Made Like Martha
An invitation for overachievers to discover what it means to rest as God's daughters without compromising their God-given design as doers.Though she didn't sit at Jesus's feet like her sister Mary, biblical Martha was loved just as she was--and you are too. This practical resource invites modern-day Marthas to sit down spiritually as they exchange try-hard striving for hope-filled freedom without abandoning their doer's heart in the process. Doers need to be affirmed in their innate design to do rather than sit, yet also be reminded that they don't have to overdo it in order to be worthy. This book is not an exhortation to add or subtract things off your to-do list, but it is an invitation to embrace the "good" of the Good News. Here is an offer to step into your position as a daughter of God and to enjoy life as a doer.

Made Like Martha Details

TitleMade Like Martha
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 10th, 2018
PublisherWaterBrook
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Christian, Christian Living, Self Help, Christian Non Fiction, Religion, Theology, Personal Development

Made Like Martha Review

  • Kim Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    GREAT news for the modern-day Martha! I strive to always get things done while secretly wish to be more like Mary. I love knowing I’m not the only one as Katie shares other stories of women I have long admired for their unwavering faith.My heart has been encouraged by Katie’s words for a few years now. I’m so grateful God gave her this special message to share with us all: “We don’t have to worship, then work; we can worship as we work.” Who knew!Katie takes us on this journey as her trusted fri GREAT news for the modern-day Martha! I strive to always get things done while secretly wish to be more like Mary. I love knowing I’m not the only one as Katie shares other stories of women I have long admired for their unwavering faith.My heart has been encouraged by Katie’s words for a few years now. I’m so grateful God gave her this special message to share with us all: “We don’t have to worship, then work; we can worship as we work.” Who knew!Katie takes us on this journey as her trusted friend sharing her experiences: “I worked myself into a prison cell of performance, as if it all depended on me. The straining to be worthy resulted in soul fatigue.”What does it mean to “choose the good part” like Mary did in Luke 10:42? Katie shares that “choosing the good part is dependent on knowing that it’s good.”If you find your Martha heart wondering what to do when you’re in a season with little to no margin, or how to live settled even when you’re busy, let Katie encourage your heart through Made Like Martha.I highly recommend this book and that you grab your girlfriends together for a late-summer or early-fall Bible study (already included in the book). How cool is that!
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  • Kate Motaung
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a breath of fresh air for my try-hard soul. It reminded me of the sufficient grace provided by the One who has already done it all on my behalf. If you've ever felt as if your worth is affected by your work, this book is for you. It is a glorious invitation to live as a beloved daughter who doesn't need to earn her Father's affection.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Made like Martha is such a truly engaging book. Martha in the bible was known from the story where her sister Mary sat at Jesus feet while Martha toiled away getting things done. Martha asked Jesus to tell her sister to help her but instead Jesus addressed the attitude with which Martha served. It is not the service that is questioned, but our attitude while serving. This is the main subject of this book. Katie takes a look at what gets us modern Marthas into trouble, which is our attitude while Made like Martha is such a truly engaging book. Martha in the bible was known from the story where her sister Mary sat at Jesus feet while Martha toiled away getting things done. Martha asked Jesus to tell her sister to help her but instead Jesus addressed the attitude with which Martha served. It is not the service that is questioned, but our attitude while serving. This is the main subject of this book. Katie takes a look at what gets us modern Marthas into trouble, which is our attitude while serving and the basis of that attitude. I love this book as a modern Martha because it was not telling me I could not serve, or make lists, or check them off as I love to do. Katie dug deep into our hearts to help us realize that the service needs to come from a place of love and gratitude not fear and servitude. This book is exactly what I needed to realize that I am sometimes serving from the wrong place and that Jesus just wants me to feel loved. The orphan mindset I had never heard of but I meet every one of those requirements. Katie is a friendly and engaging writer. I would definitely read other books by her. Her style is very easy to read and feels like you are just sitting down to have a chat while digging deep into your spiritual life. Thank you for the opportunity to review this book.
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  • Dianna
    January 1, 1970
    Encouragement for those who relate more to Martha than Mary. Ways to use your strengths; how to slow down and let go; and a reminder that Martha wasn't bad, she was perhaps just caught up in the moment.
