Creatures of Want and Ruin
Amityville baywoman Ellie West fishes by day and bootlegs moonshine by night. It's dangerous work under Prohibition--independent operators like her are despised by federal agents and mobsters alike--but Ellie's brother was accepted to college and Ellie's desperate to see him go. So desperate that when wealthy strangers ask her to procure libations for an extravagant party, Ellie sells them everything she has, including some booze she acquired under unusual circumstances. What Ellie doesn't know is that this booze is special. Distilled from foul mushrooms by a cult of diabolists, those who drink it see terrible things--like the destruction of Long Island in fire and flood. The cult is masquerading as a church promising salvation through temperance and a return to "the good old days," so it's hard for Ellie to take a stand against them, especially when her father joins - but Ellie loves Long Island, and she loves her family, and she'll do whatever it takes to ensure neither is torn apart.

Creatures of Want and Ruin Details

TitleCreatures of Want and Ruin
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 13th, 2018
PublisherJohn Joseph Adams/Mariner Books
ISBN-139781328710253
Rating
GenreFantasy, Historical, Historical Fiction, Horror, Fiction, Urban Fantasy

Creatures of Want and Ruin Review

  • Sh3lly (GrumpyBookGrrrl.com)
    January 1, 1970
    RELEASE DAY!Review also found at:https://grumpybookgrrrl.com/2018/11/1...Creatures of Will and Temper: ★★★★★Follow me at Twitter.RELEASE DAY: Tuesday, November 13, 2018. I really liked Creatures of Will and Temper and this new release is a stand-alone set in the same world! That means more diabolists and demonic shenanigans.Ellie was a great female lead, and there is another female character, Fin, who couldn’t be more different. But the two join forces and there is a lot of girl power. You can t RELEASE DAY!Review also found at:https://grumpybookgrrrl.com/2018/11/1...Creatures of Will and Temper: ★★★★★Follow me at Twitter.RELEASE DAY: Tuesday, November 13, 2018. I really liked Creatures of Will and Temper and this new release is a stand-alone set in the same world! That means more diabolists and demonic shenanigans.Ellie was a great female lead, and there is another female character, Fin, who couldn’t be more different. But the two join forces and there is a lot of girl power. You can tell the author is forward-thinking and there aren’t any stereotypes to be found here. It’s unconventional and exactly the kind of book I love to read.The demon in this one is very different than the one from the previous book. The extremist group working for this malevolent entity provides an ironic (or maybe it was intentional) backdrop for what is going on in America right now.To sum it up, it’s a fun-to-read romp involving bootlegging, religious nutjobs, and two young women who will do whatever it takes to save their home. Throw in some mushrooms with bad juju and a demon or two, and it’s a paranormal historical fantasy you shouldn’t miss!Thank you Edelweiss and publisher for providing an eARC for an honest review.Previous Post:ERMAGHERD. So excited!
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    An unusual fantasy- paranormal book and original. The tone was creepy. There were demons and mad preachers and a secret cabal and a plan to rule the world, or at least Long Island. Mwahaha! Will a group of disparate people to stop the evil before it goes too far? Read on! This plays on the B movie vibe. I love the idea of seeing giant pulsating mushrooms wreaking havoc! Great read. Thanks to Netgalley for an arc of this book.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    CREATURES OF WANT AND RUIN is the first novel I have read by Molly Tanzer. This title felt like it would fit comfortably into several sub-genres; namely fantasy, historical fiction, occult, and even romance, to a lesser degree. "Doing the right thing doesn't always mean doing the easy thing." Two of the main characters are strong female leads--unusual for the Prohibition era in history. First we have Ellie West, who sells illegal moonshine in an effort to raise enough money to send her brother t CREATURES OF WANT AND RUIN is the first novel I have read by Molly Tanzer. This title felt like it would fit comfortably into several sub-genres; namely fantasy, historical fiction, occult, and even romance, to a lesser degree. "Doing the right thing doesn't always mean doing the easy thing." Two of the main characters are strong female leads--unusual for the Prohibition era in history. First we have Ellie West, who sells illegal moonshine in an effort to raise enough money to send her brother to college. Then there's Delphine Coulthead--Fin--an unhappily married woman whose husband and friends decided to move to Long Island for a temporary retreat. Only Fin seems to "belong" on the island, whereas the others in her group clearly do not. "'I don't mind him throwing a party, if that's what you're asking' . . . a statement that was both untrue and absolutely not an answer . . . " The story itself was a compelling read, with a couple of twists that I had never seen coming. I enjoyed the ending much more so because of the action scenes and revelations. The parts that took place at the Coulthead's rented mansion were a bit frustrating to read, as the treatment Fin got from her so-called "friends" was unimaginably cruel--especially given that her husband sided with them. ". . . It wasn't that she wanted to inconvenience them. She just wanted to be seen." I also feel that the author's habit of repeating an incident, fully, to each character that entered the scene, was a bit much. As a reader, I wanted to convey "Yes, you've already said this several times. I understood it the first time." Omitting issues like that, I believe could have shortened the novel by nearly 100 pages without losing anything of importance to the main theme. ". . . It was disorienting that it was her memory alone that diverged from their narrative." Other than those subjects, I felt this was an imaginative novel with beautiful language at times, some unconventional, interesting characters, and a plot that kept the action going--especially in the later half. If it weren't for all the repetitions of words/actions, I could see giving it an additional star, but the "stop, re-start" style got tiresome after a while. "What fools men are." Overall, if you're craving a dark story of fantasy/historical fiction, this might be just the book you're looking for.Recommended.
