Things That Make White People Uncomfortable
Super Bowl Champion and three-time Pro Bowler Michael Bennett is an outspoken proponent for social justice and a man without a censor.Michael Bennett is a Super Bowl Champion, a three time Pro Bowl defensive end, a fearless activist, a feminist, a grassroots philanthropist, an organizer, and a change maker. He's also one of the most scathingly humorous athletes on the planet, and he wants to make you uncomfortable.Bennett adds his unmistakable voice to discussions of racism and police violence, Black athletes and their relationship to powerful institutions like the NCAA and the NFL, the role of protest in history, and the responsibilities of athletes as role models to speak out against injustice. Following in the footsteps of activist-athletes from Muhammad Ali to Colin Kaepernick, Bennett demonstrates his outspoken leadership both on and off the field.Written with award-winning sportswriter and author Dave Zirin, Things that Make White People Uncomfortable is a sports book for our turbulent times, a memoir, and a manifesto as hilarious and engaging as it is illuminating.

Things That Make White People Uncomfortable Details

TitleThings That Make White People Uncomfortable
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 3rd, 2018
PublisherHaymarket Books
ISBN-139781608468935
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Biography, Cultural, African American, Race, Autobiography, Memoir, Politics

Things That Make White People Uncomfortable Review

  • Brad
    January 1, 1970
    Seattle Seahawk Pro Bowler Michael Bennett has an opinion on pretty much everything, and I loved reading every one of them. Just a look at the table of contents will give you a pretty good idea of what this book is about: The NCAA is some BS, NFL Reality, Without Food Your Ass is Doing to Die, Black Lives Matter, Intersectionality Also Matters, Our Daughters Are Changemakers, Athletes United. Michael Bennett boils complicated issues down into simple statements of decency. He pulls no punches and Seattle Seahawk Pro Bowler Michael Bennett has an opinion on pretty much everything, and I loved reading every one of them. Just a look at the table of contents will give you a pretty good idea of what this book is about: The NCAA is some BS, NFL Reality, Without Food Your Ass is Doing to Die, Black Lives Matter, Intersectionality Also Matters, Our Daughters Are Changemakers, Athletes United. Michael Bennett boils complicated issues down into simple statements of decency. He pulls no punches and calls bullshit on myriad corrupt, racist, and sexist systems. This guy has done serious work on himself as a human being and should be an inspiration to us all. Damn, I'd love to hang out with this guy. A quick read and highly recommended.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    As an NFL fan who sat during the anthem in solidarity with players like Bennett at the last NFL game I attended, I was hugely excited to be sent an ARC of this book to review. Part personal memoir, part political statement (and it isn't lost on me that how extremely sad it is that a black man standing up for the rights of minorities and women is a political statement instead of widely held and shared belief), Bennett's voice and his passion shine through. His message is an important one, and inc As an NFL fan who sat during the anthem in solidarity with players like Bennett at the last NFL game I attended, I was hugely excited to be sent an ARC of this book to review. Part personal memoir, part political statement (and it isn't lost on me that how extremely sad it is that a black man standing up for the rights of minorities and women is a political statement instead of widely held and shared belief), Bennett's voice and his passion shine through. His message is an important one, and incredibly timely. The day I finished this book was the day my library received our copies of the January 15th, 2018 issue of the New Yorker, with Bennett, Kaepernick, and MLK Jr. on the cover. It seemed very fitting.
