Mr. Nice Guy
Lucas Callahan gave up his law degree, fiancée and small-town future for a shot at making it in the Big Apple. He snags an entry-level job at Empire magazine, believing it’s only a matter of time before he becomes a famous writer. And then late one night in a downtown bar he meets a gorgeous brunette who takes him home...Carmen Kelly wanted to be a hard-hitting journalist, only to find herself cast in the role of Empire's sex columnist thanks to the boys' club mentality of Manhattan magazines. Her latest piece is about an unfortunate—and unsatisfying—encounter with an awkward and nerdy guy, who was nice enough to look at but horribly inexperienced in bed.Lucas only discovers that he’s slept with the infamous Carmen Kelly—that is, his own magazine’s sex columnist!—when he reads her printed take-down. Humiliated and furious, he pens a rebuttal and signs it, "Nice Guy." Empire publishes it, and the pair of columns go viral. Readers demand more. So the magazine makes an arrangement: Each week, Carmen and Lucas will sleep together... and write dueling accounts of their sexual exploits.It’s the most provocative sexual relationship any couple has had, but the columnist-lovers are soon engaging in more than a war of words: They become seduced by the city’s rich and powerful, tempted by fame, and more attracted to each other than they’re willing to admit. In the end, they will have to choose between ambition, love, and the consequences of total honesty.

Mr. Nice Guy Details

TitleMr. Nice Guy
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 16th, 2018
PublisherSt. Martin's Griffin
ISBN-139781250189882
Rating
GenreRomance, Did Not Finish, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Fiction

Mr. Nice Guy Review

  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    Mr. Nice Guy.... hmmm....Ok.. when you have a delivery line that states "The Devil Wears Prada meets Sex and the City"... there is some big shoes to fill there.Yikes... these shoes were definitely not filled!! I was super disappointed on this one :(. First off, this was very very slow... and felt it wasn't getting anywhere. I had a very hard time connecting to any of the characters. I thought Lucas was a self absorbed ass on multiple levels. Everything was about Lucas... and if it wasn't he had Mr. Nice Guy.... hmmm....Ok.. when you have a delivery line that states "The Devil Wears Prada meets Sex and the City"... there is some big shoes to fill there.Yikes... these shoes were definitely not filled!! I was super disappointed on this one :(. First off, this was very very slow... and felt it wasn't getting anywhere. I had a very hard time connecting to any of the characters. I thought Lucas was a self absorbed ass on multiple levels. Everything was about Lucas... and if it wasn't he had a temper tantrum... literally lol.Carmen wasn't the shiniest peach in this patch either. Yikes.. she was a bit of a stuck up b...! I guess in some ways Carmen and Lucas were a pair?... ehhhh This wasn't really my cup of tea unfortunately. I felt like I skimmed the last half of the book. Thank you so much to St. Martin's Press for the opportunity to read this in exchange for my honest thoughts.2 stars for me on this one.Published to GR: 8/20/18Publication date: 10/16/18
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    On the surface, Mr. Nice Guy is about two people criticizing each others sexual performance on a public platform. Carmen is a sex columnist for popular magazine: Empire. Lucas is an invisible fact checker for the same magazine who is unknowingly and anonymously featured in Carmen's column after a one-night stand. But when Carmen's no-holds-barred honesty and vicious criticism gets under Lucas' skin, he drafts a sincere and well-written reply under the pseudonym: Mr. Nice Guy, and the back and fo On the surface, Mr. Nice Guy is about two people criticizing each others sexual performance on a public platform. Carmen is a sex columnist for popular magazine: Empire. Lucas is an invisible fact checker for the same magazine who is unknowingly and anonymously featured in Carmen's column after a one-night stand. But when Carmen's no-holds-barred honesty and vicious criticism gets under Lucas' skin, he drafts a sincere and well-written reply under the pseudonym: Mr. Nice Guy, and the back and forth gets everyone's attention as the ratings multiply. The head of the magazine obviously wants to capitalize on this, so assignments are given to the duo on a weekly basis. The column is called Screw the Critics and the name says it all. I choose to believe a good part of this book is satire in nature. It's too over-the-top to believe otherwise. But the themes that stood out to me held a lot of substance in my opinion, such as: media ethics and authenticity, giving women a voice in an age that is not as feminist as many may think, the importance of communicating with one's partner about sex, and the lengths that a woman must go through to get a little power in a man's world. In addition to all this, there's a little bit of mystery, romance with surprising vulnerability, climactic betrayal, slow redemption, and a love note to New York City where this story is set. Married authors: Jennifer Miller and Jason Feifer have co-written an interesting story with a wide range. I will be interested to see what they come up with next.Thank you to the following for permitting me access to an advance reader's copy (ARC) of Mr. Nice Guy. This generosity did not impact my honesty when rating/reviewing.Source: NetGalleyAuthor: Jennifer Miller; Jason FeiferPublisher: St. Martin's Press, St. Martin's GriffinGenres: Romance, Women's FictionPub Date: October 16, 2018
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  • Chris C - A Midlife Wife
    January 1, 1970
    This book. This book has me in a bit of a quandary. It’s not whether I liked or disliked story because I absolutely did like it. But what has me tied up as I’m not sure how to express my feelings.I guess I’ll start at the beginning. One of my first conscious thoughts was that this so much like Sex and the City in many ways. You have Journalists – You have a new guy to the city, bright eyed and bushytailed, but yet so naïve. And then you have sex columnist who writes about her adventures in New Y This book. This book has me in a bit of a quandary. It’s not whether I liked or disliked story because I absolutely did like it. But what has me tied up as I’m not sure how to express my feelings.I guess I’ll start at the beginning. One of my first conscious thoughts was that this so much like Sex and the City in many ways. You have Journalists – You have a new guy to the city, bright eyed and bushytailed, but yet so naïve. And then you have sex columnist who writes about her adventures in New York City.And when they are thrown together, it is funny, quirky, with some really off-the-wall sexy scenarios that just keep you turning those pages for some reason. The further I got into the book, the more I’ve really started enjoying it.The author team really had their work cut out for them. The topic is so unique and interesting. The characters are inventive and fresh. The topic is classic sexist big boys club with a twist of desperately seeking success. Lucas really was a nice guy, for the most part, and it was very refreshing to read much of the book from a male perspective.The authors also kept us on our toes with a wacky editor that carried some big secrets in an empire that seemed too good to be true. In the end, everyone was just looking for a way to be happy and employed.When I first started this book, I wasn’t sure what was coming and it was a bit slow. By a quarter of the way into the story, I knew I was in for the long-haul. This story is super engaging with Carmen and Lucas just end up endearing themselves to me. Plus, there were plenty of twists that kept is real and interesting too!* advance copy received for review consideration full review - https://amidlifewife.com/mr-nice-guy-...
