Boomer1
Bluegrass musician, former journalist and editor, and now PhD in English, Mark Brumfeld has arrived at his thirties with significant debt and no steady prospects. His girlfriend Cassie—a punk bassist in an all-female band, who fled her Midwestern childhood for a new identity—finds work at a “new media” company. When Cassie refuses his marriage proposal, Mark leaves New York and returns to the basement of his childhood home in the Baltimore suburbs. Desperate and humiliated, Mark begins to post a series of online video monologues that critique Baby Boomers and their powerful hold on the job market. But as his videos go viral, and while Cassie starts to build her career, Mark loses control of what he began—with consequences that ensnare them in a matter of national security. Told through the perspectives of Mark, Cassie, and Mark’s mother, Julia, a child of the '60s whose life is more conventional than she ever imagined, Boomer1 is timely, suspenseful, and in every line alert to the siren song of endless opportunity that beckons and beguiles all of us.

Boomer1 Details

TitleBoomer1
Author
ReleaseSep 18th, 2018
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250191793
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Literature, American

Boomer1 Review

  • Larry H
    January 1, 1970
    I'm between 3 and 3.5 stars.A fascinating, timely, and thought-provoking meditation on the craziness of our internet-obsessed culture, the generational divide between Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials, and just how far our lives can drift from what we've planned, Daniel Torday's Boomer1 is both funny and eerily prescient.Mark is a bluegrass musician, a journalist and editor, and a student completing his PhD in English. He hopes to find fame as an insightful political writer, although I'm between 3 and 3.5 stars.A fascinating, timely, and thought-provoking meditation on the craziness of our internet-obsessed culture, the generational divide between Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials, and just how far our lives can drift from what we've planned, Daniel Torday's Boomer1 is both funny and eerily prescient.Mark is a bluegrass musician, a journalist and editor, and a student completing his PhD in English. He hopes to find fame as an insightful political writer, although he wouldn't mind if his band hit it big either. When he meets Cassie, a fellow musician, who plays bass in an all-female post-punk band, he feels like he has met a kindred spirit, especially when he discovers Cassie knows how to play the fiddle as well. The two embark on a relationship, which brings both security, if not wild passion.But as Cassie's media career starts to take off, Mark finds himself at a dead end, which doesn't help their struggling relationship much. After she rejects Mark's marriage proposal, he's left with no prospects, career- or otherwise. With no money and nowhere else to turn, Mark decides to live the Millennial stereotype—he moves home to Baltimore to live in his parents' basement.As he starts figuring out his future, his anger grows, so he adopts a pseudonym and starts filming a series of online video rants against baby boomers. The so-called Boomer Missives tap into a vein in society, of people stuck in the same rut he is, feeling the same feelings, and wanting to find someone else to blame. But before he knows it, these videos become a rallying cry for those who feel downtrodden, put upon, and want their chance without having to wait to pay their dues. Suddenly, he goes from spokesperson to revolutionary—with potentially dangerous consequences.Narrated alternatively by Mark, Cassie, and Mark's mother Julia, a child of the 1960s who thought her life would be much more rebellious than it turned out, Boomer1 delivers quite a punch. There are times when it almost doesn't seem like fiction, because you could totally see something like this happening in today's world.This is a very well-written book, but I found the pacing really slow. Although I've seen other reviews say that things started to pick up, it didn't for me. I definitely enjoyed the story, but I just wanted things to move quicker, and I wanted to like the characters a bit more, but the book certainly gave me a lot to think about.If you like a dose of reality mixed in with your fiction, Boomer1 may be just the ticket for you. It will definitely get you thinking!NetGalley and St. Martin's Press provided me an advance copy of the book in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making this available! See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com, or check out my list of the best books I read in 2017 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2017.html.