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  • Andre
    January 1, 1970
    More like 3.5 REVIEW 👉🏾 Michael Bennett was a defensive end for the Seattle Seahawks, now of the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFL and is a thoughtful and conscious guy, fully woke. He has some thoughts he would like to share with the general public and this book is the result of his missions. Written with the very capable Dave Zirin. Dave has written other books with athletes, his book with Craig Hodges, Long Shot comes to mind. It was really his effort with that work, that led me to this one. He More like 3.5 REVIEW 👉🏾 Michael Bennett was a defensive end for the Seattle Seahawks, now of the Philadelphia Eagles in the NFL and is a thoughtful and conscious guy, fully woke. He has some thoughts he would like to share with the general public and this book is the result of his missions. Written with the very capable Dave Zirin. Dave has written other books with athletes, his book with Craig Hodges, Long Shot comes to mind. It was really his effort with that work, that led me to this one. He employs the same zippy smooth prose here in what is essentially Michael Bennett’s memoir. Michael gives the reader an inside look at an NFL locker room, a peek at big time college athletics-he played football at Texas A&M University-, and the life of a professional athlete including the journey to becoming that prominent professional in the big bad NFL. I am curious about the book’s title, because there is very little discussion about what he believes “makes white people uncomfortable.” Of course there is his full-throated support of Colin Kaepernick and Black Lives Matter movement. And he alludes to how these situations might cause discomfort for some, but he is never explicit in his writing about the discomforts. Perhaps the title is meant to convey that generally a Black athlete that has something to say, has more on his mind than just the game is what makes white people uncomfortable. Can’t be sure, but he certainly hasn’t said or done anything outlandish enough to be labeled as one who causes discomfort. Though Micheal surmises that coming out of Texas A&M he was saddled with the moniker of “difficult” leading to him being undrafted. That however actually proved to be a blessing in disguise, allowing him to choose from among several franchises where he should tryout. Michael talks about growing up in Texas, being very close to his younger brother, who is also a NFL player and partly his inspiration for being outspoken. He talks plenty about his outspokenness and how he developed his voice and the risks and consequences of having a voice that stands out from the crowd. He shares enough of his life and himself that makes this a very good read especially for sports fans and anyone wanting to know what it’s like to be a NFL professional. Thanks to Edelweiss and Haymarket Books for an advanced DRC. Book is on sale now.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.I'm going to be biased, I'm a good white liberal in Seattle and Michael Bennett is my favorite Seahawk, purely for his advocacy for literacy programs and his activism. (Also the bike ride.) I knew he was writing a book and I was excited to review it, as I know it's going to be a hot item here.Bennett (with the help of Dave Zirin) writes with a smart, funny, engaging voice about subjects he's clearly deeply invested in, namely food I received a copy from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.I'm going to be biased, I'm a good white liberal in Seattle and Michael Bennett is my favorite Seahawk, purely for his advocacy for literacy programs and his activism. (Also the bike ride.) I knew he was writing a book and I was excited to review it, as I know it's going to be a hot item here.Bennett (with the help of Dave Zirin) writes with a smart, funny, engaging voice about subjects he's clearly deeply invested in, namely food deserts, intersectionality, Black Lives Matter, and, to a lesser extent, football. Yes, there's some mentions of games that Seahawks fans will remember perfectly, but there's far more about the environment in the locker room and the support from Pete Carroll that makes the team so cohesive.Maybe it was just my DRC, but the writing and plotting felt a bit scattered, but nothing I can take a star off for. Bennett's passionate about his activism, and it's clear that he'll be an activist long after he leaves the NFL.
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  • Maurissa Mitchem
    January 1, 1970
    The “things that make white people uncomfortable” are subtlety addressed throughout. However, anyone who reads this should become uncomfortable and ask him/herself, “Am I doing enough for the betterment of my community, the community at large and mankind?” He challenges our tendency to believe that as long as “me and mine are fine” we’ve done enough, and are not morally or socially responsible to do something about the rampant injustices domestically and worldwide. A brilliantly combined memoir The “things that make white people uncomfortable” are subtlety addressed throughout. However, anyone who reads this should become uncomfortable and ask him/herself, “Am I doing enough for the betterment of my community, the community at large and mankind?” He challenges our tendency to believe that as long as “me and mine are fine” we’ve done enough, and are not morally or socially responsible to do something about the rampant injustices domestically and worldwide. A brilliantly combined memoir and call to action against social injustice.