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  • Cristina | CristiinaReads
    January 1, 1970
    ➳Flirty banter, two individuals that portray different characters and attributes but come together to spell out a marvelous chemistry and relationship... ➳There is a lot of controversy when it comes down to this novel... My head kept spinning around the idea of "hmmm... why is it taking so long for the real action to come," or "why is this character so annoying..." OR, "why am I loving this part and cannot grasp the rest of the story plot?" Yes, this is one of those novels that makes you act or ➳Flirty banter, two individuals that portray different characters and attributes but come together to spell out a marvelous chemistry and relationship... ➳There is a lot of controversy when it comes down to this novel... My head kept spinning around the idea of "hmmm... why is it taking so long for the real action to come," or "why is this character so annoying..." OR, "why am I loving this part and cannot grasp the rest of the story plot?" Yes, this is one of those novels that makes you act or think that way because of everything it has. This novel specifically is very unique in a way that as a romance reader would say it is lacking romance. It revolves around the idea of a one night stand and the after math of said one night stand. So far... interesting? Yeah, I thought so.➳What I did not think was necessary to add was the very thorough details about Lucas' job, Carmen's life outside her job. I comprehend why an author, or in this case duo-authors, would write this in a novel. But what I don't understand is why go the extra mile and write about so many different things that had nothing to do with the story plot.➳Anyways, I finished the novel... Which is saying a lot in comparison to other reviews I read about this novel. I have the rights to rate it because I FINISHED IT. Some reviews of this novel are being rated after said reviewer is DNF-ing it. Don't do that... You didn't finish the book so why would you DNF it? It makes no sense... At least leave the rating part out of it, and write your honest opinion. Because finishing it, you are at least respecting the perspective point of the authors and the publishers. ➳Overall, I did enjoy the novel don't get me wrong. There were moments where it was fast paced, and other scenarios where it was a slow pace in the turn of events. Thank you SMP for sending over a copy of this novel, I am looking forward to see what the authors write in the future.➳ARC kindly provided by SMP, in exchange for an honest review...➳Follow Me On:Blog ♕ Instagram ♕ Facebook ♕ Twitter
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  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Touted as Sex in the City meets The Devil Wears Prada. This comparison nails it. Lucas moves to New York from his small town in North Carolina, looking for a fresh start fleeing an engagement gone sour and high hopes of success at a magazine he will be working for as a fact checker. Lucas is naïve, indecisive, and inexperienced in the love department. He is quickly thrown into the fast paced New York lifestyle and cut throat business practices of the magazine. He meets a beautiful woman, Car 3.5 Touted as Sex in the City meets The Devil Wears Prada. This comparison nails it. Lucas moves to New York from his small town in North Carolina, looking for a fresh start fleeing an engagement gone sour and high hopes of success at a magazine he will be working for as a fact checker. Lucas is naïve, indecisive, and inexperienced in the love department. He is quickly thrown into the fast paced New York lifestyle and cut throat business practices of the magazine. He meets a beautiful woman, Carmen, in a bar. This turns into a one night stand with consequences that will turn Lucas and Carmen’s lives upside down when he reads a scathing article about his encounter the next day. He writes a response defending himself signed Mr. Nice Guy to hide his identity. This soon turns into a regular feature and the dueling columns boost sales as readers take interest. No one is more aware that sex sells than their boss, Jay. He manipulates the two for juicier sexual encounters for bigger sales and soon has a reality tv feel. We see the characters start to become introspective about their personal character and where their careers are taking them. The whole charade begins to back fire and sparks start to fly. I wanted more than anything to see the boss take a fall. This is a fun read and I loved the New York setting. There are characters that I question their importance to the story except to make it overly long. It dragged in parts for me, but overall I liked it and look forward to the next book these authors collaborate on.Thanks to NetGalley, St. Martin’s Griffin, and the authors for an advanced copy.
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  • Brianna
    January 1, 1970
    Lucas has recently moved to New York City to pursue a writing career. After one night of celebrating with some co-workers, he goes home with a beautiful woman. He thinks it went great. That is until he reads about his one night stand in a magazine! Refusing to let her have the last word, he pens a rebuttal and actually gets it published. The banter between the two of them goes so well, the magazine wants more. So, here begins the journey of Lucas and Carmen.From the first 10% of the novel I was Lucas has recently moved to New York City to pursue a writing career. After one night of celebrating with some co-workers, he goes home with a beautiful woman. He thinks it went great. That is until he reads about his one night stand in a magazine! Refusing to let her have the last word, he pens a rebuttal and actually gets it published. The banter between the two of them goes so well, the magazine wants more. So, here begins the journey of Lucas and Carmen.From the first 10% of the novel I was terribly bored. There was nothing drawing me in. The main characters were boring, the side characters were just confusing and the whole time I'm reading I'm questioning what I've gotten myself into! I hate not finishing a book. I would rather force myself to read something awful, then not finish at all. But, I just couldn't do it with this one! I forced myself to keep reading after Carmen's article was published because it was actually entertaining and I wanted to read what Lucas had to say back to her. However, I couldn't bring myself to continue reading after this line: "Carmen, for all her faults, would not worry about things like farting. Carmen was a pro. She could probably hold a fart for hours." DNF @ 23%Rated 1/5Thanks to NetGalley for a free copy of this book for my honest review.
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    Mr. Nice Guy is tagged as both Romance and Women's Fiction, but I'm going to open this review by telling you that it is not a romance. There is no Happily Ever After. The hero has a relationship with one woman during the book, while he is sleeping with the woman you think is the heroine (for work) and then he ends up with neither of them.The story follows Lucas, a 24 year old Southern boy fresh off a broken engagement and newly moved to New York City to work as a fact-checker at Empire magazine. Mr. Nice Guy is tagged as both Romance and Women's Fiction, but I'm going to open this review by telling you that it is not a romance. There is no Happily Ever After. The hero has a relationship with one woman during the book, while he is sleeping with the woman you think is the heroine (for work) and then he ends up with neither of them.The story follows Lucas, a 24 year old Southern boy fresh off a broken engagement and newly moved to New York City to work as a fact-checker at Empire magazine. One day, he receives an invitation to Editor Jay Jacobsen's (called Jays) office and is ushered into the glamorous, over-the-top NYC media world.Around this time, Lucas goes to a local pub that was once a writers' scene and ends up going home with a gorgeous woman a few years older than him. Turns out, she's Carmen Kelly, who writes the sex column for Empire... and she writes about him.In the column, she dubs him "Nice Guy," and mocks him for being so solicitous that she felt she was teaching him what to do, he was not good at it, etc. He writes a rebuttal and sends it to Empire, without giving his name. Reader reaction is so overwhelming that Empire wants to make it a weekly thing and they launch a joint column called "Screw the Critics." Lucas won't tell them who he is, so he isn't getting paid, BUT they get assignments on where and how to have sex.Now, let's pause a minute. Carmen and Jays had a messy relationship and breakup in which he mostly used her and then used his power to make her keep quiet. Charming, right? Fast forward to now, when he's telling her to have bad sex every week with a specific person. For work. Any alarm bells ringing?Fine, I said, let's keep going. I'm only 10% into the book, let's see where it goes.The rest of this review will contain spoilers, so consider this your warning.Lucas and Carmen