  • thereadingowlvina (Elvina Ulrich)
    January 1, 1970
    ***Unpopular opinion alert!***Are you a doer, an industrious or a to-do-list type of person? In other words, are you Martha who chose to busy herself with chores instead of resting at the feet of Jesus just like what her sister Mary has chosen? Both sisters were serving Jesus, 41 But the Lord answered and said to her, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and bothered about so many things; 42 but only one thing is necessary, for Mary has chosen the good part, which shall not be taken away from her.” ***Unpopular opinion alert!***Are you a doer, an industrious or a to-do-list type of person? In other words, are you Martha who chose to busy herself with chores instead of resting at the feet of Jesus just like what her sister Mary has chosen? Both sisters were serving Jesus, 41 But the Lord answered and said to her, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and bothered about so many things; 42 but only one thing is necessary, for Mary has chosen the good part, which shall not be taken away from her.” (NASB Luke 10: 41-42). So did all the Marthas get it wrong? How do we find rest & peace amidst the chores & responsibilities? How can we use our Martha personality to serve our Lord and His people with a grateful and thankful heart in a way that glorifies our Maker? Made Like Martha is a book that address these topics to help modern day Marthas like us to gain a better understanding about our God designed nature & how to find rest & peace in our demanding chaotic world.While I appreciate this well-intentioned book, unfortunately it is a hit and miss for me. There were parts that I enjoyed and parts that I did not.What I enjoy: 1. Relatable - I am a Martha. My constant need to do things and get them done can be overwhelming. I am glad I am not the only one. 2. Honesty - This book is written with so much honesty and sincerity as the author shares a lot from her life experiences. 3. Well-structured book - This book is divided into 3 sections: Striving, Sitting, and Standing. Each sections are chapters that provide explanations about those sections. There is also a Bible Study section at the end of the book. 4. Examples and resources - There is a lot of real-life examples given and free resources for deeper study. 5. Easy to read.What I least enjoy: 1. Using The Message to quote Bible verses - The Message is an idiomatic translation of the original languages of the Bible. It is based on Peterson's interpretation and a lot of the actual meaning of the verses are not translated accurately which rendered misinterpretations of the Scriptures actual meaning. This was a big NO for me. 2. Writing - Trite writing and feels like going in circles. Similar topics discussed in different chapters. 3. Too feelings based - It started off well, but as I read on, I find it to be too feelings based. Albeit references made to Bible passages and Scriptures, I wish there are more theology aspects in this book. In conclusion:A quick read book that requires investment of time for in-depth study, since there are lot of checklists and questions in this book. This book may be appealing to new believers as it is easy to read and understand, and using another Bible translation (not The Message) would be more effective when reading and doing the Bible study. While I appreciate and understand the intentions behind this book, however this book did not work for me. ***I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from WaterBrook Multnomah through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All views expressed in this review are my own and was not influenced by the author, publisher or any third party.***
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  • Lorraine Reep
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been a Christ follower for over forty-six years and I’ve been an overachiever since preschool. I love checklists, finishing a project and knowing it was well done. I enjoy practicing hospitality and I have always felt a kinship with Martha in the Biblical account of Jesus’ visit to her home. While she labored (slaved) in the kitchen Mary worshipped (lolly-gagged) at the feet of Jesus. Can you see where I was with this? I identified with this woman who, at a careless read, I assumed was bein I’ve been a Christ follower for over forty-six years and I’ve been an overachiever since preschool. I love checklists, finishing a project and knowing it was well done. I enjoy practicing hospitality and I have always felt a kinship with Martha in the Biblical account of Jesus’ visit to her home. While she labored (slaved) in the kitchen Mary worshipped (lolly-gagged) at the feet of Jesus. Can you see where I was with this? I identified with this woman who, at a careless read, I assumed was being chastised by Jesus.How refreshing to read the same passage through the lens of grace. Author Katie Reid took me back to the kitchen and I heard the voice of my beloved savior as he reassured Mary. I saw that Jesus didn’t tell Martha she needed to be like Mary. He simply pointed out that laboring is not required. Martha was driven; Mary was drawn. Martha labored even as Mary listened. As a modern Martha, it’s easy to focus on my To-Do list, even wrapping up all my worth in the perfect completion of the tasks at hand. Made Like Martha is written in an amiable style, giving practical steps and even exercises to set aside our striving and resentment while embracing our doer’s heart.**I received an advance copy of the book from the Publisher in exchange for my review; however my rating and opinions are my own, and were not influenced by any other person.**
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  • Beverly Lineberry
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing. Katie is spot on throughout the book. You feel like she is talking to you. I can certainly relate to this book as I am like Martha. This book has taught me that being a "Martha" is not a bad thing, but a good thing. I've learned to take time a be still and listen to what God is saying to me. I haven't been doing that. Since I have read this book, I am starting to do this more often. My life is easier when I take time to sit still and rest and listen to what God is trying to This book is amazing. Katie is spot on throughout the book. You feel like she is talking to you. I can certainly relate to this book as I am like Martha. This book has taught me that being a "Martha" is not a bad thing, but a good thing. I've learned to take time a be still and listen to what God is saying to me. I haven't been doing that. Since I have read this book, I am starting to do this more often. My life is easier when I take time to sit still and rest and listen to what God is trying to say to me.