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  • jeremy
    January 1, 1970
    but it's so much easier to talk shit than to do shit, because once you are out there representing what you believe, people see the real you. most everybody in the world wears a mask, and very rarely do people unveil who they really are. and i've done that. i'm naked here. so i'm going to be judged by strangers on the core of who i am, and, yes, that makes me vulnerable and it can even feel terrifying. former seattle seahawk defensive end (and now current philadelphia eagle!) michael bennett has but it's so much easier to talk shit than to do shit, because once you are out there representing what you believe, people see the real you. most everybody in the world wears a mask, and very rarely do people unveil who they really are. and i've done that. i'm naked here. so i'm going to be judged by strangers on the core of who i am, and, yes, that makes me vulnerable and it can even feel terrifying. former seattle seahawk defensive end (and now current philadelphia eagle!) michael bennett has racked up a number of accolades and accomplishments on the field (a super bowl ring, 3 pro bowls, pro bowl mvp), but his off-field outspokenness has garnered him just as much attention as his athletic feats. in things that make white people uncomfortable (written with sportswriter dave zirin), bennett recounts his time playing football for the ncaa and nfl, taking aim at the hypocrisy of each organization, before turning his attention pointedly at enduring racial injustice. certainly not one to pull punches, bennett offers a personal, reflective account (as human being, father, american, and pro athlete) of contending with dehumanization, marginalization, stereotyping, silencing, and delegitimization — as well as highlighting his ongoing work to help others, assist the less fortunate, support broader movements of inclusivity (there's a whole chapter called "intersectionality also matters"), and continuing self-education.bennett's candor and commitment to issues of fairness and justice are impressive to behold. it's evident that bennett both thinks and feels deeply and things that make white people uncomfortable comes across as both salvo and salve. whether addressing women's issues, food deserts, racial slurs, the black lives matter movement, and, perhaps most tellingly, forgiveness, bennett amply conveys his passion and knowledge. in an era where traditional role models seem to have forsaking their responsibility in favor of amassing ever more of that filthy lucre, michael bennett stands tally, boldly as an elder young people can strive to emulate. every american (football fan or otherwise) would benefit from a reading of things that make white people uncomfortable, wherein bennett makes plain the case for acknowledging and addressing the many systemic injustices still plaguing our society today. my parents raised me to challenge the system and to question facts when they are presented to me. you have to question the way things are, because curiosity is what drives the future. questions are the starting point for making any kind of change. this is how i approach the world, and this is how we are raising our daughters so their future can be whatever they want it to be.
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  • Victor
    January 1, 1970
    A fairly introductory primer to some of Michael Bennett's political and social justice thoughts. It's all told in a very conversational and entertaining style by Bennett himself. I'm not sure what Dave Zirin brought in. I recently read an interview with Zirin in The Jacobin that kind of alluded to some of the things he and Bennett talked about during the writing of this book. Because of that I expected a little more from this thing. Some points of the book had me questioning who this book would A fairly introductory primer to some of Michael Bennett's political and social justice thoughts. It's all told in a very conversational and entertaining style by Bennett himself. I'm not sure what Dave Zirin brought in. I recently read an interview with Zirin in The Jacobin that kind of alluded to some of the things he and Bennett talked about during the writing of this book. Because of that I expected a little more from this thing. Some points of the book had me questioning who this book would be for. Because I've already read books by Michelle Alexander and Angela Davis on mass incarceration, the sections where Bennett discussed that weren't really new to me. I'm also not sure how many people will read this book who don't already know a bit about Black Lives Matter, NFL players, mass incarceration, the Me Too movement, and others. Maybe there are Seahawks or Michael Bennett fans out there willing to read a book and learn about his views. I'm not sure!My favorite parts of the book, then, dealt more with Bennett himself and his insider view on how these movements have been received in the NFL. Reading about the Seahawks locker room and all the talks and debates the players had was very interesting. This was the more unique take I was excited for when I first started reading this book. Bennett is a very entertaining writer which really came through in the sections about the NFL and NCAA and the myriad problems of those leagues. I'm glad they were included. Bennett is definitely onto something in the chapter on Athletes for Impact about the collective power of athletes. He is also a big proponent for intersectionality among the disparate oppressed groups.
