Mothering A Muslim
What does it mean to be a middle-class Muslim kid in India today? Talking to over a hundred children and their parents across twelve cities, Nazia Erum uncovers stories of religious segregation in classrooms and rampant bullying of Muslim children in many of the country’s top schools.

Mothering A Muslim Details

TitleMothering A Muslim
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 7th, 2018
PublisherJuggernaut Books
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Social Issues

Mothering A Muslim Review

  • Chittajit Mitra
    January 1, 1970
    This book starts with the author’s dilemma to name her daughter with a proper Islamic name or something generic as she was worried that the former one might attract undue bullying. With that thought in her mind, she decided to interview several Muslim families across different cities from different strata of society. This book talks about the real stories of kids as young as from kindergarten to college going youngsters who face Islamophobia on a daily basis & how its affecting their lives & This book starts with the author’s dilemma to name her daughter with a proper Islamic name or something generic as she was worried that the former one might attract undue bullying. With that thought in her mind, she decided to interview several Muslim families across different cities from different strata of society. This book talks about the real stories of kids as young as from kindergarten to college going youngsters who face Islamophobia on a daily basis & how its affecting their lives & temperament. It also focuses on a key aspect within the Muslim community where some people are on a constant mission to judge other’s way of practicing Islam. This book surely sums up what’s going wrong in our society & forces you to think about how to improve the situation.Read the full review on Just Another Bookaholic
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  • Fiza Pathan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a good book meant for everyone to read & contemplate about. I loved the easy flow of the text. I got emotionally involved with its theme because, as a person with ONLY a Muslim first name & surname (Fiza Pathan) I have still been subjected to hate-speech, snide comments & verbal abuse in the past. I can't even fathom what an actual Muslim individual goes though, let alone a child. I think that more books like these should be published & be used in school libraries as mora This is a good book meant for everyone to read & contemplate about. I loved the easy flow of the text. I got emotionally involved with its theme because, as a person with ONLY a Muslim first name & surname (Fiza Pathan) I have still been subjected to hate-speech, snide comments & verbal abuse in the past. I can't even fathom what an actual Muslim individual goes though, let alone a child. I think that more books like these should be published & be used in school libraries as moral science or ethic lessons/classes. We NEED such books. Do purchase this book & read it. Kudos to Nazia Erum.
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  • Ashima Jain
    January 1, 1970
    Erum has researched extensively on the subject of this book. To begin with, she consciously chose to speak with Muslim women living in mixed localities rather than those from all-Muslim neighbourhoods. She documented personal experiences of urban, educated Muslim women and their families. In the course of her interviews she also met many 'authentic Muslim women' who seem to be missing from our society but are more than just a symbol. As she found out, this authentic Muslim woman could be your ne Erum has researched extensively on the subject of this book. To begin with, she consciously chose to speak with Muslim women living in mixed localities rather than those from all-Muslim neighbourhoods. She documented personal experiences of urban, educated Muslim women and their families. In the course of her interviews she also met many 'authentic Muslim women' who seem to be missing from our society but are more than just a symbol. As she found out, this authentic Muslim woman could be your neighbour, your doctor, or your child's school teacher. She is everywhere, in all her hijabi feisty-ness, as long as you care enough to pay attention, and she too is struggling to prove her identity in a community that is constantly judging her for how she practices Islam.All these women made a varied collection of subjects, each with their own stories that had one thread connecting them. They were all fearful for their children who had been targets of Islamophobia and nationalism in school.The author has presented a subject considered taboo in our society with a brilliant sensitivity. She highlights how conversations from our drawing rooms are growing roots into the minds of children as young as six years old, which in turn are becoming the cause of rampant bullying and ensuing trauma in school yards and classrooms.It may be a harmless seeming remark when a student decides to call his Muslim classmate 'Paki' or 'Terrorist'. But as the author discovered, it has raised alarming questions in the mind of the child labelled so, regarding his identity. It was disturbing to read how a parent did not reprimand their child for one such insensitivity and instead replied that it was in response to being called 'fat'. What more can one say? And this was only of the many stories revealed in this book.The experiences narrated are horrifying and heartbreaking, to say the least. Yet, many parents let it slip by, choosing not to report them to the school authorities, because it is something that happens and one has to learn to live with. The statistics presented at the end of the book clearly speak for themselves - not enough is being done. However, as the author points out, schools need to create a policy and parents need to sit up and take notice.Mothering A Muslim is not an argument over religion. It is a conversation on the values with which children are being raised today. Children perceive actions more than words and unknowingly imbibe the sentiments of the elders around them. This book is a call to parents and teachers on the role they have as nurturers and educationists. For they are the ones who must rise to fight for what is right in the hopes of creating a better future for all of us.For complete review, visit aquamarineflavours.wordpress.com.
