Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners
A formidable matriarch learns the hard way that no family is perfect in this witty, sparkling debut novelDearest loved ones, far and near--evergreen tidings from the Baumgartners!Violet Baumgartner has opened her annual holiday letter the same way for the past three decades. And this year she's going to throw her husband, Ed, a truly perfect retirement party, one worthy of memorializing in her upcoming letter. But the event becomes a disaster when, in front of two hundred guests, Violet learns her daughter Cerise has been keeping a shocking secret from her, shattering Violet's carefully constructed world.In an epic battle of wills, Violet goes to increasing lengths to wrest back control of her family, infuriating Cerise and snaring their family and friends in a very un-Midwestern, un-Baumgartner gyre of dramatics. And there will be no explaining away the consequences in this year's Baumgartner holiday letter...Full of humor, emotion and surprises at every turn, Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners brings to life a remarkable cast of quirky, deeply human characters who must learn to adapt to the unconventional, or else risk losing one another. This is the story of a family falling to pieces--and the unexpected way they put it all back together.

Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners Details

TitleEvergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners
Author
ReleaseOct 16th, 2018
PublisherPark Row
ISBN-139780778307860
Rating
GenreFiction, Holiday, Womens Fiction, Christmas

Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners Review

  • Scarlett Readz and Runz....Through Novel Time & Distance
    January 1, 1970
    Every family has one of ‘those’ relatives…that aunt that is the center of all things or the uncle that dominates all conversations. And wouldn’t it be wonderful if they ever learned the lesson that the universe doesn’t actually revolve only around them? Well, this comedic sitcom like novel gives a delightful glance at just that. Violet Baumgartner is a beloved member in her community and Queen of the Baumgartner Realm, Overseer of the Kingdom of her own Creation! She has her hands in charities, Every family has one of ‘those’ relatives…that aunt that is the center of all things or the uncle that dominates all conversations. And wouldn’t it be wonderful if they ever learned the lesson that the universe doesn’t actually revolve only around them? Well, this comedic sitcom like novel gives a delightful glance at just that. Violet Baumgartner is a beloved member in her community and Queen of the Baumgartner Realm, Overseer of the Kingdom of her own Creation! She has her hands in charities, fundraisers and events with her church. She has raised her daughter Cerise, who is now an adult, and been proudly by her husband Ed’s side through his career. Violet does not only talk the talk, she embraces everything with enthusiasm and perfection. Her image in the eyes of others is very important to her and always has been so. For thirty years she has written Christmas letters, ‘The Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners’ and never sent them out but filed them in boxes chronologically like a diary. In these letters she could truly express her love for family or share her thoughts when times were hard, but no one ever got to read them or knew about them. Ed Baumgartner is going to retire, and Violet is planning the biggest party event yet. Invited are their friends and family and everything is glitz and glamor. Until…one of the guests holds a speech of well wishes and reveals unknowingly a secret that shocks Violet so much, that she falls on her head and gets a concussion. (The whole scene was rather comical actually and only the beginning of things to come). Cerise, Violets daughter, is making a nice life with her partner Barbara with a steady career and a place to call home. She is used to her mother’s little drama and exaggerations, unlike Barb, who comes from ‘good stock’ but has no relations really with her parents. The two of them have wonderful news to share with the family, which creates a whole new commotion at the Baumgartners. Eldris, her husband Richard and their son Kyle, have been the Baumgartners closest friends since the kids were little. But lately, some funny things are going on…..Richard comes and goes at odd hours and Violet nudges Ed to keep an eye on his friend and what he might be up to. In the meantime, the Feds show up and take Kyle into questioning about some missing boxes and materials from his company…. All the while Richard is exchanging wads of cash in dark alleys and treating Eldris fancier than ever. So what is happening to these people going into retirement? What is up with Kyle? Will Violet be able to concede to the changes happening around her that she cannot change? Read it to find out! ***This is a witty satire and fast read. The shenanigans in this novel are ridiculously funny and I almost guessed it to be British. But no, this is all happening in Minnesota, US! Who would have thought? If you enjoy a lighthearted entertaining book with just a smidge of mystery in it that culminates to an ending of self-reflection and love, then YES, give this book a try. It is a mingled, discombobulated family drama wrapped in a cushions of love and Christmas letters!I received a digital copy of ‘Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners’ from NetGalley in exchange of an honest review. All opinions are my own. Thank you!More of my reviews here: https://scarlettreadzandrunz.com/
