Deck the Hounds (Andy Carpenter #18)
This Christmas mystery, featuring criminal defense lawyer Andy Carpenter and his faithful golden retriever, Tara, showcases Rosenfelt’s trademark humor and larger-than-life characters. Reluctant lawyer Andy Carpenter doesn’t usually stop to help others, but seeing a dog next to a homeless man inspires him to give the pair some money to help. It’s just Andy’s luck that things don’t end there. Soon after Andy’s encounter with them, man and dog are attacked in the middle of the night on the street. The dog defends its new owner, and the erstwhile attacker is bitten but escapes. But the dog is quarantined and the man, Don Carrigan, is heartbroken.Andy’s wife Laurie can’t resist helping the duo after learning Andy has met them before… it’s the Christmas season after all. In a matter of days Don and his dog Zoey are living above Andy’s garage and become two new additions to the family. It’s not until Andy accidentally gives away his guest’s name during an interview that things go awry; turns out Don is wanted for a murder that happened two years ago. Don not only claims he’s innocent, but that he had no idea that he was wanted for a crime he has no knowledge of in the first place. It’s up to Andy to exonerate his new friend, if he doesn’t get pulled into the quagmire first.David Rosenfelt’s signature wit, charm, and cleverness are back again in this most exciting installment yet.

Deck the Hounds (Andy Carpenter #18) Details

TitleDeck the Hounds (Andy Carpenter #18)
Author
ReleaseOct 16th, 2018
PublisherMinotaur Books
ISBN-139781250198488
Rating
GenreMystery, Animals, Dogs

Deck the Hounds (Andy Carpenter #18) Review

  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Seeing the cover of David Rosenfelt’s Christmas book is my annual warning the big day is within squinting distance (yikes!). Okay, okay…I can hear your howls of “too soon!”. Simmer down, you’ve got lots of time. Unless your last name is Carpenter & you live in Patterson, NJ. Lapsed attorney Andy has wisely given up asking his family why it’s necessary to celebrate from November to February. Besides, they wouldn’t hear him over the continuous loop of Xmas carols. The best he can hope for is t Seeing the cover of David Rosenfelt’s Christmas book is my annual warning the big day is within squinting distance (yikes!). Okay, okay…I can hear your howls of “too soon!”. Simmer down, you’ve got lots of time. Unless your last name is Carpenter & you live in Patterson, NJ. Lapsed attorney Andy has wisely given up asking his family why it’s necessary to celebrate from November to February. Besides, they wouldn’t hear him over the continuous loop of Xmas carols. The best he can hope for is to avoid the perilous trimming of the tree while watching a kajillion football games uninterrupted. But this year he will face an even greater threat……he might actually have to go to work. You know what they say about good deeds. It all begins when Andy gives money to a homeless man & his dog. In short order, the man (Don Carrigan) & the dog (Zoey) are living above his garage. Until Don is arrested for the murder of a wealthy businessman 9 months ago. No problem. Andy assures Laurie he’ll get Don the best public defender in the biz & Zoey can shack up at the dog shelter with Willie. But it seems Laurie has taken a shine to Don. In fact, if Andy doesn’t take the case she might be so upset that the ONLY activity in their bedroom for the foreseeable future will be sleeping. Game. Set. Match.Andy signs on. And it turns out Don has led an interesting life. In alternate chapters we’re kept up on seemingly unconnected current events. A former mob enforcer has an unhealthy obsession with Don & for good reason. A popular local attorney is taken out by a sniper & he won’t be the last. And Zoey has some news of her own.Rosenfelt excels at story telling & each of these plot lines keeps you turning the pages to find out how they will inevitably weave together. As Andy reassembles his legal team, we get to spend time with characters fans have grown to love. Some show up with bells on (Sam), some drag their high heels (Edna) and some are unintelligible (Marcus). It’s the smart & humorous interplay between them added to a twisty & complex mystery that sets this series apart. The result is a story that puts your brain through its paces between the laughs. It doesn’t seem possible this is book #18 but as long as Mr. Rosenfelt keeps writing, I’ll keep reading.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    I can always count on David Rosenfelt to provide me with an Andy Carpenter book that’s interesting and humorous with a serious legal story and at least one dog. This is just what I needed right now. The characters became old friends long ago. The legal case involves a homeless vet and his dog, Zoey. Although a bit formulaic, I continue to enjoy this series. If you’re already a fan, you won’t be disappointed. If you’ve never read a David Rosenfelt book, you can start with this one.
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  • 3 no 7
    January 1, 1970
    “Deck the Hounds” by David Rosenfelt is not a sappy holiday story with Andy Carpenter listening to carolers and chasing fake Santas; neither are the dogs dressed up in Santa outfits, but it is a cute cover. The book just happens to start out in November. It is Thanksgiving in Patterson New Jersey, and it is not a time to be out on the street and certainly not with a dog. Regular readers just love Andy carpenter for all the things he is and does. New readers can jump right because Rosenfelt seaml “Deck the Hounds” by David Rosenfelt is not a sappy holiday story with Andy Carpenter listening to carolers and chasing fake Santas; neither are the dogs dressed up in Santa outfits, but it is a cute cover. The book just happens to start out in November. It is Thanksgiving in Patterson New Jersey, and it is not a time to be out on the street and certainly not with a dog. Regular readers just love Andy carpenter for all the things he is and does. New readers can jump right because Rosenfelt seamlessly incorporates any needed background information into the current the tale or tail depending on whether or not you are one of Andy’s dogs.Every time Andy runs into a destitute person looking for money, he gives him or her twenty dollars. The current situation is even more heartbreaking for Andy because this homeless person has a dog and needs legal help. Andy is not just reluctant to take on a homeless person as a client, he never wants any clients. He has been trying to retire for years, but he just cannot seem to pull it off. However, because it’s Christmas, Andy takes the case. The whole team is there to assist including Hike, Lynch, Sam, Willie, Edna, Marcus, Vince, Pete, and of course Laurie and Ricky.Andy Carpenter, doer of good deeds, tells most of the story in his signature first-person style that conveys positions, scenarios, and observations as only he can. Rosenfelt expertly uses alternating points of view to intertwine other storylines and to present information that Andy does not yet know. The chapters are structured so that the story flows easily from one chapter to the next with the first sentence pulling readers into the chapter and the last sentence dangling a little tidbit for later. The pace is consistent, alternating between crime and dog walks, sports and criminals, and conversations and eating. As the body count increases, so do the unanswered questions; it is New Jersey after all. “Too bad the list of things we don’t know is longer.”There is also a lot of Andy humor intermingled along the way. “I’m going to have a cup of coffee while she makes herself some kind of healthy shake, composed of every revolting green vegetable known to humanity. She also adds some kind of powder, which I have to assume is a crushed and dried version of a revolting vegetable.”Rosenfelt excels at storytelling, and each of the plot lines goes to unanticipated places with deviations that keep readers turning the pages. Ultimately, good triumphs evil, not a surprise there, but the details are complicated and unexpected. As always, at the celebration party assorted secrets come out as Andy fills in gaps that participants (and readers) missed. I received a copy of “Deck the Hounds” from David Rosenfelt, St. Martin’s Press, Minotaur Books, and NetGalley. I love Andy Carpenter books, as do readers everywhere, because in the end, everyone lives happily ever after with their dogs.
