Click
A debut graphic novel about friendship and finding where you "click" in school.Olive wants to get in on the act . . .. . . Any act! Olive “clicks” with everyone in the fifth grade—until one day she doesn’t. When a school variety show leaves Olive stranded without an act to join, she begins to panic, wondering why all her friends have already formed their own groups . . . without her. With the performance drawing closer by the minute, will Olive be able to find her own place in the show before the curtain comes up?

Click Details

TitleClick
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 8th, 2019
PublisherHMH Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139781328911124
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Comics

Click Review

  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    What a cute middle grade graphic novel! I loved the story and the artwork. Olive was such a likeable character and I can't wait for the next book in this series!
  • Jenn Marshall
    January 1, 1970
    Click isn't really my type of story, but I can see my 6th graders living this book. It's the story of Olive, she has tons of friends but when it is time for the 5th grade variety show all of her friends have plans and no one has asked her to join their group. It's a story of her finding her way and still being true to herself. A super cute story.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusOlive's fifth grade class is having a variety show, and all of Olive's friends seem to have put groups together. There's an instrumental act, martial arts, cheer, and singing, but no one asks Olive if she wants to be part of a group. She isn't happy and sulks a bit, leading her mother to ask if she should call some of the kids' parents and ask if Olive can join. This is, of course, not what Olive has in mind as she fantasizes about being with the various groups. H E ARC provided by Edelweiss PlusOlive's fifth grade class is having a variety show, and all of Olive's friends seem to have put groups together. There's an instrumental act, martial arts, cheer, and singing, but no one asks Olive if she wants to be part of a group. She isn't happy and sulks a bit, leading her mother to ask if she should call some of the kids' parents and ask if Olive can join. This is, of course, not what Olive has in mind as she fantasizes about being with the various groups. Her hip, dyed-hair aunt offers to let her visit and hang out, eating Chinese take away and watching videotapes of female comics from the 1970s and plants the idea that Olive could be the host of the variety show. This is a fairly good solution, even if Olive's mother is less than thrilled that the aunt is forcing her "beat of your own drum" philosophy on Olive. When some friends ask Olive to be part of their group, she feels bad about saying no, but doesn't explain her plan, leading to some ill feelings. In the end, everything works out, Olive is allowed to be the host and feels better about her place in society. Strengths: This has a very pleasing, contemporary color palette and a style of illustration similar enough to Telgemeier, Jamieson, and Holms that every middle school and elementary library should break down and buy two copies, because one will surely be "lost" by the end of the year. The story has a little bit of girl-power and is easy to understand. This is less message-y and has about as many words as Telgemeier.Weaknesses: The noses are a little odd, but not as bad as Ignatow's. The lack of words resulted in what came across as a lot of sulking by Olive, which I found a bit boring. I was disappointed that actual women comics weren't used as examples by the aunt, but then I'm not sure that there were that many in real life. Would have been more instructive to use actual people and shows. What I really think: Definitely purchasing, but not my personal favorite. I'm not a fan of graphic novels in general, especially since I often doubt students actually read any of the words. I like the Holm's Sunny Side Up-- a bit more fun than Telgemeier (whose upcoming book, Guts, is about a girl who suffers anxiety induced gastric upset), but with serious issues explained without the detail of Jamieson's work (which would be easier to understand as tradition novels).
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  • R. G. Nairam
    January 1, 1970
    It was really cool that this addressed the whole feeling of having friends but not belonging to a group, or always getting the feeling that they like you but care about someone else more. Though I resent somewhat being told that the mentor character didn't find her group "until college." Ha. Ha.Other than that, there was a lot of this book where there just wasn't that much going on. (I picked up an ARC of this at a bookstore I volunteer at.)
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  • Kristy
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. This is a cute book with a very simple plot about finding your place in a group of friends. It’s super low stakes and will appeal most to the 2-5th grade set. Great for all those super young Raina Telgmeir fans! We needed a younger elementary age graphic story like this that was geared at younger kids. The story is a little too simple but it will do just fine, you know?