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- A formidable matriarch learns the hard way that no family is perfect in this witty, sparkling debut novelDearest loved ones, far and near—evergreen tidings from the Baumgartners!Violet Baumgartner has opened her annual holiday letter the same way for the past three decades. And this year she’s going to throw her husband, Ed, a truly perfect retirement party, one worthy o I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- A formidable matriarch learns the hard way that no family is perfect in this witty, sparkling debut novelDearest loved ones, far and near—evergreen tidings from the Baumgartners!Violet Baumgartner has opened her annual holiday letter the same way for the past three decades. And this year she’s going to throw her husband, Ed, a truly perfect retirement party, one worthy of memorializing in her upcoming letter. But the event becomes a disaster when, in front of two hundred guests, Violet learns her daughter Cerise has been keeping a shocking secret from her, shattering Violet’s carefully constructed world.In an epic battle of wills, Violet goes to increasing lengths to wrest back control of her family, infuriating Cerise and snaring their family and friends in a very un-Midwestern, un-Baumgartner gyre of dramatics. And there will be no explaining away the consequences in this year’s Baumgartner holiday letter…Full of humor, emotion, and surprises at every turn, Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners brings to life a remarkable cast of quirky, deeply human characters who must learn to adapt to the unconventional, or else risk losing one another. This is the story of a family falling to pieces—and the unexpected way they put it all back together.I CANNOT BELIEVE THAT THIS IS A DEBUT NOVEL - IT IS TOO FRICKING GOOD. Every year I write a parody letter of my mom and dad's Christmas letter as they spend weeks editing it and making it sound "correct' - I email my version to people who don't get the real letter and I may end up publishing these parodies in a blog someday :-)That aside, I loved this book: the characters were well fleshed out and I truly enjoyed the journey they took in this book. well-crafted, This is going to be a book club pick for sure!I cannot wait for the second book from Gretchen Anthony --- I, of course, assume that she has more stories in her.5 sparkly stars!
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  • Me
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from the publisher free of charge in return for an honest review. This book is a satire of those smarmy, boastful Christmas letters that some families send. The characters are realistic, likable or at least tolerable (like some relatives in the best of families) and others are hilarious. The plot surrounds a Minnesotan matriarch who has the "perfect" family, tons of volunteer positions and attempts to throw the best parties. She covers all of this in her annual Christmas let I received this book from the publisher free of charge in return for an honest review. This book is a satire of those smarmy, boastful Christmas letters that some families send. The characters are realistic, likable or at least tolerable (like some relatives in the best of families) and others are hilarious. The plot surrounds a Minnesotan matriarch who has the "perfect" family, tons of volunteer positions and attempts to throw the best parties. She covers all of this in her annual Christmas letter, Evergreen Tidings From the Baumgartners...At her husband's retirement party, a secret is revealed, that differs greatly from the surreal family that she likes to project to the community. I fond it to be quite the page-turner with a few plot twists near the end. This will make a great pre, during, and after holiday read and reminds us that blood is thicker than water and no family is perfect.
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    The adjectives were over the top. “Orphaned shoes” being one that needed to be edited out of the book. This book examines two families as they deal with an lgbt couple involving a pregnancy. They try to add muster over who is the father, but it’s really easy to figure it out. The drama was not realistic and a bit crazy. Granted I’m sure lgbt families could go through something similar but this was an extreme. Humor fell flat or was too over the top. Honestly this book was more 2.5 than a 3 but I The adjectives were over the top. “Orphaned shoes” being one that needed to be edited out of the book. This book examines two families as they deal with an lgbt couple involving a pregnancy. They try to add muster over who is the father, but it’s really easy to figure it out. The drama was not realistic and a bit crazy. Granted I’m sure lgbt families could go through something similar but this was an extreme. Humor fell flat or was too over the top. Honestly this book was more 2.5 than a 3 but I received this book as a giveaway so I thought it’d be better to give it a better ranking than 2 stars. Additionally it seems that some people do like this while others don’t so 3 Stars gives it a fighting chance.
