An Act of Villainy (Amory Ames Mystery #5)
Edgar Award-shortlisted author Ashley Weaver returns with the fifth installment in the Amory Ames mystery series. An Act of Villainy is a gem, filled with style, banter, and twists that traditional mystery fans will positively relish."So you've gotten yourself involved with another murder, have you?" Walking through London’s West End after a night at the theater, Amory Ames and her husband Milo run into wealthy investor and former actor Gerard Holloway. Holloway and his wife Georgina are old friends of theirs, and when Holloway invites them to the dress rehearsal of a new play he is directing, Amory readily accepts.However, Amory is shocked to learn that Holloway has cast his mistress, actress Flora Bell, in the lead role. Furthermore, the casual invitation is not what it seems—he admits to Amory and Milo that Flora has been receiving threatening letters, and he needs their help in finding the mysterious sender. Despite Amory’s conflicting feelings—not only does she feel loyalty to Georgina, but the disintegration of the Holloways’ perfect marriage seems to bode ill for her own sometimes delicate relationship—her curiosity gets the better of her, and she begins to make inquiries.It quickly becomes clear that each member of the cast has reason to resent Flora—and with a group so skilled in the art of deception, it isn’t easy to separate truth from illusion. When vague threats escalate, the scene is set for murder, and Amory and Milo must find the killer before the final curtain falls.Also out now in the Amory Ames mysteries: Murder at the Brightwell, Death Wears a Mask, A Most Novel Revenge, and The Essence of Malice.

An Act of Villainy (Amory Ames Mystery #5) Details

TitleAn Act of Villainy (Amory Ames Mystery #5)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 4th, 2018
PublisherMinotaur Books
ISBN-139781250159755
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Historical Mystery

An Act of Villainy (Amory Ames Mystery #5) Review

  • Ivonne Rovira
    January 1, 1970
    For once, Amory and Milo Ames are on the same page — virtually from the first page. Usually, Milo tries to deter his modern wife (modern for 1933 London, at any rate) from snooping, but it is Milo who allows an old chum of his, wealthy theater devotee Gerard Holloway, to saddle the couple in a mystery. Holloway is indulging himself with a play he’s scripted that he’s also directing and producing. But that’s not Holloway’s only indulgence: He’s cast his pretty blonde mistress Flora Bell in the ti For once, Amory and Milo Ames are on the same page — virtually from the first page. Usually, Milo tries to deter his modern wife (modern for 1933 London, at any rate) from snooping, but it is Milo who allows an old chum of his, wealthy theater devotee Gerard Holloway, to saddle the couple in a mystery. Holloway is indulging himself with a play he’s scripted that he’s also directing and producing. But that’s not Holloway’s only indulgence: He’s cast his pretty blonde mistress Flora Bell in the title role of The Price of Victory. Miss Bell has been receiving threatening letters, and there’s no end of folks who wish her ill, not the least of which is the wronged wife, Georgina Holloway, a friend of Amory’s. Amory — naturally enough — hates the deception even if she’s intrigued by the mystery.I won’t spoil the novel, the fifth in this fabulous series, by revealing any more; however, author Ashley Weaver has not lost her touch: sparkling dialogue, plenty of twists and a shocking ending make An Act of Villainy pure pleasure.In the spirit of full disclosure, I received this book free from NetGalley, St. Martin’s Press and Minotaur Books in return for an honest review.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of my favorite series. The characters of Amory and Milo are so charming that I love hearing about their adventures. I haven't been disappointed in the past, so I had high hopes for this one. This story follows Amory and Milo helping out a society friend, Gerard Holloway, who is putting on a new play. His lead actress, Flora Bell, has been receiving threatening letters and doesn't want the police involved. That's when he enlists Amory and Milo to investigate the problem for him. Soon This is one of my favorite series. The characters of Amory and Milo are so charming that I love hearing about their adventures. I haven't been disappointed in the past, so I had high hopes for this one. This story follows Amory and Milo helping out a society friend, Gerard Holloway, who is putting on a new play. His lead actress, Flora Bell, has been receiving threatening letters and doesn't want the police involved. That's when he enlists Amory and Milo to investigate the problem for him. Soon though, there are more problems than just threatening letters. A murder occurs after the first showing of the play. So begins the true investigation. At first, I was just going to give this story 4 stars but the ending took me by surprise. Complete surprise!! Which just continues to prove that this series will continue to be one of my favorite cozy mystery books. Loved this one!*Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jaclyn