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  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this a lot - just finished it now - at 3am- with no idea where it was headed.Mark - Cassie - Julia - each have a voice in this fascinating- relevant and frightening look at people ‘my age’ - 60’s retirement age - and my daughter’s age - mid 30’s -and the contribution our grandparents made who came from the War—It’s a terrific book ....lots to engage in — great storytelling. Themes - locations and daily life for these folks are tied together brilliantly: - Jobs-- who has them?- who does I enjoyed this a lot - just finished it now - at 3am- with no idea where it was headed.Mark - Cassie - Julia - each have a voice in this fascinating- relevant and frightening look at people ‘my age’ - 60’s retirement age - and my daughter’s age - mid 30’s -and the contribution our grandparents made who came from the War—It’s a terrific book ....lots to engage in — great storytelling. Themes - locations and daily life for these folks are tied together brilliantly: - Jobs-- who has them?- who doesn’t?- social security?- insecurity?- Education/ music/ girlband/ bandmates/ roommates/ lovers/relationships/success/ failure/ personal self worth/disappointments/ fear/ depression & loneliness/ hearing loss/ a marriage proposal turned down/ educated adult moving back home in parents basement/ East Coast..New York City/ West Coast... San Francisco......More surprises... with great characters to spend time with!!!!This is a wonderful - very well written enjoyable novel. I must read Daniel Torday’s first novel. I have a copy of the hardcopy - and will look forward to it now for sure. Highly recommended!Thank you St. Martin’s Press, Netgalley, and Daniel Torday! (Love the feeling of intimacy in your writing)
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes a reader and a novel just don't mesh. This slow going look at millennial issues with the baby boomer generation just did not work for me.While I had no issue with the writing style itself, told from three perspectives, I never connected with the characters enough to care about them or their relationships, and the music subplot fell flat for me.Thank you St. Martin's Press and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Cheri
    January 1, 1970
    ”I can't get no satisfaction, I can't get no satisfaction'Cause I try and I try and I try and I tryI can't get no, I can't get no” -- (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction, The Rolling Stones, Songwriters: Keith Richards / Mick JaggerBoy meets girl. Boy lives with girl. Boy falls in love with girl. Boy proposes to girl. Girl walks away. Boy loses job. Boy moves home with parents. Boy becomes Boomer1 online. Boy rants online about baby boomers having “all the jobs.” Boy incites radical movement. “They w ”I can't get no satisfaction, I can't get no satisfaction'Cause I try and I try and I try and I tryI can't get no, I can't get no” -- (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction, The Rolling Stones, Songwriters: Keith Richards / Mick JaggerBoy meets girl. Boy lives with girl. Boy falls in love with girl. Boy proposes to girl. Girl walks away. Boy loses job. Boy moves home with parents. Boy becomes Boomer1 online. Boy rants online about baby boomers having “all the jobs.” Boy incites radical movement. “They were baby boomers. They had and they had and they had, as if that was the very condition of their own existence—having, owning, getting, living out Bellow’s I want, I want, I want—while he and his generation had not. They, too, wanted plenty, but they did not have.” Cassie Black, née Claire Stankowitcz, began her first year at Wellesley under her new name, and she began to change, as well, as the year passed. A former violin student, she joined a punk band, and as the years passed, the band made plans to live in Brooklyn. Through playing gigs in one spot, they made connections to get gigs in another until one night they end up playing CBGB, a club in the East Village where bigger names had played. It is at this club that Cassie and Mark meet, and find they have a common love of bluegrass. At the time, Cassie was in a relationship with her bandmate Natalia, which quickly crumbles away. And so boy meets girl. Boy lives with girl. Boy falls in love with girl. Girl is happy. Temporarily…Mark Brumfeld has plans to meet up with Cassie one night when his band was playing at Pete’s Candy Store, playing mostly traditional bluegrass music, with a diamond burning a hole in his pocket, and dreams for their future.When his plans turn to so much shite, and continue to roll downhill very quickly, he not only loses the girl, his journalistic career is caught up in the mudslide that his life has become and plops him down in the basement of his parents’ house. Home again, home again…Since he can’t see the connections that led to any of this, and he’s understandably frustrated, angry, and so he begins an online rant which turns into a radical movement with an aim targeting the baby boomers, calling himself Boomer1. His mother, Julia, a woman who was also a musician in her life before marriage and childbirth, living in the Haight in the days we all associate with the Haight, the era of the 60s, when rock ‘n roll took on another level beyond “The Twist.” She could never have imagined that her son would return home, but then what is a mother to do? ”What Julia did know was that this image of Bubbe Bertha ironing tinfoil return to her at the oddest times, unpredictable and unpredicated, strangely if only momentarily debilitating.”Reading much of this felt as though I was trapped in a room with someone ranting at me about the baby boomer generation having “all the jobs.” There is a lot of “telling” that feels more like yelling, and not enough “showing,” which is why I’m not rating this one higher – not only because the telling was more like yelling, but because it felt as if it was almost all “telling,” I never felt anything for most of these characters. There are, occasionally, some lovely passages, reflecting on life, but they were too few and too far between for me.Pub Date: 18 SEP 2018Many thanks for the ARC provided by St. Martin’s Press.