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  • Ankita Arora
    January 1, 1970
    This book is by a mother who is trying to figure out what name would keep her daughter safe from religious prejudice. It is for all mothers out there who have sleepless nights thinking about the safety of their kids in this religiously unstable environment, and how a small comment can become toxic for a child and harm their development as a human being and not just a Hindu or a Muslim. Very relevant content, the research done is amazing and the author is successful in bringing out the dilemma th This book is by a mother who is trying to figure out what name would keep her daughter safe from religious prejudice. It is for all mothers out there who have sleepless nights thinking about the safety of their kids in this religiously unstable environment, and how a small comment can become toxic for a child and harm their development as a human being and not just a Hindu or a Muslim. Very relevant content, the research done is amazing and the author is successful in bringing out the dilemma that many face. We are witnessing really unstable times when it comes to religion and the repercussions of following one's own with blind devotion.The future of our country and the others rely upon the still weak and developing shoulders of our youth and the yet, unborn. They need to have a broader perspective when it comes to preaching a certain god. And mothers play the most important role in a child's development. One such mother, our author, is doing her bit wonderfully by understanding the need of the hour and ready do the needful further and beyond. P.S I loved the interviews included in the end. A more personal touch for the readers.
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  • Tushar Mangl
    January 1, 1970
    Nazia Erum in her debut book goes beyond the bullying lines to expose a much deeper malaise. Bullying or undermining people on the basis of their religion. And it is really a matter of concern that this is happening to kids at a very young age and in cosmopolitan cities and big schools. Also, how schools are seldom taking this problem head-on.Read the entire reviewat my blog
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  • Taran Sikka
    January 1, 1970
    From insensitivity towards Muslims to Paki jokes to toxic Islamists,this book covers issues that need to be addressed. Not only do Muslims folks face issues outside their faith but also struggle to find a place within the Muslim society. The impact of all this on kids and parents alike has been beautifully captured in this book.
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  • Majid
    January 1, 1970
    “It’s no more the elephant in the room. Conservative Islamization and rabid Islamophobia today are the twin camels we cannot tame” writes Nazia Erum in her book ‘Mothering a Muslim’. An account which shadows the reader with the anxiety of Muslim mothers and slowly raises the scale of fear about the growing polarisation. This book explores how schools, playgrounds, classrooms and children’s circle have been affected by the changing nature of politics. Unknowingly a hateful today has sown the seed “It’s no more the elephant in the room. Conservative Islamization and rabid Islamophobia today are the twin camels we cannot tame” writes Nazia Erum in her book ‘Mothering a Muslim’. An account which shadows the reader with the anxiety of Muslim mothers and slowly raises the scale of fear about the growing polarisation. This book explores how schools, playgrounds, classrooms and children’s circle have been affected by the changing nature of politics. Unknowingly a hateful today has sown the seeds of communal tomorrow. Nazia Erum has contributed to the nation by highlighting the troubles in the most unexpected of all places. She has mentioned the trauma and segregation brewing in an impressionable age. A child is the finest observer and she is influenced the most by the prejudices of elders. The shocking account of Islamophobia among school going kids and rabid Islamization among those growing up needs to be discussed. It needs the attention of all who care for a peaceful India tomorrow. Nazia Erum has done a huge service by compiling this gnawing issue of hatred. She has done her duty and is on a mission for an India which her ancestors dreamt of when they funded the 1857 revolts and men of her family were hanged from neem trees at Allahabad chowk by the British. She has taken a fight against this new tyranny of hate and I am hopeful we all will join her to create a lovable tomorrow. The interviews and narration place a lot of communal issues in perspective and at the same time shoulder us with a responsibility to think and act. This is a much needed book for a Muslim and their neighbours alike. A respondent’s story in the book hints at the need: "..She skipped towards the neighbour, happy to answer his many queries on where they had come from and who they were, 'Tum Mussulman ho? [Are you a Muslim]' suddenly he asked. 'No! Tum hoge Mussulman, main toh Asma hoon [You may be Muslim; I am Asma],' came the indignant retort. ..." The book is a must read so that no neighbour marks a child because of her religion and no Asma or Anita is mothered to identify herself as a Muslim or Hindu.
