My Brother's Husband, Volume 2
The concluding volume in the story of Yaichi, his daughter Kana, and how their meeting Mike Flanagan--Yaichi's brother-in-law--changes their lives and perceptions of acceptance of homosexuality in their contemporary Japanese culture.As Mike continues his journey of discovery concerning Ryoji's past, Yaichi gradually comes to understand that being gay is just another way of being human. And that, in many ways, remains a radical concept in Japan even today. In the meantime, the bond between Mike and young Kana grows ever stronger, and yet he is going to have to return to Canada soon--a fact that fills them both with impending heartbreak. But not before more than a few revelations come to light.

My Brother's Husband, Volume 2 Details

TitleMy Brother's Husband, Volume 2
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 18th, 2018
PublisherPantheon Books
ISBN-139781101871539
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Manga, Graphic Novels, LGBT, Comics, Fiction

My Brother's Husband, Volume 2 Review

  • Joce (squibblesreads)
    January 1, 1970
    SO GOOD IM CRYING. Gonna buy this for my collection and I rarely buy graphic novels because they’re just so damn expensive but omg it’s amazing.
  • April (Aprilius Maximus)
    January 1, 1970
    I AM CRYING IN THE CLUB RIGHT NOW
  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    The second of two volumes essentially about a family in grief. Yaichi loses his identical brother, Ryoji, and he also becomes divorced, in a relatively short period. The death and grieving are complicated by the fact that he and his brother were estranged, for reasons that begin to be clear in the first volume: Yaichi has never fully understood or accepted anything about his brother being gay. Yaichi also has a little daughter, Kana. One day his brother’s husband, Mike, a big bearish Canadian, s The second of two volumes essentially about a family in grief. Yaichi loses his identical brother, Ryoji, and he also becomes divorced, in a relatively short period. The death and grieving are complicated by the fact that he and his brother were estranged, for reasons that begin to be clear in the first volume: Yaichi has never fully understood or accepted anything about his brother being gay. Yaichi also has a little daughter, Kana. One day his brother’s husband, Mike, a big bearish Canadian, shows up at his door to visit. In the first volume there are uncomfortable moments in the first volume as we see that Yaichi, while not exactly shunning his brother, had been (quietly) bigoted. Mike is great, very likeable and always positive, and Kana also his very accepting and loving. The two of them form a bond that makes Yaichi consider his own actions.In the concluding volume Kana is the same irrepressible kid we love, and Mike remains who is, but Yaichi changes, as a kind of model for us of acceptance. This is a quietly and not unexpectedly positive, but still moving, volume where small, good things happen (I mean there is not a lot of drama); for instance, Yaichi confronts Kana’s homeroom teacher about protecting her from bullying because she has a gay uncle. In the process it is Yaichi who educates the teacher. In another scene, Yaichi’s ex points out that they have become a family—a divorced couple who love their daughter together, including now the husband of their lost brother and uncle. Okay, so what if I’m crying, shut up.Gengoroh Tagame's Goodreads biography tells us “he is a Japanese manga artist who specializes in gay BDSM erotic manga, many of which depict graphic violence. The men he depicts are hypermasculine, and tend to be on the bearish side.” Mike fits this category, but in no other sense would this sweet tale appear (I haven't read any of the rest of it) to be typical of Tagame’s work, which was meant for a particular gay audience. As I see it, this may be primarily written for a straight or cis-gendered audience, who are essentially Yaichi, learning to appreciate what it might mean to be gay in Japanese—or any other—society. Mike has lost his husband, the love of his life. Ryoji has lost his brother. Part of his grieving involves learning to accept and love the man his brother loved, and to accept him as loving and losing as he has loved and lost his brother (and wife, to some extent). My Brother’s Husband is about grief, but it’s also about love, which knows no boundaries.
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  • Krista Regester
    January 1, 1970
    Wish 👏 there 👏 was 👏 another 👏 one.