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  • ☮Karen
    January 1, 1970
    St. Martins Press comped me this copy, and I thank them. So, I can tell you this story is about two young adults, Cassie from Ohio who changed her name before moving to New York City, and Mark, who as a side job plays in a band with Cassie and loves her very much. Cassie won't marry him, because she really prefers women, although Mark is clueless. They both have poorly paying day jobs and are barely subsisting, and Mark blames his lack of success on the Baby Boomer generation as a whole, because St. Martins Press comped me this copy, and I thank them. So, I can tell you this story is about two young adults, Cassie from Ohio who changed her name before moving to New York City, and Mark, who as a side job plays in a band with Cassie and loves her very much. Cassie won't marry him, because she really prefers women, although Mark is clueless. They both have poorly paying day jobs and are barely subsisting, and Mark blames his lack of success on the Baby Boomer generation as a whole, because none of them will retire like they're expected to so that Mark can have a crack at their high-paying jobs. The more Mark thinks about this, in fact, the more convinced he is that this is the source of all his problems, and he is quite angry. He ends up unemployed, living in his parents' basement, and becomes an on-line celebrity called Boomer1 with some crazy, batshit ideas about how to get Boomers to retire or die.I enjoyed Cassie immensely, who by the way becomes quite a successful executive in the techy field (oh, the irony). But Julia (Mark's mom) seemed an afterthought who contributed little to the story. And Mark was just an idiot of epic proportions whose chapters I skimmed over because they were just... plain... frustrating.I think this was satire but not very funny, in my personal opinion, and also was, IMO, utter nonsense. Let's just say I am probably not the target audience for this one and perhaps I didn't get it?
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Daniel Torday’s Boomer1 is a very good novel that focuses on what people do to maintain relationships and to stick to their ideals, even in the face of hypocrisy. Even with some flaws, Torday’s ideas are genuine and hold important questions for the current generation. I enjoyed Boomer1 and will definitely recommend it.Thank you to NetGalley, St. Martin’s Press, and Daniel Torday for the advanced copy for review.Full review can be found here: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/04/19/bo...Please check o Daniel Torday’s Boomer1 is a very good novel that focuses on what people do to maintain relationships and to stick to their ideals, even in the face of hypocrisy. Even with some flaws, Torday’s ideas are genuine and hold important questions for the current generation. I enjoyed Boomer1 and will definitely recommend it.Thank you to NetGalley, St. Martin’s Press, and Daniel Torday for the advanced copy for review.Full review can be found here: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/04/19/bo...Please check out all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog
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  • Amy Gennaro
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to St. Martin's Press, the author, and NetGalley for giving me this ARC in exchange for my candid review.Wow! Tough book to review. I actually hated the book at first because it was an unadulterated attack on Baby Boomers and all that they have accomplished. And a call to arms for them to all retire, so that Millenials can take the good jobs.At that point in the book---I wanted to rip through the pages and smack the sh%& out of the characters for being whiney babies and not underst Thank you to St. Martin's Press, the author, and NetGalley for giving me this ARC in exchange for my candid review.Wow! Tough book to review. I actually hated the book at first because it was an unadulterated attack on Baby Boomers and all that they have accomplished. And a call to arms for them to all retire, so that Millenials can take the good jobs.At that point in the book---I wanted to rip through the pages and smack the sh%& out of the characters for being whiney babies and not understanding that nothing was handed to the Baby Boomers---we worked hard for it.But then it started to point out some of the crazy social, technological, and societal things that the Millenials are doing. And so it became a reflection on the struggles from both generations. And the practical decisions that were made by some of the most idealistic and artistic members of each generation.It pointed out the scope and the influence that instant information technology can have---both for good and for very,very bad. One line resonated with me...."Technology was addictive when it was working, but when technology wasn't working, it was more addictive than heroin."So, it would be a great book for Baby Boomers, Gen Xers and Millenials all to read. It actually became very thought-provoking when the whole story unfolded. I would give this book high marks. Read it--it will make you think about society's evolution.