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  • Damian Alexander
    January 1, 1970
    A colorful graphic novel about friendship, but with a twist. Ever feel like you have lots of friends...but they're all hanging out without you? You see pictures of your friends going to the movies or the faire on Instagram and Facebook and you wonder, "Why wasn't I invited?" You thought you were friends...but maybe you're not...? Then you learn the difference between a "friend" and a "best friend" and realize you maybe don't have a best friend. This is something I experienced in high school. Eve A colorful graphic novel about friendship, but with a twist. Ever feel like you have lots of friends...but they're all hanging out without you? You see pictures of your friends going to the movies or the faire on Instagram and Facebook and you wonder, "Why wasn't I invited?" You thought you were friends...but maybe you're not...? Then you learn the difference between a "friend" and a "best friend" and realize you maybe don't have a best friend. This is something I experienced in high school. Everyone hung out without me, chose each other for projects over me, went to the movies or birthday parties without me. It's not that they didn't like me...it was that they liked their other friends MORE. CLICK is a 5th grade version of that, wrapped up in brightly colored images, with a poignant message about finding your place in a sea of people.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Great for those who are in desperate need of Smile readalikes. The conflict is very mild and the characters are older elementary aged students so might even be great for those younger ones wishing to read Smile, but who might not be quite there yet.
  • Ampersand Inc.
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful gentle graphic novel that really nails how tough it can be in middle grade fitting in.
  • Kerry
    January 1, 1970
    How could I not love this!? Main character is named Olive! ❤ How could I not love this!? Main character is named Olive! ❤️
  • tony dillard jr
    January 1, 1970
    Poor Olive. Even though Olive is one of the most popular students in her class, she is all alone. There’s a big talent show coming up and all of the other students have partners. Just not her!Feeling like the odd person out, Olive is stressing out big time. Even though she clicks with everyone, she just doesn’t fit into a clique. (See that clever play on words?) Will Olive come up with an act before the talent show starts? Even more important, will Olive find her way in the fifth grade?For a fir Poor Olive. Even though Olive is one of the most popular students in her class, she is all alone. There’s a big talent show coming up and all of the other students have partners. Just not her!Feeling like the odd person out, Olive is stressing out big time. Even though she clicks with everyone, she just doesn’t fit into a clique. (See that clever play on words?) Will Olive come up with an act before the talent show starts? Even more important, will Olive find her way in the fifth grade?For a first time work, Kayla Miller does a very good job. Her freshness shows at times, especially at the beginning. Just as Olive is trying to find her voice in the fifth grade, I think Kayla Miller was struggling at first to give her characters their voice. The cadence was a bit off. Certain words, like the name of Olive’s brother were repeated ad nauseum at first. But by end of the second act when Olive has a sleepover at her aunt’s, things really fall into place.I love how Kayla Miller solved Olive’s talent show dilemma. It was very clever. I would have liked to have seen more of her performance during the school event than some of the extra scenes between Olive and a group of friends that have their feelings hurt by Olive’s ultimate decision for her act. However, the kinda open-ended finale was pretty cool. It had an very artsy feel to it that left me quite satisfied.Miller’s art style was superb. It’s super clean and she uses such thick inks. I love thick inks! It’s a key element that almost all of my favorite all-time artists use in their portfolio of work. But, I will have to say, I was fooled at first by this book.When I saw this book for the very first time, I thought it was a new graphic novel by Raina Telgemeier (Smile)! Miller and Telgemeier have such a similar look in their artwork. Is it possible for two artists to be creative twins? Even though the cover threw me for a loop, I would advise Kayla Miller to not change a thing about it! It’s really that good.This book is recommended for readers of ages 10-12. However, there’s nothing offensive or alarming that should give a parent or guardian pause if one 9 and under might want to read this book. Though there are some bigger words and concepts that might require an adults help.Click is the beginning of a new series of graphic novels. Olive and Kayla Miller will return in April of this year with Camp. I wonder if the title is going to be a unique play on words as Click was with the homonym Clique. If so, I think we’ve discovered Kayla Miller’s motif for the Olive series and it fits in perfectly!