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  • Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars rounded up for GoodreadsThis is my very first reading experience with Molly Tanzer. Ashley and I picked this book out as a read along for our curated horror book club, Night Worms. It came highly recommended to us by some authors who write urban/dark fantasy/horror: Alan Baxter, Chuck Wendig and Seanan MCGuire. New Year, New Fear!After finishing this book last night, I would conclude that it's not horror and I don't want to create any false hope or expectations. It straddles a few diff 3.5 stars rounded up for GoodreadsThis is my very first reading experience with Molly Tanzer. Ashley and I picked this book out as a read along for our curated horror book club, Night Worms. It came highly recommended to us by some authors who write urban/dark fantasy/horror: Alan Baxter, Chuck Wendig and Seanan MCGuire. New Year, New Fear!After finishing this book last night, I would conclude that it's not horror and I don't want to create any false hope or expectations. It straddles a few different genres, mainly dark fantasy, historical fiction and maybe a touch of magical realism.Despite that fact that this book wasn't horror, I enjoyed my time with this story for the most part. Ellie West is our main female protagonist. She's a little firecracker of a woman with a very decisive, sassy nature and a "do no harm, take no shit" persona that carries her through some pretty chaotic life turbulence. By trade, she delivers moonshine in a little boat to whomever is willing to pony up the cash and risk to get it.She encounters Fin Coulthead delivering booze to Fin's Gatsby-esque style party. Fin seems trapped in a complicated marriage to a wealthy man who is a lot older than she is. He runs with a very materialistic, fake crowd of friends--Fin doesn't fit the mold and she's bored and tired of trying, so she doesn't--she reads poetry and looks for ways to escape her lifestyle.I enjoyed reading about all these two ladies and was pretty engaged in the story even though it was a clear departure from my usual horror routine. I did keep feeling like I needed more teeth; something dark to start happening or I was going to get frustrated with all the romance and drama.Fortunately there was a dark turn of events near the end of Part 2 that piqued my curiosity and kept me turning pages.While the introduction of demons, cultish practices, magical mushrooms, murder and sex helped keep my attention and I finished the book, I will say that some parts seemed overly wrought and repetitive/ unnecessary. I felt like there was a missed opportunity to really spend more time unpacking the darker side of this story--Instead of the mildly amusing love triangles and Gatsby drama--I would have preferred to see more of Hunter (the evil cult leader) and his brood of hoodwinked followers.So much of all that cult stuff was told secondhand by characters explaining what was going on instead of the reader actually getting to watch the sinister actions taking place. It would have made for great storytelling to have Hunter as a third narrative/perspective besides just Fin and Ellie. The readers would get to watch the secret gatherings and the intensity build unbeknownst to our hapless protagonists. But that's just me being a horror fan and wanting to see dark stuff going on instead of just hearing about it. Molly sure has a great knack for dialogue, adventure, female characters with depth and personality as well as a great imagination. I can't wait to read another book by her--I have VERMILLION on my self!
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  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    This wasn't perfect, but queer fiction about fighting bigots is the best kind of fiction.Creatures of Want and Ruin follows Ellie, a moonshine smuggler in prohibition-era Long Island. She is a polyamorous woman in an open relationship with a bisexual man, and in this story she will have to fight demon-raising bigots masquerading as religious people with the help of her diverse group of friends.I thought I wasn't going to like this book. I DNFed its companion prequel earlier this year, and I stil This wasn't perfect, but queer fiction about fighting bigots is the best kind of fiction.Creatures of Want and Ruin follows Ellie, a moonshine smuggler in prohibition-era Long Island. She is a polyamorous woman in an open relationship with a bisexual man, and in this story she will have to fight demon-raising bigots masquerading as religious people with the help of her diverse group of friends.I thought I wasn't going to like this book. I DNFed its companion prequel earlier this year, and I still don't recommend it, but the good thing is that you don't need to read it to understand this one. It's just set in the same world, but it feels darker, and it features really creepy fungi that almost feel lovecraftian.I thought this book said some really interesting things about what it's like to love a place even though the people who live there with you hate everything you stand for. Bigots are people who project their insecurities on people who - according to them - don't belong there, but just because there are bigots, it doesn't mean the place you grew up is any less a part of you, any less yours.This book also talked about how bigotry works in general, and it was really interesting - and heartbreaking - to read.However, there were many things I didn't love about Creatures of Want and Ruin. First of all, it's full of infodumps, and the main reason I read this book so quickly is that I skimmed a lot. Also, I didn't like how a certain disabled character is basically used as a plot device (who also (view spoiler)[dies (hide spoiler)]) throughout the entire story.This story is told through two PoVs: Ellie's and Fin's. Fin's just wasn't as interesting, I didn't care about her failed marriage - the resolution of that was obvious from the start - but I did end up liking how she and Ellie became allies. I also liked the side characters, there was black and Cuban side representation here.
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  • Mindi
    January 1, 1970
    I'm bumping this one up to 5 stars because I'm still thinking about it. If a book sticks with you days after you finish reading it, then it's safe to say you found it amazing.I honestly wasn't sure what to think about this one before I started it. The cover is lovely, but the synopsis didn't immediately grab me. I got this one in my Night Worms subscription package, and I most likely would not have bought it own my own, so I owe them a debt of gratitude. I really, really enjoyed this one.At the I'm bumping this one up to 5 stars because I'm still thinking about it. If a book sticks with you days after you finish reading it, then it's safe to say you found it amazing.I honestly wasn't sure what to think about this one before I started it. The cover is lovely, but the synopsis didn't immediately grab me. I got this one in my Night Worms subscription package, and I most likely would not have bought it own my own, so I owe them a debt of gratitude. I really, really enjoyed this one.At the beginning I was still a bit on the fence, but once the characters start to come together and the action picks up I was fully invested. I love a book where you have a group of characters that are united against some form of evil and all of them are so likable that you truly feel anxious when they are in peril. And this one has two amazing female protagonists. I love the way Tanzer introduces you to their lives, and then brings them together. Both of them are strong-willed and unapologetic. We need more women like this in novels. I can relate to both of them on some level, and I know both Ellie and Fin will stick with me for a long time. So many different things made this book stand out for me. Ellie's life is fascinating, and I loved reading about her bootlegging operation. Fin is a socialite who doesn't quite fit in with her party-loving husband and group of friends, and would much rather practice archery alone in the woods of their massive rented home. The two women couldn't have been more different, and yet when they come together out of necessity, they realize they have quickly become fast friends. I also liked the secondary characters, and the setting quite a bit. I was rooting for them pretty hard, so when the final confrontation happened, I was on the edge of my seat. I'm not going to rehash the blurb on the back of the book, but I will say that this isn't necessarily straight up horror. If you are expecting that, then this one may not be for you. I don't go into a novel with expectations, so a good story is a good story for me, regardless of the label you put on it. And this is a good story well told.