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  • Gail Herrmann
    January 1, 1970
    This was not the easiest book to get into. Not a huge fan of the characters.. It became more of an enjoyable read as the story progressed and I found humor in some of the situations. Thanks to NetGalley, the author, and the publisher for the opportunity to preview this book.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    This was an okay read but I had a hard time with these two families. Violet Baumgartner writes an annual Christmas letter and this year's is a doozy. She is in combat with her daughter, Cerise who reveals a deep secret. The characters were difficult getting to know and as the story proceeded they became a little more likable. I guess the best way to describe this story is family drama. I received a copy of this ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Aryn
    January 1, 1970
    In a system where I could award partial stars, this would be a 2.5. Good enough to get me through of my recent time on an airplane, but not so great that the inflight movie didn’t occasionally distract me, even without audio. The story had a lot of potential - for Gilmore Girls fans, Violet Baumgartner on a good day is Emily Gilmore at her most unreasonable and extreme. For those who are not Gilmore enthusiasts, Violet lives in a carefully constructed world where appearances are (almost) everyt In a system where I could award partial stars, this would be a 2.5. Good enough to get me through ⅔ of my recent time on an airplane, but not so great that the inflight movie didn’t occasionally distract me, even without audio. The story had a lot of potential - for Gilmore Girls fans, Violet Baumgartner on a good day is Emily Gilmore at her most unreasonable and extreme. For those who are not Gilmore enthusiasts, Violet lives in a carefully constructed world where appearances are (almost) everything, and the accomplishments of her family are everything that’s left. So when husband’s retirement party includes an unexpected revelation about her daughter, Violet’s world starts to collapse. As I said above, the story had a bunch of potential. Old Christmas letters (the titular Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners) ranging from Violet and Ed’s first year of marriage through the current year are scattered throughout the story. The stories at the heart of the novel are solid - Ed and Violet’s relationship when she has a health issue (she doesn’t take well to resting) and he’s newly retired, Cerise and Barb’s adjustment to parenthood, Violet’s adjustment to aging all have moments that ring true. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of clutter in the novel that gets in the way. In particular, the Richard storyline (a recently downsized-out-of-a-job ad exec who’s wife is very good friends with Violet) seemed extraneous and out of place. It just kept getting in the way of what I wanted to hear about. What killed the book for me was that I either didn’t care or downright hated the characters. Violet at her worst (and somehow her Christmas letters and her daughter’s pregnancy bring out the worst in her) is overbearing, self-satisfied, pompous, and just plain awful. Her best? We don’t see much of that. Richard is bitter and unpleasant, as well as extraneous. Cerise is almost tolerable, but her kowtowing to her mother annoyed me almost as much as it annoyed Barb. Barb and Ed were both likeable characters, but they didn’t have a lot of development in my opinion. Final verdict: Probably great for some people (as evidenced by other reviews I’ve seen), but not for me. A modern take on the comedy of manners with a slightly larger than necessary cast squeezed into the confines of the novel’s length.
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  • Denice Barker
    January 1, 1970
    I was all set to not like this book. I thought it would be a quick read full of silly, but thought it was just what I needed after reading a serious book. Oh, readers, this is full of surprises. Pleasant surprises. Good surprises. And I surprise myself by already passing on the recommendation to friends to read this one. Violet Baumgartner has written a Christmas Letter every year for thirty years, ever since she married Dear Ed and thought it was her duty as a new wife. This immediately made m I was all set to not like this book. I thought it would be a quick read full of silly, but thought it was just what I needed after reading a serious book. Oh, readers, this is full of surprises. Pleasant surprises. Good surprises. And I surprise myself by already passing on the recommendation to friends to read this one. Violet Baumgartner has written a Christmas Letter every year for thirty years, ever since she married Dear Ed and thought it was her duty as a new wife. This immediately made me think of the Christmas Letters we’ve received over the years. Letters filled with smiles and pats on the back for all good things that happened during the year. Christmas Letters are the public face of a family, full of twinkly smiles. But for every public face there is a private face and the truth. Violet is determined to make her family, Dear Ed and daughter Cerise, shine to the outside world. There is nothing she can’t handle, nothing she won’t do, no committee she won’t chair to make her world and the people in it shine. When we meet Violet she is touting the party of all parties for Dear Ed’s retirement from, God love him, research to make colonoscopies more comfortable for us. At the party Violet receives the news that is definitely going to tarnish the shine and can’t be denied. No smiley public face is going to fix this one. Nothing to do for it but own it. And in owning it Violet needs to discover if she is capable of letting go of some of her control. Now, if you know a control freak, you know this is no easy thing. Violet’s world is inhabited with sometimes funny but very real people who very much really have to learn to navigate around, through or over her. I found myself laughing at Violet’s view of the world and being grateful I wasn’t in her galaxy. I absolutely loved this story. I loved that it changed my mind about my preconceived idea that I would give it little of myself. I ended up really loving being a part of Violet’s world. But I still don’t like Christmas Letters.