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  • Meera Nair
    January 1, 1970
    Mothering a Muslim by Nazia Erum is a nonfiction that explores the extent of Islamophobia in Indian society by bringing to light horrid instances of bullying and discrimination of Muslim children in schools. As a Muslim mother, Nazia gives voice to the woes of other Muslim women who are caught in the predicament of owning upto their religious identity or hiding it for fear of being considered to be extremists. She reaches out to children, teachers and parents alike, who have been impacted/ invol Mothering a Muslim by Nazia Erum is a nonfiction that explores the extent of Islamophobia in Indian society by bringing to light horrid instances of bullying and discrimination of Muslim children in schools. As a Muslim mother, Nazia gives voice to the woes of other Muslim women who are caught in the predicament of owning upto their religious identity or hiding it for fear of being considered to be extremists. She reaches out to children, teachers and parents alike, who have been impacted/ involved in the misleading stereotypes and negative bias associated with Muslims. Over the course of her book, the author draws from various sources the heartrending conclusion that even today, there’s a great deal of animosity surrounding religious communities and more often than not, innocent children are dragged into the aftermath of a verbal bloodbath.This review will not be a comment on the superiority of any religion, rather it takes into consideration the effect that negative bias has on children. The author’s writing style is punctuated by her desire to get a point across to her readers. She writes in a very collected and matter-of-fact manner. It’s a short book, one that you can finish in less than half a day. Although Nazia incorporates the stories of many families in her narrative, on a molecular level, they are just that – individually recounted instances of bullying and prejudice. Sometimes I wished that they were more seamlessly embedded into a story format. But I understand why it’s important to point out facts pertaining to a prevalent issue in the way she has.The people featured in this book come from all walks of life. The schools mentioned are a good mix of popular and less-heard-of institutions. All of what’s said in this book is very saddening. What bothers me the most is the fact that children, who don’t even understand the basics of politics and power play, get treated harshly by others; and that too on the basis of what they hear in their homes. Bullying is a very sensitive topic and we don’t get into the details as much, but it’s evident from the children’s inability to grasp the reality of their situation. All in all, it’s not a pleasant picture. But it’s one that must be acknowledged for sure, so that we as a society can come together and remedy the evils that threaten to disintegrate us. I would definitely recommend this book to others so that they can get an understanding of one side of the story.What do you get out of it? – A disheartening glance at the complexities of having an Muslim identity in today’s world.Thank you Juggernaut for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Vikas
    January 1, 1970
    This book was very good, and a page turner to boot. Nazia really put in effort here and presented a balanced narrative. I love how she put forward the issues and then put in the issues happening on other side which people from other faiths may not be aware of. I loved the mention of Bhopal as well, it's my city and it's mention is welcome is all positive things. I agree with her that the current government did stir up many extremist outfits.Book is divided in 3 parts - 1st part is where Nazia wr This book was very good, and a page turner to boot. Nazia really put in effort here and presented a balanced narrative. I love how she put forward the issues and then put in the issues happening on other side which people from other faiths may not be aware of. I loved the mention of Bhopal as well, it's my city and it's mention is welcome is all positive things. I agree with her that the current government did stir up many extremist outfits.Book is divided in 3 parts - 1st part is where Nazia writes the essay and presents her thoughts, 2nd part has list of all the schools where Nazia did her research, 3rd part has excerpts from all the interviews she conducted.I flew though the pages and you would too. Keep on Reading.
