Spymaster (Scot Harvath, #18)
Across Europe, a secret organization has begun attacking diplomats. Back in the United States, a foreign ally demands the identity of a highly placed covert asset. In the balance hang the ingredients for all-out war.With his mentor out of the game, counterterrorism operative Scot Harvath must take on the role he has spent his career avoiding. But, as with everything else he does, he intends to rewrite the rules—all of them.

Spymaster (Scot Harvath, #18) Details

TitleSpymaster (Scot Harvath, #18)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 3rd, 2018
PublisherAtria/Emily Bestler Books
Rating
GenreThriller, Fiction

Spymaster (Scot Harvath, #18) Review

  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    Brad Thor returns with another wonderful novel in his Scot Harvath series, keeping things not only exciting but politically on point. In a world where alliances are always shifting, the reemergence of Russian political dominance is one that cannot be ignored. After a number of high-ranking officials from a number of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) countries are gunned down, word is that it is part of a larger plan to disrupt the collective. There is proof that the Russians have been am Brad Thor returns with another wonderful novel in his Scot Harvath series, keeping things not only exciting but politically on point. In a world where alliances are always shifting, the reemergence of Russian political dominance is one that cannot be ignored. After a number of high-ranking officials from a number of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) countries are gunned down, word is that it is part of a larger plan to disrupt the collective. There is proof that the Russians have been amassing troops on the borders of their Baltic neighbours, leaving those within NATO feeling additionally nervous as they wonder if this could be foreboding to an aggressive move. Scot Harvath is a member of the team contracted to follow-up and investigate the intelligence, which purports that Russia will strike close to the Organization’s underbelly, in neutral Sweden. The team makes its way to as island off the country’s coast, looking for a Russian cell that could commence attacks on their former satellite states, particularly those who are new NATO members. Under the Organization’s founding documents, Article 5 insists that an attack on one member is an attack on all, which could lead to a new war on European soil. Meanwhile, the Americans are trying to deal with a major gaffe in Poland that could propel the world to turn against them. Someone has broken into a convoy of vehicle and stolen military parts capable of resurrecting previously banned missiles. With the NATO situation gaining momentum, this revelation could push the Russians to the brink. As Harvath and his team seek to dismantle the Russian cell in Sweden, there is the larger concern of what might come on another front. Diplomatic means are off the table and this must be stopped before the world media gets wind of these potentially catastrophic maneuvers. Harvath has much to accomplish and little time to waste. Thor keeps readers intrigued as the story hits home in what could be a ‘torn from the headlines’ plot. Perfect for series fans and those who love politically relevant thrillers.At a time when espionage and political thrillers are still fixated on all this ISIS, it is nice to see some authors keeping an open mind. Gone are the days when readers tend to want more Islam versus Infidel themed novels, particularly with all the action taking place with Russia at present. Thor spent a number of his novels dealing with this topic, but has been able to look at current news headlines to craft new and exciting storylines that will continue to impress readers. Scot Harvath has undergone much transformation over the series and continues to keep himself a relevant part of the discussion. Thor has not offered additional backstory, but keeps developing his protagonist. With an ever-updated ‘team’ working alongside him, Harvath’s personal attributes are highlighted in new and interesting ways. Others complement him well, while also carving out their own character development, thereby permitting series fans to see constant growth of those names who keep reappearing on the page and adding hope that some of these new names will find a means of popping up once again. The story was not only interesting, but offered the reader a chance to wonder ‘what if’ as it relates to the sub-plots being developed. While there is certainly less of a Russia-US animosity at present, that is sure to change when America finds itself once again and out of the orange-haze quagmire that has foreign policy nursing from the Russian teat. Until then, Thor posits many plausible and thought-provoking storylines that could develop in Western Europe. Using NATO was a brilliant spin on what is currently taking place and, through some of his research and personal sentiments, Thor makes some fairly grounded arguments to keep the politically savvy reader wondering, as well as gasping at the novel’s ending. Might this be some foreboding remains to be seen.Kudos, Mr. Thor, for another wonderful novel. Some may not like the tempered action, but I found it completely captivating and hope you’ll consider continuing this theme. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    To be continued....I hate endings like this. I had to revise my rating, (down) because BT is better than this. 4 of 10 stars
  • kartik narayanan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a pretty meh book. It had action and everything but there is this feeling of 'being there, done that' that kept oozing through quite often. But, the ending (which teases) gives me hope that this is a bridge to a new character arc from the next book onwards.fingers crossed
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  • Adah Udechukwu
    January 1, 1970
    Spymaster was awesome!!!When Harvath and his team were sniffing around tracking Tretyakov; Tretyakov's goons were investigating Harvath.Brad Thor did well by not portraying the bad guys as imbeciles.The novel was well written and action packed.The cliffhanger............ The cliffhanger was top notch.How come Harvath does not have a movie?