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  • Lupine
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent. I don't care one whit about football (and indeed I skipped over parts that were too football-y for me) and, in fact, I admit I really only vaguely knew who Michael Bennett is when I started it. But I'll say this, I am now a huge fan of this human who works for change and understanding and isn't afraid to stand up for what he believes. This book is inspiring, thought provoking and made me teary-eyed more than once.
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  • Michael Linsner
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Bennett's book is touching, eye-opening and tear-inspiring. Overall it's an homage to what we can be, as a global society. People standing together out of love, not fear, to break down that which oppresses and deprives some many around us.Highly recommended. It'll inspire you, motivate you, and make you thankful for the opportunity to make a positive change in the world around you.
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  • Patricia
    January 1, 1970
    Damn! Wow!It is not often that I want to write an author a letter of gratitude.This book woke me up and also rang true with some of the thingsthat I have observed about professional and college sports. I think Mr. Bennett is amazing and I want him to be very careful while hecontinues to fight for what he believes in.
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  • Kimberley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Haymarket and Edelweiss for the opportunity to read an eGalley of Things That Make White People Uncomfortable.This book is less about what makes “white people uncomfortable”, than it is the ideas and ideals of a man who has spent his life trying to navigate the roads and road blocks of being a black man in America. Bennett has made a living on the football field, but it’s clear his experience as an NFL and college player influenced his desire to become an activist—both organizations Thank you to Haymarket and Edelweiss for the opportunity to read an eGalley of Things That Make White People Uncomfortable.This book is less about what makes “white people uncomfortable”, than it is the ideas and ideals of a man who has spent his life trying to navigate the roads and road blocks of being a black man in America. Bennett has made a living on the football field, but it’s clear his experience as an NFL and college player influenced his desire to become an activist—both organizations have a long way to go to become more humane and less barbarian. The book itself doesn’t offer new insight into the Black Lives Matter movement, nor will it appease those who are still looking for a reason behind Colin Kaepernick’s silent protest. Honestly, most of what Bennett talks about will only surprise and shock those who haven’t bothered to remain informed about sociocultural issues. He does offer some insight into his family, and the importance of fatherhood, but overall it’s a book about a man with a utopian vision for the future: he really believes change is possible if people start to open their minds and respect each other’s differences. Overall, it was a pretty good read, but because I am up on many of the issues he speaks on, it easily became repetitive for me towards the end.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    Best for: Anyone interested in a compelling story about how a professional athlete lives his values.In a nutshell: Former (sniff) Seattle Seahawk and current Philadelphia Eagle team member Michael Bennett shares his prospective on a wide range of topics, including the NCAA, the NFL, racism, and sexism.Line that sticks with me: “They also tell us to stick to sports when we speak out on issues. But they don’t seem to have a problem when we’re making commercials, selling their kids sneakers they ca Best for: Anyone interested in a compelling story about how a professional athlete lives his values.In a nutshell: Former (sniff) Seattle Seahawk and current Philadelphia Eagle team member Michael Bennett shares his prospective on a wide range of topics, including the NCAA, the NFL, racism, and sexism.Line that sticks with me: “They also tell us to stick to sports when we speak out on issues. But they don’t seem to have a problem when we’re making commercials, selling their kids sneakers they can’t afford or fast food that will give them colon cancer.”“But none of this is new, and we shouldn’t pretend it is. Racists may be more confident now because of who is in the White House, but it’s been there all along.”“I think their real reason for calling me a liar is their whole worldview is built around the idea that racism in policing doesn’t exist. They would rather live in the comfort of that fiction than be forced to confront the uncomfortable truth: that racial profiling is a reality.”