write columns for a few weeks that are mainly them being mean to each other. There's hate sex, hate kissing, etc. Carmen is criticized for being unemotional and for taking notes during sex. Lucas is criticized for not being able to read Carmen's mind and for not paying attention to her cues. Fair and also not fair. *shrug*At one point, Lucas makes a mistake and his friend Sofia finds out that he's Nice Guy. She offers to "teach" him and they embark on a physical relationship. Mind, he's still having sex with Carmen once a week for the column. That wasn't a dealbreaker for me, but I know a lot of people don't like the hero/heroine to sleep with anyone else during the book. Lucas falls in love with Sofia, even though she expressly told him she didn't want a relationship, it was just sex. He takes it very personally and carries his hurt feelings forward into what becomes a friendship and then a real relationship with Carmen.And then he decides to publicly state his love for her to the whole world. She tries to get him to a more private setting, over and over, while the cameras record and she tries not to lie to him but also not to give up on her whole life. She has a Netflix deal in LA, which not only represents a career change but also an opportunity to escape Jays. Lucas just wants her to agree to be with him. When she doesn't immediately give him what he wants, he reveals her as a fraud (she doesn't have sex constantly and sometimes makes up her columns) and ruins her life. ON CAMERA.Shivers of heat ran up Carmen's arms. Sweat prickled the back of her neck and her upper lip. This had not happened. Lucas had not exposed her to the world. He had not retaliated against her with flippant, destructive cruelty. Not her lover and best friend.This is at 78%, what you'd expect to be the Dark Moment of the book. And it is, for sure. But I almost stopped reading again, because I did not want these two together and I'd been told that this was a romantic comedy. (I didn't laugh once in this book. I also didn't want the main couple together. Hmm.)Lucas is portrayed as painfully naive and optimistic. Over and over, though, I was reminded that he's 24-25 during the book. He's old enough to have a job and apartment and a college degree. If he was a woman, he would be expected to be more socially aware by now out of self-preservation. If he was a Black man, he'd be shot for half of the things he does. I'm simply unable to sit in his POV for so long without drowning in his sense of entitlement. Why does he go along with Jays? Because he believes he's deserving of the completely unearned praise and privileges Jays gives him. Why does he treat Carmen so terribly when she won't give up her career for him? Because he thinks she's the Bad Guy. He wants so badly to be the Nice Guy that he's willing to believe everyone who supports the narrative he's tried to build. Jays had brought Lucas along to 'show support,' which meant they would appear and shake some hands. Lucas liked this; his mere presence was supportive.There's a subplot with a scummy character, Nicholas Spragg, who is trying to buy himself into the NYC social scene. Early in the book, Lucas and Nicholas go out on a drug and alcohol bender with two "socialites." Everyone but Lucas (including me, the reader) can tell that they are sex workers. Lucas wakes up unaware of what happened the night before. It's really icky. At one point, Jays asks Lucas to write a profile on Nicholas, and Lucas jumps on the chance. Eventually, he's tipped off that Spragg tried to rape a girl in college and Lucas has this exchange with himself:After the way last night ended, he wasn't sure what to think of Nicholas. The guy was much seedier than he'd thought. And weirder. And creepier! But a rapist? That seemed hard to - Lucas stopped himself. This is how rapists get away with it, he thought. Nobody's willing to believe that the guy they know is a rapist. And yet why would Nicholas rape someone when he clearly had no hang-ups about just paying someone for sex? Wouldn't that just be -Lucas stopped himself. He was doing it again.Lucas then goes to ask the girl and finds out that yes, Nicholas is a total shitbag. He writes up the profile and sends it off to Empire, where it never sees the light of day. Does Lucas call Jays out on this? Not until 90% through the book. Does he do anything else? No. This is at the 49% mark and I read the rest of the book waiting for something, ANYthing to happen. Imagine reading this book during the Kavanaugh hearings and tell me you're not setting your hair on fire with incandescent rage. In summary, Lucas is not, in fact, a nice guy. Maybe he's a "Nice Guy," but he's a garbage person for much of the book. If I'm going to rate a romance highly, I have to at least want the couple to be together. I did not. By the time Lucas realizes how awful he's been, it's about 85% of the way through the book and a year into the narrative. He deserves to do a couple of years of therapy and a lot of work before he can deserve Carmen. And that's sort of what we get? Lucas enrolls in journalism school and tries to separate himself from the avarice and ambition he'd been caught up in. Is he successful? I don't know. We know that he volunteers at a law firm to help out Carmen's grandmother. We know that he's still in graduate school when he runs into Carmen at her book launch, two years after they last see each other. That's it. That's the end. The authors do a good job of depicting the absurd double standard in our culture, of the ways in which Carmen was immediately thrown under the bus not just by Lucas but by Jays, by the media, and by pretty much everyone. In my opinion, the book would have had a happier ending if Carmen had simply gone off and had a fabulous career and left Lucas in his own mess.For better or worse, the narrative is mostly from Lucas's point of view, however, which means we need to see his happy ending, not hers. Maybe that's why this book didn't work for me. This book reads like Women's Fiction for Men. Men's Fiction. Man gets to go around NYC and have instant success, fuck multiple beautiful women, then screw up bigtime before becoming the hero and exposing a Bad Guy.Content Warnings: Mention of sexual assault, drug use, manipulation, slut-shaming, misogynyI received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley for review purposes.
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  • Tonya
    January 1, 1970
    Mr. Nice Guy is written by married authors Jennifer Miller and Jason Feifer. The book is about what happens when a one night stand goes public. The good, the bad, and the ugly as Carmen a writer, tells readers all the details of her one night with a newcomer to town. Lucas, freshly arrived in the big city of New York..except let's call it The BIG CITY where dreams come true... He starts working on the bottom at Empire Magazine, as a research writer...double checking all the facts before the arti Mr. Nice Guy is written by married authors Jennifer Miller and Jason Feifer. The book is about what happens when a one night stand goes public. The good, the bad, and the ugly as Carmen a writer, tells readers all the details of her one night with a newcomer to town. Lucas, freshly arrived in the big city of New York..except let's call it The BIG CITY where dreams come true... He starts working on the bottom at Empire Magazine, as a research writer...double checking all the facts before the articles get printed. One night he works up his nerve to approach a gorgeous lady at a bar and much to his surprise, she takes him home. The next morning he rushes out, awkward and unsure of what the proper etiquette is for morning after. A couple of weeks later, all the details are shared for the world to read in the magazine that apparently Carmen works for as well.. They wind up having to work together through their romantic and sexual adventures with each other.What follows is paybacks and romance, with a few twists from their boss who is a real jerk. There were times where both characters disappointed me and there were times when I was cheering Carmen on or rooting for Lucas. Instead of moving into more of the plot details, I would rather share more about the writing. The pace starts off slow and builds with quirky and fun sex scenes as the two characters start to self reflect and grow up. Just as the pace changes, so does the writing from Carmen and Lucas. They start expanding more, giving the readers more..and learn so much about integrity and where lines should be. How much does the public deserve to know about their sex life and their romantic feelings for each other? Sometimes there was great chemistry....and other times not so much.. I bet this was a fun book to co-author with your spouse!This is more of a lighthearted romance and definitely not for everyone. The themes the characters deal with aren't just about journalism...They are about pursuit of happiness and ambitious goals.. and how far they will go to achieve their biggest dreams. The humor is really engaging, there were times when I laughed out loud. I consider that a huge compliment to the writers...if you can get me to feel...to laugh or react, then you have done a great job!Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for an advanced reader's copy for me to review. As always, my opinions are my own.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    Mr. Nice Guy is a light, battle of the ambitious sexes kinda rom-com (think How to Lose A Guy in 10 Days with a twist) complete with sneaky double agents and a side of a very sweet Grandma. This book was the perfect male vs. female perspective, presumably because the husband and wife who authored it work extremely well together. They seem like a cool couple that you would want to hang out with! A great summer read that moved at a quick pace yet didn't feel rushed. I would definitely check out an Mr. Nice Guy is a light, battle of the ambitious sexes kinda rom-com (think How to Lose A Guy in 10 Days with a twist) complete with sneaky double agents and a side of a very sweet Grandma. This book was the perfect male vs. female perspective, presumably because the husband and wife who authored it work extremely well together. They seem like a cool couple that you would want to hang out with! A great summer read that moved at a quick pace yet didn't feel rushed. I would definitely check out any other books by this Miller / Feifer tag team! Huge thanks to the authors, Netgalley, and St. Martin's Press for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Teresa (Reads_Romance)
    January 1, 1970
    I’m going to put this out there: I don’t think Jennifer Miller or Jason Feifer have ever read a romance novel. I didn’t hate this book, it’s a slightly satiric, social commentary on dating and sex in New York City. It’s general fiction. Which is fine. Just please don’t label it a romance novel. I see why romance readers are having a hard time with this book. Romance is primarily written by women, and for women, not that there aren’t male romance writers, there are, but the vast majority of the a I’m going to put this out there: I don’t think Jennifer Miller or Jason Feifer have ever read a romance novel. I didn’t hate this book, it’s a slightly satiric, social commentary on dating and sex in New York City. It’s general fiction. Which is fine. Just please don’t label it a romance novel. I see why romance readers are having a hard time with this book. Romance is primarily written by women, and for women, not that there aren’t male romance writers, there are, but the vast majority of the authors and readers are women. Mr. Nice Guy felt like it was very much written from the male gaze. You will enjoy this novel much more if you shift your focus away from the romance aspect of this novel.The first problem in this book is that 80% of it is spent in a 24-year-old man’s head. Listen, I get it. I was 24 not too long ago, I have a 24-year-old brother. It was an entertaining glimpse into the insecurities lots of young men face. Sexual inadequacies, whether their head is too small for their body, how to get ahead in business, all of these things are realistic; but not at all what I want in a romance novel hero. I don’t think the point of Lucas’ character was to be likable (which is good because he wasn’t) but I really wanted someone to root for, and I usually prefer that be the main character. As it was, Lucas had very immature characterizations of the people in his life, especially the women, a skewed idea of what a “nice guy” is, and a massive victim complex.I appreciated Carmen’s character much more. She was a confident and successful 31-year-old sex columnist looking to start the next phase in her life. I have no idea how she accepted so much criticism, but I aspire to have the confidence she does. Carmen had an extremely adversarial relationship with Lucas at the beginning of the book, and while she is portrayed as the “mean” one, I would argue that Lucas had the harder blows in their back and forth columns. She talked about technique and confidence, things that can be changed, whereas he attacked her character and attitude.The second problem for me was the lack of emotion in 95% of the sexual acts in this book. There is no exclusivity (the hero is having regular sex with two women at one point), because of the column, both Carmen and Lucas look at sex with this sad and jaded eye that made me feel just a little bit worse about the world. Not exactly what I am looking for in a romantic comedy. Worst of all, this smacked of prostitution. Please have sex with this guy, tell the world, or else you might be fired. The whole thing could have been cute but the way it was handled made me feel a bit skeevy.The climax of this book made me feel physically ill. I wanted to punch Lucas in the face and Jays was evil incarnate. Again, this is what we’re supposed to think as a reader, but it was tough to stomach. Lucas attempted to become a hero at the end; however, I wasn’t convinced. Tyler was the only character I really connected with. He was way too good for this book. #TeamTyler he should have a real romance novel with Alexis where they meet at Noser.Overall, the book is an intriguing look into the world of journalism and imperfect, ambitious people. As I mentioned before, it is NOT a romance novel. I don’t regret finishing the book, and I hope other readers connect with Lucas and Carmen more than I did.**I received an ARC of this book in order to provide an honest review**Find/Follow me on Twitter Instagram and my blog !!
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  • Adirondack Reads Romance
    January 1, 1970
    I was attracted to this title by the enemies-to-lovers theme. Although this story definitely centered around an accidentally manufactured love-hate relationship , I found it more had a women’s fiction feel than a romance.Yes there was a theme of romance. There was also talks and dialogue about sex and intimacy, but the main plot line centered around character growth.The primary protagonist, Lucas, is an NYC transplant via small town America. He works as a fact checker for a large NYC based magaz I was attracted to this title by the enemies-to-lovers theme. Although this story definitely centered around an accidentally manufactured love-hate relationship , I found it more had a women’s fiction feel than a romance.Yes there was a theme of romance. There was also talks and dialogue about sex and intimacy, but the main plot line centered around character growth.The primary protagonist, Lucas, is an NYC transplant via small town America. He works as a fact checker for a large NYC based magazine. The heroine, Carmen, also works at the magazine, but stuck in the sex/relationship staff writer role. Though they hold different positions, both are ambitious and have the high hopes of climbing the proverbial career ladder. This story unfolds when they get thrown into an unconventional assignment of having casual sex with each other, and then writing about it.In romances, I look for a connection; to some way to relate to the characters and get the spark of feelings: anticipation, giddiness, anger, hate, love. That element of empathy was simply missing. I felt vastly disconnected from the characters. Most of the time, it was like watching a news report or reading an article about their story rather than feeling integrated into the folds of the plot. The way this was written, I felt like someone was telling me about what happened rather than showing me. Ironic as the very same topic was brought up in the story.The prose felt purposefully separating. I wanted to know these characters, but was constantly held at arms length. Perhaps that was the intent. The two main characters are journalists after all. Yet, the language and tone used to tell their story was sterile and generic and sometimes pretentious. It wasn’t until the excerpts of the actual article where each described their experience, that I felt the true and genuine voice of each of their characters. Again, perhaps this was the intent: have the tone of the prose parallel the plot. The problem with that is that it turned me off and inevitably precluded me as the reader from taking an early interest and investing in the story.It wasn’t until about the 35% mark that I started to feel and understand the events and purpose of the characters. Some conflict and a little mystery rise to the surface, and I finally had something to be curious about, to keep my interest. Up until this point, the story seemed flat and ordinary. It spotlighted the growing animosity between Lucas and Carmen, and introductions to some quirky secondary characters, but all felt one-dimensional.The second half of the book reveals conflict with a side of manipulation and mystery. More dialogue happens (yay!) which finally added some much anticipated layers to the characters. And when climax occurs, I eagerly turned the pages. Unfortunately the aftermath - resolution - was disappointingly underwhelming. It did bring closure to the major plot points, sure. I just didn’t feel it.3 STARSAn ARC was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sue Trowbridge
    January 1, 1970