    January 1, 1970
    An Act of Villainy is a solid addition to Weaver's Amory Ames series. Amory and her dashing husband, Milo, are quickly pulled into another intrigue by their friend, Gerald Holloway. Holloway has written and produced a play, and his lead actress is receiving threatening letters that this performance will be her last. Amory is intrigued by the mystery but conflicted about assisting since the lead actress, Flora Bell, is also Holloway's mistress, and Hollloway's wife also happens to be a friend of An Act of Villainy is a solid addition to Weaver's Amory Ames series. Amory and her dashing husband, Milo, are quickly pulled into another intrigue by their friend, Gerald Holloway. Holloway has written and produced a play, and his lead actress is receiving threatening letters that this performance will be her last. Amory is intrigued by the mystery but conflicted about assisting since the lead actress, Flora Bell, is also Holloway's mistress, and Hollloway's wife also happens to be a friend of the Ames. The stakes are raised even further when the words of the mysterious notes are found to be prophetic and Flora is found murdered the night that the play opens. For those unfamiliar with the series, these mysteries are relatively tame and what I would class as more cozy than gritty and hard hitting. An Act of Villainy is in the same vein as the previous mysteries in the series and harkens back to a more classic whodunnit. While the plot, at times, suspends belief, it will certainly appeal to fans of series like Daisy Dalrymple or titles by Rhys Bowen. As to my personal enjoyment of this latest addition, I will admit to be losing some interest in the series. I love the time period and the author's commitment to creating a sense of such a glamorous atmosphere. However, I feel as though the character development of Amory and Milo has stalled a bit. The series started out with their marriage in trouble, and while it seems to be on more stable footing at the moment, I don't feel like its really shifting to any new ground. Since this is a central part of the plot and a big part of what drives Amory, I do think there should be more momentum in that respect. I'm also starting to doubt my belief that Milo is a spy and starting to wonder if Milo quite simply is an unknowable character that simply acts as a foil to Amory. I suppose we shall see with the next book nt the series. *Review copy provided by the publisher via NetGalley.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series and these characters a lot. The mystery's not too bad, either. I know I have a lot of friends who are really good at guessing the murderer, but I'm only passably good at that, and I was genuinely shocked here; I only guessed at one tiny aspect of the plot. The writing isn't as zingy, maybe, and there's less interpersonal tension, which is a good thing (too much and it becomes unrealistic!) and a bad thing, too (too little and it becomes blah). But it does have this line, which I love this series and these characters a lot. The mystery's not too bad, either. I know I have a lot of friends who are really good at guessing the murderer, but I'm only passably good at that, and I was genuinely shocked here; I only guessed at one tiny aspect of the plot. The writing isn't as zingy, maybe, and there's less interpersonal tension, which is a good thing (too much and it becomes unrealistic!) and a bad thing, too (too little and it becomes blah). But it does have this line, which made me laugh out loud:“Hello, Mother,” I said. “I didn't hear you knock.”“That's because I didn't. The door was ajar, and I heard voices. I must say, if this is the way you spend your evenings alone, it's no wonder I haven't any grandchildren.”Lolllll. Not enough about clothes in this one, though. And honey: you've definitely worn a formal black dress before.
