Bedtime for Sweet Creatures
Nikki Grimes, Coretta Scott King Award winning author, and acclaimed illustrator Elizabeth Zunon's latest children's masterpiece creates an imagination-fueled and animal-filled journey to bedtime."[A] rhythmic, playful romp through a restless child's bedtime routine... a loving, effective lullaby."―Publishers Weekly, STARRED reviewIt's bedtime. But Mommy's little one is not sleepy.He growls like a bear, he questions like an owl, he tosses his mane like a lion. He hunts for water like a sly wolf, and hides like a snake.Mommy needs to wrangle her sweet creature in bed so that the whole family can sleep. From tigers to squirrels to snakes, the little boy dodges around his bedtime, until he is tired enough to finally sleep. His imaginative animal friends weave their way through the illustrations, eventually joining him in curling up for the night."The mother's loving understanding is demonstrated by how she works with her child's rich imagination, never slipping into admonishment. As such, children will engage with the pajama-clad tot's antics and be soothed by the book's positive tone. A fabulous interpretation of an everyday battle."―Booklist, STARRED review

Bedtime for Sweet Creatures Details

TitleBedtime for Sweet Creatures
Author
ReleaseJan 14th, 2020
PublisherSourcebooks Jabberwocky
ISBN-139781492638322
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Animals, Cultural, African American, Family

Bedtime for Sweet Creatures Review

  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet bedtime story with wonderfully colorful illustrations.
  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks for sending me an ARC of this beautifully illustrated poem for preschoolers, Sourcebooks! I’ve always enjoyed Nikki Grimes’ poetry, but the artwork by Elizabeth Zunon makes this one stand out. Each animal used to represent the nighttime bed avoidance behaviors of young children everywhere is boldly painted and with a great blend of imagination and realism. Great bedtime read aloud.
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  • Laura Harrison
    January 1, 1970
    It is only January but Bedtime for Sweet Creatures will be one of my favorite picture books throughout 2020. The rhythm and illustrations are perfection. The book begs to be acted out. The illustrations are so interesting and lovely. I find myself reaching for this title over and over. It is wonderful.
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    Not sure how kids will react to the direct 'you' which makes it feel a little like tell and don't show, but charming illustrations with great movement and brilliant colors. With all the animal effects probably a great read aloud if the reader is good with animal noises!
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the beautiful, colorful, intricate illustrations in this bedtime book. I also enjoyed the ties between the little girl's actions and personality to the animals she imagines. My main concern is the conclusion. Instead of finally sleeping in her own bed, the child manipulates her mother into letting her sleep with her parents.Noooooooooooooo!!
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC at Book Expo.Cute story with great illustrations.
  • KDV
    January 1, 1970
    I love the illustrations and the layout. Would be fun to read and act out.
  • Ricki
    January 1, 1970
    My Review:The rhythm of this book is palpable. As a mother of three children six and under, I identified whole-heartedly with the mother of this book. She just wants her child to go to bed. As the child attempts sleep, he morphs into different animals (a lion, a tiger, an owl!). The book displays bedtime in ways that parents will identify with. Teachers will love using this book to teach metaphor and sound in story.My three-year-old's review: "I like the squirrel and the koala a lot! I liked all My Review: The rhythm of this book is palpable. As a mother of three children six and under, I identified whole-heartedly with the mother of this book. She just wants her child to go to bed. As the child attempts sleep, he morphs into different animals (a lion, a tiger, an owl!). The book displays bedtime in ways that parents will identify with. Teachers will love using this book to teach metaphor and sound in story. My three-year-old's review: "I like the squirrel and