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  • The Real Book Spy
    January 1, 1970
    See this review and more at www.TheRealBookSpy.comWhen Russia implements a daring plan to draw the United States into war, it’s up to counterterrorism operative Scot Harvath to once again save the day in Brad Thor’s (Use of Force, etc.) action-packed new thriller. A sniper in Portugal, a car bomb in Spain, and a shooter in Greece. Three attacks, three dead diplomats. As blood spills across Europe, an American private security firm discovers that a secret organization is behind the attacks and qu See this review and more at www.TheRealBookSpy.comWhen Russia implements a daring plan to draw the United States into war, it’s up to counterterrorism operative Scot Harvath to once again save the day in Brad Thor’s (Use of Force, etc.) action-packed new thriller. A sniper in Portugal, a car bomb in Spain, and a shooter in Greece. Three attacks, three dead diplomats. As blood spills across Europe, an American private security firm discovers that a secret organization is behind the attacks and quickly races to learn more about the group’s whereabouts and their overall objective. The Carlton Group, currently serving as a lifeboat of sorts to the Central Intelligence Agency while the world’s most famous spy organization undergoes a bureaucratic cleansing, is now being run by Lydia Ryan. The former deputy director of CIA, Ryan brings a wealth of experience to the Carlton Group during a period of restructuring, as the company’s founder, Reed Carlton, battles Alzheimer’s disease. Previously, Scot Harvath, a Navy SEAL turned secret service agent turned counterterrorism operative, turned down the corner office to stay in the field. Though he’s finally showing signs of aging, Harvath is still an apex predator and one of the most cunning weapons in America’s arsenal. Once again, Harvath suits up when his country needs him most. Forged through decades of experience, the battle-tested warrior is used to taking punches and soldiering onward. So when the American president finds out that Russia is attempting to draw the United States into war by attacking its NATO allies, using the North Atlantic Treaty to solicit an American response, he turns to Scot and the Carlton Group, tasking them with doing whatever necessary to avoid going to war with Russia. Assembling a team, Harvath goes on the hunt, tracking the assassins around the globe, trying desperately to connect the dots and uncover the organization’s final play before it’s too late. Meanwhile, Lydia Ryan deals with the fallout of Reed Carlton’s condition. As the spymaster’s health deteriorates, Ryan realizes that the secrets previously held in Carlton’s steel trap of a mind are now at risk. As she tries to take down as much information as she can from Carlton, an American ally approaches Ryan and demands the identity of a highly-placed covert asset, further complicating matters on the homefront. Everything comes to a roaring boil as Thor delivers a stunning final act, capped off with a killer, jaw-dropping ending that’ll leave readers absolutely stunned. Along with a large returning cast (including several Use of Force carryovers such as Jack Gage, who is fast becoming a real go-to source for book recommendations), Thor, who’s long been known for writing strong female characters into his books, also introduces readers to a couple of scene-stealing newcomers in Polish operator Monika Jasinski and Rebecca Strum, the newly-appointed U.S. ambassador to the United Nations who bears a striking resemblance to real-life ambassador Nickey Haley. Still, Harvath is the guy, and Thor shows fans a new side to Scot, who’s put through the ringer physically and emotionally in a number of ways that are bound to play a major role moving forward. While a lot of authors have written timely thrillers over the years, nobody has been more consistently right on the money than Thor, who has the uncanny ability to predict what the world will look like in the near future and craft his stories accordingly. That’s certainly the case with Spymaster, which feels ripped straight from tomorrow’s headlines, offering readers a terrifying glimpse at how the conflict between America and Russia could eventually play out. One thing’s for sure. . . with the way things are today, the world could use a little more Scot Harvath.Now seventeen books in, Brad Thor is showing no signs of slowing down anytime soon. If anything, the #1 New York Times bestseller is getting better each time out, a scary proposition for his competition, as Thor once again proves why he’s the undisputed king of the thriller genre. Spymaster is incredible, and the ending makes it clear that Thor is meticulously setting things up for his next book, which, if he can deliver the way he did here, has all the makings to be the kind of very special one-two punch that readers haven’t seen since Robert Ludlum was in his prime. Timely, raw, and filled with enough action for two books, Spymaster is this summer’s must-read thriller and the most gripping novel of Brad Thor’s iconic career. Book DetailsAuthor: Brad ThorSeries: Scot Harvath #17Pages: 336 (Hardcover)ISBN: 147678941XPublisher: Atria/Emily Bestler BooksRelease Date: July 3, 2018Book Spy Rating: 9.75/10Order Now: https://amzn.to/2stb5iiPraised as “one of today’s finest book reviewers” by New York Times bestselling author Gayle Lynds, Ryan Steck (“The Godfather of the thriller genre” — Ben Coes) has “quickly established himself as the authority on mysteries and thrillers” (Author A.J. Tata). He currently lives in Southwest Michigan with his wife and their six children.