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  • Janice Lombardo
    January 1, 1970
    I sit here with 7 actual pages of notes on this book. I guess I could write a book on this book. I didn't care for the characters although they were excellently portrayed. There were many times when I frankly did not understand where anyone was coming from. The story was much better during the parts that were current action. I had to force myself to read some of the long past stories and repetitive words. The ending was, to me, depressing. Three stars because the basic idea of this book is super I sit here with 7 actual pages of notes on this book. I guess I could write a book on this book. I didn't care for the characters although they were excellently portrayed. There were many times when I frankly did not understand where anyone was coming from. The story was much better during the parts that were current action. I had to force myself to read some of the long past stories and repetitive words. The ending was, to me, depressing. Three stars because the basic idea of this book is super! The writing is good. The characters play out.Many thanks to St. Martin's Press and NetGalley for this thought-provoking story.
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  • Lolly K Dandeneau
    January 1, 1970
    via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/'They were baby boomers. They had and they had and they had, as if that was the very condition of their own existance- having, owning, getting, living out Bellow’s I want, I want, I want- while he and his generation had not. They, too, wanted plenty, but they did not have.'For Mark Brumfeld his talents as a Bluegrass musician, journalist, and now holding a PhD in English- life hasn't taken him to the places his youthful dreams promised. Unlike t via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/'They were baby boomers. They had and they had and they had, as if that was the very condition of their own existance- having, owning, getting, living out Bellow’s I want, I want, I want- while he and his generation had not. They, too, wanted plenty, but they did not have.'For Mark Brumfeld his talents as a Bluegrass musician, journalist, and now holding a PhD in English- life hasn't taken him to the places his youthful dreams promised. Unlike the baby boomer generation (his parents included) with their endless possibilities and with their endless possibilities and still feasting on the spoils of the war generation, all he has to show is mounting debt, and a broken heart after his girlfriend Cassie refuses his marriage proposal. Tail between his legs, he has to move back home and live in his parent’s basement. There is no postwar high for his generation, and he has a lot to say about it. If he wanted to buy a house, if he ever had a solid job, there isn’t a chance he could afford one. It’s those baby boomers hogging up all the jobs, out-staying their welcome here on planet earth, refusing to give up the reins of power. They are the reason the millennials can’t have anything! His Boomer Missives (videos online) have a following, and before he knows it he is a national threat. Cassie is a Midwestern girl who wants nothing more than to change her entire being. A bassist in an all female punk band that she founded, it isn't long before she is replaced by someone who has played with bigger names. Just like that, she's out and heartbroken. It is by chance she and Mark keep running into each other, and he brings her back to the stage, what she loves doing. A year in, they are living together, making music, spending time in bed, nothing too serious but Mark is depressed. Nothing he wants is happening fast enough, everything is just wrong in the world! Old love returns in Cassie's life, maybe Mark isn’t the one? His funk is a heavy weight but maybe he can turn things around, ambushing her with a wedding proposal that costs him far more than he could imagine, making it impossible for him to remain in his apartment. His future suddenly feels like a limp thing, he moves back with his parents, his career prospects dead yet Cassie’s is thriving, taking directions where the only way is up, and making a lot of money. If Mark is love-sick, Cassie’s memories of their time together are completely different. So why is it that when he takes part in ‘activities’ she is suddenly being interviewed by the FBI? Surely Cassie loved him at some point, but she wasn’t fully committed to him, wasn’t really that serious! She knew he was lonely, broken when he left, but he had his thing, his passion in his boomer missives. Just what has he done?Mark’s mother never dreamed her adult son would be living at home again, and never in her wildest imaginings did she think he would be sharing his ‘revolutionary views’ with the world in her own home, marking her for the rest of her life! Certainly in the two weeks prior to clearing out her things to make room for him she wasn’t exactly thrilled at the prospect! Once the sort of woman who wanted to become nothing like her own parents (similar to Cassie in many ways), to escape the snares of motherhood, convention, she had her own bohemian existence, her musical talents, a 'what if' past to visit, at least in her memories.” …she was the emperor of her memory palace and not even her son or her husband was invited to join her.” A life she had to give up, decisions to make that led her here, living in a home with a son who has gotten himself in far more serious trouble than