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  • Lauren Stoolfire
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.My first introduction to Molly Tanzer was with last year's Creatures of Will and Temper and I was really impressed by her Dorian Gray inspired tale. Of course as soon as I caught wind of her newest release I knew I had to try it as well and luckily for me I managed to get approved for it via NetGalley. This new companion story (you don't need to be familiar with her previous release, but it will certainly make things much more int I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.My first introduction to Molly Tanzer was with last year's Creatures of Will and Temper and I was really impressed by her Dorian Gray inspired tale. Of course as soon as I caught wind of her newest release I knew I had to try it as well and luckily for me I managed to get approved for it via NetGalley. This new companion story (you don't need to be familiar with her previous release, but it will certainly make things much more interesting if you already are) is also a historical horror fantasy set during the Roaring Twenties in New York which has to be one of my favorite genres and time periods to read about. I couldn't help but think of The Diviners series by Libba Bray while I was reading this novel. Anyway, my favorite aspects of this slow burn novel are Tanzer's eerily lush world-building and visual descriptions. She does a magnificent job of making the era and the characters come to life. The only issues were with the characters themselves, while they were all intriguing to follow none of them exactly grew on me. I wasn't particularly interested in any of them. Overall, if you're looking for a new fantasy novel with set in the 1920s during Prohibition with just the right amount of atmospheric horror, you'll absolutely need to try Molly Tanzer's Creatures of Want and Ruin.
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  • Audra (ouija.doodle.reads)
    January 1, 1970
    This isn’t a book I would generally choose for myself to read, but that’s what is fun about subscription services like the Night Worms box. I don’t know what I’m going to get, but I know the books are carefully curated and I can trust that it’s going to be an interesting ride.A tale set during prohibition following a badass bootlegging boatwoman and a society girl with a penchant for disturbing the peace, there is a lot to like in the set-up of this book. The main characters are women with dream This isn’t a book I would generally choose for myself to read, but that’s what is fun about subscription services like the Night Worms box. I don’t know what I’m going to get, but I know the books are carefully curated and I can trust that it’s going to be an interesting ride.A tale set during prohibition following a badass bootlegging boatwoman and a society girl with a penchant for disturbing the peace, there is a lot to like in the set-up of this book. The main characters are women with dreams, who aren’t afraid to articulate and act on their desire, who are working through their issues and railing against a world and society that would prefer they just fit in rather than mix things up. It is a lot of fun to see them turn expectations upside down and be the heroes instead of some dude stepping in to save the day.The book is very interested in place: what it means to live in a specific place, love that place, and feel a part of the community—or not. What does it mean to be a part of where you live? What if you live on the outskirts of society, if you don’t fit in? And what happens when the place you live is threatened?It is also at its core a story of bigotry, and through the lens of history and fantasy takes a look at how prejudice and intolerance can prey on a small town and the people who live there. Heartbreaking but realistic, and it is so especially relevant right now.I never quite connected with the writing style of the book, which seemed to hold me at a distance from getting fully into the story. There was a tendency to tell instead of show, which often made me feel like I was having my hand held through the story, like I needed an info-dump or I wouldn’t understand what was going on. I was also confused by this strange narrative repetition that kept happening, where a character would repeat what had happened to them to multiple new characters entering the scene even though the reader already knew what happened—it felt so unnecessary. There are also several characters who seem only there to provide a specific purpose for the narrative rather than acting as a living, breathing part of the story, and they definitely stuck out to me.I really wanted to love this book because the themes and characters were so badass. But in the end, it was just an average read for me, which is definitely based in part because it didn’t leave me feeling anything special.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Ellie West is a moonshine bootlegger living in a small town in Long Island, known as Amityville. Here she finds herself working to assist her family and send her brother to college through any means necessary. Fishing by day and avoiding Prohibition regulations by night. When a wealthy stranger propositions Ellie to procure a large amount of moonshine for a party they’re throwing, she finds herself selling them everything she has, along with a few bottles of booze that she came across under unus Ellie West is a moonshine bootlegger living in a small town in Long Island, known as Amityville. Here she finds herself working to assist her family and send her brother to college through any means necessary. Fishing by day and avoiding Prohibition regulations by night. When a wealthy stranger propositions Ellie to procure a large amount of moonshine for a party they’re throwing, she finds herself selling them everything she has, along with a few bottles of booze that she came across under unusual circumstances.Unbeknownst to Ellie, the booze in those bottles has the ability to make people see terrible visions. This liquor is distilled from a strange population of mushrooms that have been slowly sprouting around the island. At the source of this product is a group of men heading up a religious group that preaches about returning the island back to the glory of the old days. The days before the village was filled with immigrants and vacationers. This group ties it’s allegiance to a god, but in reality it is cult of diabolists. In an epic battle to save her home on Long Island and those she holds dear, Ellie will need to work against the clock to defeat this cult. She’ll turn to those she’s known longest, as well as an out-of-towner, Fin, who might just hold the answers on how to win.Molly Tanzer has created a story about two badass women, Ellie and Fin, within the pages of CREATURES OF WANT AND RUIN. The story launches with passages from a book called FROM THE DEMON IN THE DEEP, which focuses on a demonic possession. I was a little confused where the book related to everything, but trust me, it’ll tie in later! From there you enter Ellie and Fin’s worlds. These two ladies lead completely different lives. Ellie is a hard-working, independent woman trying to make a better life for her family. Fin’s background is from a privileged family and friend circle that would rather focus on parties than work. Unlike her background, Fin wants to help make the world a better place and feels stuck with a group of people and a husband who she cannot relate to.The two main characters of Ellie and Fin are truly the center of the book, although you are introduced to a handful of others. I really enjoyed the supporting cast of characters with a particular interest in those who end up banding together to fight against the cult invading their town. While Tanzer does not provide an in-depth background on these characters, there is nothing lacking that would have made the story better. In fact, I think if she had chosen to focus on the secondary characters backstories more the plot would have become diluted. That being said, there were quite a few I would love to know more about!CREATURES OF WANT AND RUIN is broken down into three parts, which flow together perfectly and serve as great transition points to propel the story. There are no strange gaps of time or continuity to distract the progress of the events happening on Long Island. Tanzer’s unpacking of the story is very methodical and lends itself to this structure. Throughout the early sections there are hints to how things may play out, but the delivery is truly well done. Tying together horror, fantasy, and historical fiction is a tough combination to deliver. CREATURES OF WANT AND RUIN succeeds in melding these genres together to create an entertaining and enjoyable book!