“I realized that I wouldn’t be the person I aspire to be if I called out injustice here at home and just stopped at our border. It doesn’t work that way.”Why I chose it: I mean, a former Seahawk writing about things like social justice? Sign me up.Review: I grew up loving professional football. I was a 49ers fan, and got to attend many games growing up. However, I didn’t watch a single game in the 2017-2018 season, because of how the league treated Colin Kaepernick. I wrote about my decision here: https://www.hownottobeajerkwhen.com/f....But living in Seattle, it was impossible to avoid news of the Seahawks, and Michael Bennett (until recently) was a major piece of that team. So when I heard he was writing a book — and with Dave Zirin, whose work I’ve reviewed before (https://cannonballread.com/2014/06/wo...) — I knew I had to pick it up. Saw it at the airport before returning to London this week, and I’ve not been able to put it down.This book has so many insights, it was hard to limit the number of quotes to share above. Mr. Bennett talks openly about how hard college life is for ‘student-athletes’ (who he says would more accurately be called ‘athlete-students’), how the NCAA and universities don’t give a shit about their players. He talks about life in the NFL, and the fear of CTE and how poorly retired players are treated. He shares how important the brotherhood of the Seahawks locker room has been in his growth as a player and a Black man.He covers many topics I expected him to, like the racism inherent in calling the NFL team owners ‘owners’ when so many of the employees are Black, or Mr. Bennett’s involvement in the anthem protests. In fact, the preface could stand alone as a wonderful essay on the need to stand up (or, in this case, sit down) for what’s right. But he also talks about things like the importance of access to healthful food, or his thoughts on Palestine, or the importance of forgiveness, which I wasn’t expecting.I think this is a book anyone with an opinion on the role of college or professional athletes should read. I also think this is a good book for anyone who is looking for inspiration to keep fighting injustice.Note: Mr. Bennett was charged in late March with assaulting someone working security at the Super Bowl in 2017 (a felony, because the person is over 65). I find it hard to believe that the incident went down as suggested in the indictment; I’m especially suspect because of the way the Houston police chief shared it (Google the press conference if you’re interested). Mr. Bennett’s attorney has said: “He just flat-out didn’t do it. It wasn’t a case of, ‘He didn’t shove her that hard,’ or anything like that. … He never touched her.” That said, I wasn’t there, so if that’s something that might affect your interest in picking up this book, I wanted to put it out there.
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  • Ricardo
    January 1, 1970
    Prior to Bennett’s disturbing incident with Las Vegas Police Department I had no idea who he was. I do not follow sports of any kind at all, but after that incident I learned a bit more about this man and became even more interested with this book that he was putting out. “Things that make White People Uncomfortable” does not disappoint those who are interested in seeing an athlete and celebrity like Bennett share his thoughts, convictions, and activism with the general public. Though the title Prior to Bennett’s disturbing incident with Las Vegas Police Department I had no idea who he was. I do not follow sports of any kind at all, but after that incident I learned a bit more about this man and became even more interested with this book that he was putting out. “Things that make White People Uncomfortable” does not disappoint those who are interested in seeing an athlete and celebrity like Bennett share his thoughts, convictions, and activism with the general public. Though the title may make people judge it to be unflattering towards white people, the text makes it clear that is not Bennett’s agenda here. He believes in Black Lives Matter, feminism, LGBTQ rights, and intersectionality, and wishes to simply bring more people into the fold of caring for others by establishing equality, despite our various differences. He does not speak like someone who has always been a part of this movement, but rather as a newcomer who is learning and wishes to show more people that they too can learn and grow, despite the obstacles that there may be. Bennett credits a peer of his, Colin Kaepernick, for being a catalyst for him to want to use his influence to create a positive change for more people that are not only disadvantaged in this country, but throughout the world. He credits his teammates on the field, his family, and social justice organizations for helping him to create this change, showing that the collective work of people is what creates change, not the individual on their own. Recommend!