    Lucas Callahan is a mid-20s native of North Carolina who breaks up with his fiancée and drops out of law school in order to chase his NYC dreams. He winds up as a fact-checker at Empire magazine, a New York/Vanity Fair-type publication that is ruled by its capricious and social-climbing editor-in-chief, Jay Jacobson. One fateful night, Lucas stops in at a West Village bar called Kettle of Fish where he spots a stunning woman sitting solo and scribbling notes on a bar napkin. Lucas boldly offers Lucas Callahan is a mid-20s native of North Carolina who breaks up with his fiancée and drops out of law school in order to chase his NYC dreams. He winds up as a fact-checker at Empire magazine, a New York/Vanity Fair-type publication that is ruled by its capricious and social-climbing editor-in-chief, Jay Jacobson. One fateful night, Lucas stops in at a West Village bar called Kettle of Fish where he spots a stunning woman sitting solo and scribbling notes on a bar napkin. Lucas boldly offers her a sheet of paper, and after a couple of drinks, they head to her apartment.What seems like a one-night stand with a glamorous older woman turns into something much more when the note-taker, Carmen Kelly, writes an unsparing account of her experience with Lucas—in the pages of Empire magazine. It turns out that Carmen is the mag's dating and sex columnist (she rarely goes into the office, which is why Lucas hadn't met her), and her vicious takedown of "Mr. Nice Guy" (her nickname for Lucas) becomes a viral sensation. Lucas decides to respond, and sets up an anonymous email address and fires off a rebuttal. Sensing a way to boost Empire's web traffic, Jacobson runs Lucas's column; it is also a hit.Jacobson goads Carmen into meeting up with Lucas again, and having them both write about the experience for Empire: "a regular sexual exchange between [Lucas] and Carmen to be followed by columns penned by each, reviewing the other's performance." Since Lucas's identity is still under wraps (he continues to file his stories via the anonymous email), he can't get paid for his work, but at least he's finally a published writer, one seemingly all of New York is reading and talking about.This is a surprisingly meaty novel which considers questions of ethics in journalism and what you'd be willing to give up in order to achieve your dreams. It's also got a terrific sense of place; I read this just a couple weeks after I'd visited New York, and it really captured the city beautifully. The only thing I didn't quite buy was that a power-mad control freak like Jacobson would allow "Mr. Nice Guy" to remain anonymous—surely he'd have an underling follow Carmen around until he'd sussed out her partner's identity? But on the whole, I thoroughly enjoyed this very modern romantic comedy.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    **I received this e-arc from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks Net Galley!**2.5/3 stars. Like a lot of the reviews have said, I didn't like Lucas. I feel like romances written in a male point of view have to be done in a certain way for me to like the main character. At the beginning, I found him endearing but at only 8% in I started to find him a bit annoying. Throughout the story, I hated the way he judges women’s bodies. He was constantly judging them, critiquing them and I **I received this e-arc from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks Net Galley!**2.5/3 stars. Like a lot of the reviews have said, I didn't like Lucas. I feel like romances written in a male point of view have to be done in a certain way for me to like the main character. At the beginning, I found him endearing but at only 8% in I started to find him a bit annoying. Throughout the story, I hated the way he judges women’s bodies. He was constantly judging them, critiquing them and I just didn't see the point. Personally, I don't think it adds anything to the story to read about a side characters boob size. On the opposite side of the spectrum, I loved Carmen's chapters. I found her genuine, real, smart, tough, and a nice person who's just dealing as best she can. I want a entire book written about her where Lucas is the side character instead. That book would have probably been four or five stars. As for the other aspects of the story, I liked the setting of NYC and a magazine work place. It was interesting to see the magazine work place and the work of journalism throughout the story. I also found the outlook the book had on sex to be pretty refreshing. The story slowed down somewhat in the middle but the ending definitely picked up. There was a mystery aspect and more action that was really entertaining. The epilogue showed a lot of character growth, so if you enjoy character growth you'll probably appreciate the ending quite a bit. I'd recommend this as a contemporary romance to readers who enjoy male perspective stories. Maybe you'll like Lucas! Who knows! I think it's worth reading if only for Carmen's story because honestly, she was a tough chick who I started to admire by the end of the book.
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  • Maranda
    January 1, 1970
    NICE GUYS FINISH LAST; Correct? Lucas and Carmen are New York writers in a competitive industry also striving for an honest relationship. These main characters had little depth and were drowning in page after page of dry prose. There was some humor and there was the anticipation of a HEA that was never delivered. Some of the auxiliary individuals were at time more interesting than Lucas and Carmen. "A copy of this book was provided by St. Martin's Press via Netgalley with no requirements for a r NICE GUYS FINISH LAST; Correct? Lucas and Carmen are New York writers in a competitive industry also striving for an honest relationship. These main characters had little depth and were drowning in page after page of dry prose. There was some humor and there was the anticipation of a HEA that was never delivered. Some of the auxiliary individuals were at time more interesting than Lucas and Carmen. "A copy of this book was provided by St. Martin's Press via Netgalley with no requirements for a review. Comments here are my honest opinion."
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Things I could have lived without: a 400 page pity party for a so-called Nice Guy.Where do I even begin? If you're going to give me a 400 page romance novel with one hell of an incredible premise, then DELIVER. Suffice it to say this didn't even come close. I expected some kind of dual POV The Hating Game-esque kind of novel. Instead, 80% is from the point of view of Lucas, a completely self-centred and whining "Nice Guy." He wasn't likeable at all with how selfish he was and the oh woe is me ac Things I could have lived without: a 400 page pity party for a so-called Nice Guy.Where do I even begin? If you're going to give me a 400 page romance novel with one hell of an incredible premise, then DELIVER. Suffice it to say this didn't even come close. I expected some kind of dual POV The Hating Game-esque kind of novel. Instead, 80% is from the point of view of Lucas, a completely self-centred and whining "Nice Guy." He wasn't likeable at all with how selfish he was and the oh woe is me act. And whenever we got Carmen, she wasn't much better. Then again, we barely got to sink our teeth into her. The narration was all over the place. We'd get one Carmen chapter for every five of Lucas's. Then we finally get a Carmen chapter, and mid sentence it shifts into Lucas or both of them.From there we go on to the fact they have almost zero chemistry. Again, going into the premise, you expect something steamy. Anything to make you desperate to keep reading. I wanted saucy and instead I got week old gravy. Any time it got remotely intriguing, it would be glossed over or the chapter would end with Lucas "diving in." That's where you choose to be classy?? Not to mention you can kind of figure out which parts were written by the male half of this author duo. And then the plot. Yikes, that was slow. It didn't get actually interesting until about 80%, and by then it was too late for me to care. The ending, while realistic, was unbelievably unsatisfying. Know your audience, guys. I don't know about you, but I don't pick up romances to be disappointed. They're guaranteed happy endings, and I didn't get that here.
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  • MichellemyBelle
    January 1, 1970
    ***ARC provided by St. Martin's Griffin in exchange for an honest review.***I am going to stop right here. ✋ 5% is where I will end it. I refuse anymore to wade begrudgingly through mediocre reads. I know this book is not for me. The characters are distasteful and cringe-worthy. The plot seems to be done all wrong. On to the next!
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  • Ariel
    January 1, 1970
    You ever get really excited because a book looks kind of cute, but then there's fat shaming right away, and the attempted sex scene read like a teenage boy trying to undress a woman in the blandest of terms?That's how this book read for me. DNF.