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    The first time I ever laid eyes on this book my initial impression was that it looked like a creepy Alice in Wonderland. The similarity stops at the cover. Reading the book actually felt like a mix of The Great Gatsby and Stranger Things.I loved the excerpts from the fictional book, The Demon in the Deep, even though I was very confused about the book’s significance at first.The two main characters are strong females and I enjoyed reading both of their back stories. It gets even better when thei The first time I ever laid eyes on this book my initial impression was that it looked like a creepy Alice in Wonderland. The similarity stops at the cover. Reading the book actually felt like a mix of The Great Gatsby and Stranger Things.I loved the excerpts from the fictional book, The Demon in the Deep, even though I was very confused about the book’s significance at first.The two main characters are strong females and I enjoyed reading both of their back stories. It gets even better when their paths finally cross. There were so many great supporting characters as well! I don’t think there was a single person I didn’t like (besides the obvious antagonists of the story).For a good portion of the book it feels more like a historical fiction/fantasy read, but the horror aspect becomes apparent in the second half. I enjoyed the mix and the slow build to tension.Overall a fantastic read with a strong ending and a new author that I wouldn’t hesitate to pick up again.
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  • Alan Baxter
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant fun. A wonderfully written dark weird adventure built around prohibition era moonshine running in Long Island. Recommended. Brilliant fun. A wonderfully written dark weird adventure built around prohibition era moonshine running in Long Island. Recommended. ‬
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  • D Gillis
    January 1, 1970
    Ellie West runs moonshine during prohibition. She is trying to help her brother who has been accepted to college and can’t afford to go. Ellie has the opportunity to provide alcohol for a large party. She sells them some booze that includes some kind of special mushrooms that cause those to drink it to see apocalyptic things. Ellie teams up with Fin (another female character, who couldn’t be more different from Ellie) to try to set things right. We’ve got demons, religious nuts, bootleggers and Ellie West runs moonshine during prohibition. She is trying to help her brother who has been accepted to college and can’t afford to go. Ellie has the opportunity to provide alcohol for a large party. She sells them some booze that includes some kind of special mushrooms that cause those to drink it to see apocalyptic things. Ellie teams up with Fin (another female character, who couldn’t be more different from Ellie) to try to set things right. We’ve got demons, religious nuts, bootleggers and two women who are pretty bad-ass. I enjoyed this one quite a lot. I’d like to see what else Molly Tanzer has written.
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  • Evelina | AvalinahsBooks
    January 1, 1970
    I have waited for a sequel to Creatures of Will and Temper for a year now! I was very excited to be able to read it, and very thankful to both the publisher and Molly Tanzer herself who was so sweet to help me out to procure a review copy as an international reviewer - considering how NetGalley makes us nearly invisible. I enjoyed the book for sure, although my heart still belongs to part one - Creatures of will and Temper - both because of the lighter nature of the book, and the characters invo I have waited for a sequel to Creatures of Will and Temper for a year now! I was very excited to be able to read it, and very thankful to both the publisher and Molly Tanzer herself who was so sweet to help me out to procure a review copy as an international reviewer - considering how NetGalley makes us nearly invisible. I enjoyed the book for sure, although my heart still belongs to part one - Creatures of will and Temper - both because of the lighter nature of the book, and the characters involved, who were just more relatable to me personally, as well as of the time period. Despite that, Creatures of Want and Ruin is a great read that I can truly recommend. And now let me give you several reasons for reading it! Molly Tanzer Writes Strong Females So Well I love Molly's strong female characters - in the last novel, we had a sword fighting and headstrong independent girl, plus a rebellious and flamboyant younger sister, and this time we have a few girls who are just as strong - a bootlegger street kid who is quite tough and a married archer who finds herself in the wrong society. Those are not all the strong females though! There are male characters, of course, but the driving force of the story lies in the women's hands. Molly succeeds wonderfully in giving young women a voice - and I have to say, not just plain old young women, but diverse young women - queer (even poly!) and straight, rich and poor, black and white. It's truly wonderful. And it's not just that these women are diverse, and that's all. These women are also immensely CAPABLE. They are physically strong - one used to take boxing lessons, another is good at archery, the third can defend herself with a crossbow. They are all physically capable and do not set the example of cowering behind a man - they're more likely to defend a man. And that's not all! These women are nearly all, with an exception of one who is wealthy, gainfully employed or even have their own businesses, despite the odds and the oppression. They won't let themselves be put down. they are inspiring. Relevant Topics: Immigration and Minorities The main theme in the book focuses on hate crimes and oppression of non-locals, or simply people who have a different heritage. These themes are so important right now, in the current political climates. One of the things that really touched me was how the bigots of Long Island claimed that they wanted to return to the "good old days" when the land was "theirs", because they came first. Except, no - you didn't come first, people. The Indigenous came first. Americans never remember that. I wish that had been touched on in this book - in fact, that would have brought it up to five stars for me. But the racial and national minorities talk still remains very important and I'm really happy that the book was centered around it. The Book Is Very Dark I don't know if this is a turn-on or a turn-off for you. Most likely, you will like it being dark! I am at a place in my life right now where I don't enjoy dark and that might have influenced my rating. As I've mentioned before, Creatures of will and Temper had its darkness - demons after all, right? But it was also very whimsical. Creatures of want and Ruin is not. It's dark in a much more serious way, where loss and death are real, and so is the hate. Judging by the book's name, this was the plan! I would say it's executed well, the demons are believably dark and evil, as is their plan. Connections To The Previous Book What I liked most of all were the connections to Creatures of Will and Temper! I'm sure there were more of them than I even noticed, as I read the sequel a year later. But we do get to see the demonic entity from the first book, as well as mentions of the "family unit" from it. The lore in this one is much darker than in the previous one, and it's interesting to compare. But Beware Of The Triggers Triggers include (view spoiler)[hate crimes against immigrants, scary visions, murder, assault on women, pet death, death in general. (hide spoiler)] Overall, I definitely enjoyed it, although it was a little bit hard to get into it at first, because it has quite a lot of characters. Readers of the first book will definitely enjoy Creatures of Want and Ruin, and I must say it can be read as a stand-alone as well - although I definitely recommend reading the first one, because it's simply brilliant! You can find my review of Creatures of Will and Temper here.I thank HMH Books and Molly Tanzer for giving me a free copy of the book in exchange to my honest opinion. Receiving the book for free does not affect my opinion.Read Post On My Blog | My Themed Bookstagram | My Quick Update Bookstagram | Bookish Twitter
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    "Looking away from something doesn't make it disappear."Ahhhhhh words can not express how much I enjoyed this book!! I loved Creatures of Will and Temper, and while I know they aren't exactly a series, I hoped this one would also be awesome, and it did not disappoint. We have 2 strong leading ladies (in their own ways), openness about sexual preferences, other subject matter that's highly relevant today (like prejudices of all kinds), oh and of course, your average cult of diabolists and some sp "Looking away from something doesn't make it disappear."Ahhhhhh words can not express how much I enjoyed this book!! I loved Creatures of Will and Temper, and while I know they aren't exactly a series, I hoped this one would also be awesome, and it did not disappoint. We have 2 strong leading ladies (in their own ways), openness about sexual preferences, other subject matter that's highly relevant today (like prejudices of all kinds), oh and of course, your average cult of diabolists and some special 'shroom booze that causes visions and hallucinations. Ellie and Fin come together to save their island from said cult, which is pushing temperance and a return to "the old days." This book was so fun, and while Will & Temper hit me right in the feels in more ways, Want & Ruin had me mentally clapping and highfiving these ladies and admiring their attitudes. Fin was my favorite, her character growth was fantastic, albeit a bit bittersweet. I felt a kinship with her in many ways.Molly Tanzer really knows how to write a great story!