he ever intended.Each character has spent time changing everything about themselves from their names to shaking off their upbringing. Mark’s mother Julia says as much in the telling of her past. Each wants reinvention at some point in time.Characters are on the cusp of becoming, it is easy for some and impossible for others. Who doesn’t want the golden apple of success? Are the baby boomers really as bad as Mark believes, or have they too given up on their own dreams? What is more emasculating than failure, having to return home and feel like a ‘man child’, reverting? What about the baby boomers who are meant to be enjoying their golden years but are giving shelter to their full-grown children who can’t seem to catch a break? Or do they all just really need a good kick in the arse?Cassie is an interesting character, confused about where she is going, who she loves, what she wants and for whatever reason opportunities seem to present themselves to her. Maybe it’s in her attitude, her desires. Mark is disgruntled from the start, maybe he is just in his own way, not to say he doesn’t have legitimate complaints, lord knows times are hard and it can feel like the luck of the draw is against you. You can work hard, you can educate yourself to the point of brain exploding but success isn’t guaranteed. But the frustration of youth is clearly genuine, and it’s understandable why the baby boomers and the millennials clash so much and sometimes seem to come from different planets. Truth is, they are trying as hard as they can but it is highly competitive, and jobs don’t fall out of the sky. Are there lazy millenials, of course, but there are just as many working their fingers to the bone just to stay afloat.There is so much angst in his boomer missives, creations taking on a life of their own. An interesting story though I wasn’t really in love with the characters, I was still interested in where all of this was leading.Publication Date: September 18, 2018St. Martin’s Press
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  • Jessica Mcbee
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. I didn't know what to expect, but this novel was intense. You could feel the frustration of the Boomer Boomers in Mark's sections. Very interesting take on the millennial vs. baby boomer generations. Definitely an interesting read that makes you think. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Barbara Hall
    January 1, 1970
    Four words come to mind in thinking about Daniel Torday's "Boomer1": I was knocked out!!Boomer1 tells the story of Mark Brumfeld, an unemployed writer and would-be academic who is forced to move back to his parent's home. He begins a series of video rants against Baby Boomers that go viral and his life is upended in unexpected ways.Written in 10 different parts, each featuring either Mark, his ex girlfriend Cassie or his mother, Julia, Torday's stunning writing is smart, funny and drives an ener Four words come to mind in thinking about Daniel Torday's "Boomer1": I was knocked out!!Boomer1 tells the story of Mark Brumfeld, an unemployed writer and would-be academic who is forced to move back to his parent's home. He begins a series of video rants against Baby Boomers that go viral and his life is upended in unexpected ways.Written in 10 different parts, each featuring either Mark, his ex girlfriend Cassie or his mother, Julia, Torday's stunning writing is smart, funny and drives an energy and urgency of the characters depicted. Modern urban living, writing, music and the ever present internet, are explored in what is ultimately a cautionary tale.This is one of the best works of fiction I've read in 2018 and I will be highly recommending Boomer1 to my customers.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway. I enjoyed this story. I am in the age range of the younger group of characters in this novel and have seen many battles played out between generations. I think this book had an interesting take on these differences.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I had trouble getting into this book but once in, I really enjoyed it. As one of the Baby Boomer generation, I tired of the "blame-game" that Mark raged about. We grew up with a work ethic and deserved the jobs we got based on merit. We retire when we are able to (fortunately I am)! So I had to re-adjust my thinking a little to see through his eyes. I have children his age so I understand the frustration of being over-educated and unable to find suitable employment. I also understand the frustra I had trouble getting into this book but once in, I really enjoyed it. As one of the Baby Boomer generation, I tired of the "blame-game" that Mark raged about. We grew up with a work ethic and deserved the jobs we got based on merit. We retire when we are able to (fortunately I am)! So I had to re-adjust my thinking a little to see through his eyes. I have children his age so I understand the frustration of being over-educated and unable to find suitable employment. I also understand the frustration of not knowing whether Social Security will be around. We worry about that too. I did like the three different perspectives--from Mark, Cassie, and Mark's mother Julia. There are important concepts addressed by Torday and we would be wise to take heed as the digital age moves at the speed of light. Things we once took for granted may not be there in the future. This is a relevant and poignant read!Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC!