the koala a lot! I liked all of the aminals. [sic]"My six-year-old's review: "I like how his mom and his dad are trying to get him to sleep at night. I like how it is night-time in the book and the colors of the book make it feel like it is night-time."Teachers' Tools for Navigation: The ways in which Grimes uses sound and metaphor is very intriguing and quite teachable. I spent a significant amount of time thinking about the almost-anthropomorphism of the text. The animals are given human characteristics of the child. But the child is actually given animal characteristics. This is zoomorphism, right? I would love to have this kind of study and debate with students. So cool!Discussion Questions: What animals does the child act like? How does the author choose qualities of the child to connect them with animals?; Choose another animal not within the book. How might the child act like this animal at bedtime, too?Full review (Available January 15): http://www.unleashingreaders.com/?p=2... in a new tab)
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  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    A small child does not want to go to bed in this poetic look at bedtime struggles. The book begins with the word “no” being chanted like a drum beat. The child asks “who” like an owl as if there is someone else heading to bed. Their mother takes the teddy bear and heads off towards the bedroom. Once in bed, there is growling like a bear, hissing like a snake due to monsters, and even roaring like a lion to check beneath the bed. Fawns and squirrels appear as a storybook is shared. The child hugs A small child does not want to go to bed in this poetic look at bedtime struggles. The book begins with the word “no” being chanted like a drum beat. The child asks “who” like an owl as if there is someone else heading to bed. Their mother takes the teddy bear and heads off towards the bedroom. Once in bed, there is growling like a bear, hissing like a snake due to monsters, and even roaring like a lion to check beneath the bed. Fawns and squirrels appear as a storybook is shared. The child hugs like a koala for a final kiss. Then there is water to drink and the bathroom to use before the child may or may not head to their own bed and sleep.Grimes takes the battles of bedtime and turns them into a menagerie of animals who fill the pages with the reactions. The process of bedtime negotiations is rather like lions and snakes for parents at times. I appreciate that the process is imperfect and at times filled with the child’s strong emotions. As always, Grimes’ writing is marvelous. Her words are energetic and the combination of behavior and animals is clever.The art by Zunon is done in vibrant mix of collage and painting. The character’s faces are detailed and expressive, while the various animals are done in a colorful and stylized format. The child could be any gender, which makes this book all the more inclusive in addition to having an African-American family of characters.A poetic and animal-filled bedtime story about bedtime. Appropriate for ages 1-3.
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  • Margie
    January 1, 1970
    Regardless of the continent, country or community, it is a routine repeated daily. When parents are ready to rest, their children are not sleepy. You would think after a day of nearly non-stop action the children would be tired, but the opposite is true. The words, it's time for bed, are akin to a super surge of energy for little gals and guys.They will say and do anything to avoid going to bed. Bedtime for Sweet Creatures (Sourcebooks, Jabberwocky, January 14, 2020) written by Nikki Grimes with Regardless of the continent, country or community, it is a routine repeated daily. When parents are ready to rest, their children are not sleepy. You would think after a day of nearly non-stop action the children would be tired, but the opposite is true. The words, it's time for bed, are akin to a super surge of energy for little gals and guys.They will say and do anything to avoid going to bed. Bedtime for Sweet Creatures (Sourcebooks, Jabberwocky, January 14, 2020) written by Nikki Grimes with pictures by Elizabeth Zunon is a story of patient parental persuasions. It is a story of the enchantment of love renewed each evening.My full recommendation: https://librariansquest.blogspot.com/...