  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    The thing is, from the description I was hesitant. But part of me wondered, how could this premise actually work? How could this get through editorial and marketing and sales at a publisher and have no one say, maybe now isn't the right time to publish a book with such horrible sexual dynamics? It doesn't matter how much consent is implied, these two characters essentially prostitute themselves for their jobs. You can't get beyond that. The sex becomes their job and neither of them really enjoys The thing is, from the description I was hesitant. But part of me wondered, how could this premise actually work? How could this get through editorial and marketing and sales at a publisher and have no one say, maybe now isn't the right time to publish a book with such horrible sexual dynamics? It doesn't matter how much consent is implied, these two characters essentially prostitute themselves for their jobs. You can't get beyond that. The sex becomes their job and neither of them really enjoys it. I mean, maybe they get their rocks off, but it's angry and resentful and not good. I'm not sure why this was tagged as romance or as women's fiction, because this is not a romance, and the main character here is a man, which makes it not women's fiction. Mr. Nice Guy is full of hateful characters doing hateful things, which is generally how I describe literary fiction so there's that. I think this book should come with a buyer beware, it's packaged as if it were one thing, but it isn't that. And if you get the ickiness from the description, don't be fooled into thinking it can't be that bad, it is that bad. I should have trusted my gut.**Mr. Nice Guy will publish on October 16, 2018. I received an advance reader copy courtesy of NetGalley/St. Martin's Press (St. Martin's Griffin) in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Vicki
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 21%I hardly ever DNF a book, and when I do it is usually from technically bad writing with lots of errors and that was not the case here as the writing was of good quality. I originally wanted to stop at 10%, because nothing had grabbed me and I was turned off by the hero, but I made it to Carmen's first article about their one-night stand and that made me continue on to read his rebuttal article. Those two articles were the most enjoyable part of what I read - I was drawn to that aspect DNF at 21%I hardly ever DNF a book, and when I do it is usually from technically bad writing with lots of errors and that was not the case here as the writing was of good quality. I originally wanted to stop at 10%, because nothing had grabbed me and I was turned off by the hero, but I made it to Carmen's first article about their one-night stand and that made me continue on to read his rebuttal article. Those two articles were the most enjoyable part of what I read - I was drawn to that aspect just as much as their fictional readers were in the book. That concept was what had intrigued me from the blurb and made me request the ARC from NetGalley to begin with. Unfortunately, everything else in the book did not appeal to me - it was either boring to me, or there was something I outright didn't like. I didn't find the hero attractive at all, and most of what I read was from his POV. I know I didn't read far enough to see what was really going on with some of the side characters and those stories, but I just can't bring myself to spend any more time on this book. I encourage readers to read a sample to see if they are hooked by the story, as maybe it will be more to their liking.
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  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    Start with the positive. It’s contemporary. Conversational. Easy, fast read. You kind of get emotionally involved with the character, Carmen...almost. She’s a little bit hooker with a heart of gold. There are some moments that go beaneath the surface to reach emotion. The setting, NYC media/magazine world is great fun. Love how the internet and social media are really characters in the story.I found it difficult to cheer for any of these characters or become emotionally interested. Again, Carmen Start with the positive. It’s contemporary. Conversational. Easy, fast read. You kind of get emotionally involved with the character, Carmen...almost. She’s a little bit hooker with a heart of gold. There are some moments that go beaneath the surface to reach emotion. The setting, NYC media/magazine world is great fun. Love how the internet and social media are really characters in the story.I found it difficult to cheer for any of these characters or become emotionally interested. Again, Carmen’s character is the most multi-dimensional and most interesting. Lucas, not so much. Jays, definitely not. The entire middle of the book is a bit monotonous. this story is almost believable given entertainment, like so much else today, has dropped to satisfy the lowest common denominator. This is a reality show on paper with lots of sex. If for you, that’s entertainment, read it. If you're looking to lose yourself in a story, be intrigued by a plot, cheer for a protagonist, marvel at the manipulation of the English language and clever turns of phrase, this isn’t for you.Eh. There isn’t much of a story until you reach Part III, almost page 300. I wouldn’t recommend it.
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  • Pennie Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    Not much I can tell you about this one other than it wasn't my cup of tea. Lucas was cringe worthy at times and made me roll my eyes (which with the headache I'm nursing was not a good thing) and Carmen, though better, we needed more of her. Pitting them against each other in the work place was so unprofessional especially when they should have been a one and done. Frankly, if this had been a shorter book and condensed to get rid of some of the blah-blah-blah it would have been better and probab Not much I can tell you about this one other than it wasn't my cup of tea. Lucas was cringe worthy at times and made me roll my eyes (which with the headache I'm nursing was not a good thing) and Carmen, though better, we needed more of her. Pitting them against each other in the work place was so unprofessional especially when they should have been a one and done. Frankly, if this had been a shorter book and condensed to get rid of some of the blah-blah-blah it would have been better and probably could have shown more promise. **Received this ARC for review from the publisher via NetGalley**
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Lucas Callahan seeks fame in the BIG APPLE as a famous writer for Empire magazine .Carmen Kelly is cast in the role as Empire's sex columnist who brags of her encounter with Lucas as he rebuts the whole thing as "nice guy." War of words.Love is on the line.Romance is in the air...Oh gosh, I'm sorry but I couldn't get into this whatsoever.I didn't care for the characters, the story, the plot, it was just not for me.I hope someone else may feel differently and pick it up and give this one the warm Lucas Callahan seeks fame in the BIG APPLE as a famous writer for Empire magazine .Carmen Kelly is cast in the role as Empire's sex columnist who brags of her encounter with Lucas as he rebuts the whole thing as "nice guy." War of words.Love is on the line.Romance is in the air...Oh gosh, I'm sorry but I couldn't get into this whatsoever.I didn't care for the characters, the story, the plot, it was just not for me.I hope someone else may feel differently and pick it up and give this one the warmth it needs.Thank you Jennifer Miller for this ARC Copy, thank you publishers, and Goodreads Giveaways.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 StarsI wanted to love this book. I really like the premise and it’s commentary on social media, journalism, media ratings and relationships. But the plot felt forced and a bit bloated. It got tighter after halfway through and the ending was appropriate. It was refreshing reading about a young man, filled with insecurity about his career and personal life. And, like most, it was only after growing and maturing, was when he saw his own selfishness and self centeredness. I received an arc from 2.5 StarsI wanted to love this book. I really like the premise and it’s commentary on social media, journalism, media ratings and relationships. But the plot felt forced and a bit bloated. It got tighter after halfway through and the ending was appropriate. It was refreshing reading about a young man, filled with insecurity about his career and personal life. And, like most, it was only after growing and maturing, was when he saw his own selfishness and self centeredness. I received an arc from a goodreads giveaway but all opinions are my own.
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  • Dana Blazsek
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from Netgalley and the publisher. This was a 3 star read for me and that is just because I found it fine. Not overly entertaining, but not underwhelming. I can see how many people would give this a two star rating due to the dragging on of the story. With today's society, I did not find the story that far fetched, but the story was just fine.
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  • Suzanne (Under the Covers Book blog)
    January 1, 1970
    Got to 28% - I just wasn't connecting to any of the characters
  • Rady Reads
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 30%. Unfortunately this book is my very first DNF. I couldnt get into the story. There was no chemistry between the main characters in my opinion, kinda boring. DNF at 30%. Unfortunately this book is my very first DNF. I couldn´t get into the story. There was no chemistry between the main characters in my opinion, kinda boring.