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  • Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    The premise and indeed even the first quarter or so of the book had me drawing parallels with a Fannie Flagg novel, with larger than life personalities living their lives in their small towns. I loved that chapters were interspersed with Christmas card letters from the past, ranging from ironically funny to tragic. Through newspaper clippings, the book's second weakest b-plot unfolds. The weakest b-plot is the "forced retirement" of one of the Baumgartner neighbors and friends, a former advertis The premise and indeed even the first quarter or so of the book had me drawing parallels with a Fannie Flagg novel, with larger than life personalities living their lives in their small towns. I loved that chapters were interspersed with Christmas card letters from the past, ranging from ironically funny to tragic. Through newspaper clippings, the book's second weakest b-plot unfolds. The weakest b-plot is the "forced retirement" of one of the Baumgartner neighbors and friends, a former advertising executive who comes across as an angry, miserable human being. This all lead me to being pretty strongly in the 2-star camp with this. The book shines when it focuses on the relationships of the Baumgartners, matriarch Violet and her daughter Cerise. Husband Ed on the other hand is in desperate need of some life breathed into him, as his role exists in only the passive sense through nearly the entire book. The small town mysteries posed at various points of the book are just glaringly obvious, to the point of painful that these characters can't seem to figure it out.The only surprise of the book is a reveal at the end, which brought about one of the most poignant and "real" moments in the action. There are some great over the top comedic situations that could have benefited from having more interesting fleshed out characters reacting to or setting them up.I loved the Violet character, even though she's written to be nearly unlikable; the book succeeds when she's either allowed to manipulate others or she's being put through the wringer of public displays of familial dysfunction. Unfortunately, she has to share the story; everything else in this book is a pretty big a bore--plots and characters included. Decent debut from this author and will probably be a fun (and easy) read during the holidays.ARC provided by NetGalley
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  • Janah Del Gatto
    January 1, 1970
    This book is more of a 2.5 star rating for me. The cover and the title really had me excited about the book. I enjoyed the beginning. The situation between the two main families children was predictable right from the beginning. The main character, Violet, drove me absolutely insane. Over the course of the book, became irritated when it was her chapter. I suppose that is good writing when you have a true reaction to a character. But her story line just seemed miserable and I didn't enjoy it. I n This book is more of a 2.5 star rating for me. The cover and the title really had me excited about the book. I enjoyed the beginning. The situation between the two main families children was predictable right from the beginning. The main character, Violet, drove me absolutely insane. Over the course of the book, became irritated when it was her chapter. I suppose that is good writing when you have a true reaction to a character. But her story line just seemed miserable and I didn't enjoy it. I never really understood why the story line went as it did. I felt like the book was trying to be too many types...mystery? new age? religious? chick lit? I found the parts about the best friend's husband to be completely irrelevant to the book. Sadly, by the end of the book, I just wasn't into it. The point of the Christmas letters and the reveal of them at the end wasn't interesting. I didn't feel like there was any real closure because , what was the main point of the book? My expectations were let down unfortunately.
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  • Mary Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    by Gretchen Anthony is a funny, family drama about Violet, Ed, and their adult daughter Cerise (Baumgartner, obviously). Told in alternating chapters by Violet, Cerise, their neighbor and close friend, interspersed are the tomes Violet writes each year as a Christmas greeting, as well as news reports of Cerise's spelling bee wins and Ed's career successes. The story opens in the build up to Ed's retirement party, an event which control-freak Violet has orchestrated very carefully for months. Th by Gretchen Anthony is a funny, family drama about Violet, Ed, and their adult daughter Cerise (Baumgartner, obviously). Told in alternating chapters by Violet, Cerise, their neighbor and close friend, interspersed are the tomes Violet writes each year as a Christmas greeting, as well as news reports of Cerise's spelling bee wins and Ed's career successes. The story opens in the build up to Ed's retirement party, an event which control-freak Violet has orchestrated very carefully for months. The toast of a minor celebrity shocks her into a faint, which leads to a concussion sidelining her to sit at home for months. Events in all the participants lives somewhat spin out of control as she tries to find answers and manage events. At times laugh out loud funny, I would suggest this read to fans of books like Where'd you go Bernedette?, Young Jane Young and similar tales with quirky characters and family dramedy. With thanks to the author, publisher and Netgalley.com for the advanced readers copy of the e-book.