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  • Deborah Ross
    January 1, 1970
    My introduction to the work of Molly Tanzer was her novel, Creatures of Will and Temper, a 19th century urban fantasy revolving around The Portrait of Dorian Gray, and demonic possession. Creatures of Want and Ruin takes place in the Roaring Twenties on Long Island, New York. The common thread between the two books is the role of demons controlling human lives. Demons take possession of people who freely agree to the arrangement, granting their hosts long life, wealth, beauty, or in this case th My introduction to the work of Molly Tanzer was her novel, Creatures of Will and Temper, a 19th century urban fantasy revolving around The Portrait of Dorian Gray, and demonic possession. Creatures of Want and Ruin takes place in the Roaring Twenties on Long Island, New York. The common thread between the two books is the role of demons controlling human lives. Demons take possession of people who freely agree to the arrangement, granting their hosts long life, wealth, beauty, or in this case the ability to detect falsehoods and to compel others to tell the truth. In exchange demons receive various experiences that can come about only through physical incarnation. Some demons are benign, but others are highly malevolent. Demons pass summoning instructions through generations or encoded in children’s books, as is the case here.In this story two women from very different walks of life encounter unsettling changes in the sleepy community of Amityville. (The Amityville Horror, it should be said, lies decades in the future and does not play a part in this story.) One of the women is a boat woman engaged in the moonshine smuggling trade during Prohibition. The other is the wife of a newly wealthy Gatsby type of social idler who finds herself increasingly alienated from her husband and his party loving, booze zwilling friends. Spooky things are afoot: illegal liquor that causes most people to hallucinate. a preacher who gathers bigger and bigger crowds, bent on ridding their community of immigrants and anyone who isn't a white Protestant. And creepiest of all, slimy fungus growths that appear and spread. As in the novel the characters are engaging and the story moves right along. The creepiness grows, step by Lovecraftian step. Just when you think nothing more terrible could happen, something else goes disastrously wrong. Stopping the white nationalist mob and defeating the fungus-monster necessitate finding out the truth, which is where the bargain with the demon comes in. There are moments of sweetness, of courage, and of terrible but necessary choices. I loved every page of it and I'm eagerly looking forward to Tanzer’s next. The usual disclaimer: I received a review copy of this book, but no one bribed me to say anything about it.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to like this so much. The storyline was intriguing, the cover was fantastic...I couldn’t wait to read it. But then I started it...and it went downhill from there. It took me ages to get through it because it felt like a chore. I ended up skimming it around 35%.The characters are unlikable. The conversations seemed forced and often uncomfortable. Actually the entire book was uncomfortable. Which could be purposeful, but it didn’t work for me. I think this may be a sequel, but this is my I wanted to like this so much. The storyline was intriguing, the cover was fantastic...I couldn’t wait to read it. But then I started it...and it went downhill from there. It took me ages to get through it because it felt like a chore. I ended up skimming it around 35%.The characters are unlikable. The conversations seemed forced and often uncomfortable. Actually the entire book was uncomfortable. Which could be purposeful, but it didn’t work for me. I think this may be a sequel, but this is my first book by this author. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC.
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  • Nicole Beaudry
    January 1, 1970
    Molly Tanzer's Creatures of Want and Ruin is a loose follow-up to Creatures of Will and Temper, which I read at the beginning of the year and then browbeat every single person I know into reading, or close to. I was worried picking this one up - would it live up to my expectations? Would it live up to its predecessor? In some ways, it doesn't. I found I liked Ellie and Fin just a bit less than Will and Temper's sisters, and main characters can make or break a novel. But Ellie and Fin, and the ca Molly Tanzer's Creatures of Want and Ruin is a loose follow-up to Creatures of Will and Temper, which I read at the beginning of the year and then browbeat every single person I know into reading, or close to. I was worried picking this one up - would it live up to my expectations? Would it live up to its predecessor? In some ways, it doesn't. I found I liked Ellie and Fin just a bit less than Will and Temper's sisters, and main characters can make or break a novel. But Ellie and Fin, and the cast and crew around them (Gabriel, Lester, SJ, Aaron, Jones (oh, Jones)) are wonderful, in their own ways. Tanzer gives us the bored society wife and the tomboyish bootlegger with a great deal of insight into both psyches, playing with tropes in a way that makes both incredibly human to the reader.What's truly spectacular, though, is that Tanzer has delivered an extremely topical political novel couched in diabolism, occultism, fantasy, and a head-spinning adventure. Creatures of Want and Ruin is set in the 20s in Long Island, in the town of Amityville. It's been mostly a quiet town, where Ellie runs moonshine made by her friend SJ, who lives in a small shack in the woods with her brother, as much because she makes moonshine as because she's one of the few black women in Amityville. Ellie's fiance is Polish, a carpenter, and SJ's brother's boss. It is the rest of Amityville, however, that Tanzer digs into incisively. A preacher has come to Amityville, sowing seeds of unrest and dissatisfaction - how dare men like Ellie's fiance, like SJ's brother, like Officer Jones (half-Cuban on his mother's side) flourish, when men like Ellie's father, wounded in a training accident during World War I, good Long Islanders, true Long Islanders, are forced into genteel poverty? If this rhetoric sounds familiar, it's because it should be. Tanzer gives the hatred we feel seething below the 49th parallel occult legs, but she makes it clear that this takes root only where the seeds have already been sown. It's an incredibly fun read, if sometimes disorienting because of how close it hits to home politically. Canada is certainly not immune to the hate that has become part and parcel of political discourse in the United States, and to see it exposed under the light of fantasy is unsettling. It is easy to believe oneself immune to it, and easier still to doubt the fact of it in our friends and family. Tanzer shows how easily one can let oneself succumb to it, or flourish under it, but she also exposes our privileges in believing ourselves immune to it, or unaffected by it. She's provided us with a deft statement on how we act when it would be easier not to do so, with scintillating characters, clever humour, and a great deal of fun.