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  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet children's comic book about the beginnings of cliques and social grouping, and finding your place while negotiating different friendships. Unlike Telgemeier's works, Real Friends, El Deafo, and Awkward/Brave/Crush, this isn't a book about middle school - the characters are fifth graders and this book is emotionally perfect for 1st/2nd graders and up. My critiques fall in two areas: believability and execution. First, the plot seems almost too gentle and sweet and kind. The social challenge Sweet children's comic book about the beginnings of cliques and social grouping, and finding your place while negotiating different friendships. Unlike Telgemeier's works, Real Friends, El Deafo, and Awkward/Brave/Crush, this isn't a book about middle school - the characters are fifth graders and this book is emotionally perfect for 1st/2nd graders and up. My critiques fall in two areas: believability and execution. First, the plot seems almost too gentle and sweet and kind. The social challenges are still minor, there isn't any bullying or cruelty, everyone talks through their minor issues and resolves things almost instantly, and everyone is friendly and kind and supportive of each other. Elementary school students are meaner than this. Sure, it's not middle school, but this book is almost too ideal and perfect. This isn't the worst thing - there are plenty of books about the horrors of middle school and bullying and cliques, so this book isn't misleading kids into having a false sense of how things are/will be. However, it's a drawback to the realistic setting. Second, this is a debut novel, and doesn't hit its stride until the middle of the book. The beginning really had me worried that it wouldn't be strong enough to be anything but a money-grab by publisher's hungry for stronger comics artist's works. There were too many characters too fast, and undeveloped. The scenes showing Olive happy at school and getting along with everyone were too long and too numerous. Having two full sets of "Olive is so happy with everyone" scenes made the transition to "Olive feels left out and doesn't belong anywhere" too quick and not justified. And a conversation with her aunt established the title pun click/clique with a dialogue mistake, where characters speaking to each other comment about the spelling of click and clique in a way that doesn't make sense. Thank goodness the middle picked up and found a perfect solution to Olive's problem that no one had trouble with so that everything could stay perfect and happy.TL;DR - Would recommend to kids hungry for more popular titles, and those who might be a little young emotionally for full middle school bullying and crushes. Children's comics are popular enough to warrant purchasing this title for a collection, but it isn't incredible or ground-breaking.
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  • Kim Bongiorno
    January 1, 1970
    Olive is in the 5th grade, and like many kids around that age, gets along with a bunch of her classmates. She has a happy home life, and is in a good place, overall.When the teacher announces a talent show, kids around her immediately start pairing off into acts. She's not asked to join any, and starts to get sad. Why didn't anyone ask her? Do they not like her all the time, only some of the time? Why doesn't she have that one best friend?It's a great exploration of the reality of this age (I ha Olive is in the 5th grade, and like many kids around that age, gets along with a bunch of her classmates. She has a happy home life, and is in a good place, overall.When the teacher announces a talent show, kids around her immediately start pairing off into acts. She's not asked to join any, and starts to get sad. Why didn't anyone ask her? Do they not like her all the time, only some of the time? Why doesn't she have that one best friend?It's a great exploration of the reality of this age (I have a 6th grader who likes to do things like talent shows right now) when it comes to friendship dynamics, cliques (in a good way), and doing your thing. There's great examples of sibling dynamics (kid and adult), respecting one's differences, and a parent's struggle to just want their kid to fit in somewhere. With a diverse cast of characters, realistic conversations/reactions, and a focus on one main force that moves the book forward, it does exactly what I had hoped it would once I got into it. What a fantastic book to get into the hands of middle grade readers. 4th graders will like seeing what is to come. 5th/6th/7th graders will be in the thick of this sort of thing and appreciate both how to handle the situation Olive is in or better understand the opposite position. 8th graders will be able to relate and can see some of the more subtle layers of the book. Everyone will definitely be smiling by the end. Really well done! I highly recommend it.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This was set in the 90s and NO ONE CAN CONVINCE ME OTHERWISE.The book kind of bothered me, though I can't quite put my finger on why. Maybe everything worked out too well? Maybe the fact that cliques were not described as excluding people but simply as a group that shares your interests? Maybe because I was a weird kid who wasn't super well-liked but I got along with everyone just fine, I just didn't really have a bunch of friend-friends, and this read so polar opposite to my experiences that I This was set in the 90s and NO ONE CAN CONVINCE ME OTHERWISE.The book kind of bothered me, though I can't quite put my finger on why. Maybe everything worked out too well? Maybe the fact that cliques were not described as excluding people but simply as a group that shares your interests? Maybe because I was a weird kid who wasn't super well-liked but I got along with everyone just fine, I just didn't really have a bunch of friend-friends, and this read so polar opposite to my experiences that I feel like the author is kinda sorta lying to kids to make them feel better about their relationships? Like, in real life, no one's gonna ask you to join their group at the last minute, and everyone's gonna laugh at you if you want to be the most important person in the show. Or maybe I'm just bitter and wish there were books that weren't all "everything is gonna be okay if you BE YOURSELF" without having to write them myself.