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  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    Milo and Amory have become one of my favourite sleuthing duos. Their tales, set in Weaver's pitch- perfect setting of ambience and crystal-cut-glass dialogue are refined, surprising and deliciously elegant.However, despite the vintage splendour, the human interest piece and the very flawed characters that populate her high London set make the series easily accessible. For no matter whether you are dripping in diamonds and lush dressing gowns, matters of the heart, betrayal and jealousy transcend Milo and Amory have become one of my favourite sleuthing duos. Their tales, set in Weaver's pitch- perfect setting of ambience and crystal-cut-glass dialogue are refined, surprising and deliciously elegant.However, despite the vintage splendour, the human interest piece and the very flawed characters that populate her high London set make the series easily accessible. For no matter whether you are dripping in diamonds and lush dressing gowns, matters of the heart, betrayal and jealousy transcend time and class.It is quite obvious that Weaver has a passion for the russet chairs and electric marquises of the theatre. Here, in a mystery that evokes the West End in a delectable age, she carefully unveils a tale of affairs, lovers, the spotlight and murder. In the meta moments when the play is brought to life, we see that Weaver has a nose for secondary plots ( and even for theatrical writing. Seriously, reader friends, I would watch this play to DEATH! <--- pun intended) I cannot say enough for the atmosphere here which in all books is perfect-- but in this one becomes more and more delicious as the curtain is tugged open to reveal a world sinister and splendid. With several plausible suspects, Milo and Amory's healing marriage (SUCH ROMANCE), a monkey (!!!) and a really well-honed sense of rapier wit, An Act of Villainy is a love letter to an era Weaver owns in current mystery ( I said on twitter recently I prefer her to Agatha Christie-- and I do). Amory's inimitable narrative is paired here with a city I love and a hobby I adore.Also, Milo is chocolate, moonlight and Valentino ( of course) and we even meet Amory's mother! I am so in love with this series. I read each book more than once and act of Villainy is yet another immensely enjoyable addition to a series that really, truly, wonderfully stands out.(with thanks to the author for the ARC copy )
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    Whodunit? Well, Ashley Weaver has done it again with the fifth Amory Ames mystery! This is a sparkling, clever, romantic installment in the series. It has all the elements we've come to know and love. And these last two installments have been more complexly and intricately plotted, so kudos to Weaver for that.Milo and Amory are back in London after their sojourn abroad. After coming out of a theater one night, (having seen a murder mystery play, no less) they're approached by Milo's old friend G Whodunit? Well, Ashley Weaver has done it again with the fifth Amory Ames mystery! This is a sparkling, clever, romantic installment in the series. It has all the elements we've come to know and love. And these last two installments have been more complexly and intricately plotted, so kudos to Weaver for that.Milo and Amory are back in London after their sojourn abroad. After coming out of a theater one night, (having seen a murder mystery play, no less) they're approached by Milo's old friend Gerard Holloway. Gerard is a wealthy theater investor/director/playwright. He has a new play opening soon. The catch: his mistress, the lead of the play, has been getting threatening notes. As Gerard's heard of the Ameses mystery solving success, he asks them to look into it. Amory is put in an awkward position, as she's friends with Georgina, Gerard's wife. But she and Milo agree to investigate. Unsure of the seriousness of the notes, they're unable to prevent things from turning deadly. And this case may be the hardest one yet when it comes to Amory and Milo's marriage.We find a fun setting in the London stage, which comes with a colorful cast of suspects. An Act of Villainy is a great page-turner. Really, where is the show for this?! It would fill the Poirot and Marple sized hole in my heart now that those shows are off the air,I love the network of help Amory calls upon when investigating. Five books in and I feel like I really know this eccentric squad (#SquadGoals). They really are the best combo of resources. The book contains well placed bursts of ominous foreshadowing. There's a very Poirot denouement with a twist! Brava, Ms. Weaver! Well played.Weaver continues to sensitively explore the issues of the Ameses' complex marriage, this time through the lens of their friends' marriage. We explore Amory's insecurities and uncertainties about Milo's affection, along with Milo's communication issues and reticence. Still, no matter what, they're the dream team. I love their connection. I also love how Amory and Milo usually get there at the same time as to whodunit, unbeknownst to each other. It just goes to show that they're on the same wavelength.If you loved Nancy Drew as a kid, and are all grown up now, the Amory Ames mysteries are for you. Read them! You're missing out! And if anything, you have to get to them before the inevitable TV adaptation I keep blathering on about becomes a thing ;)
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  • Myra
    January 1, 1970
    Not as engaging as the previous books unfortunately. I would also like to see more character development between Milo and Amory. But it was still fun. Just thought previous mysteries were more engaging
  • Melanie (Mel's Bookland Adventures)
    January 1, 1970
    I adore this series and was so happy to read this ARC copy while on holiday. I am not the biggest fan of mysteries set in the theatre but alas, pretty much every series will end up having one that has a theatre setting and Amory Ames is no exception. Also, the overall plot is very similar to another mystery that I read not so long ago, but the conclusion, thankfully, was completely different. Very enjoyable and I am already looking forward to no. 6!