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  • bundledwithbooks
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first experience reading through the world Molly Tanzer has created. I enjoyed this book because it is my first supernatural read. 1920's prohibition era story + a couple strong leading female characters + questionable religious leader = dark, twisted fantasy. Yes, please!
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe more of a 1.5 stars in Goodreads terms: it was okay, and for some parts I didn't like it (including the climax -- I voluntarily put this book down to go do something else a couple hours. During the big confrontation!).Possibly a good part of my enjoyment only comes from the obviously fond descriptions of rural and coastal Long Island. Sigh...Dragging my score down:- the paaaaaaaacing. I have mixed feelings, because sure, you want to lay proper groundwork for everything and everyone... But Maybe more of a 1.5 stars in Goodreads terms: it was okay, and for some parts I didn't like it (including the climax -- I voluntarily put this book down to go do something else a couple hours. During the big confrontation!).Possibly a good part of my enjoyment only comes from the obviously fond descriptions of rural and coastal Long Island. Sigh...Dragging my score down:- the paaaaaaaacing. I have mixed feelings, because sure, you want to lay proper groundwork for everything and everyone... But cripes, to still be laying exposition at the halfway mark! Surely that's excessive.- And despite the time spent moving everyone into place, I still didn't buy the relationships that arose (or a couple illogical, plot convenient decisions/conclusions). It was especially bad with the (red herring, it turned out, basically) budding chemistry between two characters: we literally get one line of inane dialog from each before we step back into POV characters narration about gee whiz! They're talking and just crackling with chemistry! Ooh!-- just realized, too, we don't see the other character again. He was more small plot device than character. Huh.- couldn't get a firm grasp of some things/people. How old was Fin supposed to be again? Ellie is 25 but feels younger. I completely forgot she was into poetry: certainly she's been a bit stressed and busy during the book, but her connection to the water and her attempts at boxing are much more visible. Surely that could have been reinforced, too.Enjoyments:- Long Island- Contraceptives being employed before characters have sex. So rare! - There were a couple times I made eyerolling notes only for a sentence or paragraph later, the author answered my concern. Good! - Holy rollers disturb me in real life: the supernaturally creepy ones definitely punch my buttons as credible threats. See also: Libba Bray's The Diviners (first book and the barely decent parts of the third book).- nice title, nice cover artMixed bag:I'm not a pacifist, at least not for fictional characters, and normally I'm gritting my teeth when the heroes can't bring themselves to kill bad guys. Here, the bad guys are fellow townsfolk with the btw SUPER COMMON in the 20s (and today, 100 years later, it turns out) bigotry that c'mon, this shouldn't have been a surprise to anyone, this was peak eugenics time, too... I digress. Anyway, bunch of hopped-up-on-demon-moonshine townies are the mooks, and our leads very quickly and relatively easily get right to the "better kill them to be safe" mode of thinking. Refreshing...but also you definitely just killed a bunch of neighbors -- not generic demons or such, but regular crappy ol' people who you can identify... And we don't see any follow-up to that! Actual townsfolk are dead now! What's the reaction? What's the investigation? How do people react in the wake of losing the influence of the lead antagonist?And this is purely subjective personal preference, but I was expecting evil fairies, not demons. Was it just the rainbow sheen on the first guy? I think rainbows (and mushrooms and questionable comestibles), I think fairies before I think demons? It wouldn't, I think, change much one way or the other. Just mildly surprising: oh. Demons. Okay.
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  • rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    This may be my favorite Molly Tanzer novel. The plot is smart, the pacing is perfect, the historical setting is convincing without becoming precious, and the nods to Weird Fiction's forbearers are organic, not contrived. Tanzer's characters are vividly drawn, and she excels at writing smart capable women. In 1920s Amityville, baywoman Ellie West is saving every penny she makes to put her brother through medical college. Her bootlegging has consequences far beyond the expected scrapes with the Lo This may be my favorite Molly Tanzer novel. The plot is smart, the pacing is perfect, the historical setting is convincing without becoming precious, and the nods to Weird Fiction's forbearers are organic, not contrived. Tanzer's characters are vividly drawn, and she excels at writing smart capable women. In 1920s Amityville, baywoman Ellie West is saving every penny she makes to put her brother through medical college. Her bootlegging has consequences far beyond the expected scrapes with the Long Island mafia when she accidentally delivers a batch of demonic moonshine to wealthy clients Fin and Jimmy and their tedious friends. The consequences of the mistake draw unwanted attention from local bigoted cultists. Ellie, African-American distiller SJ, the friendly local Cuban-American cop, and her Polish fiance are Long Island's only hope against the demon-raising temperance preacher. Fin realizes she's better off without her husband and joins Ellie to summon a demon of their own and sacrifice everything to prevent the impending cataclysm, as one does in such situations. This is the second book in the loosely connected Creatures series with the next volume promised next year.
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  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the first Creatures book quite a bit, I think this is a great premise for a series, and in theory, Want and Ruin is a great entry in that world. The setting is both fun and particular enough to feel embodied, and the cast of characters has Molly's trademark blend of strength, sex, humor, and idiosyncracy. The problem is that the story itself just feels way too rushed and superficial, and while the characters come through well enough, the worldbuilding is weak and contrived, and most im I enjoyed the first Creatures book quite a bit, I think this is a great premise for a series, and in theory, Want and Ruin is a great entry in that world. The setting is both fun and particular enough to feel embodied, and the cast of characters has Molly's trademark blend of strength, sex, humor, and idiosyncracy. The problem is that the story itself just feels way too rushed and superficial, and while the characters come through well enough, the worldbuilding is weak and contrived, and most importantly, there's no real drama. Where Will and Temper built its mythology into a charming and witty web of interesting relationships, this time the main plot swamps the character work almost immediately, and things only get worse as the conflict grows. The villains are thin, the relevance of their plot to the protagonists is undersold, and everything just feels tenuously asserted where it should be felt and grounded. None of the intricate and layered construction of the first book is evident this time.