  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    It took a while for me to get into the second and final volume of Gengoroh Tagame’s superb series, My Brother’s Husband, because not a whole lot initially happens (the whole onsen episode). And, really, not much happens afterwards either - in that regard, this feels like a superfluous book. Yaichi has accepted his dead brother Ryoji’s homosexuality and he and his daughter Kana have become friends with his brother-in-law, burly Canadian bear Mike - that’s the arc and it was done by the end of Vol It took a while for me to get into the second and final volume of Gengoroh Tagame’s superb series, My Brother’s Husband, because not a whole lot initially happens (the whole onsen episode). And, really, not much happens afterwards either - in that regard, this feels like a superfluous book. Yaichi has accepted his dead brother Ryoji’s homosexuality and he and his daughter Kana have become friends with his brother-in-law, burly Canadian bear Mike - that’s the arc and it was done by the end of Volume 1. Still, there’s so many feels later on in this book that, even if it does seem a little unnecessary, it’s impossible not to like. Seeing Yaichi, Kana and Mike’s relationship blossom further is heart-warming and Yaichi continues to grow as a person. From someone who turned his back on his brother for being gay, he’s now sticking up for Mike after a schoolteacher is alarmed that Kana’s uncle is living, what is still in Japan, a taboo lifestyle. And Yaichi seeing the photos of his brother’s wedding and how his bigotry led him to miss out on such an important occasion - *bawls*!That whole final half is one long sob-fest so fair warning, guys. Mike listening to the closeted gay kid and giving him advice, Yaichi taking Mike to his parents’ graves, Mike saying his goodbyes to both Kana and Yaichi individually - this manga is all heart. My Brother’s Husband, Volume 2 is a bit overlong with a slow beginning but Gengoroh Tagame’s crafted a modern masterpiece with this series. Here’s hoping the real audience for this title - close-minded Japanese - learn to become more accepting and loving like Yaichi. Nothing good ever came from prejudice.
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  • Greta
    January 1, 1970
    The second volume of this Manga was much more restrained than the first installment that felt too didactic, yet delved deeper into the difficulties and discomfort with which homosexuals are being faced and the awkward self-consciousness they feel due to the constant social and moral shunning by their straight fellow man. A book with a heart and a voice.
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  • Richard Derus
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4* of fiveThe Publisher Says: The concluding volume in the story of Yaichi, his daughter Kana, and how their meeting Mike Flanagan--Yaichi's brother-in-law--changes their lives and perceptions of acceptance of homosexuality in their contemporary Japanese culture.As Mike continues his journey of discovery concerning Ryoji's past, Yaichi gradually comes to understand that being gay is just another way of being human. And that, in many ways, remains a radical concept in Japan even today. In Rating: 4* of fiveThe Publisher Says: The concluding volume in the story of Yaichi, his daughter Kana, and how their meeting Mike Flanagan--Yaichi's brother-in-law--changes their lives and perceptions of acceptance of homosexuality in their contemporary Japanese culture.As Mike continues his journey of discovery concerning Ryoji's past, Yaichi gradually comes to understand that being gay is just another way of being human. And that, in many ways, remains a radical concept in Japan even today. In the meantime, the bond between Mike and young Kana grows ever stronger, and yet he is going to have to return to Canada soon--a fact that fills them both with impending heartbreak. But not before more than a few revelations come to light.SECOND VOLUME IN SERIES BEGUN IN MY BROTHER'S HUSBAND vol. 1My Review: Yaichi's gay twin, Ryuji, married Canadian bear Mike after emigrating to escape his repressive, hidebound culture. He promised, swore!, he would have his twin—his only remaining family—know Mike as his husband. Then, as is the way with sworn promises, Ryuji died. Mike, to make his dearly beloved husband's promise come true, visits Yaichi and his daughter Kana in their home.We pick up the story in medias res, this being a two-volume omnibus edition of the manga. Yaichi, a lovely man (for legal purposes), has his most acute attack of the collywobbles yet. Mike mentions that it's possible Kana will be a lesbian. These two pages made me laugh so hard I almost choked: Poor Yaichi! What's a traditional Japanese father to think? My daughter with a woman?! HEEELLLP!!!!The rest of the story is Yaichi coming to value and care for Mike, whose love for his brother is strong. They've lost so much, they've got to come to peace with each other. Mike has no problem with this, since he's been out a long time; Yaichi finds himself saddened that he didn't try harder to connect with Ryuji while he was alive because now he can't. All while being a divorced custodial dad to a little girl. Who has fallen utterly in love with her big Canadian bear-uncle.A very telling scene comes when Mike goes to Kana's school, to be met with hostility and suspicion. It's really amusing at first because Mike doesn't see it, but it becomes a major Thing between Yaichi and his inner demons. It provides Yaichi with a chance to work through what he thinks about Mike's gayness and what Japan as a whole thinks about gayness. The men resolve their desire to be close to each other over a look at Mike's photo album, including wedding pictures. Yaichi realizes how much he will miss Mike as he's about to leave, and Kana asks for a sworn promise that Mike will visit again, or she gets to come to Canada to visit Mike.And now I venture into personal territory. My Young Gentleman Caller, Rob, is 34 (thirty-four) years younger than I am. We might as well be Canadian and Japanese, since I understand his culture about as well as he does mine. The Moon landing was 50 years ago. I remember it vividly. I had to YouTube footage for Rob, who had sort-of heard about it. His FATHER was born two years after it happened. So we both relate to the "...say what now?" moments between Yaichi and Mike.We talked at some length about the way it feels to be so different from someone you care very much about, and how that puts strains on one's inner sense of peace and quiet. We both worry about the other's feelings being hurt when we're being our separate selves...we both worry about the way our beloved handles the need we have to be understood. Am I trying hard enough, too hard, do I even know what he means? And it was this manga that called that conversation into being. If you don't read the series for any other reason, read it for that one. It is good enough to start a life-altering conversation between people too different to know where or how to begin to do that for themselves. THAT's good storytelling!Also! Extra! May the US be blessed with the live-action TV series! Here's a promo photo of the amazing casting:
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  • Raeleen Lemay
    January 1, 1970
    I WANT MORE but I’m happy with the way this wrapped up. I love this little series!