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  • Rachna
    January 1, 1970
    All of us who have been in the majority and never had to face discrimination or worry about our children being ridiculed, excluded or worse should read this and examine how we are complicit or have actively caused such hurt. It is appalling that so many of our friends and children live in this constant fear. My only criticism of the book is that it should've been more in depth. Although it gives an idea of what the situation is, we need to be aware of how bad the situation is and the urgent need All of us who have been in the majority and never had to face discrimination or worry about our children being ridiculed, excluded or worse should read this and examine how we are complicit or have actively caused such hurt. It is appalling that so many of our friends and children live in this constant fear. My only criticism of the book is that it should've been more in depth. Although it gives an idea of what the situation is, we need to be aware of how bad the situation is and the urgent need to educate and change perspectives
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  • Nithya Sashi
    January 1, 1970
    "Are we Pakistanis?" a very confused and angry Raiqa Saulat Khan asks herself when her son asks her the same question. When she probes further, she unearths a disturbing truth her son Faizan is facing in his dorm. Bullying, name calling, and unwarranted hatred. Faizan is the only Muslim in his dorm and owing to his religious subscription, he is singled out for acerbic and often violent attacks. Raiqa is troubled. She does not understand these allegations and racist remarks that more often than n "Are we Pakistanis?" a very confused and angry Raiqa Saulat Khan asks herself when her son asks her the same question. When she probes further, she unearths a disturbing truth her son Faizan is facing in his dorm. Bullying, name calling, and unwarranted hatred. Faizan is the only Muslim in his dorm and owing to his religious subscription, he is singled out for acerbic and often violent attacks. Raiqa is troubled. She does not understand these allegations and racist remarks that more often than not paint a picture of dismay and betrayal. The child facing this question about his identity often feels singled out and betrayed, as if his parents kept some prime information from him.Branded a Pakistani and in the same breadth a terrorist owing to the religion one follows, is also a sad reflection of the political situation in our country. Distrust and dismay along with incidents that spark more confusion ensure that the fault lines remain deeply etched.Nazia Erum, the author of this book started asking herself some very difficult questions after her daughter Myra was born. It all started when she had to choose a name for her precious bundle. Would a non-religious name be better than a Islamic name? It is a nightmare every Muslim parent, especially the 'good Muslims', those who don't indulge in 'those' activities must wrap their heads around. Mothering a Muslim is a very timely and sensitive portrayal of the troubled times we live in. Seven different incidents, one common thread running through the narrative, painting a united front to the world. A dilemma of being not good enough to the self-proclaimed custodians of the Muslim faith and of not being enough of a patriotic Indian to the outside world, is something every Muslim is painfully aware of. Having to live upto unrealistic expectations of a 'True Muslim' and to an equally difficult proposition of being branded a terrorist at the drop of a hat, is the hard reality of a Muslim in today's India.Nazia has painstakingly portrayed the dismay at being branded by faux-nationalists and ponders at the expectation of rigidity and fanaticism from each Muslim born in any part of the world. The unrealistic and often unyielding demands of the custodians of faith, the haraam police, as they are called in the book ends up confusing an entire generation who hang precariously between the liberal upbringing of their 'not-too-Muslim' parents and the custodians. Where would they eventually go? Wherever they turn, they end up receiving hatred and communal barbs without realizing the roles they are expected to play. In this confusion lies the narrow alley, which allows a clear path for the Saudi-sponsored Islam to enter and thrive. Radicalization happens when there is an obvious mismatch between the external influence and the norms followed at home. This eventually boils down to one single point: even if a child is brought up in a liberal and secular household, all it takes is a rigid mullah to convert. A Muslim kid in today's world faces undiluted discrimination, scorching insults, and often pure hatred from anyone identifying the child as a Muslim. Without correct and complete answers, a Muslim is left with no space to move. They are in a precarious place, they cannot run, hide, and most importantly, cannot even accept what is being thrust at them from the Saudi-sponsored custodians. They don't want to accept, most often.The book is an open mirror and a terrible reflection of our daily lives. Wearing your religious identity is almost an invitation for unwarranted scrutiny and eventual boycott. Wearing the Muslim tag, as the author says, is like wearing a crown of thorns. With each and every action being scanned by rigid fundamentalists and a system that views each Muslim suspiciously, irrespective of their identities, it becomes very important to bring more such Muslim voices out in the open. A louder proclamation of nationalist pride will not solve the problem, but an open discussion might begin to help thaw the ice mountains that have sprung up between the 'Others' and the rest of the Indians.As Nazia says in her book, in Bhopal, language (by this she means the two sections that a school has created: Sanskrit and Urdu) is constructing identities. Literally. Instilling a sense of identity based on religion is something foreign to Indians but has taken the shape of a Tsunami and in no time is going to consume an entire generation. Most worrisome is the demarcation of boundaries on religious lines even between friends, a Ahmed Sameer will not mix with a Rahul or a Shankar rather would feel 'safe' with an Ali.As Nazia points out, according to various researches done in the West, there seems to be a clear linkage between racial segregation and academic achievement gaps. She wonders if there could be another invisible line connecting religious segregation too? Nobody can be sure what the future holds and how the people are going to get segregated along religious lines, but one thing is sure: as mothers or parents, it becomes our prime duty to ensure our kids grow up recognizing and respecting the 'others' and mix with people from all races and backgrounds and not end up branding anybody as an 'other'.Mothering a Muslim is a timely work and must be read by one and all. Irrespective of their religious or communal belief systems. The book offers a balcony view of the effect of marginalization of a race based on speculation and misplaced hatred.The book is a must-read for all parents, parents of 'other kids', and of course, every Indian. This spectacularly written and exhaustively researched book is a timely intervention for our troubled times when one has to wear our nationalistic pride on our sleeves else face discrimination.Now, coming to the prettier facts. The book has a delightful yet simple cover. The editing is watertight and there are absolutely no typos (can't/won't expect it in any book from Juggernaut) and the font is perfect. The book is divided into seven different chapters, an epilogue, and an Appendix section including three sub-sections. Overall rating: 9.5/10Ease of reading (on a scale of 1-10): 9Look and feel: 10This book was sent to me by the Publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Pragya