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  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book from EdelweissI really enjoyed Creatures of Will and Temper from this author, but I had a bit of trouble getting into this one. This isn't a sequel really so you don't need to have read the first book to enjoy it, although I think they might have name dropped a few characters briefly. This story blends the supernatural elements of weird plants and demons with an unfortunately still all too realistic preacher who basically wants to 'make Long Island great again I received an ARC copy of this book from EdelweissI really enjoyed Creatures of Will and Temper from this author, but I had a bit of trouble getting into this one. This isn't a sequel really so you don't need to have read the first book to enjoy it, although I think they might have name dropped a few characters briefly. This story blends the supernatural elements of weird plants and demons with an unfortunately still all too realistic preacher who basically wants to 'make Long Island great again'. It's both an interesting piece of historical fiction and an incredibly relevant commentary on our society today. I honestly don't know why I had such trouble getting into it - it took me over two weeks to read - but I feel like if I was in a different mood it would have easily been a four star book. I would definitely recommend it to people who like historical fiction with awesome female protagonists.
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  • Julai
    January 1, 1970
    Creatures of Will and Temper had just a little less imagination, a little less adventure, a little less of that dirty creativity I look for in Molly Tanzer books. Creatures of Want and Ruin has a bit less than that. I’m not sure if it’s the attempt at a series that is making the “Creatures” books seem forced, slow, and awkward. Perhaps it’s an attempt to be a bit more mainstream? All I know is that this book was a slog, when I usually devour a new Tanzer book in hours. If the next in the series, Creatures of Will and Temper had just a little less imagination, a little less adventure, a little less of that dirty creativity I look for in Molly Tanzer books. Creatures of Want and Ruin has a bit less than that. I’m not sure if it’s the attempt at a series that is making the “Creatures” books seem forced, slow, and awkward. Perhaps it’s an attempt to be a bit more mainstream? All I know is that this book was a slog, when I usually devour a new Tanzer book in hours. If the next in the series, set in a girls’ boarding school, doesn’t have that dirty, scary frisson, well, I will probably still keep reading Tanzer, I love her that much. I guess some are going to hit. And some are going to Mis(katonic).
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    There are two Lovecraftian horrors in this novel, the cosmic horror kind and the people who think like Lovecraft. i.e. all non WASPs are decadent, wicked and should be deported as well as some run of the mill misogyny. Ellen West and friends rout the cosmic horror and poke some patriarchs and racists in the eye. Does have a fantasy trope that's not well handled, if magic and demon summoning is so easy, why aren't we seeing more of the results? A decent read.
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  • Aryssa Hutchins
    January 1, 1970
    A fun story. I enjoyed the thoughts of the two women as they experienced life and death.
  • MamaMiaReads
    January 1, 1970
    Creatures of Want and Ruin is my introduction to Molly Tanzer's writing. This was a creepy supernatural read that dives into witchcraft and the occult. I truly enjoyed this story and its cast of characters. Ellie is an Amityville baywoman in Long Island, NY and to help support her family and send her brother to college she sells moonshine. It is during one of these runs that she encounters something unusual and her whole world changes. What follows is a battle between good and evil. I truly love Creatures of Want and Ruin is my introduction to Molly Tanzer's writing. This was a creepy supernatural read that dives into witchcraft and the occult. I truly enjoyed this story and its cast of characters. Ellie is an Amityville baywoman in Long Island, NY and to help support her family and send her brother to college she sells moonshine. It is during one of these runs that she encounters something unusual and her whole world changes. What follows is a battle between good and evil. I truly loved this story and all the spookiness plus the cast of characters. While spooky and a bit creepy it was not so scary that it keeps you up at night. Just the right amount of scare and tension that made it a fast-paced read for me.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Creatures of Want and Ruin takes readers back to the era of pulp fiction with its gothic atmosphere and horror-filled storyline. The main characters are Fin and Ellie, two strong heroes who fight for their homes in the face of demonic evil in prohibition-era Long Island. These two strong female characters are well developed and likeable, but in no way are they perfect. Their faults and weaknesses motivate their actions just as much. Unusually, the secondary characters are also very thoroughly dr Creatures of Want and Ruin takes readers back to the era of pulp fiction with its gothic atmosphere and horror-filled storyline. The main characters are Fin and Ellie, two strong heroes who fight for their homes in the face of demonic evil in prohibition-era Long Island. These two strong female characters are well developed and likeable, but in no way are they perfect. Their faults and weaknesses motivate their actions just as much. Unusually, the secondary characters are also very thoroughly drawn and play a large part in the story. Tanzer’s novel is fantastic and thrilling but doesn’t move quickly. Instead of being action-filled, the focus is on the characters and the concept and battle of the over-reaching evil. The setting and time period lend credence to the story and instigate the events at the beginning of it, but are not a major part of the plot itself. I recommend Creatures of Want and Ruin for fans of 1920’s and 30’s pulp fiction such as Weird Tales or H.P. Lovecraft.
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  • Jess Harker
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed Tanzer’s creativity and vocabulary in this book, but other than that I didn’t enjoy much of anything else. I felt it was a bit convoluted and even sloppy at times. What upset me the most were the unrealistic and perhaps careless story choices. The best example I can give is the main character having a sexy romp with her fiancé while excitedly planning a threesome and crab bake the day after her beloved brother was murdered by her own father. Fantasy shouldn’t mean poor story or writing I enjoyed Tanzer’s creativity and vocabulary in this book, but other than that I didn’t enjoy much of anything else. I felt it was a bit convoluted and even sloppy at times. What upset me the most were the unrealistic and perhaps careless story choices. The best example I can give is the main character having a sexy romp with her fiancé while excitedly planning a threesome and crab bake the day after her beloved brother was murdered by her own father. Fantasy shouldn’t mean poor story or writing. It can be just as rich and exquisitely told as the great classics, or any other literary masterpiece.