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  • Nina
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars. Micheal Bennett is a former Seahawk, so I knew exactly who this guy is when I saw this book at a book store during Seattle Independent Bookstore Day. So I just had to buy it! (Support your local bookstores) Bennett talks about how shitty the NCAA and NFL are to its players, the NFL kneeling protests, his foundation on fighting food deserts and how awesome Seattle is! He also talks about other NFL players in a chapter he titles “Soap Opera for men.” But the thing that made this white g 4.5 Stars. Micheal Bennett is a former Seahawk, so I knew exactly who this guy is when I saw this book at a book store during Seattle Independent Bookstore Day. So I just had to buy it! (Support your local bookstores) Bennett talks about how shitty the NCAA and NFL are to its players, the NFL kneeling protests, his foundation on fighting food deserts and how awesome Seattle is! He also talks about other NFL players in a chapter he titles “Soap Opera for men.” But the thing that made this white girl so uncomfortable is that Bennett says Tom Brady is a good quarterback. WTF! Them fighting words here in Seattle! Does Bennett even want us to read his book if he is gonna say that smug ass, cheater pants is a great player. F that! Not only does Bennett support the Black Lives Matter movement as an active kneeling protestor in the NFL, but he also supports the Women’s March and eliminating women’s pay inequality and violence against women. And I appreciate that. I am a white woman that supports the Black Lives Matter movement. We can all speak out against any injustice. Intersectionality Matters! Football is more fun now that it got more political. But for the sake of its players, the sport has to change or it has to go away. We know better now about CTE and it’s affects and we need to do better.
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  • Ramiro Guerra
    January 1, 1970
    It blows my mind that black athletes speaking out against racial injustice in ‘Merica is considered “controversial” or “distracting” or whatever. But here we are. There will also be folks who...will judge a book by its cover and assume the position of “offended” at the mere idea of an athlete releasing this book with this title. Oh well ::shrug::It’ll be their loss because those folks will miss out hearing from one of the smartest pro athletes in today’s society break down the conditions that le It blows my mind that black athletes speaking out against racial injustice in ‘Merica is considered “controversial” or “distracting” or whatever. But here we are. There will also be folks who...will judge a book by its cover and assume the position of “offended” at the mere idea of an athlete releasing this book with this title. Oh well ::shrug::It’ll be their loss because those folks will miss out hearing from one of the smartest pro athletes in today’s society break down the conditions that led to Colin Kaepernick kneeling during the national anthem (for the trillionth time, it was not about the flag or veterans, so get over it), and what his ideas are for path towards addressing those conditions. I would 100% recommend it to anyone who has wanted to tell any athlete to “stick to sports”. Or to anyone who is bothered more by symbolic protests and less about racial injustice. Or anyone who has ever responded “all lives matter” to a person screaming “black lives matter”. Also check out the homie Dave Zirin. Drops fire books and fire podcasts.
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  • Ren_Lee
    January 1, 1970
    I follow Glennon Doyle (a white author/activist) on Instagram and she gave a great tip today for white people who are beginning this "journey of learning" in the fight against racism. She said, "JUST BE A LEARNER. Read and listen instead of writing and talking" (unless, of course, you are in a group of white people). She goes on to explain her motto: When in a room with people of color, LISTEN UP. When in a room with white people, SPEAK UP. I think the act of listening is SO important for someon I follow Glennon Doyle (a white author/activist) on Instagram and she gave a great tip today for white people who are beginning this "journey of learning" in the fight against racism. She said, "JUST BE A LEARNER. Read and listen instead of writing and talking" (unless, of course, you are in a group of white people). She goes on to explain her motto: When in a room with people of color, LISTEN UP. When in a room with white people, SPEAK UP. I think the act of listening is SO important for someone like me who is just beginning to scratch the surface on the issue of race. I am all ears. So I listened to what Michael Bennett had to say and I found it very insightful. His voice is unique and I appreciate his blunt honesty and humor. He tells it like it is and sticks to his truth. This book is very inspiring and brave. I would recommend to all.