  • Miriam
    January 1, 1970
    Don't wait on that rapprochement with your family member. If you delay it may be too late.(This isn't the main point, but it is a point, possibly the one with the widest scope of application.)
  • Jananie (thisstoryaintover)
    January 1, 1970
    just heart eyes for this series cuz it's the most precious thing on the planet <3
  • Eloise
    January 1, 1970
    Excuse me while I go cry in the corner because this volume was utter perfection.
  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    Vol. 1 ★★★★★Vol. 2 ★★★★★Do you have any idea how painful it is to go through a 352-page manga trying not to cry? 😭I adored this manga series so, so much, and I'm totally heartbroken that it's over already. I wanted so much more time with Yaichi and Kana and Mike, and I loved every single interaction between them all. They're the most wonderful, precious little family, and watching Yaichi grow so much over this three-week span with Mike in his home? It was everything. ♥
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  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I got choked up a couple times reading this gentle book about recognizing and confronting homophobia in yourself and others. Highly recommended.
  • Martin
    January 1, 1970
    The conclusion of Yiachi and Kana's story.What can I say?I definitely know how this story continues in my head...5 stars!!!
  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    Heartwarming and filled with fluff. I wish this series would continue on, but it seems to have come to a bittersweet end.
  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't enjoy this volume as much as the first one because I don't think it had a hard-hitting moment which shaped the story. I still really liked it though, the family dynamic is excellent and the message is so beautiful. The characters and art are wonderful. It was a lovely ending to the series. Very wholesome!
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    Volume 2 continues the story directly from Volume 1, still during Mike's three week visit to Japan. The themes are overcoming stereotypes and building family, and it was a pleasure to read. I was sent this by the publisher last year.
  • ❄️Nani❄️
    January 1, 1970
    So deep and heartfelt.
  • Stewart Tame
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely! Now I'm all teary eyed, but in a good way. My Brother's Husband is the story of Yaichi, a single father raising his young daughter Kana. His brother Ryoji died recently. Yaichi and his brother hadn't spoken in a long time. He knows that Ryoji came out as gay and moved to Canada years ago, and that he’d gotten married to another man. And then Mike Flanagan shows up on his doorstep, intending to meet his husband's family and see where he grew up …This is a story that's as big and welcoming Lovely! Now I'm all teary eyed, but in a good way. My Brother's Husband is the story of Yaichi, a single father raising his young daughter Kana. His brother Ryoji died recently. Yaichi and his brother hadn't spoken in a long time. He knows that Ryoji came out as gay and moved to Canada years ago, and that he’d gotten married to another man. And then Mike Flanagan shows up on his doorstep, intending to meet his husband's family and see where he grew up …This is a story that's as big and welcoming and fuzzy as Mike Flanagan himself. He’s a big Canadian teddy bear of a man. Kana loves him at first sight. Yaichi is reserved but polite. This manga is all about Yaichi sorting through his feelings about LGBTQ people and his brother in particular. There's no real hatred or anything, just a lot of things he never really thought about before. It's about tuning in on an aspect of life that he’d overlooked before.This is honestly one of the best LGBTQ themed comics I’ve ever read. Gengoroh Tagame has a knack for capturing the subtlest facial expressions. The whole sequence where Yaichi is talking with one of Kana’s teachers is just amazing in how well it captures the nuances of their exchange. The artwork reminds me in some ways of Tim Barela’s Leonard & Larry books--both artists draw impressively beefy bearded men. I’m definitely keen to check out more of Tagame’s work (and yes, I understand that it's generally more adult-oriented.) Highly recommended!