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  • Maxine
    January 1, 1970
    On the way home from his office, Andy Carpenter, semi-retired lawyer and full-time dog lover, runs across a homeless vet and his dog, Zoey. He shares a few words with the man as he gives a donation and is impressed by him. A couple of days later, he reads that the homeless vet, Dan Carrigan, was attacked and, to protect him, Zoey bit the attacker. Now, she is in quarantine. Andy convinces the shelter to let him keep her during the quarantine period and invites Dan to move into his garage loft so On the way home from his office, Andy Carpenter, semi-retired lawyer and full-time dog lover, runs across a homeless vet and his dog, Zoey. He shares a few words with the man as he gives a donation and is impressed by him. A couple of days later, he reads that the homeless vet, Dan Carrigan, was attacked and, to protect him, Zoey bit the attacker. Now, she is in quarantine. Andy convinces the shelter to let him keep her during the quarantine period and invites Dan to move into his garage loft so that the pair can stay together. When the media gets hold of the story, they print it as a nice feel-good holiday tale and include Dan's name. But turns out the police have been looking for Dan as a prime suspect in a murder and he is arrested. Andy is convinced that he is innocent and, since those are the only kinds of clients he will take, he decides he will defend him. But it becomes clear pretty quickly that what had looked like an easy case was anything but and Andy may be in a whole lot more trouble than he could have ever anticipated.Deck the Hounds by author David Rosenfelt is the latest installment in the Andy Carpenter Mystery series but it was the first I have read. I can say, though, it won't be the last. It is a fast fun read with an interesting plot and characters. Andy, especially is an extremely likeable protagonist with a wonderfully understated and self-deprecating sense of humour that I could fully appreciate. This is definitely my favourite of all the cosy mysteries I have read this year and recommend it highly to anyone who is a fan of cosies or is looking for a book to fill the Christmas stocking of their favourite cosy aficionado.Thanks to Netgalley and St Martin's Press for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review
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  • Jeannine
    January 1, 1970
    I always enjoy this series and this one is as good as the rest. The mystery elements are always sufficient, though the superhuman abilities of Marcus and Sam's super-hacking allow considerable shortcuts (though I still figured it out before Andy, so ha!). But the mystery is just the framework for the characters to show off their quirks and Andy's smart mouth. The reader comes back to the series for the people and dogs above all, as well as Andy's last minute rabbit-out-of-the-hat courtroom drama I always enjoy this series and this one is as good as the rest. The mystery elements are always sufficient, though the superhuman abilities of Marcus and Sam's super-hacking allow considerable shortcuts (though I still figured it out before Andy, so ha!). But the mystery is just the framework for the characters to show off their quirks and Andy's smart mouth. The reader comes back to the series for the people and dogs above all, as well as Andy's last minute rabbit-out-of-the-hat courtroom drama. Very solid, very humorous and very enjoyable.
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  • Hobart
    January 1, 1970
    This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.--- Andy Carpenter sees a homeless man with a dog on the street, gives the man some money and a gift card for dog food (naturally, the dog gets more than the man, because it's Andy Carpenter) and has a brief conversation with him. Not long after that, that same man is on the news -- he'd been attacked by a stranger and his dog defended him. Which resulted in the dog being put in the pound. Laurie's filled with pre-Christmas spirit and insists This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.--- Andy Carpenter sees a homeless man with a dog on the street, gives the man some money and a gift card for dog food (naturally, the dog gets more than the man, because it's Andy Carpenter) and has a brief conversation with him. Not long after that, that same man is on the news -- he'd been attacked by a stranger and his dog defended him. Which resulted in the dog being put in the pound. Laurie's filled with pre-Christmas spirit and insists that Andy help out. So he uses his rescue foundation to get custody of the dog and moves the pair into the apartment over his garage. How heartwarming is this? Clearly, this is fodder for a Christmas/holiday story. But it's also an Andy Carpenter story, so naturally, after Andy does a newspaper interview about the man -- giving his name -- he's arrested for murder. No one was more surprised by this move than Andy's guest, Don. Not only has Don never heard of the victim, he was unaware that he was wanted by the police. Laurie's pre-Christmas spirit is still strong, so she talks him into defending the man. It helps that he's innocent, a dog lover, and an educated, articulate vet with PTSD. The PTSD aspect of the story was told with sensitivity and tact. It didn't feel tacked on to make the character more sympathetic, but it grounded him in reality and may help to inform some readers about the prices that too many vets are paying.There is another storyline -- seemingly unrelated -- running through the novel. Obviously, it's going to tie into Andy's case, but it takes a long time for that to happen. This gives the reader multiple opportunities to guess how the two are connected (and multiple opportunities to be wrong. I guessed what was happening in that story pretty easily, and I think most people who read a lot of legal thrillers will. But how it connects to the main story will likely leave most readers as surprised as I was (surprised, and then filled with a strong sense of, "well, naturally, what else could it be?").The usual gang is back and in their prime form -- Hike is back to his full-time dour self; Ricky is a cute kid; Laurie provides the moral center; Pete is a good cop who continually underestimates Andy's clients; Sam is a wizard with computers in a way that probably defies reality Marcus is his super-hero best here, and possibly faces his biggest challenge yet (I thoroughly enjoyed this scene). What better way to spend a holiday (or at least a book set around one) than with a bunch of friends like these have become over the years?Andy spent more time in the courtroom in this book than he has lately -- it seemed to me, anyway, I didn't do a page count. His courtroom antics and cross-examinations are what drew me to the character in the first place, so this is the stuff in these books I most look forward to. Rosenfelt brought his A-game to the courtroom events here, and I loved it. As far as mysteries go, this in one of the most satisfying cases that Rosenfelt has brought us in years.In my post about the previous "holiday special" I said that I really don't like it when long-running series do a holiday special -- yet, The Twelve Dogs of Christmas and Deck the Hounds have been my favorite installments in the last couple of years in this series. Maybe that means this Grinch's heart is growing a couple of sizes, or maybe it's that Rosenfelt is inspired to work harder in these. My guess? It's the clients -- the Andy Carpenter books are at their best when they focus on the client, not on some large conspiracy. These holiday books have the kind of clients you spend time on, that the reader gets invested in -- and therefore, Andy gets to shine in defending them. Whatever the reason, this is a sure-fire win for Andy Carpenter fans. Particularly if you don't mind a little Christmas celebration (or, if you're like Laurie, and insist on commemorating the holiday for months).Disclaimer: I received this eARC from St. Martin's Press via NetGalley in exchange for this post -- thanks to both for this.