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  • N.N. Light
    January 1, 1970
    Amory and Milo in a dramatic mystery filled with ingénues, leading men and a killer on the loose. Leaving the theatre one night, Milo and Amory run into wealthy investor Gerard Holloway. He invites them to a dress rehearsal of his upcoming play. Amory readily accepts. Little do they know Amory’s about to star in a murder and when the curtain falls, she could very well be the next victim. Move over Nick and Nora Charles, Amory and Milo have taken your place. In classic 1930’s chic style, An Act o Amory and Milo in a dramatic mystery filled with ingénues, leading men and a killer on the loose. Leaving the theatre one night, Milo and Amory run into wealthy investor Gerard Holloway. He invites them to a dress rehearsal of his upcoming play. Amory readily accepts. Little do they know Amory’s about to star in a murder and when the curtain falls, she could very well be the next victim. Move over Nick and Nora Charles, Amory and Milo have taken your place. In classic 1930’s chic style, An Act of Villainy reads like a Thin Man comedy with smart dialogue, a trope of cagy suspects, sophisticated amateur detectives and instead of a fluffy dog, the Ames have a cuddly monkey. Cloak and dagger false clues kept me riveted and when the murderer was unveiled, shock erupted from my lips. Highly recommend, especially if you love Agatha Christie and screwball mysteries set in the 1930’s. I can’t wait to read more from this series! Disclaimer: I received an ARC from St. Martin’s Press (Minotaur Books) via Netgalley in the hopes I’d review it.My Rating: 5+ starsReviewed by: Mrs. N
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2018/09...The latest Amory Ames mystery finds Amory and her husband investigating a series of threatening letters directed at the star of a new play—who happens to be having an affair with her director. I like these characters a lot, but this mystery didn’t work for me. It’s one of those where they all just have a lot of conversations until the solution is revealed. I did guess one major portion of it, but then the end strained credulity so much that I probably woul http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2018/09...The latest Amory Ames mystery finds Amory and her husband investigating a series of threatening letters directed at the star of a new play—who happens to be having an affair with her director. I like these characters a lot, but this mystery didn’t work for me. It’s one of those where they all just have a lot of conversations until the solution is revealed. I did guess one major portion of it, but then the end strained credulity so much that I probably would have thrown the book across the room had I not been reading on my Kindle. I will probably give this series another chance but this one did not work for me. B/B-.__A review copy was provided by the publisher. This book will be released on Tuesday.
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  • Delaina
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series so much. Amory and Milo jump in with both stylishly clad feet--well, maybe Amory jumps in. Milo urbanely steps in. The killer was something of a surprise, though once the curtain started to pull back it also felt obvious. The set up was well-executed nonetheless.Possible spoilers below! But really it's just my opinion with a mild rant.My only concern is that Amory and Milo's relationship will always feel teetery and on the edge of breaking up. His character is written to be bl I love this series so much. Amory and Milo jump in with both stylishly clad feet--well, maybe Amory jumps in. Milo urbanely steps in. The killer was something of a surprise, though once the curtain started to pull back it also felt obvious. The set up was well-executed nonetheless.Possible spoilers below! But really it's just my opinion with a mild rant.My only concern is that Amory and Milo's relationship will always feel teetery and on the edge of breaking up. His character is written to be blase and suave, and I'm glad that Ashley Weaver is allowing him to verbalize more of his emotions in this book. However, Amory has a hard time trusting him long-term, like she's just waiting for him to stop loving her or announce it was never real or something (but he never actually had an affair, right? Just that he was too flirty and didn't see what harm it did because he didn't care about the other women throwing themselves at him?), and it's starting to feel a little too one-note. One of the problems similarly with Rhys Bowen's Georgie Rannoch is that she absolutely jumps to the worst conclusions. At least Darcy calls her on it, but it's so tiring! I don't want Amory and Milo to feel tiring because their relationship never changes. They need to continue to become more and more solid (and solidly) together. If the gimmick between them in every book is that she can't trust him or he doesn't understand her, it'll get old. She also needs to be braver about explaining what she's thinking and feeling instead of avoiding difficult conversations (but he does make them difficult sometimes)!