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  • Patricia Romero
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the premise of this book. Why are so many millennials moving home and not being able to find jobs? Why are these people so angry at baby boomers?Told through the eyes of Mark,Cassie and Mark's mother we have voices of all generations.One thing that bothered me was the huge words over and over again. Not necessary. I felt like a lot of this should have been edited better as Mark comes off as out of touch and entitled. Cassie is more go with the flow and Julia certainly doesn't want her I enjoyed the premise of this book. Why are so many millennials moving home and not being able to find jobs? Why are these people so angry at baby boomers?Told through the eyes of Mark,Cassie and Mark's mother we have voices of all generations.One thing that bothered me was the huge words over and over again. Not necessary. I felt like a lot of this should have been edited better as Mark comes off as out of touch and entitled. Cassie is more go with the flow and Julia certainly doesn't want her adult son living down in her basement making videos that have her being followed by the Feds.While I can understand the angst of not being able to find a job, what exactly did he expect to do with a liberal arts degree, if not teach. He says there are no jobs. While right here where I live they are begging for teachers.Unfortunately not every book clicks with a reader and this one had so many 6 syllable words that it just felt off. They didn't mesh with the story well.Give it a try. You may like it.Negalley/St.Martin's Press September 18th
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  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    As one of the culpable Baby Boomers described in this story, I really enjoyed this book about the frustrations and trials for the millennial left in our wake. Always a subject worth debating that no one ever wins.Mark tries so hard to succeed but fails miserably and embarrassingly at every turn. His friend (wish girlfriend) Cassie, on the other hand, is wildly successful in any venture she makes a small effort with. The perspective of Mark’s mother, Julia, adds another dimension to the personali As one of the culpable Baby Boomers described in this story, I really enjoyed this book about the frustrations and trials for the millennial left in our wake. Always a subject worth debating that no one ever wins.Mark tries so hard to succeed but fails miserably and embarrassingly at every turn. His friend (wish girlfriend) Cassie, on the other hand, is wildly successful in any venture she makes a small effort with. The perspective of Mark’s mother, Julia, adds another dimension to the personalities and perspectives.I thoroughly enjoyed this book and can understand some, but not all of the frustration detailed in the lives of the youth.(I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. Thank you to St. Martin’s Press and NetGalley for making it available.)
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  • Rachel Sukeforth
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't want to out this book down. Well written by closely examining 3 characters and how their lives were interwoven. I also found this book to be topical. As a millennial myself the sentiment hit close to home.