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This book was remarkably bad. This book just can't build up any momentum without going off on some tangent that not only should've been dealt with earlier or just isn't necessary in the first place. Not only is the book structurally a mess (this guy has written a TON of books, how has he not figured this out by now?), but the prose just isn't that engaging. It's bad enough that I was genuinely shocked that it had sold so many copies! The books builds (I use the word charitably) to a few seq Wow. This book was remarkably bad. This book just can't build up any momentum without going off on some tangent that not only should've been dealt with earlier or just isn't necessary in the first place. Not only is the book structurally a mess (this guy has written a TON of books, how has he not figured this out by now?), but the prose just isn't that engaging. It's bad enough that I was genuinely shocked that it had sold so many copies! The books builds (I use the word charitably) to a few sequences of thrilling (again, arguably) action in which things kind of just don't happen. Everything kind of just goes right for the main characters until the end, when they go wrong for a second, but then go right again. This book is a snooze. I do not recommend reading it, or even thinking about reading it. There are better crappy books to read.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Good book. Everything I've come to expect from a Harvath thriller. The politics of the book are certainly in context with the headlines of the times, not unusual for Brad Thor. But, seriously—what's with that ending? Not cool, man. I mean, cool—but not cool! The next book is a long way off and I am not a patient person.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I look forward to my yearly date with SH however this was a huge disappointment. I kept waiting for things to get going then when they did the book was over. Thankfully there was little politics in this go round; BT can get a bit preachy. As this ended on a cliffhanger, I will be back next July. Hopefully the next one starts off with a bang and we get the BT outing we are used to!
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    I like the macho man character of Scott Harvath. I like the complex political plot line (which seemingly could be ripped from the current headlines a la Tom Clancy). The enthralling and freshly unique plot in SPYMASTER is interesting, but regrettably, the execution is not captivating; it didn’t even hold my interest well ( evidenced by my putting the book down several times and taking 2 weeks - instead of 2 days- to finish it!)Even with only 316 pages, the pacing and plot lag. Complex becomes co I like the macho man character of Scott Harvath. I like the complex political plot line (which seemingly could be ripped from the current headlines a la Tom Clancy). The enthralling and freshly unique plot in SPYMASTER is interesting, but regrettably, the execution is not captivating; it didn’t even hold my interest well ( evidenced by my putting the book down several times and taking 2 weeks - instead of 2 days- to finish it!)Even with only 316 pages, the pacing and plot lag. Complex becomes complicate, even confusing, with a slew of characters. A Who’s Who Cast of Characters page would have been helpful. There is action, but not heart-stopping, edge-of-your-seat, adrenaline fueled. It is a good espionage story, simply not a compelling one....certainly not a thriller! The ending is hurried. The resolution to the many threads (and red herrings) is revealed on the next to last page! Now, THAT is rushed and should have been developed. Abrupt endings are dissatisfying. The last sentence offers a cliffhanger. Not nice. More importantly, not authentic. The Carlton Group is at the apex of security and spy tradecraft. The cliffhanger indicates a scenario that is completely out of character to The Carlton Group’s ethos. Such an inconsistency is disappointing.With few exceptions, Brad Thor has written explosive espionage thrillers. If you are unfamiliar with this series, I highly recommend starting with the incredibly electrifying LIONS OF LUCERNE (#1). I would rather reread his earlier Scott Harvath books than muddle through the likes of less than stellar recent ones, such as USE OF FORCE (#17)and SPYMASTER (#18j.