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  • Sharon Vander Meer
    January 1, 1970
    Is your worth tied up in your work? Do you believe productivity and performance will bring you happy-ever-after and the recognition and appreciation you deserve? Is that important to you? If so, Made Like Martha, Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done, by Katie M. Reid, is a book you might want to put on your reading list. Don’t have time? Take time. Ms. Reid – a recovering workaholic (or merely in remission, perhaps) – understands what it means to have family demands, work demands, outsid Is your worth tied up in your work? Do you believe productivity and performance will bring you happy-ever-after and the recognition and appreciation you deserve? Is that important to you? If so, Made Like Martha, Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done, by Katie M. Reid, is a book you might want to put on your reading list. Don’t have time? Take time. Ms. Reid – a recovering workaholic (or merely in remission, perhaps) – understands what it means to have family demands, work demands, outside interests demands, and the demands of life in general, put Martha-types in a vice called overachieving.Reid’s book description reads, “An invitation for overachievers to discover what it means to rest as God’s daughters without compromising their God-given design as doers.”Where did this all start? Remember Jesus’ seeming admonition of Martha when he came to visit and she got all stirred up because she was doing the work and her sister, Mary, was doing nothing! Mary sat and listened to what Jesus had to say, but for Martha, a woman who really, really wanted things to go well, that wasn’t what was needed. She needed a second pair of hands in the kitchen.And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha, Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things, but one thing is needful, and Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall not be taken away from her. Luke 10:41-42 KJVKatie M. ReidThis sounds like Jesus is shaking his finger at his good friend Martha. Is it any wonder she was stirred up? Reid’s take on this interaction between Martha and Jesus is an encouraging departure from the obvious (and often mistaken) explanation of what Jesus meant. Reid makes the point that Jesus isn’t criticizing Martha, merely stating that Mary’s choice was to listen and learn. Martha’s choice was to make preparation, maybe to impress the guest in her home or simply because she believed a feast would make her guest happy. There is nothing wrong with that, in fact it is a gift to a guest to provide hospitality. But in Martha’s busyness, did the gift become a burden, not a joy?Reid uses personal experience and words of wisdom from what she calls Modern Marthas to give insight into the ways doers, women especially, lose sight of what is important. Yes, it is a balancing act, and sometimes you fall off the balance beam. Nobody’s perfect, let alone a woman with a husband, five children, a full-time job, speaking engagements, a popular and active blog, and, and, and… well, you get the picture. Reid is a very busy woman. She is by nature a worker bee, and so am I, and so are many women for whom this book is written.Reid is a tad hard on herself, but that’s part of the charm of the book. As women, we all tend to be hard on ourselves, finding reasons to over-analyze what we’re doing or what we’ve done, or what we should be doing, adding one more burden to the bag of responsibility we carry around. At what point in our efforts do we lose faith in anything but our own labors? We are taught to believe God is enough, so why do we work so hard to do it all, leaving little room for worship of or trust in God?Reid’s book does make one think about how hard women work to prove themselves. For God, proof isn’t necessary. He already knows who we are and accepts us the way we are.Made Like Martha, publication date July 10, 2018, is interactive. There are places where Reid asks the reader to pause and look up scripture, or write down a list of concerns or traits that help the reader have broader understanding. At the end of the book is a planned bible study designed for small groups.Reid’s biography describes her as a “firstborn overachiever and a modern-day Martha.” She is a blogger at katiemreid.com. Her blog provides posts, articles, letters, and other resources for try-hard women. She has published articles on multiple mainstream and spiritual websites, and is a contributing writer for iBelieve.com and Lightworkers.com. Reid has been syndicated on ForEveryMom.com. She is married to a youth pastor and home schools her five children. Title: Made Like Martha, Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done Author: Katie M. Reid Print Length: 240 pages Publisher: WaterBrook Publication Date: July 10, 2018 Sold by: Random House LLC Language: English Tags: Christian, Religion & Spirituality Social #s: #MadeLikeMartha #NetGalley
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  • Melissa Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book full of encouragement and wisdom. The author reminds us to share time with God daily and not "put off" our precious moments with God. There will always be things to take care of, chores to do, places to go and more. Remember what is most important and that is sharing our heart with God. We have the opportunity to "worship while we work". Great read and great to give as a gift, too. I received a copy of this book and this is my personal honest opinion. No review was required.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Made like Martha is such a truly engaging book. Martha in the bible was known from the story where her sister Mary sat at Jesus feet while Martha toiled away getting things done. Martha asked Jesus to tell her sister to help her but instead Jesus addressed the attitude with which Martha served. It is not the service that is questioned, but our attitude while serving. This is the main subject of this book. Katie takes a look at what gets us modern Marthas into trouble, which is our attitude while Made like Martha is such a truly engaging book. Martha in the bible was known from the story where her sister Mary sat at Jesus feet while Martha toiled away getting things done. Martha asked Jesus to tell her sister to help her but instead Jesus addressed the attitude with which Martha served. It is not the service that is questioned, but our attitude while serving. This is the main subject of this book. Katie takes a look at what gets us modern Marthas into trouble, which is our attitude while serving and the basis of that attitude. I love this book as a modern Martha because it was not telling me I could not serve, or make lists, or check them off as I love to do. Katie dug deep into our hearts to help us realize that the service needs to come from a place of love and gratitude not fear and servitude. This book is exactly what I needed to realize that I am sometimes serving from the wrong place and that Jesus just wants me to feel loved. The orphan mindset I had never heard of but I meet every one of those requirements. Katie is a friendly and engaging writer. I would definitely read other books by her. Her style is very easy to read and feels like you are just sitting down to have a chat while digging deep into your spiritual life. Thank you for the opportunity to review this book.
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  • Michelle Castaneda
    January 1, 1970
    Made Like Martha: Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done by Katie M. Reid is a new book on a common topic for women. In this book, the author calls women to stop striving and to sit at Jesus' feet. For a topic that is written about so frequently, I expected much of the same. However, I loved Katie's fresh view of the topic. I especially loved how she illustrated God's delight in us using concrete illustrations. She calls us to live with abandon and delight because of the Father's great lov Made Like Martha: Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done by Katie M. Reid is a new book on a common topic for women. In this book, the author calls women to stop striving and to sit at Jesus' feet. For a topic that is written about so frequently, I expected much of the same. However, I loved Katie's fresh view of the topic. I especially loved how she illustrated God's delight in us using concrete illustrations. She calls us to live with abandon and delight because of the Father's great love for us. Fantastic book-- I highly recommend it. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher. These opinions are entirely my own.