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  • RO G'ma
    January 1, 1970
    Deck the Hounds is the eighteenth book David Rosenfelt’s Andy Carpenter Mystery series and is a great book that can be read as a standalone. This is a cozy, with a humorous hero, who has a happy home life with his human and canine family. There is some adult language in this book, but no graphic violence or adult situations. I enjoy this author’s writing style and witty dialog. Mr. Rosenfelt has written a fast paced, well thought out, interesting and complex mystery, with a good story line, and Deck the Hounds is the eighteenth book David Rosenfelt’s Andy Carpenter Mystery series and is a great book that can be read as a standalone. This is a cozy, with a humorous hero, who has a happy home life with his human and canine family. There is some adult language in this book, but no graphic violence or adult situations. I enjoy this author’s writing style and witty dialog. Mr. Rosenfelt has written a fast paced, well thought out, interesting and complex mystery, with a good story line, and excellent character development. The fun and quirky characters, twists and turns, and multiple subplots keep the reader engaged.Andy Carpenter is a reluctant attorney who also runs the Tara Foundation, an animal rescue organization, with Willis and Sondra Miller. Andy lives in Paterson, New Jersey with his wife, Laurie, their adopted son, Ricky, and two dogs, Tara and Sebastian. It’s November and Laurie is gearing up for Christmas, a holiday she loves and celebrates from November to February. Andy’s independently wealthy, compassionate, and generous, so when he sees a homeless man and his dog, Zoey, huddled together in the cold, he gives him a twenty-dollar bill and a fifty-dollar gift card to a pet supply store. When Andy and his family learn the homeless man, Don Carrigan, was attacked and his dog taken away from him because he bit the attacker, his family wants to help Don. Andy arranges to be responsible for Zoey and the pups she’s expecting and the Carpenters move Don and Zoey into the apartment above their detached garage.After walking Ricky to school, Andy returned home to find the police arresting Don for the murder of Steven McMasters nine months ago in his Shore Hills home. There are no witnesses, but there’s circumstantial and DNA evidence against Don. Don, who served two tours in Iraq and suffers from PTSD, is adamant he’s never been to Shore Hills, didn’t know the victim, and didn’t murder him. Andy doesn’t want to take Don on as a client; in fact, he really doesn’t want to represent any clients, but Laurie would like him to and before he knows it, he and his team are deeply invested in the case. Andy’s team consists of Laurie, a former cop and investigator licensed to carry a gun, Edna, the self-proclaimed office manager who does as little work as possible, Hike Lynch, a fellow lawyer and doomsayer, Sam Willis, an accountant and computer genius, and Marcus Clark, a scary guy who protects Andy when necessary. The legal investigation is complex, but Andy and his team set out to prove Don was framed.I received an Advance Reader Copy of this book from NetGalley and voluntarily reviewed it.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars rounded up to 4. Thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for an advanced copy of this book. I had previously read a couple books in the Andy Carpenter series by David Rosenfelt and was delighted to receive this one. Who could resist the delightful cover art showing a pile of puppies wearing Santa hats? This looks like a cosy, relaxing mystery. Instead we get a complicated legal thriller, with many twists and turns and sardonic humor. The Andy Carpenter series always features at leas 3.5 stars rounded up to 4. Thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for an advanced copy of this book. I had previously read a couple books in the Andy Carpenter series by David Rosenfelt and was delighted to receive this one. Who could resist the delightful cover art showing a pile of puppies wearing Santa hats? This looks like a cosy, relaxing mystery. Instead we get a complicated legal thriller, with many twists and turns and sardonic humor. The Andy Carpenter series always features at least one dog. Carpenter is a wealthy retired attorney who cannot resist a case involving dogs. His mission is to rescue dogs and their owners from possible death sentences or lengthy time locked up. He is a happy family man with a sarcastic sense of humor. Andy and his wife own the Tara dog rescue centre. The series parallels the author’s life and interests. Rosenfelt and his wife started the real Tara Foundation and have rescued over 4,000 dogs. One of his books chronicles their adventure moving from California to Maine with 25 dogs.. it is no wonder his books reflect his love of these animals. The story begins when Andy encounters a homeless man and his dog. Soon the homeless man is attacked by an unknown subject, and uses force to defend himself against the assault. His dog bites the assailant. The dog is removed from his care and put in quarantine and may be destroyed. The homeless man is devastated by the loss of his dog. In the spirit of Christmas season, Andy’s family has the dog released and both he and his master are moved into an apartment above the family garage. Publicity resulting from the attack identifies the man as Don Carrigan, a former Green Beret with PTSD. He is wanted for the murder of a very wealthy man two years earlier. There is DNA evidence that he is guilty. Andy visits Carrigan in prison and believes him innocent. Carrigan denies knowing the murdered man and had no idea he was wanted by the police. He learns his dog is well cared for and is expecting puppies. The legal investigation is most complex but believable. It involves mercenaries trained killing by deadly force in hand to hand combat and sharp shooters, the mob and its enforcers, the staff at a homeless shelter, police, members of the legal prosecution, the defence, and their witnesses and the widow of the wealthy murdered man, among others. With so many characters I had difficulty keeping all their names straight. A list of characters both living and dead along with a sentence summarizing their role in the story would be helpful. Recommended for readers who enjoy legal dramas and dog rescue stories.