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    An Act of Villainy is the fifth book in the Amory Ames series. Set in 1930's London, Amory and her husband Milo have been asked to investigate a series of threatening letters sent to cast members in a play directed by one of their society friends. One of the cast members is subsequently murdered and the rest of them are suspected of the killing. I enjoyed the characters very much; they were very well developed. The book was well-paced and the plot contained several twists and good red herrings. An Act of Villainy is the fifth book in the Amory Ames series. Set in 1930's London, Amory and her husband Milo have been asked to investigate a series of threatening letters sent to cast members in a play directed by one of their society friends. One of the cast members is subsequently murdered and the rest of them are suspected of the killing. I enjoyed the characters very much; they were very well developed. The book was well-paced and the plot contained several twists and good red herrings. The ending was very surprising for several reasons. I also liked the natural give-and-take between Amory and Milo in their relationship. **Thanks to NetGalley for a complimentary digital copy of this book. My review is voluntary.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Amory and Milo Ames run into an old friend, wealthy Gerard Holloway, who is directing a play he has written, and who tells the couple he's concerned about his new star, lovely Flora Bell, who has been getting threatening letters. Intrigued, they accept his invitation to a rehearsal and meet the members of the cast. Amory, a friend of Gerard's wife, is disturbed that he seems infatuated with Miss Bell, who is talented as well as beautiful. A murder after opening night creates a mystery which the Amory and Milo Ames run into an old friend, wealthy Gerard Holloway, who is directing a play he has written, and who tells the couple he's concerned about his new star, lovely Flora Bell, who has been getting threatening letters. Intrigued, they accept his invitation to a rehearsal and meet the members of the cast. Amory, a friend of Gerard's wife, is disturbed that he seems infatuated with Miss Bell, who is talented as well as beautiful. A murder after opening night creates a mystery which the Ameses feel impelled to solve. I didn't find this quite as gripping as early books by Weaver, although the ending is a shocker.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    If you are a fan of Tommy and Tuppence Beresford and Nick and Nora Charles, this is a mystery series you will enjoy. The period is the 1930's and the settings are European. This is London, full of glitter and glamour, it's theater and a murder wound together in a very satisfying mystery. Add a dash of humor here and there, mostly from scenes with Amory's mother - it's perfect.Milo, Amory's husband, usually tries to stop his wife from becoming involved in murder investigations as do the police. N If you are a fan of Tommy and Tuppence Beresford and Nick and Nora Charles, this is a mystery series you will enjoy. The period is the 1930's and the settings are European. This is London, full of glitter and glamour, it's theater and a murder wound together in a very satisfying mystery. Add a dash of humor here and there, mostly from scenes with Amory's mother - it's perfect.Milo, Amory's husband, usually tries to stop his wife from becoming involved in murder investigations as do the police. Not this time, however. On their way to dinner after seeing a play, they encounter a friend of Milo's, Mr. Holloway. who is married to an old friend of Amory's.. As the conversation progresses, he invites them to see his new play. And so it all begins - Holloway is having a dalliance with the young leading lady, Flora Bell and she has been getting threatening letters. She brushes them off. After opening night, everyone goes to a charity Gala held in the restaurant next door and a good time is had by all. After midnight, people start to depart and Amory goes in search of their hostess, Georgina, wife of Mr. Holloway. Thinking that she may have gone back into the theater, Amory finds herself on stage, on her way to the dressing room area. Unfortunately, before she crosses the stage, she discovers the strangled body of poor Flora Bell. Being a fan of the Golden Age of mysteries, this series is a favorite of mine. I'm already looking forward to the next mystery with Amory and Milo.My thanks to the publisher, St. Martin's and to NetGalley, for giving me an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Linniegayl
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve enjoyed the rest of the series but this was fantastic. The mystery this time focuses on a London theatre with the actors in the play the chief suspects. I found the mystery intriguing with a number of surprises for me. But as always my primary interest is in the evolving marriage of Amory and Milo.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    This series has become one of my favorites. Every year I eagerly await the latest release. This did not disappoint.
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    This remains one of the lovely series I look forward to reading each year. I am thinking of asking for Milo POV for Yuletide.(view spoiler)[This solution to the mystery was a bit much, though!!! (hide spoiler)]
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is a good series but it needs to move forward. I’m getting a bit bored of amory constantly questioning milo and his past. I STILL have no idea if he cheated on her way back when, I assume not, but who knows anymore because the riddle is NEVER solved. Either answer it or move on. I was also disappointed because I thought we’d get some drama in their personal lives in the form of a possible baby(thought I saw signs last book) but that led nowhere so .. oh well. It could still happen, I just t This is a good series but it needs to move forward. I’m getting a bit bored of amory constantly questioning milo and his past. I STILL have no idea if he cheated on her way back when, I assume not, but who knows anymore because the riddle is NEVER solved. Either answer it or move on. I was also disappointed because I thought we’d get some drama in their personal lives in the form of a possible baby(thought I saw signs last book) but that led nowhere so .. oh well. It could still happen, I just thought it would be cool to get more hints and see how this would effect their relationship. So maybe I’ll stick with the series but might wait til a few more books are out so it doesn’t feel so drug out.