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  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    What a disappointment!The book felt like Brad Thor had a word goal from his publisher.Too much fluff, not enough action.If you want an action thriller, just read the last 15% of the book.And a terrible ending!
  • Glen
    January 1, 1970
    This latest entry in the Scot Harvath series appears to be a transitional novel.Someone is murdering diplomats, and harvath has to find out who, and why. He's aging out of the field, taking shots of some serum to stay in the game, but knows he has to retire soon. His boss has Alzheimer's disease. There's a scenario that recently (months after the book was published) was discovered in the newspapers.Very exciting,and beyond timely.
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  • Skip
    January 1, 1970
    The book opens with Scot as an observer on a Norwegian cabin by its elite military, but all hell breaks loose. Scot is trying to stop a group killing diplomats with an agenda to foment trouble within NATO by a foreign superpower. The deeper plan is to recapture former colonies by making a military response by NATO impossible, both tactically and strategically. I liked the parallels drawn by Thor to Nazi Germany's hegemony to protect its nationals in neighboring countries. Nicholas and Vella play The book opens with Scot as an observer on a Norwegian cabin by its elite military, but all hell breaks loose. Scot is trying to stop a group killing diplomats with an agenda to foment trouble within NATO by a foreign superpower. The deeper plan is to recapture former colonies by making a military response by NATO impossible, both tactically and strategically. I liked the parallels drawn by Thor to Nazi Germany's hegemony to protect its nationals in neighboring countries. Nicholas and Vella play roles, but Reed Carlton continues his sad decline. I had to knock off a star for the lame cliffhanger ending.
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  • John H Sneed
    January 1, 1970
    The story line is very weak, disjointed, and uninteresting. Did I forget to say it was weak?I've noticed that around the 20th title, some authors seem 'used up'. No new ideas, bonded to the established characters, preventing them from having new ideas. Did I forget to mention 'no new ideas'?I will keep reading Brad Thor (and Ted Bell and Tom Clancey and Clive Custler) just to see if they can break out of their creative detention center.
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  • Jill Mackin
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy a Scot Harvath adventure once in awhile.
  • David Eppenstein
    January 1, 1970
    My interest in this series has been waning. Thor's last few additions to the series have been rather tiresome in that they seem to be a continuous repetition of hunting down and killing Arab terrorists. After awhile the originality of going about such tasks can be exhausted and that can be fatal for an author. I am happy to report that with this book Thor is back to his A game and has left the Arabs in the desert. This story concerns the Russian plans to undermine NATO and its allies with a phon My interest in this series has been waning. Thor's last few additions to the series have been rather tiresome in that they seem to be a continuous repetition of hunting down and killing Arab terrorists. After awhile the originality of going about such tasks can be exhausted and that can be fatal for an author. I am happy to report that with this book Thor is back to his A game and has left the Arabs in the desert. This story concerns the Russian plans to undermine NATO and its allies with a phony terrorism group in order to create dissension and confusion. Using this disruption to their advantage the Russians plan to invade the Baltic countries much like they have done on the Crimean Peninsula. There is plenty of action and tension and a whole new team of operatives have joined Thor's hero, Scot Harvath, in this adventure. From the track of the story it appears that the author might be preparing to take Harvath on to a new storyline entirely. If that is true then I am pleased to see it as the series is overdue for an ending or a new direction with new people. The new people seem to be in place so I guess we'll have to wait and see what Thor does with them.Now while I did enjoy the book a great deal there are a couple of criticisms that I need to make, one minor and one major. First the minor criticism. Three or four times during the course of reading this novel characters mention books that they are reading. The first time this happened I didn't think anything of it but then it happened again and then again. This has never been done in any of Thor's prior Harvath books so it is very noticeable and caused me to check if these were real books and authors and they are. I found this practice to be tacky and clumsy. I do not know if this was the author's idea of helping author friends or if it is the publisher trying to use Thor's fan base to advertise other book offerings. Whatever the reason or whoever is responsible it needs to stop immediately. I do not mind an author or a publisher making book