    January 1, 1970
    Sort of a book reviewI have just finished reading this book and I am agitated and sleep deprived. Having inadvertently being brought up in the most seluar environment in the 1980 and 90s where your friends were just friends never a religion,where people of other religions and caste became a part of my immediate and extended family and got addressed as Mami or Jijaji or bhabhi, where when the babri masjid fell , I as a 13 yr old was told by her father that it should not have been done, it was unf Sort of a book reviewI have just finished reading this book and I am agitated and sleep deprived. Having inadvertently being brought up in the most seluar environment in the 1980 and 90s where your friends were just friends never a religion,where people of other religions and caste became a part of my immediate and extended family and got addressed as Mami or Jijaji or bhabhi, where when the babri masjid fell , I as a 13 yr old was told by her father that it should not have been done, it was unfathomable for me that children as young as 6 yr old were capable of uttering the sentiments of ' otherness' without even realising that they are doing so. And then came along this book. As I read, I realised, how wrong I was to think that a 7 yr old saying ' I hate Muslims' is is a one off instance. It's rather a manifestation of a deep rooted and widely prevalent mentality among the kids of the Hindu famalies that pick this sentiments from around them... Parents, famalies, schools , media. You name it and it's there. Nazia Erum ,in this book, delves into breaking the myth that Islamophobia occurs only in non urban and economically weaker sections. From the prestigious Daly college in Indore to the non mainstream schools like shikshantar and Sanskriti to DPS, class room bullying has taken place in each one of these reputed institutions. The book is well researched and highlights, in my view , one of the most important issues that our country is facing. The threat to Secularism. And this threat doesn't necessarily come through fringe elements like Karni Sena or gau raksha samiti. From a 5 yr old being called a Paki to a 12 yr old being told to go back to Pakistan. A 10 yr old delebrately not invited for a birthday party to a college student's bag being checked every day.. the stories made me cry and remind me of my upper caste privileged background that has prevented me from religious bullying. The stories are scan the various generations and you notice a trend of harmless jokes on Islam ( like the ones on sardars) and Muslims to more pronounced feeling of alinnation and misplaced anger. ' when there is one Muslim among 40 other non muslim students, there is no threat, how then a handful of Muslim students in a class of non muslim students suddenly become a threat ?' This and many such lines in the book shake you to the core and make you look inward for your own biases. This book is in no way geared towars any sustainable solutions, though in the annexure it does talk about small steps that school authorities can do to foster more secularism. However I do wish that Nazia had dived slightly deeper in talking about the perperators of the playground dynamics... The parents and the media. A book that I would highly recommend to anyone who has a child or interacts with one . Mothering a Muslim is a leasson in ingraning empathy and love for your fellow humans.
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  • Nitin Vadher
    January 1, 1970
    Why I love to read non-fiction is that it shows the reality, this book Mothering a Muslim is really an alarming, true situation of Muslim’s in Metro and urban area’s of India is perfectly presented by the author. Athithi Devo Bhava is followed by Indians for centuries, but for last 3-5 years situation has changed especially for Muslim’s because of the Gujarat riot and influence of ISIS in India.According to my view we can’t blame the politics, it’s because of the Muslim Jihadist, the whole commu Why I love to read non-fiction is that it shows the reality, this book Mothering a Muslim is really an alarming, true situation of Muslim’s in Metro and urban area’s of India is perfectly presented by the author. Athithi Devo Bhava is followed by Indians for centuries, but for last 3-5 years situation has changed especially for Muslim’s because of the Gujarat riot and influence of ISIS in India.According to my view we can’t blame the politics, it’s because of the Muslim Jihadist, the whole community has to suffer, even urban Muslims’ are afraid of their own peoples for not following their rules. It’s just mentioned by the author on page no 73 that a thirteen year old boy was brain washed by their mullah that when a boy started to grow mustache he should visit masjid everyday, also for a women if her head is uncovered or sleeves aren’t full their own people will reject her as a Muslim. Today’s news papers and also channels provide such news which targets particular community and they have to suffer. Although author accepts the reality by mentioning that 95% terror attack in 2015 were done by ISIS which is organized by Muslim. I still remember when I was studying in school many Borah Muslims were in our class, they are still our good friends, we used to share our lunch box and never heard anyone bullied them. What is mentioned in the book is severe in metros and urban areas but there is good harmony in tier 3 cities and villages of India. One incident which is mentioned in the book is very alarming for the future of India i.e. Muslim children’s refuses to enter Mandir, and Hindu children’s in Masjid or Dargah, actually parents should teach their child that both the communities are living in harmony for centuries in India, and this types of activities should not be tolerated by them.What I didn’t like in the book: Those who have been interviewed have targeted Modi government and their (Muslim’s) situation after Gujarat riot and recent events. A particular BJP government if framed by the author, which is not healthy for the book. I would like to say Congress has ruled many decades after Independence, also 93’s bomb blast, where Hindus and Muslim’s both were affected but author has not mentioned in her book. Although I highly recommend this book to today’s parents and teachers of India, and really appreciate the work of debut author.I got this book from Juggernaut publication, a big thank you for providing this wonderful book for an honest review.