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  • Jacqui
    January 1, 1970
    I am a big fan of David Rosenfelt's Andy Carpenter series. I read all of the early ones and would read every one he publishes except, well, I’ll be honest: The ebooks got expensive and my local library didn't carry them. I cheered when NetGalley offered his latest, Deck the Hounds (Minotaur Books 2018) and was lucky enough to grab a free copy. By now, in the series, Andy is married with an adopted child and two (three?) dogs to round out his family. When he sees on TV that a homeless Iraqi vet w I am a big fan of David Rosenfelt's Andy Carpenter series. I read all of the early ones and would read every one he publishes except, well, I’ll be honest: The ebooks got expensive and my local library didn't carry them. I cheered when NetGalley offered his latest, Deck the Hounds (Minotaur Books 2018) and was lucky enough to grab a free copy. By now, in the series, Andy is married with an adopted child and two (three?) dogs to round out his family. When he sees on TV that a homeless Iraqi vet who he knows mostly through the soldier's dog has been arrested for murder and his dog placed in a shelter, likely scheduled to be euthanized, Andy can't sit by and allow that to happen. Though he rarely practices law anymore, and then only for innocent defendants in a case that appeals to him (a family inheritance left him wealthy), this case qualifies. It doesn't take long to realize this vet is being framed and Andy is his only hope of vindication.As with all of Rosenfelt's books, this is filled with humor, clever quips, and feel-good events that make you wish there really was an Andy Carpenter and that all dogs lived in his house. Here are a few examples:"... reaching his hand through [the cage] to gently pet the dog. It’s not that difficult because the dog seems equally anxious to make the connection and is lying right up against it..."xx"Two seconds in Marcus-time is an hour and a half to anyone else" [refers to Andy's investigator].My only complaint, and one that didn't hurt the rating, is that Rosenfelt spent a smidgeon too much time reviewing past activities. Even at my age, I do remember events longer than five pages but maybe others don't. So, really, it's OK. Just calling this out. Overall, this--as with all of his books--is a delightful read that I hated to put down even to eat dinner.
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  • Myarn
    January 1, 1970
    Deck the Hounds by David Rosenfelt - 5 StarsI received an ARC from Netgalley and the publisher St. Martins PressIn the tradition of "The Twelve Dogs of Christmas" David Rosenfelt has penned another wonderful Christmas mystery starring Andy Carpenter. I loved this book, the dialogue was witty and vintage Andy Carpenter. It opens up with Andy helping a homeless man with a dog. The dog is featured in a news story because she helps fend off an attack on the homeless man. Andy, Laurie and Ricky bring Deck the Hounds by David Rosenfelt - 5 StarsI received an ARC from Netgalley and the publisher St. Martins PressIn the tradition of "The Twelve Dogs of Christmas" David Rosenfelt has penned another wonderful Christmas mystery starring Andy Carpenter. I loved this book, the dialogue was witty and vintage Andy Carpenter. It opens up with Andy helping a homeless man with a dog. The dog is featured in a news story because she helps fend off an attack on the homeless man. Andy, Laurie and Ricky bring the homeless guy to their home for a temporary stay while the dog is in quarantine for biting the attacker. The police come out to arrest the guy because he is accused of murder. Suddenly, Andy has a new client and a mystery to solve. There are wonderful side characters like Pete, Vince, Marcus and Willie to enjoy. I also liked that Mr. Rosenfelt made the plight of veterans part of the plot. I can't wait for this to be published because the audiobook narrated by Grover Gardner will be the icing on the cake. Thank you Mr. Rosenfelt for a wonderful book.
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  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    Andy Carpenter, attorney for the innocent dog-loving downtrodden of America, is back with a Christmas-themed courtroom novel.DECK THE HOUNDS is the 18th installment in David Rosenfelt’s series, which offers readers a character who shares quite a bit in common with its author. Rosenfelt spent many years as the president of marketing for TriStar Pictures. He and his wife then moved to Maine, where they created the Tara Foundation to help find homes for sick or injured dogs. In these books, Andy al Andy Carpenter, attorney for the innocent dog-loving downtrodden of America, is back with a Christmas-themed courtroom novel.DECK THE HOUNDS is the 18th installment in David Rosenfelt’s series, which offers readers a character who shares quite a bit in common with its author. Rosenfelt spent many years as the president of marketing for TriStar Pictures. He and his wife then moved to Maine, where they created the Tara Foundation to help find homes for sick or injured dogs. In these books, Andy also heads such a foundation, although he came to his work by a much different path. The fictional lawyer inherited a substantial estate from his attorney father. He began a highly specialized legal practice, taking only clients he believed to be innocent. Along the way, he added to his fortune by winning large settlements against the law enforcement officials who participated in the wrongful convictions of his clients.Andy has been doing this for so long that he is contemplating retirement. When his wife, Laurie, asks him to take on a new case, Andy announces that he is retired. Laurie, an investigator and former police officer, responds that she will work on the case whether Andy accepts it or not. So he reluctantly agrees to represent Don Carrigan, who has been charged with murder. Andy has come out of retirement more times than Michael Jordan.Andy feels a certain responsibility to Carrigan because he unintentionally set in motion a chain of events leading to the ex-soldier’s arrest. The homeless man was mysteriously attacked; his dog, Zoey, came to his defense and bit the assailant. Rather than allow the canine to be quarantined, Andy puts Zoey and her owner in an apartment above his garage. When this act of kindness receives news coverage, Carrigan’s outstanding warrant is discovered, and he is arrested for murder.As always, once Andy is on the case, he assembles his legal team. His associate, Hike Lynch, is the polar opposite of Andy as an attorney. An eternal pessimist who finds gloom and despair in every aspect of these cases, Hike does the legwork and research, while Andy is the courtroom warrior. Other members include his secretary Edna, whose primary assignment seems to be complaining, and Sam Willis, an accountant and extraordinary investigator. Sam can find anything, and often does through means that Andy cannot fathom. Some of his tactics are less than legal, but Andy prefers not to speculate. This is the fictional legal world, and often it is better to simply not ask how or why. Finally, Andy has Marcus Clark, his security man. Strong and silent do not properly describe Marcus, who is always protecting Andy and Laurie in ways that Andy does not even recognize until after the fact.The Rosenfelt formula in this series is consistent. Early in each book, the author makes clear that Andy’s client is innocent. As trial preparation progresses, a parallel story of the actual offender is presented in incremental pieces. When the trial begins, readers wonder if Andy can identify the actual murderer before the jury returns its verdict. The concluding pages of an Andy Carpenter novel are always a race to the finish line to see if justice will triumph. Rosenfelt makes the race interesting with humorous courtroom scenes. As Andy admits, his courtroom demeanor is not the best: “Where judges are concerned, to know me is to dislike me, since I don’t always do everything by the book.”But what about Christmas? you might be asking. Laurie loves the holiday, which for the Carpenter family begins around Thanksgiving and ends long after the New Year. Andy and Laurie have a son, Ricky, who enjoys the lengthy celebration, unlike Andy, who tolerates Christmas as long as there are football games he can watch after placing a wager on the outcome.It is a rollicking group brought together once again by David Rosenfelt. One hopes that Andy Carpenter will continue to be called out of retirement to defend the innocent and entertain readers for a few more cases.Reviewed by Stuart Shiffman