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  • Lauren loves llamas
    January 1, 1970
    Content warning: (view spoiler)[sexual assault (women retells attempted rape), rampant sexism (hide spoiler)]First off – this is not a romance. It’s lit fic about two characters who have sex with each other and then write articles about it, layered on top of a traditional “boy meets city” theme. It’s a bit of mash-mash of several themes, and while some of them work, some of them most definitely don’t. It, like Lucas, is a bit too naively ambitious, and they both fall short.“Jesus! We’re not sexu Content warning: (view spoiler)[sexual assault (women retells attempted rape), rampant sexism (hide spoiler)]First off – this is not a romance. It’s lit fic about two characters who have sex with each other and then write articles about it, layered on top of a traditional “boy meets city” theme. It’s a bit of mash-mash of several themes, and while some of them work, some of them most definitely don’t. It, like Lucas, is a bit too naively ambitious, and they both fall short.“Jesus! We’re not sexual altruists working for the greater good. This is about making people buy magazines. And do you know how?”“Apparently not.”“We’re creating a titillating, tidy little circle of judgment. I’m going to judge you. You’re going to judge me. And the good people of New York are going to judge both of us.”What starts out as a one-night-stand turns into a snarky popular sex column, when Lucas finds out that the woman he picked up at a bar is actually the sex columnist at the magazine he works for, and her latest viral article excoriates, well, him. Full of fury for himself and all the other “nice guys” she’s panning, he pens a scathing response, and before he knows it, they’re meeting weekly to have bad sex and then write mean articles about the other person’s performance. In the midst of this, Lucas is trying to manage his day job as a fact-checker, going to lavish and over the top PR parties, and trying to find a way to move himself up the career ladder. In that sense, at least, this reads as more of a “young man comes to the big city to make something of himself!!!” book, with the whole sex column thing plastered on top. The book itself references The Great Gatsby several times, and to be honest, it’s been a long time since I read that book, so I’m not sure how much of this can be read as an updated response to it.My main issue with this book is that the characters are unlikeable. I think we’re supposed to sympathize with Lucas for his gullibility and honesty, but goodness, even in his vulnerability he’s a jerk. While he does live up to his “nice guy” status in the end, he spends most of the book stumbling from one stupidity to the next, and ignores advice from his friends that could’ve helped him. Reading the parts of the book from his POV – which is the majority of it – was eye-rollingly frustrating, because it was so obvious how each gullible action he took would backfire on him. My least favorite was when he realizes that Jays (his boss, the main editor of the magazine) had also slept with Carmen, and is elated because it “puts him in the same league.” Delightfully sexist, right? He makes his mom cry when he comes home for Christmas! Carmen’s not much better, though I appreciated that she was much more self-aware about her actions and how they appeared. I do have sympathy for women trying to fight the glass ceiling. Carmen’s searching for a way out of the sex columnist box she’s found herself in, and trapped in the persona she’s had to craft to survive in the cutthroat world of journalism.The romance is nonexistent. I was expecting a “hate-to-love” but instead we get something more like “hate-to-friends-with-benefits.” They’re forced into this relationship, and Carmen’s determined to handle it in a business-like manner while Lucas is constantly pushing for “vulnerability” and “meaning.” From the beginning, there’s a level of disdain and judgement on both sides that wreck any chances of an actual relationship forming. Lucas’s insistence on an emotional response to what was honestly a business transaction was annoying, rather than endearing. While they have some chemistry, I don’t feel like it was communicated to the reader very well, and frankly I found most of the sex scenes (and the erotic retellings of them in their columns) to be decidedly unsexy. We’re halfway through the book before the two even start actually talking to each other, and that’s when they finally became interesting. Unfortunately, it’s not too long after that the big misunderstanding occurs, and they basically cut contact with each other.“She felt tall and powerful, towering above Jays in her Louboutins. And, yet, the rush of total victory eluded her. Negotiating the terms of a contractually bound fuck buddy was not what Sheryl Sandberg had in mind when she instructed women to Lean In.Still, Carmen felt competent. She hadn’t been totally steamrolled—a small and perhaps pathetic kind of success, but also the only one available to her. Working with what she had, she’d harnessed that same resourcefulness from her childhood bedroom. She wasn’t much different from Jays, in this way. She was taking care of herself, first and foremost, as always.”Despite the fact that I didn’t enjoy the majority of the book, I think there are some interesting points to take away from it. Many of the main characters are well-off white men who came to NYC to “make something of themselves.” Lucas, while living the life on a “poor” fact-checker in NYC, comes from an upper middle-class Southern family that’s constantly trying to appear richer. Spragg, the eccentric and obscenely wealthy heir to a hotel empire, is constantly trying on new origin stories that play better than his midwest roots. Even Jays fits the mold of the guy who came from nowhere and hit it big, with his magazine, restaurant, and other ventures. The differences – and similarities – between the men’s approaches to success, and the degree to which they get it, was thought-provoking. Carmen, in contrast, is a native New Yorker, who, along with her grandma, is struggling to maintain her place in a city that doesn’t seem to return her loyalty, and seems to want nothing to do with her now that she’s no longer in her twenties. Of course there’s also the obvious media ethics angles – should a magazine be paying people to have sex, and what does it say about us that we want to read about it?Overall, I think you can guess that this isn’t my kind of book. I went in expecting a romance, and was disappointed by the lit fic angle instead. If you’re looking for something Gatsby-ish, love stories that idolize NYC as the “greatest city in the world,” and looking for stories about ambitious – but gullible – people, I think you’d have a better time of it.One extra note, about the content warning: (view spoiler)[There’s a scene where Lucas, while investigating someone for an article, finds an allegation of attempted rape and he confronts the victim.“Why’d you let some rich kid get away with it?” he asked. “Why not press charges?”I know this was written well before the Kavanaugh allegations came out, but this struck me as really tone-deaf. I understand where the authors were going with this, but I feel like it was addressed in a way that could be harmful for survivors. (hide spoiler)]I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    I had really high hopes for this because the premise seemed really interesting. The main thing is that the two characters are both awful, and I really didn't care about reading about either of their lives. Half of the book was essentially useless. Why include anything about Nicholas? I still am not seeing the point. I couldn't even finish the book. I got to the part where they inevitably break up and I couldn't even read to the part where they get back together. That's how uninterested I was. I I had really high hopes for this because the premise seemed really interesting. The main thing is that the two characters are both awful, and I really didn't care about reading about either of their lives. Half of the book was essentially useless. Why include anything about Nicholas? I still am not seeing the point. I couldn't even finish the book. I got to the part where they inevitably break up and I couldn't even read to the part where they get back together. That's how uninterested I was. I couldn't even care to read the last few chapters. I'm tired of talking about this book already.