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  • Anamitra Debnath
    January 1, 1970
    Product detailsHardcover: 248 pagesPublisher: Juggernaut (15 December 2017)Language: EnglishISBN-10: 938622853XISBN-13: 978-9386228536Package Dimensions: 20 x 13.2 x 3.2 cmWhat is this book all about?Nazia Erum runs a fashion start-up, and is the mother of an adorable little girl. But from the day Myra was born, she found herself asking questions she didn’t have answers for. It began with her daughter’s name – should Nazia choose a traditional Islamic name or a more non-religious sounding one so Product detailsHardcover: 248 pagesPublisher: Juggernaut (15 December 2017)Language: EnglishISBN-10: 938622853XISBN-13: 978-9386228536Package Dimensions: 20 x 13.2 x 3.2 cmWhat is this book all about?Nazia Erum runs a fashion start-up, and is the mother of an adorable little girl. But from the day Myra was born, she found herself asking questions she didn’t have answers for. It began with her daughter’s name – should Nazia choose a traditional Islamic name or a more non-religious sounding one so that her daughter couldn’t be identified as a Muslim? Nazia was not the only modern middleclass Muslim asking this question. Soon she discovered that finding the right name for Myra was the least of her worries. Talking to over 100 children and their parents across 12 cities, what Nazia uncovers is deeply troubling. She heard stories of rampant bullying of Muslim children in many of the country’s top schools, of six-year-olds being hit by their classmates because of their faith, of religious segregation in classrooms and of anxious Muslim parents across the country who monitor their children’s dress, speech and actions to protect them. In Mothering a Muslim, she finally lifts the veil on this taboo subject, one that is spoken of only in whispers. Urgent, gripping and heartbreaking, this is essential reading for every Indian.ReviewThis book has been a eye-opener for me. I am very shocked and surprised that the kids of the younger age are treated so badly and even the adults are not spared. Children who do not understand the harsh reality and the politics power play are dragged into the unnecessary stuff which has negative impact on them. We need to make sure that Muslim children should lead a happy and good life. Muslim mothers also should not be a victim of the same thing with their children. We need to make sure that the children should be inculcating the right ideas. Bullying and Ragging is a serious issue. We also need to educate our children that everyone should be treated equally and should not be biased towards anyone. The author has done a commendable job in terms of writing and has explained what situations they go through.VerdictA very good book which is a must read. I personally recommend this book to all the parents and teachers of India, and really appreciate the work of the debut author.Rating: 5*/5
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  • Yash Sharma
    January 1, 1970
    The story of the other side : The muslims of India---------------------------------------------------------------1) Mothering a Muslim, is a collection of stories of various Indian Muslim families and how their childrens being bullied in schools and colleges because of their religion.2) These families shared their experiences with the author,that how their children being called as Pakistanis, terrorist and other types of communal bullying because of their religion.3) And the families which share The story of the other side : The muslims of India---------------------------------------------------------------1) Mothering a Muslim, is a collection of stories of various Indian Muslim families and how their childrens being bullied in schools and colleges because of their religion.2) These families shared their experiences with the author,that how their children being called as Pakistanis, terrorist and other types of communal bullying because of their religion.3) And the families which shared their experiences with us are not from economically backward section, Infact they all belongs to the upper-middle class, and their children studied in the elite schools  and still they faced the discrimination, and it's not only their classmates who called them as pakis, talibs, but there are some  teachers also who shows their anti-muslim attitude in the classroom.4) Although the writer only covered the Muslim families and shared their experiences with us, it would be better if she also talked to those non-muslim families, where someone from the family has converted to islam, and later because of this how the society treats them and their children, because the latter were also called as Pakistanis by the society.5) But still kudos to the author for writing a book on this issue, it shows how much divided we all are, Infact we all are culprits, and education alone will not solve this problem, we all have to take collective action against this third-class mentality, where people bully anyone because of their caste, Creed, religion, language, food habits etc6) The language of the book is very easy to read, and I will surely recommend this book to the Readers, although bakhts, pseduo-seculars, hyper-nationalist, may get offended after reading this book, but still anyone who thinks herself/himself as an Indian can go for this book.My Ratings : ⭐⭐⭐⭐ ( 4/5 )I hope you like the review, thanks for reading, Jai Hind