recommendations and there are plenty of less offensive methods for doing that. Recommendations can be included as an end note in the book or on the back of the dust cover but do not put it in the story. Such a practice reminds me of product placements used in movies and it just cheapens the author's work and smacks of an attempt to manipulate loyal readers. If you want to recommend a book then be honest about it instead of trying to be clever.My major criticism is a pet peeve of mine. This book ends in a cliffhanger and that is a mortal sin. It is the ploy of insecure authors or publishers to sell books. Thor has a very loyal following so there is no need for him to resort to such gimmicks to sell his books. Further, since these books usually only come out once a year it means a year of suspense that the fans must endure for no good reason. That is a terrible thing to do to people that have supported you for years. Thor has never done this before so I am going to assume the publisher may have been behind this and if so then Thor needs to be more of an advocate for his fans.
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  • Anthony Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading this book. The plot was good and the characters were great. The only bad thing is I felt as if it started with a bang then slowed down. The book did pick back up but then it ended.
  • Stuart Ashenbrenner
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, Brad Thor, how do you do it? Brad Thor continues to be at the top of the genre, beating headlines, and keeping an exciting the story the whole way through. I've noticed Thor's books taking a harder and harder political stance, but I didn't feel it with this one, which I think will help it to appeal to people across the aisles. What a great story, and it probably has one of the craziest endings of any of Thor's books. Great, great novel!
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    After a while these types of books all seem the same but I still enjoyed reading it and it was a fast read.
  • Yv
    January 1, 1970
    Eh ja.. Actie en reactie, geweld, complotten en overdosis testosteron..
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Brad Thor certainly knows how to write a thrilling, timely and fast paced novel! There's not a ton of character development in this one, but there's a lot of action. Also, it's dealing with NATO and Russia so it's interesting in that way. It ends on a major cliffhanger!!!! I'm sure it will be another year before we see the next installment so that kind of sucks, but I can't wait.
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  • Michael Goulette
    January 1, 1970
    Not his best work. The plot was somewhat predictable and not all that exciting.
  • Pam1007
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't wait to read the new Scot Harvath book. He is one of my favorite characters. However, the cliff hanger ending ruined it for me. I purchased the book through Audible and thought there had been some type of mistake in the download when the book ended so suddenly. I am very disappointed.
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  • Bill Yarbrough
    January 1, 1970
    Disappointed. Kept picking it up, reading a few pages, putting it down. Bought it the day it was published, just now finished reading and it is only 322 pages hardcover. This book was like the season ending episode of a TV series---you have to wait until the next one. I have read every Brad Thor book as soon as they were published, even have an autographed "The Last Patriot." I have stopped watching some TV series I really liked and used to watch faithfully, until they screwed up and I quit watc Disappointed. Kept picking it up, reading a few pages, putting it down. Bought it the day it was published, just now finished reading and it is only 322 pages hardcover. This book was like the season ending episode of a TV series---you have to wait until the next one. I have read every Brad Thor book as soon as they were published, even have an autographed "The Last Patriot." I have stopped watching some TV series I really liked and used to watch faithfully, until they screwed up and I quit watching them. Is this going to happen with Brad Thor books for me? Is he just throwing books out there, because he had us hooked? Another author I read every book he wrote as soon as they were published, but the last couple books were lacking. They were short, just over 300 pages, and didn't have the details the previous books had. I am wondering if this is an issue with the publishers just like the movie studios making movies into a timeframe to fit TV and movie theaters showings to make more money, make books shorter to sell for the same price as the previous longer/thicker books. At age 17, I read "Atlas Shrugged" 1,084 pages, so thick books have never scared me away from reading---I have gone back and read it three more times over the years and even listened to the unabridged CD while driving across the United States from Oregon to Key West, Florida. Don't hold out on the details, or the book is a loser. Spymaster kind of reminded me of reading a comic book without the pictures---lacked details.