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  • Anna (The Bursting Bookshelf)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to St Martin’s Press for the review copy via NetGalley!I'm going to start this review by saying how much I wanted to like this book. I tend to love books that follow the hate to friendship to love path. They're often gooey and sappy and adorable. Unfortunately, this book really didn't do it for me.Mr Nice Guy follows Lucas - an aspiring writer (and current fact checker at a major magazine) who is seeking a way up the corporate ladder. After a random hookup with Carmen (a prolific sex c Thank you to St Martin’s Press for the review copy via NetGalley!I'm going to start this review by saying how much I wanted to like this book. I tend to love books that follow the hate to friendship to love path. They're often gooey and sappy and adorable. Unfortunately, this book really didn't do it for me.Mr Nice Guy follows Lucas - an aspiring writer (and current fact checker at a major magazine) who is seeking a way up the corporate ladder. After a random hookup with Carmen (a prolific sex column writer) he finds his personal life is suddenly tabloid fodder. Instead of sitting idly by, he writes an anonymous response and inadvertently starts a biweekly column that starts a media frenzy. Along the way, the two clash and develop from hate to friendship to something more. One thing that really detracted from this book were the long inner monologues that the characters had a tendency to go on. Don't get me wrong, I realize that these can be a powerful plot tool to show character growth, but when over used they tend to make characters sound preachy and over-inflated. Both Lucas and Carmen constantly went on long, self important monologues about what they had learned in the five pages since their last monologue. It was all a bit over the top for me. On the whole, the plot really dragged most of the book. The book could have been significantly reduced and it would have been a more enjoyable read.Let's focus in on the two main characters: Lucas and Carmen. The story is told from both of their points of view, which did add a certain amount of depth to the book. However, I found both of them to be insufferable for most of the book. Carmen could have been one of the characters I love most: a tough, takes no shit, career oriented woman. However, she turns out to be a stubborn and immature person who never takes ownership of her own choices. She's a woman who is trying to claw her way out of the writing corner she has painted herself into. Specifically, she decides to write a sex column knowing that there isn't much growth potential, and then is upset and blames everyone but herself for the rest of the novel when she is stuck in a career without upward mobility. Honestly, it just really bothered me that she never owned her own choices, she just continued to languish in a job that made her miserable and pointed fingers at everyone else.Lucas is a naive new New York-er looking to cut his teeth in the world of journalism. He is also trying to get out there in the big city. He is the archetypal 'nice guy' (ie. I was nice to you and now you owe me a relationship), which would have been fine if it was used as a starting point for his personal growth. Unfortunately, he never really grew as a character past this expectation that if he was nice enough to a woman she would fall head over heals for him. Everything he did was driven by his need for the women around him to want to be with him:  even his big final act was driven by the need to win the affection of a woman who had time and time again told him her expectations did not match his. He constantly disregarded what the women around him said: for example, he started hooking up with a woman who stressed from the start that she was not looking for a relationship, but he decided that they were in love. He then got upset when she broke things off with him for  not respecting the boundaries she had set, and instead of reflecting on the missteps he had made, he made her out to be the villain for standing by WHAT SHE HAD TOLD HIM SINCE THE BEGINNING.On the whole, this was just not a great book. The plot dragged and the characters were overly self important. The sort of half redemption that Lucas and Carmen got was too little, too late, and made me wish I didn't sink as much time into this book as I did. It wasn't my cup of tea, an moving forward I think I might be taking a break from this genre.
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  • Jolie
    January 1, 1970
    So, the first thing that popped into my head when I saw the title of this book was the Alice Cooper song. I had this song running through my head the entire time I was reading the book. Too bad I didn’t like the book as much as I liked the song. Which was sad because I wanted to like this book.I wanted to like Mr. Nice Guy. I thought the blurb was fantastic and described the book well. I was excited to read it. My excitement waned after the first chapter and was gone by the middle of the book. B So, the first thing that popped into my head when I saw the title of this book was the Alice Cooper song. I had this song running through my head the entire time I was reading the book. Too bad I didn’t like the book as much as I liked the song. Which was sad because I wanted to like this book.I wanted to like Mr. Nice Guy. I thought the blurb was fantastic and described the book well. I was excited to read it. My excitement waned after the first chapter and was gone by the middle of the book. By the time I finished the book, I gave myself a mental high-five for getting through a book that was boring, unrelatable and unrealistic.Mr. Nice Guy had a good plotline. Lucas is trying to make it big in NYC. Working as a fact checker in a popular magazine, he aspires to be a famous journalist one day. He needs his big break. One night, he picks up a gorgeous woman in a bar. Thinking it was an unremarkable one night stand, Lucas soon sees an article written by a sex columnist that describes their one night stand. Boring and inexperienced were the nicest thing that she wrote. That columnist is Carmen Kelly and she works at the same magazine as him. Lucas writes up a rebuttal signed Mr. Nice Guy and watches as it goes viral. Soon, Carmen and Lucas (who is still known as Mr. Nice Guy) are writing a dueling column. Once a week, they get together, have sex and then write about it. Nothing could go wrong, right?When the book started off, I felt bad for Lucas. He was working his butt off checking facts but was getting nowhere. While enchanted with the City, he feels that he is getting nowhere. Then he meets and sleeps with Carmen. The article and his rebuttal launches his career into the stratosphere. Then I started seeing a side of Lucas that I didn’t like. He was selfish and self-centered. He gave little thought to his actions and how they would affect people. All he wanted to fame. And when he got it, he wasn’t sure what to do with it. Carmen tried to warn him but he didn’t listen to her. Towards the end of the book, my dislike turned to apathy. All his “good deeds” were done to ease his conscience. To be frank: Lucas was a huge jerk and I couldn’t stand him.Not that Carmen was any better. She was bitter and it came across in her writing. She wanted to be so much more than a sex columnist and was frustrated that she wasn’t taken seriously. I thought her article slamming Lucas was awful. I did start to like her the more I read about her. She did care about Lucas, as much as she denied it the first few weeks they were doing the article. It was her interactions with Mira, her grandmother, that I saw a different side of her. A side that I liked. Towards the end of the book, I felt bad for her. She got the short end of the stick with what Lucas did. It cost her everything but she found her true calling.I wouldn’t classify this book as a romance. To have a romance, you need chemistry. I saw none of that in this book. They had zero chemistry together. Zero. The lack of chemistry figured hugely in my review.Going with the lack of chemistry, I thought the sex was bland and unoriginal. I also thought that them having sex for a magazine article was a mood killer for me. I like it when my characters spontaneous, unexpected sex. Not scheduled sex that was dissected in a magazine article. What also made me go “Eh” was that Lucas slept with two other women while sleeping with Carmen. One being a call girl and there was no mention of condoms being used. As soon as I realized this was happening while he was having sex with Carmen, all I could think of was “I hope he’s getting tested for STD’s” and “I hope Carmen is getting tested“. That wasn’t sexy or a turn on. It skeeved me out.The secondary plotline with Lucas’s friend Nicolas was weird. I felt that it had no bearing on the story at all until the end. Nicholas was a rich friend who came in and out of Lucas’s life. Then, he started to figure more into it. Also, the same thing went for the storyline with Jays. Which tied into the storyline with Nicholas. It didn’t belong in the book and felt out-of-place.The end of Mr. Nice Guy was meh. While I understood what happened, I was hoping, praying that there would be more. Instead, it was a lukewarm ending that halfheartedly wrapped up all the secondary storylines. While I understand not every book can have a happy ending, I was hoping for more of a resolution with Lucas and Carmen’s storyline.I gave Mr. Nice Guy a 2-star rating. While I thought the storyline was interesting, I couldn’t get into the story. I didn’t like the main characters and couldn’t connect with them. I felt that there were zero chemistry and sexual attraction in the book. Also, Lucas having multiple sex partners at the same time didn’t do it for me. I was left feeling unfulfilled by the ending.I would give Mr. Nice Guy an Adult rating. There is sex. There is language. There is some mild violence. I would suggest that no one under the age of 21 read this book.I will not reread Mr. Nice Guy. I also will not recommend it to family and friends.I would like to thank St. Martin’s Griffin, St. Martin’s Press, and NetGalley for allowing me to read and review Mr. Nice Guy.All opinions stated in this review of Mr. Nice Guy are mine.**I chose to leave this review after reading an advance reader copy**
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