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    Evergreen Tidings is humorous but not "laugh-out-loud." In fact, parts of it I found a bit depressing. As I started the book, I saw shades of We're All Damaged by Michael Norman. I giggled a bit.But, as the tale (told from three points of view--more about that later) delved into a traumatic brain injury, a mid-life crisis and numerous annoying characters, I was looking for laughs. The novel is told from the perspectives of a meddling mother, a gay and pregnant daughter and a family friend. It wa Evergreen Tidings is humorous but not "laugh-out-loud." In fact, parts of it I found a bit depressing. As I started the book, I saw shades of We're All Damaged by Michael Norman. I giggled a bit.But, as the tale (told from three points of view--more about that later) delved into a traumatic brain injury, a mid-life crisis and numerous annoying characters, I was looking for laughs. The novel is told from the perspectives of a meddling mother, a gay and pregnant daughter and a family friend. It was an odd group. At times, I thought I was reading a novel set in the 70s and not in the present day as one of the main characters strives for the perfect domestic life. Then, there's the whole hubbub over the "my two moms" scenario. Really?Yes, there were a couple of occasions that I found some laughs (most specifically with the pre-birth announcements), and I would recommend this book. I just think the blurb writers got it wrong.
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  • Virginia
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you for sending me the ARC for this book. The Baumgartners' are a dysfunctional family from Minnesota. Mrs. Baumgartner (Violet) leads the mayhem in trying to be perfect in an imperfect world. She is the type of person who cares what people think and tries her best to shield her imperfect family by trying to change events that have happened. Unfortunately, through a serious of mishaps, she finds that she can't always do that. The events that happen to her are hysterical. She constantly wor Thank you for sending me the ARC for this book. The Baumgartners' are a dysfunctional family from Minnesota. Mrs. Baumgartner (Violet) leads the mayhem in trying to be perfect in an imperfect world. She is the type of person who cares what people think and tries her best to shield her imperfect family by trying to change events that have happened. Unfortunately, through a serious of mishaps, she finds that she can't always do that. The events that happen to her are hysterical. She constantly worries about what people think of her and her family. Her Christmas letters show her to be very creative with what she tells her family/friends. It's a very amusing and an entertaining read and I would recommend it. All of us have had a Mrs. Baumgartner in our life at one time or another. I'll look forward to other books by this author.
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  • Chris Markley
    January 1, 1970
    This story of controlling mother Violet as she deals with unexpected news about her daughter Cerise will have you laughing, shaking your head, and thanking your lucky stars that your mother is not like Violet. Just reading the annual Christmas greeting from Violet Baumgartner, the type of Christmas letter that gives Christmas letter's their bad reputation - filled with over the top sharing of the wonderfulness of the family Baumgartner's year, provides . background on Violet and her family. and This story of controlling mother Violet as she deals with unexpected news about her daughter Cerise will have you laughing, shaking your head, and thanking your lucky stars that your mother is not like Violet. Just reading the annual Christmas greeting from Violet Baumgartner, the type of Christmas letter that gives Christmas letter's their bad reputation - filled with over the top sharing of the wonderfulness of the family Baumgartner's year, provides . background on Violet and her family. and the letters are interspersed with the story. But what makes it a wonderful holiday read is that at its heart it is a story of love and family.Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing an ARC for my honest review.
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  • Nettie
    January 1, 1970
    I began this novel with high hopes but found myself struggling to maintain an interest in the book and never finished it. It’s rare that I give up on a book but the characters were pretty boring with the exception of Violet. She was a busybody but liked order in her life and was well-meaning. Being a mother and grandmother myself I could identify with her to a point. The other characters were not at all interesting! I didn’t find much substance in the book and would class it as chick-lit. Thanks I began this novel with high hopes but found myself struggling to maintain an interest in the book and never finished it. It’s rare that I give up on a book but the characters were pretty boring with the exception of Violet. She was a busybody but liked order in her life and was well-meaning. Being a mother and grandmother myself I could identify with her to a point. The other characters were not at all interesting! I didn’t find much substance in the book and would class it as chick-lit. Thanks to Goodreads Giveaways for the chance to read and review this novel. It is rare that I give a book a two star and I really did try to engage with the story.