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  • Nichole Tompkins
    January 1, 1970
    Fierce female characters that are both bold and brave and an aged but heroic capable main character make this story a thrilling plot. Virginia Hall would be proud of the women portrayed in this novel. Moreover, military deception is not a new idea and has been a real issue long before WW II, when forces spread rumors of reinforcements coming for battleships in the Caribbean, of course there were none. Strategic services do change global events. This book is realistic for current events and tensi Fierce female characters that are both bold and brave and an aged but heroic capable main character make this story a thrilling plot. Virginia Hall would be proud of the women portrayed in this novel. Moreover, military deception is not a new idea and has been a real issue long before WW II, when forces spread rumors of reinforcements coming for battleships in the Caribbean, of course there were none. Strategic services do change global events. This book is realistic for current events and tensions globally today, including the Spymaster ending.
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    Incredibly topical. Book started out real strong, but seemed to a fizzle a bit. Could have gone in more directions with the plot lines
  • Rick
    January 1, 1970
    Another great installment. Particularly better than the previous one. Strongly recommended.
  • Ben House
    January 1, 1970
    I was thrilled to win an advanced copy that Mr. Thor autographed. I was slightly disappointed because it is a paperback, but a win is a win.The book was enjoyable, and it did rescue me from the pain of reading the first Harry Potter book. As always with Thor, the book has lots of action and close escapes. Some of the rescues were a bit too out of nowhere, but Scot Harvath has got to survive.In this book, the enemy is the Russians. Interesting because of so much current news regarding ongoing pro I was thrilled to win an advanced copy that Mr. Thor autographed. I was slightly disappointed because it is a paperback, but a win is a win.The book was enjoyable, and it did rescue me from the pain of reading the first Harry Potter book. As always with Thor, the book has lots of action and close escapes. Some of the rescues were a bit too out of nowhere, but Scot Harvath has got to survive.In this book, the enemy is the Russians. Interesting because of so much current news regarding ongoing problems with the Russians. I cannot help but remember the awful comment former President Obama made criticising Mitt Romney in one of the debates. "The 1980s called and they want their foreign policy back."The plot worked, and Thor is a definite patriot with no illusions about foreign threats.I do wish he would use fewer cliches and fewer unnecessary curse words. Overall, a good, although not a great, read.
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  • Douglas Barrow
    January 1, 1970
    I have to begin this review at the end of the book... Brad, what were you thinking! I have to wait a year now?!Now my review: Scot Harvath has now evolved into a different kind of operative/leader. He has gotten older and now has a growing team of top shelf operators to do some of the heavy lifting. And as it turns out, he needs them.The Russians have embedded cells and individuals that are carrying out terrorist attacks in NATO countries. They want to destabilize them as a preamble to an invasi I have to begin this review at the end of the book... Brad, what were you thinking! I have to wait a year now?!Now my review: Scot Harvath has now evolved into a different kind of operative/leader. He has gotten older and now has a growing team of top shelf operators to do some of the heavy lifting. And as it turns out, he needs them.The Russians have embedded cells and individuals that are carrying out terrorist attacks in NATO countries. They want to destabilize them as a preamble to an invasion of the Baltic States of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. It's up to Harvath and his team to head to Sweden (and a few other places) to locate a spy and get information on Russian organizer of of these attacks. And boy does it get complicated.This is one fast paced exciting read as expected from Brad Thor. Once again, he does not disappoint. This book is as timely as any book Brad has written. You can tell it was well researched with all the details included. He really paints a picture and you can almost "see" what he has written. Well recommended.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, you will want to continue reading it in just one sitting! This is not a spoiler!It seems as if it is so real, as if it has just popped up on the daily newscast. I especially enjoyed it because we lived for a year in Estonia and traveled extensively through the Baltic states, though never in Kaliningrad itself. It all rings true, with the Russian menacing and their efforts to destabilize Nato, except the POTUS in the book is Not Aiding & Abetting the enemy!!!
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  • Ray Palen
    January 1, 1970
    Read my full review tomorrow on bookreporter.com.
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