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  • Virginia Anness
    January 1, 1970
    This is definitely my cozy mystery series of choice. The writing is smooth and Amory and Milo are lively on the page. Whenever I get my hands on a new one, I devour it in one or two sittings. This one works best when the tension of the plot affects the Ames's marriage, which, after all, is the heart of the series. I do have some concerns about the series going forward. 1. I feel like newer installments are heavy on the repetition, whether it be the cast of potential killers or Amory's thoughts o This is definitely my cozy mystery series of choice. The writing is smooth and Amory and Milo are lively on the page. Whenever I get my hands on a new one, I devour it in one or two sittings. This one works best when the tension of the plot affects the Ames's marriage, which, after all, is the heart of the series. I do have some concerns about the series going forward. 1. I feel like newer installments are heavy on the repetition, whether it be the cast of potential killers or Amory's thoughts on motives. I understand cozies need to have clarity, Agatha Christie-style, but it leads to quite a bit of skimming. 2. Amory uses the same few methods of investigation in each installment—talk to people, read the gossip columns, overhear conversations. I'd like to see her character branch out and learn more about active investigating now that she's been involved in five murder investigations and it's still somehow only 1933.3. I'd like to see some forward momentum on the character development. Revisiting old wounds works marvelously for this plot, but going forward I want either new information (I love the theory that Milo is a spy and he never cheated on Amory at all) or new tension. As a genre, cozy mysteries love the status quo. I get the appeal of that, but I think audiences these days are open to dynamic characters that change with their experiences. 4. I want more character work to go into the twisty reveals. Shock value isn't as fun when you can't clearly understand what you overlooked.All that said, I do enjoy this series immensely and will definitely be reading the sixth installment!
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  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    I selected this book because I loved the cover and I noted that the author was an Edgar Award nominee for best first novel. The first books I fell in love with when I was young, were Agatha Christie novels. They really set the bar for me for the detective led British mystery novel. I was intrigued by the premise of a wealthy, young woman solving crimes alongside the police. The author perfectly captures the tone of the times of Great Britain in the 1930s. The book flows well, in perfect whodunit I selected this book because I loved the cover and I noted that the author was an Edgar Award nominee for best first novel. The first books I fell in love with when I was young, were Agatha Christie novels. They really set the bar for me for the detective led British mystery novel. I was intrigued by the premise of a wealthy, young woman solving crimes alongside the police. The author perfectly captures the tone of the times of Great Britain in the 1930s. The book flows well, in perfect whodunit fashion. Each character has a reason to be found guilty, as well as a reason why they couldn't have done it. Amory Ames' amateur sleuth is a wonderfully, endearing character. I found myself quickly pulled into the London theater world and trying to unravel the identity of the murderer alongside Amory. I really enjoyed this story and I look forward to going back to read the first four books in this series. This can easily be read as a stand alone story. I would highly recommend this story to any reader who gravitates to the cozy murder mystery, that leans towards the old fashioned rather than the shock and gore of more contemporary murder mysteries. I received a copy of this title from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    Gerard Holloway -- a friend of Milo and Amory Ames -- is getting ready to open a new play, "The Price of Victory." However, he is also in the middle of a scandal which links him to his leading lady, Flora Bell; an actress who is receiving death threats for her part in the play. Knowing that Milo and Amory have helped out with mysteries and crime in the past, Holloway enlists their help in discovering the identity of the letter-writer and keeping Bell safe. Despite Amory's misgivings of helping t Gerard Holloway -- a friend of Milo and Amory Ames -- is getting ready to open a new play, "The Price of Victory." However, he is also in the middle of a scandal which links him to his leading lady, Flora Bell; an actress who is receiving death threats for her part in the play. Knowing that Milo and Amory have helped out with mysteries and crime in the past, Holloway enlists their help in discovering the identity of the letter-writer and keeping Bell safe. Despite Amory's misgivings of helping the man cheating on her good friend, Georgina Holloway, the Ames' agree to help if they can. But in a world where all the suspects are putting on an act and nothing is what it seems, will they be able to solve the mystery before they become a part of it?This latest installment to the Amory Ames series brings the reader to the world of the theater -- its glitz, glamour, passion, heartache, and mystery. Once again, Weaver spins a tale that is both charming and engaging with characters that draw the reader in and plots which leave the reader guessing. I thoroughly enjoy this series and was excited to receive an ARC for review. I look forward to reading even more of Amory and Milo's adventures.
