brain washed by their mullah that when a boy started to grow mustache he should visit masjid everyday, also for a women if her head is uncovered or sleeves aren’t full their own people will reject her as a Muslim. Today’s news papers and also channels provide such news which targets particular community and they have to suffer. Although author accepts the reality by mentioning that 95% terror attack in 2015 were done by ISIS which is organized by Muslim. I still remember when I was studying in school many Borah Muslims were in our class, they are still our good friends, we used to share our lunch box and never heard anyone bullied them. What is mentioned in the book is severe in metros and urban areas but there is good harmony in tier 3 cities and villages of India. One incident which is mentioned in the book is very alarming for the future of India i.e. Muslim children’s refuses to enter Mandir, and Hindu children’s in Masjid or Dargah, actually parents should teach their child that both the communities are living in harmony for centuries in India, and this types of activities should not be tolerated by them.What I didn’t like in the book: Those who have been interviewed have targeted Modi government and their (Muslim’s) situation after Gujarat riot and recent events. A particular BJP government if framed by the author, which is not healthy for the book. I would like to say Congress has ruled many decades after Independence, also 93’s bomb blast, where Hindus and Muslim’s both were affected but author has not mentioned in her book. Although I highly recommend this book to today’s parents and teachers of India, and really appreciate the work of debut author.I got this book from Juggernaut publication, a big thank you for providing this wonderful book for an honest review.
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  • Ritu Mantri
    January 1, 1970
    India, right from her independence had witnessed many deadly communal riots between Hindu and Muslims. Irrespective of differences, mutual harmony was always restored. But now, according to the research of Nazia Erum in her book, Mothering a Muslim this communal differences have entered into the schools and Indian Muslims children are targeted and bullied for their religion by referring them as Pakistani and terrorist.This is a very serious issue and a matter of great concern in respect of the f India, right from her independence had witnessed many deadly communal riots between Hindu and Muslims. Irrespective of differences, mutual harmony was always restored. But now, according to the research of Nazia Erum in her book, Mothering a Muslim this communal differences have entered into the schools and Indian Muslims children are targeted and bullied for their religion by referring them as Pakistani and terrorist.This is a very serious issue and a matter of great concern in respect of the future of the country. We are a secular nation and bigotry and intolerance is not acceptable. We, as parents, certainly can't do much about the hate speech of politicians, but can definitely curtail it's venom spreading in our drawing rooms.The book also gives insight into the Muslim community and the author's analysis. Liberal Muslims are always in a dilemma whether to live according to conservative rules or embrace change and go with the flow. Dilemma while selecting the name for their child which should be socially acceptable. And how Indian Muslims are adopting and practicing more radical form of Islam after coming under the influence of Gulf and Middle East countries.I completely empathize with the author, but I really don't agree with the author blaming Modi and BJP for increasing Islamophobia incidents in India. The atrocities of Taliban and other religious fanatic groups are responsible for the increasing hatred towards the Muslim community. I have heard of similar incidents happening in the USA after the destruction of World Trade Centre on 11th September 2001 killing more than 2000 innocents. Islamophobia is not just in India. It is present, little or more, everywhere in the world and I strongly believe religious fanatics like the Taliban and similar jihadists groups are responsible for it. So why to zero on Modi and BJP.
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  • Vikas
    January 1, 1970
    This book was very good, and a page turner to boot. Nazia really put in effort here and presented a balanced narrative. I love how she put forward the issues and then put in the issues happening on other side which people from other faiths may not be aware of. I loved the mention of Bhopal as well, it's my city and it's mention is welcome is all positive things. I agree with her that the current government did stir up many extremist outfits.Book is divided in 3 parts - 1st part is where Nazia wr This book was very good, and a page turner to boot. Nazia really put in effort here and presented a balanced narrative. I love how she put forward the issues and then put in the issues happening on other side which people from other faiths may not be aware of. I loved the mention of Bhopal as well, it's my city and it's mention is welcome is all positive things. I agree with her that the current government did stir up many extremist outfits.Book is divided in 3 parts - 1st part is where Nazia writes the essay and presents her thoughts, 2nd part has list of all the schools where Nazia did her research, 3rd part has excerpts from all the interviews she conducted.I flew though the pages and you would too. Keep on Reading.
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  • Farheen Fatima
    January 1, 1970
    Bullying in itself is a sensitive topic, and when it comes on religious lines , it makes matters worse. The book is based on the author’s interaction with more than 100 Muslim families with school going children. Sensitively handled, while putting across the point in a hard hitting manner. Must read for everyone.
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