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    I received this picture book for ages 3+ at Book Expo 2019. The lyricism of Nikki Grimes is superb. The little one in this story doesn’t want to go to bed, and mom describes her child in a manner similar to animals that may growl and nibble, but still need to slumber despite their resistance. Whimsically illustrated animals and poetic words sweep across the pages, making for a dynamic and captivating story that will guide our littlest ones to bed for the night. A sweet and endearing family story I received this picture book for ages 3+ at Book Expo 2019. The lyricism of Nikki Grimes is superb. The little one in this story doesn’t want to go to bed, and mom describes her child in a manner similar to animals that may growl and nibble, but still need to slumber despite their resistance. Whimsically illustrated animals and poetic words sweep across the pages, making for a dynamic and captivating story that will guide our littlest ones to bed for the night. A sweet and endearing family story that is normal in many homes. Recommended.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Can Mama get this boy in bed, the one growling along with his bear? First, the monsters must go, then a drink, the bathroom, one more time. But, wait, what about "Once upon a time"? Readers understand how hard it is to go to bed, all in the dark, without Mama or Papa. It feels like a hurry, to this boy, but perhaps takes a while, to the Mama. Nikki Grimes knows just what it's like to get a child to bed and Elizabeth Zunon's collages with real people's photos show them in the child's animal Can Mama get this boy in bed, the one growling along with his bear? First, the monsters must go, then a drink, the bathroom, one more time. But, wait, what about "Once upon a time"? Readers understand how hard it is to go to bed, all in the dark, without Mama or Papa. It feels like a hurry, to this boy, but perhaps takes a while, to the Mama. Nikki Grimes knows just what it's like to get a child to bed and Elizabeth Zunon's collages with real people's photos show them in the child's animal wonderland. The cover gives a glimpse of her creativity. What a fun book!
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  • Aolund
    January 1, 1970
    A gentle bedtime book where a toddler reluctant to go to sleep is coaxed to bed by their mother. A metaphorical dimension is present throughout the book as the child's different actions are compared to various animals, and brightly-colored and patterned illustrations of these animals accompany the child across the pages. The child and their family have black skin, and the gender of the child is not specified. Themes: Bed time, Animals, Pajamas
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Toddler bedtime is full of rituals some of which are to prolong the occurrence. Here are the rituals overlaid with all the animals the child may be seeing. The illustrations are intersections of the actual bedtime process and beautiful artful animal illustrations done in oils, acrylics, and paper collage, collage being one of my favorite art forms. Looking forward to more illustrations from Elizabeth Zunon.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Critically acclaimed poet Nikki Grimes can turn such a simple everyday task into something magical. As a mother tries to put her stubborn child to bed, their nighttime routine and thoughts are accompanied by the animals they represent-- a coiled snake in a blanket, a ferocious bear as teddy, a koala for a hug. This makes for a lovely bedtime story.
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  • Sasha
    January 1, 1970
    I got this as an advance copy in 2019 and have loved it because of its vibrant colors/illustrations & the representation of African-American parents. My daughter (at the age of three) will often ask, “which one is me, Mommy?” The young boy in the story associates everything with animals and there is a beautiful rhythm to this book that both my daughter & I love.
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  • Colorado Buck
    January 1, 1970
    the animals she pretends to be instead of falling asleep are cute, the sounds they make make it into the descriptions, it's really a good night book, not really for storytime unless you can have them all fall asleep afterwards? and pretend?
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet bedtime picture book for those restless critters, this one in a fuzzy red onesie, who don’t want to go to bed. Gentle nudges and fabulous collage like illustrations make this book a treat for parents and kids alike.
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Great concept, reads aloud beautifully. The combination of two distinct illustration styles does a wonderful job of distinguishing clearly between the imagination and reality. Parents will totally relate to this one. Highly recommended for ages 2-5.
  • Liv
    January 1, 1970
    Received an arc from Sourcebooks Kids of this beautiful picture book. What a clever way to add animal information to a bedtime story. Highly recommended!
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully illustrated and easy for a child to mimic the various animals. However, the child ends up getting what they wanted all along. Hmmm
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    A perfect book to read to that child who isn't quite ready for bed.
  • Gail
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely book; exquisite art
  • Miss Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A child imagines they are a differnt animal during each part of it's bedtime routine. Colorful. Toddler and up
  • Tracie
    January 1, 1970
    A little one does not want to go to bed!
  • Elisabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Ha! This book is telling the true story of about every toddler’s bedtime routine. I loved this clever little story and the illustrations are really original.
  • mg
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely sentiment...wonderful pictures.But why does the dad play such a passive role throughout the whole thing? Why is he even featured if he's not going to have any sort of active role?
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous art
  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, this was spot on real. Charming.
  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    Favorite aspect is the artwork. Least favorite is the ending, what are we trying to tell the children here?
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