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  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    In every class, there is that one ‘popular’ kid, who does well academically, is decent in sports and who’s also ‘nice’. He is the kid teachers depend on and who the other kids look upto. In my son’s class, that kid happens to be Muslim. I can’t imagine anybody being nasty to him, and I picked up the book because I wanted to see for myself if Islamphobia was so entrenched that even he could be a victim of it. Having read the book, I realise that I should be aware of the existence of a world beyon In every class, there is that one ‘popular’ kid, who does well academically, is decent in sports and who’s also ‘nice’. He is the kid teachers depend on and who the other kids look upto. In my son’s class, that kid happens to be Muslim. I can’t imagine anybody being nasty to him, and I picked up the book because I wanted to see for myself if Islamphobia was so entrenched that even he could be a victim of it. Having read the book, I realise that I should be aware of the existence of a world beyond my own idealistic one and I should be prepared to speak up whenever required.
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  • Nikhil Kumar
    January 1, 1970
    I found the experiences of Muslim children and parents in schools and communities - mixed and of upper middle class - shared in this book frightening. Their testimonies left me ashamed as a citizen. If the communal tensions have invaded our schools, as they evidently have, we really need to think about they way we are going forward as a society. This choking atmosphere which kids face today - of constantly proving their patriotism and of constantly proving their 'Muslimness' too - will stifle th I found the experiences of Muslim children and parents in schools and communities - mixed and of upper middle class - shared in this book frightening. Their testimonies left me ashamed as a citizen. If the communal tensions have invaded our schools, as they evidently have, we really need to think about they way we are going forward as a society. This choking atmosphere which kids face today - of constantly proving their patriotism and of constantly proving their 'Muslimness' too - will stifle their lives and ours for much worse.
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  • Farheen Fatima
    January 1, 1970
    Bullying in itself is a sensitive topic, and when it comes on religious lines , it makes matters worse. The book is based on the author’s interaction with more than 100 Muslim families with school going children. Sensitively handled, while putting across the point in a hard hitting manner. Must read for everyone.
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  • Chinmaya Lal
    January 1, 1970
    With extensive field research and survey of more than a hundred families, Nazia Erum has produced a very good book that reflects on the relation between religion and education in contemporary India. Specifically, the context detailed in the work is of young Muslim children in some well-known schools in and around Delhi. Working with examples drawn from interviews and interactions with several Muslim mothers, Erum argues that schools and playgrounds are increasingly becoming polarized spaces wher With extensive field research and survey of more than a hundred families, Nazia Erum has produced a very good book that reflects on the relation between religion and education in contemporary India. Specifically, the context detailed in the work is of young Muslim children in some well-known schools in and around Delhi. Working with examples drawn from interviews and interactions with several Muslim mothers, Erum argues that schools and playgrounds are increasingly becoming polarized spaces where the religious identity of their wards is repeatedly evoked in a mostly insulting manner. Such bullying, social marking, and prejudice complicates the manner in which children usually mature to have a certain subjectivity for themselves and makes them conscious of their identity as belonging to a specific religious group at a very, very young age. There are three specific things that I find particularly noteworthy in Erum's book. One, that she is able to link the many instances of bullying and regressive stereotyping of young Muslim children in different educational institutions to the rise of conservative politics in and around the world where the burden of demonstrating patriotism mostly falls on those from the minority and vulnerable sections of the society. Two, that Erum realises that religious discrimination produces a certain kind of complex in the minds of most of the children exposed to it and it forces them to re-orient themselves in their understanding of the world that they live in. They have to (re)evaluate all the people and situations they encounter in terms of their recently acquired awareness that they are Muslims. Third, distinct from a certain strand of scholarship on the relationship between education and religion and the situation of the minority subject therein, Erum's book also turns the critical gaze inward into the Muslim community itself and bravely points out that accompanying the Islamophobia in the world outside the Muslim family is a streak of conservatism that forces individuals within to ask if, on their own, they are Muslim enough. Such a streak of conservatism that itself sticks to and forces others to adhere to a particular definition of being Muslim in contemporary India is, as Erum recognises, perhaps as dangerous as Islamophobia that seems to be widespread anyway.