  • Kaye
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure: I was born solidly in mid-Baby Boom. This book could be described as an anti-Boomer manifesto. That said, I can't express how much I loved reading it.Yes, as some other Goodreads reviewers have pointed out, the three main characters are shallow. At times I wanted to slap each of them silly over the choices they made. But they are not portrayed in a shallow fashion. It is clear that each -- of whatever age, gender or sexual orientation -- is fairly confused at the various turns o Full disclosure: I was born solidly in mid-Baby Boom. This book could be described as an anti-Boomer manifesto. That said, I can't express how much I loved reading it.Yes, as some other Goodreads reviewers have pointed out, the three main characters are shallow. At times I wanted to slap each of them silly over the choices they made. But they are not portrayed in a shallow fashion. It is clear that each -- of whatever age, gender or sexual orientation -- is fairly confused at the various turns of life, and is trying to puzzle through it.Mark, who later in the book calls himself Boomer1, frustrated me because his life to this point has been directed by a desire to please and impress. His mother Julia, in contrast, had pinballed through her life (much like girlfriend Cassie), caroming from one impulse to another before finally coming to rest, perhaps immobilized by disability.Reading Boomer1 presented me with a delicious dilemma: Each sentence seemed so packed with wit and insight that I would slow down to savor the meaning -- until the propulsive plot would again kick in and I would speed up to discover "what happens next?" I still wonder, how did author Daniel Torday do that?I'm mystified that none of the readers on this site so far have mentioned the sheer hilarity in Torday's story. If you plan to read the book, put on your satire glasses and you might get more out of it. Yet it's more than a beautifully-written satire. There is inter-generational insight and there are profound questions about society, leavened by subtle mockery.I did take umbrage at one point, when Julia was depicted as largely computer-illiterate. Had to remind myself it wasn't an indictment of all boomers, and that I was personalizing.I will be recommending this book far and wide. (Thank you to Netgalley and St. Martin's Press for the ARC of this book.)
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I have struggled to keep reading this book for 161 pages. I am beginning to see the theme and I like the evolving awareness that content once online has a life of its own. I don't like the main character and have trouble believing he is so clueless as to blame his problems on a whole generation. I think if I liked the characters more, or even hated them more, I would feel more connection. Also, as a Boomer with a Milllenial son, I dislike the broad characterization of generations.
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  • Lois Sittu
    January 1, 1970
    I could not connect with the characters in this book. I didn't care about them and had to force myself to read a chapter or two at a time in order to finish it. It took me over a month to get through this. I finished several other books while trying to read this one. Under other circumstances, I would have quit reading it but I won Boomer 1 on goodreads giveaways and felt obligated to see it through to the end.
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  • Elaine Young
    January 1, 1970
    I received an early copy of Boomer1 by Daniel Torday in a goodreads giveaway and I thoroughlyenjoyed it. This novel, told through the perspectives of three characters, Mark, Cassie, and Mark's mother, Julia is timely, well-written, amusing, and definitely thought provoking.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    This one was just not for me. As much as I am curious about what happens I could not bring myself to keep reading. I need someone to give me the spoilers and I'll be good. I feel kinda bad since I won this arc on Goodreads and I appreciate that but clearly not enough to force myself to finish. It's now up for grabs in the Library staff lounge.
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  • James Beggarly
    January 1, 1970
    Exciting book about a young man, Mark, who can’t make it in the world and starts ranting on the Internet, which starts a revolution that quickly grows out of his control. Sharp, funny and heartbreaking as we see the story told through Mark, his ex girlfriend and his mother.
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  • Ramona Mead
    January 1, 1970
    While I appreciate that this novel is timely and relevant, it simply didn't resonate with me. I am in between the millennial and baby boomer generations, and I can see both sides of the issue. Boomers are working past the retirement age, hanging on to jobs the younger generations have been working toward. The novel started out strong and I was intrigued, however by the half way point, I just didn't care too much. The writing throughout is sharp and witty, but I just couldn't rally any emotional While I appreciate that this novel is timely and relevant, it simply didn't resonate with me. I am in between the millennial and baby boomer generations, and I can see both sides of the issue. Boomers are working past the retirement age, hanging on to jobs the younger generations have been working toward. The novel started out strong and I was intrigued, however by the half way point, I just didn't care too much. The writing throughout is sharp and witty, but I just couldn't rally any emotional energy for Mark and Cassie. The only character I enjoyed is Julia, whose sacrifices for her family (and some resentment because of them) felt more realistic than the rest of the story.
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  • Lisabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley, the publisher. and the author for allowing me to read and review a digital copy of this book. What stood out to me most about this book is the firm grounding it finds in contemporary digital culture. Boomer1 is an enjoyable and relevant literary reading experience.