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  • Michelle Castaneda
    January 1, 1970
    Made Like Martha: Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done by Katie M. Reid is a new book on a common topic for women. In this book, the author calls women to stop striving and to sit at Jesus' feet. For a topic that is written about so frequently, I expected much of the same. However, I loved Katie's fresh view of the topic. I especially loved how she illustrated God's delight in us using concrete illustrations. She calls us to live with abandon and delight because of the Father's great lov Made Like Martha: Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done by Katie M. Reid is a new book on a common topic for women. In this book, the author calls women to stop striving and to sit at Jesus' feet. For a topic that is written about so frequently, I expected much of the same. However, I loved Katie's fresh view of the topic. I especially loved how she illustrated God's delight in us using concrete illustrations. She calls us to live with abandon and delight because of the Father's great love for us. Fantastic book-- I highly recommend it. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher. These opinions are entirely my own.
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Wow - Katie Reid gets it. She effortlessly used Truth to back up her message of acceptance, love and encouragement for the “Modern Day Martha.” While I’ve always been a doer, Katie brought to light some habits and experiences of mine I didn’t even realize were rooted in a “Martha” mentality and graciously encouraged me to step into a peace about who God created me to be.This book is for anyone who feels they are often distracted from Jesus by their mental check-list, who serve with rushed, frant Wow - Katie Reid gets it. She effortlessly used Truth to back up her message of acceptance, love and encouragement for the “Modern Day Martha.” While I’ve always been a doer, Katie brought to light some habits and experiences of mine I didn’t even realize were rooted in a “Martha” mentality and graciously encouraged me to step into a peace about who God created me to be.This book is for anyone who feels they are often distracted from Jesus by their mental check-list, who serve with rushed, frantic exhaustion or even just love to get things done.
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  • Joanne Viola
    January 1, 1970
    I recently had the opportunity to read Made Like Martha: Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done by Katie M. Reid. This book is like a breath of fresh air as Katie shares her own struggles with striving to get things done. Not just some things but everything.The book is a wonderful read, excellent for individual or group studies. Each chapter includes an "It is Finished" section with activities, making application of each chapter easy and practical. In the back of the book one will find a f I recently had the opportunity to read Made Like Martha: Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done by Katie M. Reid. This book is like a breath of fresh air as Katie shares her own struggles with striving to get things done. Not just some things but everything.The book is a wonderful read, excellent for individual or group studies. Each chapter includes an "It is Finished" section with activities, making application of each chapter easy and practical. In the back of the book one will find a five week Bible Study with a format which will encourage discussion for each chapter.Through her stories and biblical insights, Katie helps us to realize what is truly important in serving is our hearts. We don't need to earn God's love but embrace His love, for the work has been completed.This was an encouraging and refreshing read as Katie's writing style is engaging and easy to read. This would make an excellent selection for a book club and discussion.**I received an advance copy of the book from the Publisher in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Jen Ferguson
    January 1, 1970
    It's so important to embrace who you are! There are so many good things about girls who love to get things done! If you're a Martha, you have a purpose and a plan and God has equipped you with many gifts for you to use for His Kingdom. But this book is so good for helping you figure out just why you're using your gifts when opportunities call. Life gives lots of opportunities and we have to be willing to be ready with a "yes" and "no" depending on what God says. When we know who we are and Whose It's so important to embrace who you are! There are so many good things about girls who love to get things done! If you're a Martha, you have a purpose and a plan and God has equipped you with many gifts for you to use for His Kingdom. But this book is so good for helping you figure out just why you're using your gifts when opportunities call. Life gives lots of opportunities and we have to be willing to be ready with a "yes" and "no" depending on what God says. When we know who we are and Whose we are, we can make discerning decisions about what to do and when. There are so many good reminders about our identity in this book!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who enjoys crossing things off a to-do list, this book was an encouragement to me to remember that while doing and serving and accomplishing is good, it is also good to be able to sit back and rest in the Lord and reflect on all that I've already accomplished by His grace. Katie's writing style is easy to read and makes the reader feel like a friend is sharing her heart with you. There are plenty of opportunities for the reader to be able to reflect and respond to the challenges and e As someone who enjoys crossing things off a to-do list, this book was an encouragement to me to remember that while doing and serving and accomplishing is good, it is also good to be able to sit back and rest in the Lord and reflect on all that I've already accomplished by His grace. Katie's writing style is easy to read and makes the reader feel like a friend is sharing her heart with you. There are plenty of opportunities for the reader to be able to reflect and respond to the challenges and encouragement Katie shares in Made Like Martha, including a 5 week Bible study in the back of the book. I trust this book will be an encouragement to many others who feel the weight of life and motherhood and responsibilities, just as I do! *I was very thankful to receive an advanced copy of this book and am happy to share my honest response in this review.