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  • Angie Boyter
    January 1, 1970
    Yule love this book!When Andy Carpenter helps a homeless man and his dog by giving them twenty dollars and a Petsmart gift card, you KNOW this good deed will not go unpunished, and soon Andy finds himself defending the man, Don Carrigan, on a murder charge and rescuing the dog Zoey from the animal shelter so that she can comfortably give birth to six puppies. Andy is a reluctant lawyer, and he never seems to get easy cases, but convincing a jury to find his client innocent when there is a hat wi Yule love this book!When Andy Carpenter helps a homeless man and his dog by giving them twenty dollars and a Petsmart gift card, you KNOW this good deed will not go unpunished, and soon Andy finds himself defending the man, Don Carrigan, on a murder charge and rescuing the dog Zoey from the animal shelter so that she can comfortably give birth to six puppies. Andy is a reluctant lawyer, and he never seems to get easy cases, but convincing a jury to find his client innocent when there is a hat with the client’s DNA found at the scene of the crime and a ring belonging to the man found in the client’s locker at the homeless shelter may be even a little harder than usual.David Rosenfelt's legal thrillers featuring wise-cracking New Jersey defense lawyer Andy Carpenter and an array of lovable canines and quirky humans are favorites of mine. They have interesting plots, likable characters, and a quiet but sassy humor that provokes more smiles than guffaws. Andy’s voice as narrator is wry and often self-deprecating, but never mean, as you can see in his descriptions of his legal team. His wife Laurie is a private investigator and former police detective. Andy adores her (and their son Ricky); he also depends on her. Even as he prepares to go into a meeting alone he says, “You can watch through the window and shoot him if things get rough”. The other lawyer on the team, Hike, “is not just a glass half empty guy; he thinks the glass can never hope to be filled again.” Marcus is the “muscle” on the team; ”Godzilla isn’t as intimidating as Marcus.” There is also Edna, Andy’s secretary, who is even more reluctant a secretary than Andy is a reluctant lawyer, and Sam, the essential IT guy a.k.a. hacker. Andy’s courtroom antics make a real hit with the readers but do not make him very popular with the judge or the prosecutors. As Andy says, “Where judges are concerned, to know me is to dislike me.” This is not surprising, given Andy’s attitude towards rules: “There’s sort of an unwritten rule against recording witness interviews. I’m not even a big fan of written rules, so I pretty much ignore unwritten ones.”If you like the glimpse of Andy described above, you are going to love this book. However, since this is the 18th book in the Andy Carpenter series, a new reader surely has the question: can I start with this one? If you are new to the series, you can enjoy this book without reading any of the others, but I would suggest you read the first book, Open and Shut, to get the background for Andy’s team and their circumstances, after which you can enjoy them in any order. There’s not a bad one in the bunch.The denouement was a bit of a surprise to me but I didn’t feel cheated, because it stumped Andy for quite a while as well. The bad guys are definitely bad and pretty ruthless, but this is not an excessively graphic or nasty book. I don’t think it is too much of a spoiler to let you know that all ends well for Don Carrigan…and, of course, for dog mama Zoey.My thanks to Netgalley for an Advance Reader Copy of this book for review purposes.
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  • Teena in Toronto
    January 1, 1970
    Andy is a criminal defense lawyer who doesn't want any clients. Because of the money his father left him, he is able to not work and spend his time with his friend, Willie, running the Tara Foundation, a dog rescue that he and Willie formed. He is married to Laurie and they have a young son, Ricky, so he is enjoying his life.It's the Christmas season and Andy and Laurie befriend a homeless man with PTSD named Don and Zoey, his dog, and offer to let him live in the apartment above their garage. W Andy is a criminal defense lawyer who doesn't want any clients. Because of the money his father left him, he is able to not work and spend his time with his friend, Willie, running the Tara Foundation, a dog rescue that he and Willie formed. He is married to Laurie and they have a young son, Ricky, so he is enjoying his life.It's the Christmas season and Andy and Laurie befriend a homeless man with PTSD named Don and Zoey, his dog, and offer to let him live in the apartment above their garage. When Andy is interviewed in the newspaper after Don has been attacked, he gives Don's name. The next thing they know, Don is being arrested for a two year old murder. Don said he didn't do it and that he didn't even know the victim and Andy feels inclined to defend him. Zoey turns out to be pregnant and Willie takes care of her at the rescue.This is the eighteenth in the Andy Carpenter series (I've read them all). I enjoyed this book and am enjoying this series. I find with most series that by the time an author has come this far, the series isn't good and the author is pounding out the books just to get a paycheque. That's not the case with this series ... the author is able to keep this series fresh and fun.The story was interesting and there were some twists and turns along the way. Even though it is part of a series, it works as a stand alone (so you don't need to have read the ones before it to know what is going on). I like the writing style of this author as it was funny, sarcastic and amusing. It was written mostly in first person perspective in Andy's voice but is sometimes in third person perspective when the focus is on the bad guys.I like Andy ... I think he would be a hoot to be around and he's quite generous with his time and money (his two best friends continue to take advantage of his tab at their favourite bar). He loves their dog, Tara, and thinks she's the best dog in the world. They also has another less lively dog named Sebastian. Part of Andy's team is Laurie, his wife and former police officer and now his investigator. Hike is his associate who is the most depressed and pessimistic person ever. Marcus, an investigator with persuasive reasoning skills, continues to provide protection when it's most needed (which is often since Andy is a self-professed coward). Sam is his accountant who is also a computer hack leading a team of elderly hackers.Blog review post: http://www.teenaintoronto.com/2018/09...