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  • Mary Nee
    January 1, 1970
    A good story. Enjoy it !
  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    My review for this novel was published in the July 1, 2018, edition of Library Journal:In his provocative second novel (after The Last Flight of Poxl West), Torday takes the idea of generational warfare a step further. When 31-year-old Mark Brumfeld—overeducated, underemployed, and freshly rejected by his bandmate and would-be fiancée Cassie—moves back to his parents' house in Baltimore to lick his wounds, he channels his frustration into a series of furious "Boomer Missives" under the moniker B My review for this novel was published in the July 1, 2018, edition of Library Journal:In his provocative second novel (after The Last Flight of Poxl West), Torday takes the idea of generational warfare a step further. When 31-year-old Mark Brumfeld—overeducated, underemployed, and freshly rejected by his bandmate and would-be fiancée Cassie—moves back to his parents' house in Baltimore to lick his wounds, he channels his frustration into a series of furious "Boomer Missives" under the moniker Boomer1, replete with meme-ready calls to action: "Boom boom." "Retire or we'll retire you." "Resist much, obey little." Soon Mark's rants spawn copycats who turn his catchphrases into tangible action, manipulating American media and threatening retaliation. As the story moves toward a violent climax, Mark's ex-girlfriend Cassie, who has begun a lucrative career in new media, and his mother, Julia, a product of the 1960s with her own history of rebellion, both struggle to reconcile their sympathies with his beliefs with the true damage his videos have wrought. VERDICT Torday's novel is smart and culturally attuned, but its satirical edge suffers from a split narrative that leaves its protagonist too often a spectator to the movement he created. For fans of Nathan Hill's The Nix and Tony Tulathimutte's Private Citizens.Copyright ©2018 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. Reprinted with permission.
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  • Olga Pavlov
    January 1, 1970
    A fun and dynamic read with Mark Brumfeld.I felt entertained, it sure came with some lengthes and an exceptional price (!!!) but it is worth it. I will buy again to have it standing in my home.
  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed reading this book- the story told from 3 characters view. very interesting and recommended reading.
  • Scull17
    January 1, 1970
    How to emotionally and financially bankrupt your aging deaf mother (lol)! I have to say this book kept me interested even though I had problems with it; it was hard for me to believe, for example, that highly educated young people could be so misguided (their understanding of a complex set of issues too simplistic, no gray area, they're right and the baby boomers are wrong). As for the positives: the sense of humor (when a book has me snickering I tend to be more generous towards it); and Julia: How to emotionally and financially bankrupt your aging deaf mother (lol)! I have to say this book kept me interested even though I had problems with it; it was hard for me to believe, for example, that highly educated young people could be so misguided (their understanding of a complex set of issues too simplistic, no gray area, they're right and the baby boomers are wrong). As for the positives: the sense of humor (when a book has me snickering I tend to be more generous towards it); and Julia: it would be a real treat to read a book dedicated wholly on Julia; and perhaps another book on her grandmother, a woman scarred by the Great Depression, the image of her ironing a piece of tinfoil in order to reuse has stuck with me (just as it had with Julia).Thank you Goodreads Giveaways for my ARC.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars for me.I was disappointed by this one - This was another one where I just didn't "get" it. While the characters were intertwined, there was still a disconnect between them and what I thought was the plot line. I felt like there was a lot of information provided that didn't really relate to the overall story. I enjoyed Cassie's character, but really didn't connect with Mark or Julia. There was potential here; the concept was interesting and could have provided a great opportunity to exp 2.5 stars for me.I was disappointed by this one - This was another one where I just didn't "get" it. While the characters were intertwined, there was still a disconnect between them and what I thought was the plot line. I felt like there was a lot of information provided that didn't really relate to the overall story. I enjoyed Cassie's character, but really didn't connect with Mark or Julia. There was potential here; the concept was interesting and could have provided a great opportunity to explore some hard societal questions, but it was overall pretty superficial. There just wasn't enough depth to the story to wow me.Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for an advance copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
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