Exit Stage Left
It’s 1953. While the United States is locked in a nuclear arms race with the Soviet Union, the gay Southern playwright known as Snagglepuss is the toast of Broadway. But success has made him a target. As he plans for his next hit play, Snagglepuss becomes the focus of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. And when powerful forces align to purge show business of its most subversive voices, no one is safe! Drama! Humor! Tragedy! It all starts in Exit Stage LEFT: The Snagglepuss Chronicles #1, a new miniseries from the writer who brought you the Flintstones.

Exit Stage Left Details

TitleExit Stage Left
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 3rd, 2018
PublisherDC
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Lgbt, Animals, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Historical, Historical Fiction

Exit Stage Left Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    Snagglepuss as a closeted gay Southern playwright standing up to systemic oppression in 1950s America? Heavens to Murgatroyd, that sounds like a barrel of laffs! Yeah, it’s a surprisingly serious reboot for the iconic Hanna-Barbera character that’s not even pretending to aim for a kiddie audience which is probably why the first issue isn’t bad. Mark Russell is definitely one of DC’s most interesting current writers. I really enjoyed his underrated Prez book and his Flintstones run was surprising Snagglepuss as a closeted gay Southern playwright standing up to systemic oppression in 1950s America? Heavens to Murgatroyd, that sounds like a barrel of laffs! Yeah, it’s a surprisingly serious reboot for the iconic Hanna-Barbera character that’s not even pretending to aim for a kiddie audience which is probably why the first issue isn’t bad. Mark Russell is definitely one of DC’s most interesting current writers. I really enjoyed his underrated Prez book and his Flintstones run was surprisingly decent so I’m glad he’s continuing to take fringe DC properties and relaunch them with a fresh, contemporary spin. Like The Flintstones, Russell adopts an unexpectedly dark tone for a Hanna-Barbera comic. Gloomy real-life history appears throughout with the paranoid spectre of Cold War tension taking the form of the House Committee of Un-American Activities going after figures in the entertainment industry. The Rosenbergs’ execution and the famous gay bar, the Stonewall Inn, also feature prominently. Weirdly, it works quite well for the character as if this was always Snagglepuss’ natural setting! Mark Russell’s writing and Mike Feehan’s art is fine throughout. However, there isn’t much of a story. Nor is Russell doing anything especially original besides dredging up the past and mixing in animal humanoids like Snagglepuss. His subtle commentary is similarly unremarkable and banal: what a dark time in American history! It feels like this could be a very predictable, very safe and disappointingly boring comic if it continues this way. That said, there’s potential here to draw parallels with our present-day hysterical witch-hunt atmosphere and equally-unhinged political climate so perhaps the series could get much more interesting down the line if it goes in that direction. I liked the bait-and-switch climax to the issue regarding the middle-aged couple on their date night as well as Huckleberry Hound’s cameo - if Snagglepuss is meant to be Tennessee Williams, is Huckleberry Hound meant to be Truman Capote? It didn’t wow me but Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepuss Chronicles #1 wasn’t bad either. And at the very least Mark Russell got me to read a fucking SNAGGLEPUSS comic which I never thought I’d do! Though I’m still interested to see how the story plays out, my expectations are also somewhat tempered after this lukewarm first issue.
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  • Brandon St Mark
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really cool first issue. I've really been looking forward to this title, and I didn't know it was set during the Red Scare. I loved the shots of McCarthy, and I hope this shows him as a total maniac (like he was). I also really love that S.P. went to the Stonewall, that was a good... cameo, I guess you'd call it.
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  • Artur
    January 1, 1970
    The first issue promises a great and topical story about an authoritarian regime going after “deviants and subversives” (including, of course, the protagonist: a gay playwright who also happens to be a pink panther). I’m gripped and I’m pulling Exit Stage Left on my list of regularly read comics.
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  • Vinton Bayne
    January 1, 1970
    What did I just read? I had no expectations, but I could have never expected that. It was pretty good, but definitely not the type of story that will hold my attention.
  • Reuben S. Mezrich
    January 1, 1970
    FoolishnessSimplistic, “book” just wanders around, showing two dimensional caricatures of heroes from earlier in our history, without explaining who they were or why they were important. And then it ended in a long commercial for another comic...hard to believe I paid for this crap
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  • Sam Bux Romatet
    January 1, 1970
    .......sure. why not
  • Garrison
    January 1, 1970
    Having absolutely no expectations for this, it was a good surprise and well-written issue #1.
  • Robert Kranz
    January 1, 1970
    Seems factual.
  • Mauricio Portillo
    January 1, 1970
    I've got to say that was very good; the dialogues and design of the characters were amazing . I mean they are doing very well , despite that's the first publication , and I hope that maintain the same level in every publication.
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