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  • Tyler Hurst
    January 1, 1970
    So many things to share that I learned, but the first was the biggest.Because of the lack of black superheroes, many black kids looked up to athletes as their idols. I mean, I sorta figured this just by observing how many non-white people you see at nerd/geek events versus sporting events, but having Bennett come out and say it changed how I viewed such fandom.He does a great job of being honest about how the NFL works, and what he expects from society at large.Fun, if heavy, book I'd recommend So many things to share that I learned, but the first was the biggest.Because of the lack of black superheroes, many black kids looked up to athletes as their idols. I mean, I sorta figured this just by observing how many non-white people you see at nerd/geek events versus sporting events, but having Bennett come out and say it changed how I viewed such fandom.He does a great job of being honest about how the NFL works, and what he expects from society at large.Fun, if heavy, book I'd recommend to anyone looking to know more about the life of black athletes.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    The title of this book and interviews Michael Bennett has given regarding it do not represent the reality of this book's contents. Michael Bennett has written a book about himself which is fine but not what I wanted to read. I was hoping for a frank discussion about race relations in America but alas those issues are only discussed as it relates to Michael Bennett. If you want to read a book about a football player this is the book for you. If you wanted something else you won't find it here.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    A good-hearted man challenging readers and fellow athletes to make the world a better place by fighting racism, sexism and homophobia in practical ways. It didn't make me too uncomfortable because I'm not really into football and I'm down with BLM. I also was listening to Sherman Alexie's book at the same time as I was reading this, and you can tell that Alexie - who has problems of his own - is the professional poet/writer, and this well-meaning book suffers in the comparison.
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  • Potassium
    January 1, 1970
    This book made me both sad and happy. Sad because of the mess we are all in right now, but happy because now I know all these ways people are working to help. Great job, Michael Bennett! I really appreciate you using your status as a platform to say the things I think need to be said. :) Now I need to figure out what I can do to help...I also enjoyed getting to know you through this book. That was fun too.
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  • Kellie Sloan brown
    January 1, 1970
    I found myself nodding emphatically, shaking my head in disgust, and saying "Yes!" throughout this entire book. Michael Bennett details systemic racism in both the NCAA and the NFL, why he supports #BlackLivesMatter and kneeling for the National Anthem, the #MeToo movement and a host of other issues affecting POC and women. If you were not also a supporter of these causes before, you will certainly finish this book having a deeper understanding of - and, hopefully, empathy for - them.
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  • Maria Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    This book, this man, both AMAZING!!! Took me no less than 48 hours to finish it and didn't want it to end. Fascinating, honest, genuine and uplifting. How a 31 year old can already have so much vision, grace, heart and soul is inspiring. WELL WORTH your time and Go Michael! Your efforts will always be appreciated. It was my pleasure to meet you!
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  • Sarah -
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free digital ARC via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.I'm not sure what else I can say that will convey all that this book is, except that every person who has ever said #AllLivesMatter needs to read this book. They won't, but they should.See my full review on my blog: https://allthebookblognamesaretaken.b...
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  • Raymonds009
    January 1, 1970
    Clear and concise take on all the latest skirmishes over race relations in the US as well as the world from an athlete on the front lines. A superb explanation of why it is important for everyone to be counted in the debate. I encourage you to listen in even if you think that you have heard it all--you probably have not. Here are surprises and ideas for going forward. Highly recommended.
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  • Brian Bergen-Aurand
    January 1, 1970
    The second half of this book is worth your time, especially. The way he writes about Black families, moving from philanthropy to activism, and the importance of Intersectionalism--and what might have been had Fred Hampton lived--got me thinking a lot about where we all stand, sit, or kneel now.
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  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    Best book that I have read this year. It is challenging and informative. I am not a football fan and still found it touching my head and heart. Michael wrote of justice issues in the world we live in, including race, poverty, nutrition and family life. Richly spiritual.
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    Not at all what I expected from the title. I wound up truly admiring the perspectives of this young man. This book reveals personal growth, love of family and community, understanding of social inequities, contributions to the needy, etc. Such powerful insight gleaned from a genuine, caring,human being. This book has a conscious and dares us all to reach out to others.
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  • Hanson Ho
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. Lays out a template for pro athlete activism from one of the sharpest sports ballers out there.
  • Megan Regel
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Bennet is truly a man to look up to
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Love, love, love this man. He has so much wisdom on football, activism, and making the world better for everyone.
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