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  • Carol Ensminger
    January 1, 1970
    I’m a ✅and ✅ girl. My life is crazy busy and yet I get so many things done! Of course, I love to sit at the feet of Jesus but I’m more wired like Martha, the one who is a doer (and often gets a bad rap!) I just finished reading Made Like Martha (because I am!) and it is indeed #goodnews for those who like to get things done. 💕Made Like Martha is well written and I have added highlights all over my book. I love Katie's sense of humor and her transparency. I highly recommend this book even if you I’m a ✅and ✅ girl. My life is crazy busy and yet I get so many things done! Of course, I love to sit at the feet of Jesus but I’m more wired like Martha, the one who is a doer (and often gets a bad rap!) I just finished reading Made Like Martha (because I am!) and it is indeed #goodnews for those who like to get things done. 💕Made Like Martha is well written and I have added highlights all over my book. I love Katie's sense of humor and her transparency. I highly recommend this book even if you are not a "doer" because there are so many good messages throughout each chapter. I coach/mentor a number of women and this book will be on the “must read list” and love that we can do the study at the end of the book.
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  • Mary Elsbury
    January 1, 1970
    Are you constantly pushing yourself to get things done, all the while being worried that you don’t measure up?Made Like Martha explores the tension between being a “doer” and someone who is resting in God’s grace. Using the story of Mary and Martha, Katie M. Reid, writes from the heart about being a perfectionist that is learning to lean into God without guilt or condemnation. She points out that when Jesus corrected Martha for being distracted, worried, and bothered about so many things, He was Are you constantly pushing yourself to get things done, all the while being worried that you don’t measure up?Made Like Martha explores the tension between being a “doer” and someone who is resting in God’s grace. Using the story of Mary and Martha, Katie M. Reid, writes from the heart about being a perfectionist that is learning to lean into God without guilt or condemnation. She points out that when Jesus corrected Martha for being distracted, worried, and bothered about so many things, He was more concerned about her heart and mind-set than her tasks and service.Today women are pushed to believe that productivity equals value. That isn’t true – Jesus provided all that was needed for our salvation. Productivity does not equal worthiness. Busyness does not equal holiness. We are worthy only because Christ is worthy. We are holy only because Christ is holy.Modern Marthas thrive on doing but struggle with receiving. This book helps clarify that even when we struggle to find that solid ground between striving and resting, we are still beloved daughters of the Most High God who leads us with love. As a recovering perfectionist, this book reminds me that Jesus invited Martha to find rest amid her serving – and that He is doing for same for you and me.I received an uncorrected proof copy of this book as part of the book launch team.
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  • Alley
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a breath of fresh air. Katie's balanced perspective on Martha is refreshing. She shares insights in her book that make you wish you could sit across from her with a cup of coffee and talk through life together. This book is full of biblical truths that speak life to the hearts of Modern Marthas. One of my favorite parts of the book were the "Modern Martha" sections at the end of each chapter that provided encouragement through modern day Martha stories. The core message of the book This book is a breath of fresh air. Katie's balanced perspective on Martha is refreshing. She shares insights in her book that make you wish you could sit across from her with a cup of coffee and talk through life together. This book is full of biblical truths that speak life to the hearts of Modern Marthas. One of my favorite parts of the book were the "Modern Martha" sections at the end of each chapter that provided encouragement through modern day Martha stories. The core message of the book for me is best summed up in this quote, "We go about the Father's business and work hard for the Lord because we are convinced of His love for us as beloved daughters. Our souls can be at rest even when our hands are busy working." May this book help you find true rest in the Lord while going about His work!
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  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    A book for all the modern Marthas, the women who are wired to be doers, of how to examine their motivations for doing, to make sure their hearts are in the right place and that they aren’t trying to earn their way into God’s family. It’s a reminder to receive and give grace. There’s affirmation that it is ok to do but reminders to also take time to rest and make sure you aren’t biting off more than you can chew. And practical tips on how to serve from a healthy place physically and spiritually.K A book for all the modern Marthas, the women who are wired to be doers, of how to examine their motivations for doing, to make sure their hearts are in the right place and that they aren’t trying to earn their way into God’s family. It’s a reminder to receive and give grace. There’s affirmation that it is ok to do but reminders to also take time to rest and make sure you aren’t biting off more than you can chew. And practical tips on how to serve from a healthy place physically and spiritually.Katie M. Reid provides a refreshing read that will resonate with any modern Marth (aka that woman everyone knows can get stuff done). She shares her own struggles with her motivations for doing, and offers suggestions for how to live and do better. A lot of books on Martha challenge the go-getter woman to just slow down and drop tasks, but Reid acknowledges that some of us are just wired to do and that that isn’t necessarily bad. She points out that Martha serves Jesus a second time and doesn’t get scolded for serving, it was her heart that needed work. Now that isn’t to say that we modern Marthas don’t sometimes need to be reminded to take time to rest, most of us probably do and Reid gives that reminder. But overall in this book she encourages modern Marthas to acknowledge and embrace the way God wired us, but provides several challenges to make sure that our doing flows out of a healthy relationship with God. The end of the book includes 5 Bible studies (one for every 2 chapters) that can be done as an individual or small group. I really liked the layout of these Bible studies and the way they brought home the points for each of the chapters while letting modern Marthas try out various Bible study methods that might work better for their personalities. They also were just the right length, very approachable for a busy woman. As a busy woman in charge of several things both big and small, I found this book a very refreshing and helpful read. And I happened to get this ARC just in the middle of a busy season while gearing up for another year of a big project. There were some really good reminders in here that I needed to read. Reid’s writing style is approachable and friendly, it feels like she’s chatting with you over a cup of tea, and her biblical studies and applications are solid. Highly recommended for any modern Marthas out there.I received an ARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Nathan Albright