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  • Suzy Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Molly Tanzer transports us back to the roaring '20's, where Prohibition reigned supreme just as much as the bootlegging did in back alley deals. But what happens when one of these deals is with the devil himself? Even Gatsby wouldn't be able to charm his way out of a deal like that, but instead it is up to an unlikely feminine duo, who are going to give the devil a run for his money in this entertaining and unsettling novel.Set in Long Island in 1927, the story follows Ellie, a fisherman by day Molly Tanzer transports us back to the roaring '20's, where Prohibition reigned supreme just as much as the bootlegging did in back alley deals. But what happens when one of these deals is with the devil himself? Even Gatsby wouldn't be able to charm his way out of a deal like that, but instead it is up to an unlikely feminine duo, who are going to give the devil a run for his money in this entertaining and unsettling novel.Set in Long Island in 1927, the story follows Ellie, a fisherman by day and bootlegger by night. Determined to see her brother go to med school, Ellie takes up the dangerous business of bootlegging to support her brothers financial burden. During one of her nightly routes, Ellie gets into a fight with another bootlegger. Getting the upper hand, Ellie takes the hooch from the other bootlegger. Her new acquisition comes in handy when she is asked by Delphine "Fin" Coulthead and her rich husband to procure alcohol for a huge party they are having. Unbeknownst to Ellie, the new alcohol is tainted, distilled from special mushrooms by a cult on the island. The paranormal effects give the guests at the party horrifying hallucinations. During Finn's hallucination, she sees a man bowing in front of a monster, a demon. Ellie experiences these effects as well, and the two women team up to save the people of Long Island from themselves and the demonic presence the cult has summoned.I absolutely loved this book! It's set in a fun, atmospheric time! Flappers galore at all the parties, dancing to swing music, and everyone drinking the forbidden juice. No one has a care in the world during this time. And I thought this made for an interesting backdrop and brought character to a story that could have been told in any time period- but this was a good choice. The author weaves this authentic historical setting into a tense and engrossing supernatural frame with vivid descriptions. Her gifts of world and character building were not lost on me.The two main characters are strong female women, and complete opposites. Ellie is a tomboy, tough, not afraid to get her hands dirty or back down from a fight smuggler. While Fin is the thoughtful, demure, sad, socialite, held captive in a loveless marriage. They couldn't be more different, but the author plays their differences off one another expertly, while their strengths and weaknesses form a perfect bond. And the fact that these two women- in the 1920's, do not run to the men in their lives to help them defeat what seems unstoppable, is not typical for the time, but because of the authors fantastic character building, it makes it completely believable. And as a side note, not only are these strong minded women, but Ellie is an amateur boxer and Fin an expert archer. These are no flappers in distress.The pacing of the story is steady, as well as the intensity, and both build to a heart pounding climax.I could go into the themes in the story that have an eerie parallel with present day society, but I think I've made this review long enough! What I will say is the author does draw on the strong dislike of immigrants in the 1920's, and the similarities between then and our countries present state did not go unrecognized. A sad reminder that maybe we haven't progressed as a society as much as we like to think.Creatures of Want and Ruin takes a long hard look at what can happen if people embrace evil, even if they don't know they are. This is a misguided reality that threatens families and friendships. In the past and present. The story asks what would you do to save your loved ones, your neighborhood, your town? All morals are in a grey area, and when it comes to the Devil, all bets are off. This was a fascinating and dare I say delightfully devilish tale, in which Molly Tanzer used her gift of spectacular writing, to carve out her own significant niche in the horror genre with her own unique voice.
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  • Brandt
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a fan of Molly Tanzer since I read her steampunk western Vermilion a few years back and after a hiatus on Goodreads, I had remembered that book and put in a request for Creatures of Want and Ruin at my local library. In the interim, I discovered that she had written another book called Creatures of Will and Temper that preceded this one and found out from the blurb that almost every book has accompanying it here or elsewhere that both concerned demons and diabolists (those who would co I've been a fan of Molly Tanzer since I read her steampunk western Vermilion a few years back and after a hiatus on Goodreads, I had remembered that book and put in a request for Creatures of Want and Ruin at my local library. In the interim, I discovered that she had written another book called Creatures of Will and Temper that preceded this one and found out from the blurb that almost every book has accompanying it here or elsewhere that both concerned demons and diabolists (those who would consort with said demons) and figuring it for a series, I also got my hands on a copy of Creatures of Will and Temper and read that first. So one thing I have to give Tanzer credit for, you do not need to read Creatures of Will and Temper to read Creatures of Want and Ruin. That is a rare thing when reading a "series" like this--one expects to know what happened in the first book and that this knowledge is necessary for the second book, but Will and Temper is merely a spiritual successor to Want and Ruin. There is a character who links the two novels, but ultimately you do not need to know about this link to understand what is going on in Want and Ruin, however the linkage is nice for those who have read Will and Temper and readers may be pleasantly surprised or shocked by the actions of the linking character as the book reaches its climax. I guarantee you will not expect it.If I have a problem with Creatures of Want and Ruin it is pretty the same issue I had with Creatures of Will and Temper which is difficult to discuss without spoiling the plot to the book. Suffice to say, in both books Tanzer only sets out one way to resolve issues by those who would consort with demons and the nefarious plans that are generated as a result. Unlike Creatures of Will and Temper where the plot twists a bit to obfuscate who the actual villain of the piece is (likely because the narrative exposes the fact that demons have different agendas in their dealings with humans), Creatures of Want and Ruin makes it obvious who the big bad is pretty early on. The narrative here is driven by how the two heroines in the book deal with the big bad and the choices they must make. Unfortunately, when we reach the denouement, one of the choices made is the same choice that one of the heroes makes in Will and Temper. In both works Tanzer poses the choice in both characters' inner monologue as no choice at all, and I think that is what has disappointed me about both books. Given the costs of those choices, you wouldn't think that either character would be so eager to make it, regardless of the circumstances.Tanzer has another spiritual sequel coming out in 2020 (do I have to wait that long?) called Creatures of Charm and Hunger, and I am assuming that we haven't seen the last of one of the characters that plays a big role in this novel. I'm still going to be along for the ride, and hope that in the next volume that when characters are presented with high cost choices, they can find the will to say "no", even if situations dictate that they will be at a severe disadvantage if they find the courage to say it.
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