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  • Kristin Crouch
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Kayla Miller for providing an ARC to #collabookation for review. Click is a wonderful graphic novel, perhaps one of my favorites. Olive has lots of friends, but when the school variety show is announced, she finds that no one asks her to be a part of their 'group.' She feels isolated and alone, and struggles for a bit. A helpful aunt helps her deal with her feelings, and Olive ultimately finds the perfect solution. I loved that the book honored her feelings of isolation, while also Thank you to Kayla Miller for providing an ARC to #collabookation for review. Click is a wonderful graphic novel, perhaps one of my favorites. Olive has lots of friends, but when the school variety show is announced, she finds that no one asks her to be a part of their 'group.' She feels isolated and alone, and struggles for a bit. A helpful aunt helps her deal with her feelings, and Olive ultimately finds the perfect solution. I loved that the book honored her feelings of isolation, while also acknowledging that she may have to reach out to friends to be heard. It also seemed the perfect foreshadowing for the segmentation that often occurs once kids get out of elementary school. I predict my fifth graders gobbling this one up and asking for more! I was happy to learn that there are more Olive tales on the horizon!
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  • Carmen
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book through the #bookposse Twitter book club. I loved that this graphic novel addressed real friendship and confidence issues without cruelty. Olive is a fifth grader with a wide variety of friends. When her teacher announces an upcoming variety show, these friends separate into groups to plan their talents. Without malicious intent, Olive is left out. It will take a compassionate aunt and some DVDs of old variety shows to help Olive find her place! I found this g I received an ARC copy of this book through the #bookposse Twitter book club. I loved that this graphic novel addressed real friendship and confidence issues without cruelty. Olive is a fifth grader with a wide variety of friends. When her teacher announces an upcoming variety show, these friends separate into groups to plan their talents. Without malicious intent, Olive is left out. It will take a compassionate aunt and some DVDs of old variety shows to help Olive find her place! I found this graphic novel refreshing, and I know I will have many kids reading and re-reading it when it comes out in November!
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  • Marisa
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher HMH Kids for providing a physical arc. Able to read over a lunch break. I can see 2nd to 6th graders reading this book. The main character is in 5th grade and at the beginning life seems pretty good, Olive seems to be friends with...everyone. But the fateful Friday the 5th grade variety show is announced and everyone rushes to pair up or team up and no one asks Olive. Cute ending. Fun, unique aunt character who helps give Olive her inspiration to be true to herself. Ol Thank you to the publisher HMH Kids for providing a physical arc. Able to read over a lunch break. I can see 2nd to 6th graders reading this book. The main character is in 5th grade and at the beginning life seems pretty good, Olive seems to be friends with...everyone. But the fateful Friday the 5th grade variety show is announced and everyone rushes to pair up or team up and no one asks Olive. Cute ending. Fun, unique aunt character who helps give Olive her inspiration to be true to herself. Olive learns that soon her grade will start cliques and you need to find your people and be you.
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  • Weston Humphreys
    January 1, 1970
    Click is a fun and meaningful story featuring Olive, a fifth grader who is loved by everyone yet still struggles with her sense of belonging and what it means to be her. The art is super cute and endearing all the way through! I really appreciated the way Kayla Miller approached Olive's family dynamics, especially when it came to conflict. She gave us a gentle glimpse into what conflict can look like among people who love each other well but don't always understand where the other is coming from Click is a fun and meaningful story featuring Olive, a fifth grader who is loved by everyone yet still struggles with her sense of belonging and what it means to be her. The art is super cute and endearing all the way through! I really appreciated the way Kayla Miller approached Olive's family dynamics, especially when it came to conflict. She gave us a gentle glimpse into what conflict can look like among people who love each other well but don't always understand where the other is coming from.Click is a true blessing of positivity and genuine emotional struggle.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. Pros: It's a very nice depiction of the life of a 5th grader who is well liked by everyone in class, but doesn't have a special friend or group. Loved the character of the aunt who listens to her and helps her find inspiration. The naggy mom rang true. Cons: It's very very basic, and could be unrelatable for kids who are not universally liked (which is many, many kids). Just too happy-go-lucky for me. Needs even a taste of drama. This low-stakes book is a good match for kids in 2-5th 3.5 stars. Pros: It's a very nice depiction of the life of a 5th grader who is well liked by everyone in class, but doesn't have a special friend or group. Loved the character of the aunt who listens to her and helps her find inspiration. The naggy mom rang true. Cons: It's very very basic, and could be unrelatable for kids who are not universally liked (which is many, many kids). Just too happy-go-lucky for me. Needs even a taste of drama. This low-stakes book is a good match for kids in 2-5th grade, especially those who like Raina Telgemeier.