    January 1, 1970
    [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Waterbrook/Net Gallery.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.]When I was reading this book, as someone well acquainted with the cultural importance of the sons of Martha [1], my main thought concerning the materials from my own perspective was:  Has this author forgotten that there were sons of Martha and not only daughters of Martha?  Like so many other books written and published in the contemporary period, this book is written by women, about [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Waterbrook/Net Gallery.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.]When I was reading this book, as someone well acquainted with the cultural importance of the sons of Martha [1], my main thought concerning the materials from my own perspective was:  Has this author forgotten that there were sons of Martha and not only daughters of Martha?  Like so many other books written and published in the contemporary period, this book is written by women, about women, and for women, and seems to totally forget that the struggles faced by anxious and try hard daughters of Martha are struggles faced by men as well.  This book exists in that realm where only women have the problems and share some sort of sisterhood encouraging each other.  Why this society came to exist when it came to books is mysterious to me and deeply unpleasant no less, and it greatly hindered my enjoyment of this book.  That is not to say that this book is worthless by any means, but rather that it misses a big opportunity to talk about a human problem and instead writes about it as if it was a woman's problem, like so many other books written nowadays.This book's material takes up about 200 pages or so in the version of the book I read, though it may be longer in print.  After a foreword that shows how relatable the author's perspective is to women, the book is divided into four parts.  The first part deals with striving (I) and contains chapters on God's love for the doer's heart (1), a discussion of the conflict between worry and worship (2), and the heavy burden carried by the anxious (3).  The second part of the book deals with sitting (II) and looks at the completed work of the cross (4), grace with no strings attached (5), and enjoying one's spiritual inheritance (6).  The third part of the book deals with standing (III) and contains chapters on stewarding without overdoing it (7), rest for the try-hard soul in the Sabbath (8), living settled when one is busy (9), and serving from a place of strength and peace (10) rather than neediness and anxiety.  The fourth part of the book consists of a Bible Study for individuals and groups that is five parts long and that examines some NT passages.Given that the book suffers the limitations from being written only with women in mind (a major shortcoming when a male reader is the one reading and reviewing it) and has a fairly standard ignorance of and neglect of the Hebrew Old Testament, where a fuller explanation of the Sabbath would be a major aid to the author's argument about rest and peace for harried women, this book manages to succeed rather well despite these shortcomings.  Normally, the author's discussion of easy grace would be a bigger problem, but since the author is writing to an audience of try-hards who will already be doing good works out of gratitude, this concern is not as urgent as it would be in general with regards to false ragamuffin gospels.  While this book is certainly not as good as it could have been had the author been cognizant of the emotional world beyond her circle of harried and busy sisters, there are many women who are overburdened and who very much do need to feel the peace that comes from trusting in God and Jesus Christ and in working out of gratitude and not feeling as if they are hired help within the household, and so for that group of people in that situation--a large group of people, sadly--this book has a guarded recommendation.[1] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2015...
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  • The Word Nerdess
    January 1, 1970
    Quotes:"I didn't choose to be a doer; I was designed to be one. This temperament--this nature--is here to stay. It's not to be erased but rather to be celebrated and used for God's glory.""May our 'what if' worry be changed to 'even if' worship as we remember who is with us. Even if our what-if happens, the good news does not change. Jesus is enough.""While God sometimes asks us to do hard things, those things are never wasted and serve a purpose far greater than we can imagine . . . no matter w Quotes:"I didn't choose to be a doer; I was designed to be one. This temperament--this nature--is here to stay. It's not to be erased but rather to be celebrated and used for God's glory.""May our 'what if' worry be changed to 'even if' worship as we remember who is with us. Even if our what-if happens, the good news does not change. Jesus is enough.""While God sometimes asks us to do hard things, those things are never wasted and serve a purpose far greater than we can imagine . . . no matter what happens, we are delighted in, are held by, and belong to a good Father."Made Like Martha was a perfect read for my weary Martha soul. I'm already planning on buying a copy for myself that I can take notes in and recommending it to my family once it's published!I loved how the author approached this topic. Books for the do-all Christian woman are not new, but Katie gave interesting and fresh insight. She shared her own struggles with perfectionism and Type-A thinking and offered biblical wisdom to help form a healthier perspective. She also included a Modern Martha section with insight from other writers/authors, practical ways to put the chapter topics into action, and space to reflect on your own heart and motives.Most of all, I loved that the author was encouraging and pointed out God's love for Martha in the biblical story. Jesus did not condemn her, and He does not condemn us. He made us unique, with unique strengths and weaknesses. It was refreshing to hear from another driven woman like myself and hear her speak on her own Martha personality. Being a doer is not the problem, but the motives and attitudes that accompany the tackle-everything personality can be a problem. It's great to realize you're not alone in your approach to life, and even better, that you can use your God-given personality for His glory!I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I can't wait to order my own hard copy in July!