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  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    Amory and Milo venture into true Golden Age territory in this theater-based mystery - complete with backstage love affairs, jealous understudies, and secret alliances. Ms. Weaver keeps this moving at a fast pace (possibly a little too fast, in places) and I do think the author is progressing in leaps and bounds in her ability to set the stage (wink, wink) for the reader. As always, I'm glad to see Amory and Milo taking equally active roles in the investigation (perhaps with Amory's mother playin Amory and Milo venture into true Golden Age territory in this theater-based mystery - complete with backstage love affairs, jealous understudies, and secret alliances. Ms. Weaver keeps this moving at a fast pace (possibly a little too fast, in places) and I do think the author is progressing in leaps and bounds in her ability to set the stage (wink, wink) for the reader. As always, I'm glad to see Amory and Milo taking equally active roles in the investigation (perhaps with Amory's mother playing a part in the future?) and, if I had my druthers, I'd like to see Amory investigate with the Inspector sans Milo just to really see what she can do. In all, probably the best entry so far, which bodes well for the future of the series!I received an ecopy from the publishers and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, this book is really PRETTY - the cover art is beautiful and even the typeface looks Art Deco (I checked to see if the font was mentioned at the end but it was not). If you like the series, buy the actual book! It's nice to hold in your hands.Second, the story is good fun. If you need a break from blood and guts, swearing, and/or the demonically possessed, Amory and Milo Ames are the two most civilized sleuths to come along in print since Agatha Christie ran out of typewriter ribbon First of all, this book is really PRETTY - the cover art is beautiful and even the typeface looks Art Deco (I checked to see if the font was mentioned at the end but it was not). If you like the series, buy the actual book! It's nice to hold in your hands.Second, the story is good fun. If you need a break from blood and guts, swearing, and/or the demonically possessed, Amory and Milo Ames are the two most civilized sleuths to come along in print since Agatha Christie ran out of typewriter ribbon. Take a little trip to middle class (this is British for "rich") London in the 1930s, enjoy this cleverly crafted whodunnit set in a West End theater, and then get on back to your usual slasher fiction - or not, because this might just be a world you want to stay in for a while, and Ashley Weaver has other stories to entice you.
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  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    Actually 3.5 why don't they let u do halves. Well I like this cozy mystery series amory and milos r adorable and a fun read. The fun in cozy mysteries is trying to guess the murderer and the reason why one murder. ***** Spoiler *****Well I guessed one of the culprit (Georgina)but not why ( i thought she just killed her husband's lover and then make it look as if he did it) but I loved the reasoning behind the murder which is rarely seen in a cozy mystery. I think my only issue is the setting I f Actually 3.5 why don't they let u do halves. Well I like this cozy mystery series amory and milos r adorable and a fun read. The fun in cozy mysteries is trying to guess the murderer and the reason why one murder. ***** Spoiler *****Well I guessed one of the culprit (Georgina)but not why ( i thought she just killed her husband's lover and then make it look as if he did it) but I loved the reasoning behind the murder which is rarely seen in a cozy mystery. I think my only issue is the setting I felt I have read the set up before a murder in a theater seems so cliche (i hoped I used the word correcly)so i took points off for that. But i hope the author continues with the series. It is one of my favorites.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Gerard Holloway puts Amory in an awkward and uncomfortable spot when he asks her, and her husband Milo, to investigate the nasty letters sent to his lover (and star of his stage production) Flora Bell. Amory is a good friend of Georgina- Gerard's wife! And then, Flora is murdered! I'd not read this series before but that wasn't a problem because there was good backstory and the characters stood out on the page. Set in 1933 London, it's a combo of a historical and a cozy mystery, although the the Gerard Holloway puts Amory in an awkward and uncomfortable spot when he asks her, and her husband Milo, to investigate the nasty letters sent to his lover (and star of his stage production) Flora Bell. Amory is a good friend of Georgina- Gerard's wife! And then, Flora is murdered! I'd not read this series before but that wasn't a problem because there was good backstory and the characters stood out on the page. Set in 1933 London, it's a combo of a historical and a cozy mystery, although the theater setting, which can sometimes be cloying, sends it toward the latter. There are plenty of suspects and a few good twists (including one at the end.). Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. This is a good read.