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  • Alexis Petric-black
    January 1, 1970
    Overall a quick funny read. I found Violet to be a hard target for sympathy and felt she was largely be copy of Hyacinth Bucket from the British sit com "Keeping Up Appearances" which isn't necessarily a bad thing just not very original. The conversations around LGBT families range true, especially the curiosity over "who dunit". The use of a head injury to change a personality so thoroughly did not ring true and became something of a cartoon aspect, at one point I was waiting for Violet to have Overall a quick funny read. I found Violet to be a hard target for sympathy and felt she was largely be copy of Hyacinth Bucket from the British sit com "Keeping Up Appearances" which isn't necessarily a bad thing just not very original. The conversations around LGBT families range true, especially the curiosity over "who dunit". The use of a head injury to change a personality so thoroughly did not ring true and became something of a cartoon aspect, at one point I was waiting for Violet to have another knock to the head to set her "right" again.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading people's holiday letters each year. They tend to be insane, but always interesting. This novel has holiday letters interspersed throughout the book that are equally insane but help you understand the characters more. At first, you think this is a book about a dysfunctional family, but it's also about letting go of control, LGBTQ issues, how to live in community, dealing with family and friends, change, retirement, and more. Highly recommended. Out October 16, 2018.Thank you to Ede I love reading people's holiday letters each year. They tend to be insane, but always interesting. This novel has holiday letters interspersed throughout the book that are equally insane but help you understand the characters more. At first, you think this is a book about a dysfunctional family, but it's also about letting go of control, LGBTQ issues, how to live in community, dealing with family and friends, change, retirement, and more. Highly recommended. Out October 16, 2018.Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for this ARC.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book & found it hard to believe that Gretchen Anthony is a new novelist. Anthony accurately captures the passive-aggressive nature that is so prevalent in Minnesota - but this is a book that everyone will enjoy. I'm sure that everyone will recognize these characters in their lives. Cerise, Violet, Ed, Barb, Richard, and even Eldris are all people I've worked with. I found myself devouring this book & needing to know what happened next. The book isn't out until October 16, bu I LOVED this book & found it hard to believe that Gretchen Anthony is a new novelist. Anthony accurately captures the passive-aggressive nature that is so prevalent in Minnesota - but this is a book that everyone will enjoy. I'm sure that everyone will recognize these characters in their lives. Cerise, Violet, Ed, Barb, Richard, and even Eldris are all people I've worked with. I found myself devouring this book & needing to know what happened next. The book isn't out until October 16, but do yourself a favor & put it on your TBR list now. You won't be sorry.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Violet Baumgartner, a controlling mother who dominates the lives of friends and family members alike, has to come to terms with her lesbian daughter's decision to raise a baby with her partner. Intermingled with the unfolding story are snippets of backstory told from Violet's perspective through the Baumgartners' annual Christmas letter. The characters in this book were very hard to like although a few exhibited some redeeming qualities toward the end.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite novels of the year, DO NOT MISS Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners. It is warm, hilarious and a must read. I liken this to This is Where I Leave You by Jonathan Tropper, only I feel it is a bit lighter - but it deals with the dysfunctional family made functional by their strong love for each other. I am a huge fan of this novel.I am looking forward to more stories by Gretchen Anthony - witty, warm, realistic, SO MUCH FUN.
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  • Amy Lou
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a fun easy read. A story about the Baumgartners, including the very involved and controlling matriarch Violet, her scientist husband Ed, and their adult daughter Cerise. Ed retires from work and Violet plans the perfect retirement party for him. Their daughter Cerise has exciting news. When it is revealed to all, mayhem ensues
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    Violet is a control freak, particularly when it comes to her daughter, Cerise. Cerise and her partner, Barb, are having a baby, causing Violet to obsess over who and how. Add in Ed, Violet’s husband, a scientist studying digestive issues, and the comedy is laugh out loud funny. Although it was a bit slow to start and weave in all of the other characters, I liked it.
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  • Jane Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book in a Goodreads giveaway. It surprised me. It was a quick but delightful read. The characters reveal more dimensions as the story professes and there are some really touching and memorable moments. A few scenes resort to unnecessary slapstick.
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  • Shonna Froebel
    January 1, 1970
    https://cdnbookworm.blogspot.com/2018...
  • Caryn
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come
  • Alissa
    January 1, 1970
    Violet's world is put into a tailspin due to an unexpected announcement at dear husband's Ed's retirement party.
  • Rebecca Collins
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't put it down! its a very quick and easy read perfect for passing time with a cup of hot tea. very relatable since every family has a few crazy relatives. its both lighthearted and dramatic with a bit of southern charm. I have a great relationship with my mother and this book is a perfect mother daughter read.
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