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  • Susan Mead
    January 1, 1970
    Are you made like Martha or more like Mary? I thought I was more like Mary, yet the truths Katie Reid shares in Made Like Martha revealed a LOT of Martha in me. What a heads up that is! Take note, you may want to learn how to wear your Martha well too!
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  • Tricia Hackney
    January 1, 1970
    I was given a digital copy of this wonderful read by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I loved this book!! We've recently been studying Martha in my Sunday School class and between that class and this book - I've learned that I'm absolutely a Martha!!! Perfectionist, queen of all things and a Do-er of. This is an encouragement to let go of those things and to just bask in the love of the Lord - take a minute out of all your busy-ness and let God refuel you. Most importantly - to not se I was given a digital copy of this wonderful read by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I loved this book!! We've recently been studying Martha in my Sunday School class and between that class and this book - I've learned that I'm absolutely a Martha!!! Perfectionist, queen of all things and a Do-er of. This is an encouragement to let go of those things and to just bask in the love of the Lord - take a minute out of all your busy-ness and let God refuel you. Most importantly - to not see your worth in the services that you are to others. God SEES you - wherever you are and loves you unconditionally.
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  • Kaitlyn Bouchillon
    January 1, 1970
    If you're a to-do list maker, a type-A girl, the first to volunteer and serve and give of yourself until you've run dry... run to the words in Katie's first book.Many of us have heard the story of Mary and Martha. Over and over, Mary seems to receive the A+ and the gold star, while Martha is reprimanded. "Be more like Mary," we're taught. But for the doers and the helpers, Katie offers a different take on this familiar story. Jesus wasn't trying to change Martha, nor was He telling her to become If you're a to-do list maker, a type-A girl, the first to volunteer and serve and give of yourself until you've run dry... run to the words in Katie's first book.Many of us have heard the story of Mary and Martha. Over and over, Mary seems to receive the A+ and the gold star, while Martha is reprimanded. "Be more like Mary," we're taught. But for the doers and the helpers, Katie offers a different take on this familiar story. Jesus wasn't trying to change Martha, nor was He telling her to become her sister... it was really about her heart, where she found her worth, the striving underneath the serving.The tagline is true. This book is good news for the woman who gets things done.
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  • PoshTomes
    January 1, 1970
    I am so a Martha! I really connected with this book and thoroughly enjoyed it. I was challenged but I walked away with a better understanding of who I am.
  • Gleniece
    January 1, 1970
    I was drawn to the title of the book Made Like Martha—Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done by Katie M. Reid because I, too, follow the Martha pattern as an organized, take charge, list checker, can-do woman and yet we all know about the gentle reprimand Martha received from our Lord. Is there something amiss in the way we're wired compared to our laid-back, easy-does-it sisters?"You don't have to worship, then work; you can worship as you work. May you view your God-given wiring as a cat I was drawn to the title of the book Made Like Martha—Good News for the Woman Who Gets Things Done by Katie M. Reid because I, too, follow the Martha pattern as an organized, take charge, list checker, can-do woman and yet we all know about the gentle reprimand Martha received from our Lord. Is there something amiss in the way we're wired compared to our laid-back, easy-does-it sisters?"You don't have to worship, then work; you can worship as you work. May you view your God-given wiring as a catalyst for working for the Lord, not as an obstacle blocking the way." While Katie acknowledges that it was the spirit by which Martha strove that was the problem, not her work ethic, she goes beyond this to tackle how we as Modern Marthas falter in believing we are beloved daughters of a loving Father and thereby serve from a place of strife and worry."This whole Martha and Mary thing is more than a matter of personality. It's bigger than being type A or B. Regardless of your bent, you face a choice: what to do with the love given and the grace extended to you from your Father, through Christ. . . . When you understand the uninhibited love of your Father and the benefits of being a daughter, how can you not choose the better way of resting in who you are in light of who He is?"One of the key points of the book is addressing the Hired-Help Mentality Katie coined with a checklist of areas we may have believed about ourselves, God, and our position in His heart and contrasting that with the Beloved Daughters Mentality Assessment at the end of chapter 6 entitled Possessing What's Already Yours."Sitting and serving are both necessary, but not to achieve the approval that has already been given through Christ."I disagreed, however, with a few quotes in the book, one being, "You don't have to clean up for Me—cereal or character." While I don't believe we can ever earn our salvation, I do believe we should never stay stagnant in our character just because Christ died for us. It is out of our love for God that we do the 'work' of obedience and strive for Christ-like character. We can't act unrighteously and still please God. "I tell you Nay: but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish" (Luke 13:3.) Repentance is not something we do once at conversion but is a daily habit, a change of heart, we do because we are no longer our own but have been bought for a price (1 Corinthians 6:20). We cannot ignore the many warnings in the Bible nor can we forget the eternal love and forgiveness God extends towards those who faithful to Him. Both have merit.Although there are generous dollops of fluffy metaphors in every chapter, Katie, thankfully, hasn't skimped on substance. Katie has written a book in a breezy, friend-at-your-side tone that includes stories of her own struggles to accept her worth at rest and organized with bullet point lists of Bible verses, an 'It Is Finished' section with checkboxes (what Martha doesn't like that?), and the light bulb moments of several Martha women at the end of every chapter. I wished there had been more theological study throughout the body of this book as she expounded upon her main points (and I found her occasional use of The Message translation unappealing), however, Katie reinforced the truth that I am loved personally by our heavenly Father and I can, indeed, relax at the feet of Jesus Christ whether I get all my work done or not.(I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.)