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5⭐This mystery series, set in 1930s London, centers around Amory Ames, a socialite, who inevitably finds herself (usually along with her husband Milo) helping the police solve murder cases. I ❤ the ease and smoothness of Weaver’s writing (it’s a true pleasure to read her stories!), and they just keep getting better and better. I could make a literary meal out of Amory and Milo’s complex relationship and scenes together alone...no mystery needed! Dark twists here and wonderfully suspenseful d 4.5/5⭐️This mystery series, set in 1930s London, centers around Amory Ames, a socialite, who inevitably finds herself (usually along with her husband Milo) helping the police solve murder cases. I ❤️ the ease and smoothness of Weaver’s writing (it’s a true pleasure to read her stories!), and they just keep getting better and better. I could make a literary meal out of Amory and Milo’s complex relationship and scenes together alone...no mystery needed! Dark twists here and wonderfully suspenseful denouement. Great plot! If you haven’t tried this series, I highly recommend it and start at the beginning.Thanks to both #NetGalley and #StMartinsPress for the ARC. The opinions are strictly my own.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    An Act of Villainy continues the adventures of Amory and Milo Ames. This one involves a West End theater, threatening letters, a friend whose marriage is disintegrating as her husband has an affair, and of course, a murder.Set in the 1930's, Ashley Weaver's series echoes some of the techniques of The Golden Age of Detective Fiction with some modern twists. Clever detection, stylish writing, the avoidance of graphic violence, and in an Act of Villainy, a surprising twist.If you've been following An Act of Villainy continues the adventures of Amory and Milo Ames. This one involves a West End theater, threatening letters, a friend whose marriage is disintegrating as her husband has an affair, and of course, a murder.Set in the 1930's, Ashley Weaver's series echoes some of the techniques of The Golden Age of Detective Fiction with some modern twists. Clever detection, stylish writing, the avoidance of graphic violence, and in an Act of Villainy, a surprising twist.If you've been following this series, you will enjoy Weaver's latest offering for the mystery and the characters. Read in June; blog review scheduled for August 23.NetGalley/St. Martin's PressDetective Fiction. Sept. 4, 2018. Print length: 320 pages.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into mystery surrounding their friends Gerard and Georgina Holloway. Gerard is producing a play and rumor has it he's involved with his leading lady. She has been receiving threatening notes and Gerard turns to Milo and Amory to investigate the situation. The ingenue is murdered and the duo must sift through the various relationships and resentments to discover the killer. Meanwhile, the disintegration of the Holloway's "perfect" marriage causes Amory to have doubts Amory and Milo Ames are drawn into mystery surrounding their friends Gerard and Georgina Holloway. Gerard is producing a play and rumor has it he's involved with his leading lady. She has been receiving threatening notes and Gerard turns to Milo and Amory to investigate the situation. The ingenue is murdered and the duo must sift through the various relationships and resentments to discover the killer. Meanwhile, the disintegration of the Holloway's "perfect" marriage causes Amory to have doubts, once again, about her own relationship with Milo. Great story. Incredible resolution. Here's hoping Amory has finally resolved some of her doubts about her husband.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book!I fell in love with Milo and Amory in the first book and I just keep falling! Every book in this series adds new dimensions to their relationship and detecting partnership. This story was told so well. All the clues are there and it’s both solvable and surprising. I like to relax and just enjoy the rhythm of words and story...and I’ve not been disappointed by Ms Weaver [Now if she could write four or five books a year of this quality then my birthday wish would come true! ;) ] Another great book!I fell in love with Milo and Amory in the first book and I just keep falling! Every book in this series adds new dimensions to their relationship and detecting partnership. This story was told so well. All the clues are there and it’s both solvable and surprising. I like to relax and just enjoy the rhythm of words and story...and I’ve not been disappointed by Ms Weaver [Now if she could write four or five books a year of this quality then my birthday wish would come true! ;) ]. So my advice is buy all of this series; I have and I’m looking forward to the next Ames Adventure.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    The story takes place in 1930s London. Amory Ames and her husband Milo meet an old friend, Gerard Holloway who has just written a play he is casting his mistress in to play the lead. They are shocked that he has a mistress as he and his wife Georgina have always been such a loving couple. Holloway has asked for help as the actress has received some threatening letters. Amory attends the play rehearsal trying to decide who could be the person behind the letters. On the night of Georgina's charity The story takes place in 1930s London. Amory Ames and her husband Milo meet an old friend, Gerard Holloway who has just written a play he is casting his mistress in to play the lead. They are shocked that he has a mistress as he and his wife Georgina have always been such a loving couple. Holloway has asked for help as the actress has received some threatening letters. Amory attends the play rehearsal trying to decide who could be the person behind the letters. On the night of Georgina's charity gala and the premier of the show Flora Bell is killed. Now the setting requires finding who did it. It could be one of many but maybe not who you would expect.
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