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    It's a very good day when I can settle down and read the latest Andy Carpenter mystery from the very talented David Rosenfelt. This series is on my top ten list of books, the ones you will cut back on groceries to buy as soon as it comes out, not being able to wait to have it in your hands. This is book #18 (and #19 comes out next July, Bark of Night). Andy is, as he says, a dogooder. He gives money to the homeless he meets on the street and he loves and adores dogs. Put those together and Andy It's a very good day when I can settle down and read the latest Andy Carpenter mystery from the very talented David Rosenfelt. This series is on my top ten list of books, the ones you will cut back on groceries to buy as soon as it comes out, not being able to wait to have it in your hands. This is book #18 (and #19 comes out next July, Bark of Night). Andy is, as he says, a dogooder. He gives money to the homeless he meets on the street and he loves and adores dogs. Put those together and Andy can't say no when a homeless man and his dog, Zoey, need his help. Andy helps Don and Zoey move into the space above the garage. Soon after, it turns out that Don Carrigan is wanted for a murder, two years ago. Now, the thing about Andy is, that even though he is a very, very talented lawyer, he doesn't want any clients. His is also very wealthy thanks to his father (read Open and Shut, the first in the series) Andy is happy with his life, married to Laurie (an ex-cop and his investigator on his cases) his adopted son, Ricky and his dogs Tara and Sebastian. Outside of that group is the rest of his extended family, a quirky, funny bunch of people who all form his legal team. They are quite a team. Andy is happy with his family and his work as co-founder of the Tara Foundation, named after his Golden, Tara, the best dog in the universe, ever, period. He is partners with Willie Miller, an ex-con Andy got out of prison by proving he was innocent. Andy helped him sue and won the case. Willie will do anything to help dogs. This is a mystery that balances the plight of the homeless and the returning vets with PTSD. There is just the right amount of humor (Andy does, after all, earn his title of wise ass, almost daily). It is a great legal mystery, as are all of the Andy Carpenter books. The only down side to reading one? When I've finished reading it, I have to wait for the next one and I'm not into being very patient. So, if you have never met Andy, Laurie, Tara and the gang, jump right in, it's fine as a stand alone. But I have to warn you, if you find Andy as great as I do, you will want to line up every single one of the previous 17 books and settle down for a binge. Yep, this series is that good.My thanks to the publisher, St. Martin's Minotaur Books and to NetGalley for giving me an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Sharon Grow
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished the 18th book in the “Andy Carpenter” mystery series and I want to sit down and read it all over again! Mr. Rosenfelt is one of my all-time favorite authors as I have read and enjoyed the entire “Andy Carpenter” and “Doug Brock” series (I would probably read the phone book if he wrote that). Andy Carpenter is an independently wealthy lawyer who doesn’t want to practice law. He would rather watch sports and spend time with his family, wife Laurie and young son Ricky, and his belov I just finished the 18th book in the “Andy Carpenter” mystery series and I want to sit down and read it all over again! Mr. Rosenfelt is one of my all-time favorite authors as I have read and enjoyed the entire “Andy Carpenter” and “Doug Brock” series (I would probably read the phone book if he wrote that). Andy Carpenter is an independently wealthy lawyer who doesn’t want to practice law. He would rather watch sports and spend time with his family, wife Laurie and young son Ricky, and his beloved dog Tara. When he does take a case, Laurie who is a former police officer, works as his investigator. Andy offers money to a homeless man, a former veteran, Dan Carrigan. After he learns that Dan was attacked, he offers him the use of the apartment above their garage. When he happens to mention Dan’s name to one of his police friends, Dan is arrested for murder…a murder he did not commit. Now, Andy doesn’t want to take the case, any case, but he calls “his team” together and the investigation begins. I would love to relate the entire story to you, but you really need to read it for yourself. Mr. Rosenfelt’s writing is clever, engagingly sarcastic (down-right funny at times) and the words seem to flow so effortlessly. His characters are amazing, instilled with the same engaging qualities as his writing. If you enjoy a complex yet easy to follow (and humorous) mystery then you should be reading this series. I received a free copy of this book and voluntarily chose to give an honest review. (by paytonpuppy)
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  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    This is book number 18 in the Andy Carpenter Mystery series, but don’t let that scare you away. This book works well as a standalone, and you won’t feel as if you were left in the dark at any point.I like how the author brings such an interesting mix of characters to this book. There are some bad guys, some that are relatively optimistic, and some that are a bit grumpy. The main character, Andy Carpenter is clever and hardworking. He really doesn’t want his current case, since he doesn’t need th This is book number 18 in the Andy Carpenter Mystery series, but don’t let that scare you away. This book works well as a standalone, and you won’t feel as if you were left in the dark at any point.I like how the author brings such an interesting mix of characters to this book. There are some bad guys, some that are relatively optimistic, and some that are a bit grumpy. The main character, Andy Carpenter is clever and hardworking. He really doesn’t want his current case, since he doesn’t need the money and desires nothing more than the opportunity to retire. However, his wife gently pushed him into it, because it’s Christmas. (Although it really isn’t. Yet. For her, Christmas starts on Thanksgiving day and continues through February.) It also certainly looks like the guy Andy’s defending is guilty, and he doesn’t like taking cases that he can’t win. So how will Andy get him off?By the end of the book all the facts are laid out, and everything is neatly wrapped up. I must admit, I never could have solved this mystery. Told in a conversational style, the story has twists, turns and surprises throughout. This is definitely an enjoyable book to read for the Christmas season, even if you don't celebrate it from November until February. Another definite plus is the fact that there aren’t any curse words or sex scenes.
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  • Marianne
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 rounded up for characters This was my first book by this author and this is book 18 in the Andy Carpenter series. It can be read as a stand alone with no problem. I think Andy is one of those characters you will either love or hate. I loved him! His sarcasm and self deprecation was hilarious! His wife, Laurie, compliments his persona while holding her own. There are other staff and friends that also bring a lot to this story. I am interested to see how the characters have evolved though and 3.5 rounded up for characters This was my first book by this author and this is book 18 in the Andy Carpenter series. It can be read as a stand alone with no problem. I think Andy is one of those characters you will either love or hate. I loved him! His sarcasm and self deprecation was hilarious! His wife, Laurie, compliments his persona while holding her own. There are other staff and friends that also bring a lot to this story. I am interested to see how the characters have evolved though and have some questions answered, like where their son Ricky came from (he’s only been with them 4 years) so I will be reading more of them I think... All that aside, I found the story a bit confusing. It had so many twists and bad guys that by the time we got to the reveal I was a bit indifferent. It was so out of left field and I had no emotional investment in that character so I didn’t even really care. The connections between all the players were confusing and improbable. It has too many side stories I think, overly complicated (the mob, paramilitary, homeless, business moguls, snipers with vendettas...). I am going to check out another because I love the characters and hope the story is more to my liking. If so, I have a lot of reading to do! Thanks to NetGalley, the author and St. Martin’s Press for a copy in exchange for a review.