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  • Sarah Koontz
    January 1, 1970
    If your worth and value is often tied to your ability to perform for the acceptance and approval of others, Made like Marth is a must-read book for you! If worry is your default emotion, this book is for you. If you are a doer by design, this book is for you.Katie Reid gentle invitation to all the Martha's in the world to stop striving and start thriving. She helps us see all that God has already given us and reminds us we don't have to work for something we already have. God loves us in the mes If your worth and value is often tied to your ability to perform for the acceptance and approval of others, Made like Marth is a must-read book for you! If worry is your default emotion, this book is for you. If you are a doer by design, this book is for you.Katie Reid gentle invitation to all the Martha's in the world to stop striving and start thriving. She helps us see all that God has already given us and reminds us we don't have to work for something we already have. God loves us in the mess, the mundane, the midst of our work--we don't need to clean up for Him!Katie encourages us to set down our burdens, and the burdens of others, and rest a while in the presence of our Heavenly Father. And she doesn't condemn us for our Martha-tendencies. In fact, she shows us how they are a big part of what makes us extraordinary.Here are a few of my favorite takeaways:Our past is forgiven, our present is promising, and our future is secure. Our souls can rest in Christ's sufficiency.God gives us the strength to serve Him with our gifts. It's time to start serving for all the right reasons.There is nothing you can do to earn God's love, it's already been freely given.Our works are a response to God's love.If I were to wrap up the message of this book in one sentence, it would be: You can learn how to serve from a place of strength and peace. Women all over the world would benefit from reading this powerful and uplifting message. I highly recommend this book!**I received an advanced copy from the publisher for review purposes.
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  • Megan Ericson
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a breath of fresh air for my Perfectionist/Enneagram 1 heart! Made Like Martha gave me permission to be proud of my Martha status and not beat myself up about not being Mary at Jesus' feet. I was divinely wired this way. There is nothing wrong with me. The author, being a Martha herself, speaks to all the traps our doer mentality can put us in: elevating checking off our to-do list over the people in our lives, feeling like we're not worthy of rest if we haven't earned it, and – wo This book was a breath of fresh air for my Perfectionist/Enneagram 1 heart! Made Like Martha gave me permission to be proud of my Martha status and not beat myself up about not being Mary at Jesus' feet. I was divinely wired this way. There is nothing wrong with me. The author, being a Martha herself, speaks to all the traps our doer mentality can put us in: elevating checking off our to-do list over the people in our lives, feeling like we're not worthy of rest if we haven't earned it, and – worst of all – the fear of not having any value if we aren't doing. (Ouch! It hurts to even type that sentence.)If any of those make you a bit queasy just reading them, this is the book for you!Favorite Quotes:- Jesus never asked Martha to be Mary, and He didn't ask you to be either. He simply pointed out that you do not have to serve from a place of striving and worry, because He is already enough for you.- The antidote for worry is belief – pure, uncomplicated belief. The "Jesus loves me – this I know, for the Bible tells me so" kind of belief.- It is good to be reliable, but there is a sneaky shift that can happen from being responsible to putting ourselves in charge of things that aren't ours to manage.- Enjoying what is ours is an important principle (from both a spiritual and a practical standpoint). It's called contentment. - Excellence is honorable; perfectionism is idolatry.- Jesus is enough for our not-enough.Note: I was provided a free copy of this book by the publisher.
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  • Briana Willis
    January 1, 1970
    I can definitely relate to chapter 8 in, "It's Definitely Not Quiet On The Western Front!"Although I'm in my room, with my bedroom door shut, I can- of course- still hear shouts of choice words from my 14- year old brother in the living room playing his video games. Or sometimes I get a text from my mother requesting some ice.I'm ashamed to admit, I sometimes do not have a Christlike response either. I, too, insist on a tranquil environment (or AS tranquil as possible) but then turn around and t I can definitely relate to chapter 8 in, "It's Definitely Not Quiet On The Western Front!"Although I'm in my room, with my bedroom door shut, I can- of course- still hear shouts of choice words from my 14- year old brother in the living room playing his video games. Or sometimes I get a text from my mother requesting some ice.I'm ashamed to admit, I sometimes do not have a Christlike response either. I, too, insist on a tranquil environment (or AS tranquil as possible) but then turn around and treat my family like dirt.I love how Katie puts it, "I can let this fact keep me from spending time with Christ, or I can learn to connect with Him amid the crazy," and it can absolutely get crazy!I loved learning, "There must be a way to rest even when conditions aren't ideal."Like Katie did, I want to continue to discover ways to relax even when it's loud and things are out of my control. I need to learn to rest in my Beloved, even in the chaos.So thankful that rest comes in many forms!!
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