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  • Ritu Mantri
    January 1, 1970
    India, right from her independence had witnessed many deadly communal riots between Hindu and Muslims. Irrespective of differences, mutual harmony was always restored. But now, according to the research of Nazia Erum in her book, Mothering a Muslim this communal differences have entered into the schools and Indian Muslims children are targeted and bullied for their religion by referring them as Pakistani and terrorist.This is a very serious issue and a matter of great concern in respect of the f India, right from her independence had witnessed many deadly communal riots between Hindu and Muslims. Irrespective of differences, mutual harmony was always restored. But now, according to the research of Nazia Erum in her book, Mothering a Muslim this communal differences have entered into the schools and Indian Muslims children are targeted and bullied for their religion by referring them as Pakistani and terrorist.This is a very serious issue and a matter of great concern in respect of the future of the country. We are a secular nation and bigotry and intolerance is not acceptable. We, as parents, certainly can't do much about the hate speech of politicians, but can definitely curtail it's venom spreading in our drawing rooms.The book also gives insight into the Muslim community and the author's analysis. Liberal Muslims are always in a dilemma whether to live according to conservative rules or embrace change and go with the flow. Dilemma while selecting the name for their child which should be socially acceptable. And how Indian Muslims are adopting and practicing more radical form of Islam after coming under the influence of Gulf and Middle East countries.I completely empathize with the author, but I really don't agree with the author blaming Modi and BJP for increasing Islamophobia incidents in India. The atrocities of Taliban and other religious fanatic groups are responsible for the increasing hatred towards the Muslim community. I have heard of similar incidents happening in the USA after the destruction of World Trade Centre on 11th September 2001 killing more than 2000 innocents. Islamophobia is not just in India. It is present, little or more, everywhere in the world and I strongly believe religious fanatics like the Taliban and similar jihadists groups are responsible for it. So why to zero on Modi and BJP.
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  • Ragini
    January 1, 1970
    For a detailed review, please visit: https://www.raginipuri.com/2018/04/bo...In Mothering a Muslim, the author talks about Islamophobia, claiming how Muslim children in many top Indian schools are being bullied and are being called terrorist and Pakistani, because of their religion. She blames it all on the present government and the anti-Muslim sentiments in the society post-2014. She laments how she has no answers to the difficult the children ask – about religion, about Pakistan, about terror For a detailed review, please visit: https://www.raginipuri.com/2018/04/bo...In Mothering a Muslim, the author talks about Islamophobia, claiming how Muslim children in many top Indian schools are being bullied and are being called terrorist and Pakistani, because of their religion. She blames it all on the present government and the anti-Muslim sentiments in the society post-2014. She laments how she has no answers to the difficult the children ask – about religion, about Pakistan, about terrorism, etc. At one point in the book, she also wonders if she was unnecessarily paranoid about the whole issue.Well, to some extent, the book really reads like a projection of author’s paranoia and her insecurities about her Muslim identity. She talks about Muslim community’s internal issues and the haraam police (community’s elders, the moral police basically) who sit on their moral high horse and judge others, and herein she gives away her frustrations about the rigidities in her religion. But coming back to the basic premise of the book – about Muslim children being bullied by their non-Muslim peers – observations are all myopic and one dimensional. There are no thoughts on Islamist terrorism across the world, no comment at all about Islamist fundamentalism, no opinion at all about why terrorism has become so deeply associated with the word Islam. Mothering a Muslim also lacks a parallel take on what a modern Hindu family with a school-going child feels about the so-called anti-Islam sentiment in schools.Moreover, the book has lots of poor analogies, inciting remarks and random observations that check-mate some earlier observation by the author. In all, nothing in this book registers other than the strong in-your-face anti-Modi/ anti-BJP sentiments.
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  • Gopesh P
    January 1, 1970
    The Worst book ever read. Totally senseless comments and observations. A one-sided work without any mention of the reasons for such incidents. The author should ask self why such incidents happen in the society?
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