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  • Pattyh
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Netgalley for the opportunity to preview Deck the Hounds by David Rosenfelt.Another Hit!!!! Andy Carpenter is an attorney in New Jersey - he is charming, witty, and can be quite the "jackass" when he wants to be - He is one of the best characters in fiction today. Rosenfelt takes the reader on another roller coaster ride - An army veteran is charged with murder - the police find his DNA, he has a history of violent behavior, and he is homeless. On the surface he appears to be guilty as Thank you Netgalley for the opportunity to preview Deck the Hounds by David Rosenfelt.Another Hit!!!! Andy Carpenter is an attorney in New Jersey - he is charming, witty, and can be quite the "jackass" when he wants to be - He is one of the best characters in fiction today. Rosenfelt takes the reader on another roller coaster ride - An army veteran is charged with murder - the police find his DNA, he has a history of violent behavior, and he is homeless. On the surface he appears to be guilty as charged, but Andy Carpenter doesn''t think so and will prove it beyond a reasonable doubt. As usual, the Andy works with the evidence which is overwhelmingly not in his client's favor. As usual, Andy will "piss off" as many cops, good guys and bad guys as possible. The plot is excellent and will keep you guessing till the end.The usual cast of characters join Andy in this case and again, as usual, they add comedy and conviction to the plot. This series just never disappoint - Rosenfelt is just so good. When you laugh out loud, literally, reading the Andy Carpenter series because it is written in such as way that the characters come alive.I would love to see NETFLIX or AMAZON pick this series up and put it on TV - that's how good it is.Another hit for David Rosenfelt and fans of this series will not be disappointed at all - 5 STARS!!!!
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsChristmas, puppies, veterans and murder... What more could you ask for in a book? Rosenfelt has delivered yet again! Andy Carpenter is still a wise cracking, do-gooding lawyer who hates being a lawyer. He finds himself defending a homeless veteran whose DNA was found at a murder scene.This Christmas edition “Deck The Hounds” is fresh, funny and delivers a satisfyingly good mystery. Once again, Rosenfelt kept me guessing until the very end. I so appreciate a writer who can keep me guess 4.5 starsChristmas, puppies, veterans and murder... What more could you ask for in a book? Rosenfelt has delivered yet again! Andy Carpenter is still a wise cracking, do-gooding lawyer who hates being a lawyer. He finds himself defending a homeless veteran whose DNA was found at a murder scene.This Christmas edition “Deck The Hounds” is fresh, funny and delivers a satisfyingly good mystery. Once again, Rosenfelt kept me guessing until the very end. I so appreciate a writer who can keep me guessing and entertained without resorting to sex or cussing. I just love the characters in this series of books especially Edna and Andy’s faithful dogs Tara and Sebastian! I have yet to read one of Rosenfelts books that haven’t gripped my attention from the first page. It is very hard to believe this is his 18th book in this series! One of the most unique aspects of this series is the ability to pick up any one in the series and not be confused by characters or background.I highly recommend this book.I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher and NetGalley. The views given are my own.#NetGalley #DeckTheHounds #StMartinsPress
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  • Laura Reading
    January 1, 1970
    Christmas is not one day or even one week of the year. for Andy's wife, Laurie, "Christmas" starts as soon as the Thanksgiving turkey is eaten and can last until Cupid sights in on his target.I read this book as a stand alone, my introduction to the Andy Carpenter mystery series. It will not be my last book by author David Rosenfelt. Told from protagonist Andy's view point, the verbiage is a bit dry, in a good way. The book has action, drama, humor, and a really excellent mystery to solve. From Christmas is not one day or even one week of the year. for Andy's wife, Laurie, "Christmas" starts as soon as the Thanksgiving turkey is eaten and can last until Cupid sights in on his target.I read this book as a stand alone, my introduction to the Andy Carpenter mystery series. It will not be my last book by author David Rosenfelt. Told from protagonist Andy's view point, the verbiage is a bit dry, in a good way. The book has action, drama, humor, and a really excellent mystery to solve. From the beginning I felt that Carrigan, the homeless man, was not guilty of murder, but I was curious about the secrets he was keeping. EVERYONE in this book has secrets.It was also refreshing to have someone who seemingly has endless funds available to him take notice and comment on high prices! The book also offers something here for dog lovers among us.From the streets to the courtroom and into some other very shady places, this book will keep you guessing until the very end.
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  • Denise Jewell
    January 1, 1970
    I have never given a Andy Carpenter book a one star and I actually think the story of this book is probably a 4 star. But I can't get past a character that was dead not only is he alive in this book but his head that was blown apart was put back together as well. That dropped this book down to a one start. In the same book that Dominick Patrone was finally arrested he put a hit out on Andy, Joseph Russo wouldn't do it and was trying to turn states evidence against Dominick. As Joseph was talking I have never given a Andy Carpenter book a one star and I actually think the story of this book is probably a 4 star. But I can't get past a character that was dead not only is he alive in this book but his head that was blown apart was put back together as well. That dropped this book down to a one start. In the same book that Dominick Patrone was finally arrested he put a hit out on Andy, Joseph Russo wouldn't do it and was trying to turn states evidence against Dominick. As Joseph was talking to Andy in Andy's house he was shot in the head through the window. Willie was sad saying something about he knew he was a bad guy but still a friend. But in this book Joseph Russo obviously was risen from the dead and is alive and well now running the Patron family. The previous book which I never update to actually give my review I notices so many continuity mistakes it was driving me nuts but this one took the cake for me.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    Take a wisemouthed lawyer who can afford to take semi retirement by only representing innocent clients while supporting an animal shelter, add in that his wife is no longer law enforcement but works as his private investigator and more and you have the baseline for this convoluted mystery. There are many other people who help Andy find out what the truth really is and make it courtroom admissible, and then there's the complex man who is accused of the first murder and becomes Andy's client. Lots Take a wisemouthed lawyer who can afford to take semi retirement by only representing innocent clients while supporting an animal shelter, add in that his wife is no longer law enforcement but works as his private investigator and more and you have the baseline for this convoluted mystery. There are many other people who help Andy find out what the truth really is and make it courtroom admissible, and then there's the complex man who is accused of the first murder and becomes Andy's client. Lots of twists and turns in the plot and the characters certainly are, but there's no need for spoilers or an attempt at a summary. I found it to be a real brain grabber and was surprised to find that it is the most recent in a series! At no time does the reader feel lost or as if missing background info. I requested and received a free ebook copy from Minotaur Books via NetGalley. Thank you!