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favourite manga series EVER!! This is such a heartwarming, poignant and very sweet story. Everyone should read this!RTC
  • Marta
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely conclusion to the two-part series and Yaichi’s transformation. He comes to accept Mike, different relationships, and makes peace with his dead brother’s memory. Kana, Mike and Yaichi become a family unit who stand up for each other. There are many important conversations,but my favorite parts were all the wonderful food, everyday pleasures, and the joy of spending time together as a family. Lovely art and character designs.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    I love this manga so much. Volume 2 picks off where volume 1 ends and completes this wonderful story of love, acceptance, and family. After his husband Ryoji dies, Mike travels from Canada to Japan to meet his husband’s identical twin brother, Yaichi. Though estranged from his brother, Yaichi let’s Mike live with him and his daughter, Kana, over the next three weeks. This story explores Yaichi’s grief over his brother’s death and the shame of separation when his brother came out. In these books I love this manga so much. Volume 2 picks off where volume 1 ends and completes this wonderful story of love, acceptance, and family. After his husband Ryoji dies, Mike travels from Canada to Japan to meet his husband’s identical twin brother, Yaichi. Though estranged from his brother, Yaichi let’s Mike live with him and his daughter, Kana, over the next three weeks. This story explores Yaichi’s grief over his brother’s death and the shame of separation when his brother came out. In these books several side characters round out the story of a really loving world with Yaichi’s ex-wife (Kana’s mother), a former friend of Ryoji, and classmates of Kana.This book is pure delight. It deals with some big themes and issues in a very gentle way. The book is charming in its drawings, sometimes without dialogue, just the family sitting, eating, and traveling together. Several moments are very funny and I laughed out loud reading them. The book has so much food, that it’s almost a primer on Japanese cuisine. In some ways this feels very much aims towards the outside world as an introduction to Japanese culture, as Mike is introduced to Japan. I am interested in how this was received in Japan. At several points characters make reference how closeted Japanese culture is and I would like to know more about the Japanese gay experience. However, this story is not that. It is a beautiful story of what makes a family and I think people of all ages will love it. If you’ve never read manga, this is a good place to start. • Hardcover • Fiction - Graphic Novel • ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ • I received this from my partner for my birthday.▪️
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  • Shelby M. (Read and Find Out)
    January 1, 1970
    FAVORITE DUOLOGY EVER
  • Joshua
    January 1, 1970
    This little book broke my sweet gay heart. I can't even begin to say how much I enjoyed this book.While a stormy narrative filled with conflict, Tagame is able to tell a beautiful story about a man recognizing that he has been possessed and driven by the homophobia of his culture. When his brother's husband, a burly Canadian named Mike, appears wanting to know him better he begins to recognize that he was not emotional support for his brother. This second volume then follows Yaichi as he and his This little book broke my sweet gay heart. I can't even begin to say how much I enjoyed this book.While a stormy narrative filled with conflict, Tagame is able to tell a beautiful story about a man recognizing that he has been possessed and driven by the homophobia of his culture. When his brother's husband, a burly Canadian named Mike, appears wanting to know him better he begins to recognize that he was not emotional support for his brother. This second volume then follows Yaichi as he and his daughter Kana welcome Mike into their home and this small story culminates with Yaichi realizing that he had nothing to fear from his brother being gay, or the possibility of his daughter being so.This story is about the conflict within the self and finding what you personally believe. Most importantly, it's a book which explores the dynamic of families and how, no matter what shape they form, they are worth holding onto because they give us emotional support through our worst moments.Gengoroh Tagame meditates on the homophobia of his home country but finds within it a possibility for change. The lives of LGBTQ people can be difficult, but Tagame offers his reader a hopeful vision where people can change their mind and live lives of happiness rather than shame. Such a book is beautiful and worth our time.
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  • Nore
    January 1, 1970
    While I still found it very obvious that this is a series drawn by a man who usually draws nothing but bara manga (leading to some slightly awkward scenes), you really can't hold that against the story. A bittersweet but heartwarming conclusion, with some fantastic character growth and a gentleness to the introspection that really invites the reader to think about what beliefs they may hold without even realizing it. I really hope this ends up popular enough in Japan that it helps along the chan While I still found it very obvious that this is a series drawn by a man who usually draws nothing but bara manga (leading to some slightly awkward scenes), you really can't hold that against the story. A bittersweet but heartwarming conclusion, with some fantastic character growth and a gentleness to the introspection that really invites the reader to think about what beliefs they may hold without even realizing it. I really hope this ends up popular enough in Japan that it helps along the changes that Tagame would obviously like to see.
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  • Andrew Reid
    January 1, 1970
    Shut up. I'm not crying, you're crying!
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    Slightly better than Volume 1.3.5 stars
  • Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)
    January 1, 1970
    4.0 Stars This is a super cute, bittersweet manga with a wonderful, positive message of acceptance. It was great to see so much character growth in the second volume of this duology.
  • Matthew Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    What a heartwarming conclusion! Hopefully, We get Kana and Yaichi's visit in Canada (for a future manga), but if we don't I'm happy to have known this two part series and I'm completely satisfied.
  • Charlos
    January 1, 1970
    A satisfying ending to the story arc, in a way that was not dull or obvious. "It" does not happen, if you were worried about it from the first volume. I liked the larger focus on the larger family in this volume.
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