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    A must read graphic novel about friendship, fitting in, and belonging for middle grade kids. I recognize Olive in my own ten and thirteen year old daughters and in my fourth and fifth grade students. Had to buy two copies...one for school, one for home. Grateful to the author for sharing the situations and conversations that are happening in my home and school (and similar places everywhere)! Looking forward to reading more about Olive in her camp adventures!
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    3rd&upWhat a super sweet graphic novel- perfect for elementary/early middle school readers!Any child who has had a fear of being on the outside, of being the extra friend, can absolutely relate to Olive's need to find her place and her own way to shine.A delightful, quick read that will find many fans.Thank you to HMH Books for Young Readers/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review
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  • Erin Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Story is mostly contained in one weekend and shows supportive family relationships and attempting to assert independence as a kid. Olive is a friendly girl who has a variety of friends but no one she's completely "clicked" with yet and tries to find a way to showcase her talents in the upcoming fifth grade variety show. When she isn't invited into groups she's uncertain of what to do but wants to find a resolution to it herself, rather than letting her mother troubleshoot it for her.
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  • Erin O'Donovan
    January 1, 1970
    Super cute graphic novel about finding yourself. Very low key drama. I loved that I identified with Olive with her having lots of friends from various cliques but seeming to belong totally to one group. It was later in life I found a close circle of friends that I really connected to and I think that is an important lesson for kids today to try out all kinds of different things to find themselves.
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  • Em
    January 1, 1970
    A couple sweet themes in the book- definitely best suited for a mid to upper elementary age student as the language is quite simplistic. I like how similar it is to a lot of the other great graphic novels out there for middle school readers but there were a few things that could have been a little more detailed or packed a bit more of a punch.
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Fifth grader Olive is trying to figure out how she "clicks" with all of her friend groups at school and in the neighborhood, especially now that the fifth grade variety show is happening and no one has asked her to join their act. I liked the topics of friendship and fitting in, but felt the dialogue was a bit hokey and not authentic to kids this age.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    Cute story of a girl who is friends with multiple groups of people and doesn’t find a group to be with for a school variety act. She does end up finding her place!What I liked about this was it went into the subject of cliques without doing the normal bully plot.
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  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect for fans of the "Babysitters Club" graphic novel series or Roller Girl.Olive is trying to find where she clicks - with friends and with what she enjoys doing. This middle grade graphic novel is going to click with a lot of readers!
  • Steph
    January 1, 1970
    Super cute and very accessible graphic novel that alllll of our little readers who love Smile & Sisters will absolutely adore! I’m so glad it’s completely appropriate for any age, and I’d say 2nd-6th graders will all greatly enjoy this book. What a find!
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  • B
    January 1, 1970
    Cute 4-5th grade graphic about fitting in, sometimes you dont "click" with a certain person. Olive finds a way to click with all of her friends at the school Talent Show. The graphics are fun and colorful, and the message is good.
  • WKPL Children's/YA Books
    January 1, 1970
    Miss Lori devoured this Graphic Fiction novel! What a great way to show the struggles middle school children have trying to "fit in"....even among their friends! Very quick read with a strong message to stay true to yourself.Great for 4th grade through 6th grade kids.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Lots of smiling characters help the main character, Olive, through a minor social problem in this very gentle realistic fiction story. Recommended for people who like Smile by Telgemeier but who wouldn't be comfortable with Sunny Side Up or Roller Girl.
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