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Andy Carpenter's good intentions lead him into murder and intrigue. When he stops to give a homeless man a $20 and a gift card from PetSmart, he assumes that is the end of his encounter with the man. When he turns on the news that night and learns the man was attacked and his dog bit the attacker, he decides to help get the dog back to the owner. This leads him to offer the homeless man and his dog the apartment above the garage. Don Carrigan and Zoey move into the garage but before long the pol Andy Carpenter's good intentions lead him into murder and intrigue. When he stops to give a homeless man a $20 and a gift card from PetSmart, he assumes that is the end of his encounter with the man. When he turns on the news that night and learns the man was attacked and his dog bit the attacker, he decides to help get the dog back to the owner. This leads him to offer the homeless man and his dog the apartment above the garage. Don Carrigan and Zoey move into the garage but before long the police show up to arrest Don for murder. Andy and his investigator wife Laurie try to find the real killer.
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  • Joey
    January 1, 1970
    Just started this one this morning. So far I'm loving it, as I knew I would. The book had me chuckling from the first page. Can't wait to read it but then I'll be waiting for the next one to come out. I hope Mr. Rosenfelt never stops writing the Andy Carpenter books. They are so good, love all of the characters, and of course, I look forward to getting to know and keep up with all of the dogs.UPDATE: OMG! Absolutely loooovvvveeeeddd it! All of the Andy Carpenter books are wonderful reads, but so Just started this one this morning. So far I'm loving it, as I knew I would. The book had me chuckling from the first page. Can't wait to read it but then I'll be waiting for the next one to come out. I hope Mr. Rosenfelt never stops writing the Andy Carpenter books. They are so good, love all of the characters, and of course, I look forward to getting to know and keep up with all of the dogs.UPDATE: OMG! Absolutely loooovvvveeeeddd it! All of the Andy Carpenter books are wonderful reads, but some are better than others. This one had most of the characters I've come to know and love, of course, a mama dog and her pups, a great plot and storyline. Couldn't stop reading it but now I have a big dilemma! How am I going to manage waiting for the next one to come out? I'm ready for it NOW! Run to the bookstore, or the computer, and get a copy for yourself. You won't be disappointed.
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  • Jacque
    January 1, 1970
    Christmas, dogs, a mystery, and David Rosenfelt’s quirky humor...what’s not to like? Andy Carpenter, reluctant lawyer, gives a handout to a homeless man with a dog, only to become more involved than he had planned. Andy’s wife loves Christmas...and celebrates from November through February. The homeless man is a vet and is soon arrested for murder, but Andy and his team set out to prove he was framed. I love the characters in these books and the sense of humor that each story is laced with and D Christmas, dogs, a mystery, and David Rosenfelt’s quirky humor...what’s not to like? Andy Carpenter, reluctant lawyer, gives a handout to a homeless man with a dog, only to become more involved than he had planned. Andy’s wife loves Christmas...and celebrates from November through February. The homeless man is a vet and is soon arrested for murder, but Andy and his team set out to prove he was framed. I love the characters in these books and the sense of humor that each story is laced with and Deck the Hounds continues the tradition perfectly.
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  • Sylvia
    January 1, 1970
    The story is interspersed with third-person accounts of a series of sniper attacks. It would appear that this and Andy's case have no connection. Until the witty lawyer connects the dots. The author does a great job in leading readers to think that one particular character is behind it all, only to be surprised in the end.His humor is everywhere in the book. Another thing I like about it is that there's no gory stuff and it's definitely not R-rated either. Violence is kept to the minimum.It's fu The story is interspersed with third-person accounts of a series of sniper attacks. It would appear that this and Andy's case have no connection. Until the witty lawyer connects the dots. The author does a great job in leading readers to think that one particular character is behind it all, only to be surprised in the end.His humor is everywhere in the book. Another thing I like about it is that there's no gory stuff and it's definitely not R-rated either. Violence is kept to the minimum.It's fun to read and very entertaining. Five-star!
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  • Linda C. Brizendine
    January 1, 1970
    Very Good book!This is the best Andy Carpenter book yet. You could read this as a stand-alone and love it. This book grabs your interest and keeps it through to the very end. Once again Rosenfelt brings an issue to the forefront, that of homeless veterans and their struggles. He weaves it into the story masterfully. The book is very good and if you're an Andy Carpenter fan, you'll love it. I think you'll like it even if you've never read any of the other books. I thought "Rescued" was the best y Very Good book!This is the best Andy Carpenter book yet. You could read this as a stand-alone and love it. This book grabs your interest and keeps it through to the very end. Once again Rosenfelt brings an issue to the forefront, that of homeless veterans and their struggles. He weaves it into the story masterfully. The book is very good and if you're an Andy Carpenter fan, you'll love it. I think you'll like it even if you've never read any of the other books. I thought "Rescued" was the best yet and "Deck the Hounds" is just as good.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    It’s Christmastime, and Andy and Laurie invite a homeless veteran with a pregnant canine companion to stay in their garage apartment. It seems like a good idea, until Don is arrested for murder. Of course, Andy takes his case because he believes his client is innocent, but the question remains: who killed the wealthy businessman, and left Don’s hat there to incriminate him? Humor, great characters, and an exciting plot makes this latest Andy Carpenter mystery a must-read.
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  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    The first Andy Carpenter book I ever read was THE TWELVE DOGS OF CHRISTMAS, his first Christmas story. I fell in love with it! That was two years ago, and I have read every other book in the series ever since. The latest Christmas installment, DECK THE HOUNDS, is a terrific addition to the series. It has the team I adored from TWELVE, as well as the twisty mystery, the sweet dogs, and the snarky defense attorney that keeps this series on my "must read" list. Highly recommend.
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  • Gail O'Connor
    January 1, 1970
    Rosenfelt's typical novel keeps you entertained while never losing your attention. He has warm, smart characters with loving personalities and his wit is incomparable. His story of helping a homeless man is heartwarming and a pleasure to read. His books are so funny and surprisingly tender to read. His books never fail to entertainVery sweet read
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