Good Riddance
“Effortlessly charming . . . The book inspires a very specific kind of modern joy.”—New York Times Book Review The delightful new romantic comedy from Elinor Lipman, in which one woman’s trash becomes another woman’s treasure, with deliriously entertaining results. Daphne Maritch doesn't quite know what to make of the heavily annotated high school yearbook she inherits from her mother, who held this relic dear. Too dear. The late June Winter Maritch was the teacher to whom the class of '68 had dedicated its yearbook, and in turn she went on to attend every reunion, scribbling notes and observations after each one—not always charitably—and noting who overstepped boundaries of many kinds. In a fit of decluttering (the yearbook did not, Daphne concluded, "spark joy"), she discards it when she moves to a small New York City apartment. But when it's found in the recycling bin by a busybody neighbor/documentary filmmaker, the yearbook's mysteries—not to mention her own family's—take on a whole new urgency, and Daphne finds herself entangled in a series of events both poignant and absurd.   Good Riddance is a pitch-perfect, whip-smart new novel from an "enchanting, infinitely witty yet serious, exceptionally intelligent, wholly original, and Austen-like stylist" (Washington Post). 

Good Riddance Details

TitleGood Riddance
Author
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherHoughton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN-139780544808256
Rating
GenreFiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Romance, Contemporary, Humor

Good Riddance Review

  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Good Riddance is a about Daphne, a recently divorced almost thirty year old woman living in Manhattan who attempts to spark joy by cleaning out her apartment and finds that throwing out her mother's copy of a 1968 high school yearbook changes her life.This book has a light hearted tone but its improbability--regarding biology--and extremely dated everything else makes it a bust. In 1968, Daphne's mother was a first year teacher who won over the students to the extent they dedicated the yearbook Good Riddance is a about Daphne, a recently divorced almost thirty year old woman living in Manhattan who attempts to spark joy by cleaning out her apartment and finds that throwing out her mother's copy of a 1968 high school yearbook changes her life.This book has a light hearted tone but its improbability--regarding biology--and extremely dated everything else makes it a bust. In 1968, Daphne's mother was a first year teacher who won over the students to the extent they dedicated the yearbook to her. She may have written snarky comments in it, but Daphne's mother faithfully kept up with the class of 1968 and when Daphne's pushy neighbor, Geneva, picks up the discarded yearbook, she pushes Daphne into attending the upcoming reunion.At the reunion, Daphne finds out that her father isn't her father--bio dad was one of her mother's students. (They got involved right after he graduated, as if this makes it better)Anyway. It being 2019, this means Daphne was born in 1989. Which means her mother got pregnant with her in her mid-40s, which means she had Daphne's sister Holly when she was closer to 50 than 40, which makes the biological odds of both pregnancies pretty small. So, biological stuff? Nope. Also along those lines--how does a rising politician keep a decades long affair, not to mention a child, secret these days? Then we get to the rest of the book. People (30 and under) still email. Like, to send nonwork messages! No. Sorry. And the Thanksgiving get together that mentions Bernie Madoff? The 1988 Olympics? Martha Stewart in her pre-Snoop days? Yikes. And then the one person at this Thanksgiving who mentions having taught Woody and Soon-Yi's children in preschool? Given that said kids haven't been in preschool for almost two decades, I felt like I was reading a draft of a novel set in the 1990s, with the Madoff aside thrown in to make it current for today. Which still misses today by over a decade.Then we get to the one modern reference. Riverdale. Jeremy, Daphne's across the hall neighbor and love interest is an extra on the show Riverdale. Except the show films in Canada. And not in Toronto, whuch would be really pushing Jeremy's location. Riverdale is filmed in Vancouver so Jeremy's decision (aided, in funding, by his wealthy parents who live in California) to live in Manhattan? Not even probable for an extra on a tv show that films on another coast. In another country.I'm all for suspension of disbelief but setting aside the popular culture reference that's poorly researched (does Lipman not have a relative or assistant who could do that?), the rest of the extremely dated references (there's no Uber in this universe? people still use Craigslist? Bernie Madoff? the no longer small children of Woody Allen and Soon'Yi? Eeesh), the biological improbability of Daphne existing in the first place makes Good Riddance something that should have sparked joy about two decades ago. Now it reads like an old draft of a novel found lying around on a zip drive (there's a dated reference to fit this mess of a book) that was spellchecked and had Riverdale tossed in for...reasons? (To be trendy? That was two seasons of Riverdale ago.)As I said before, Eeesh.
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  • Jennifer Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    A quirky heroine done with great writing made for an enjoyable read!
  • Melki
    January 1, 1970
    I've been an Elinor Lipman fan since I read her first book Then She Found Me way back in 1990. Since then, I've read most of her work, and at one time I probably would have listed her as a favorite author. And, I still get a kick out of her stuff . . . just not as much as I once did. This story seems, well, familiar. It's almost as if Elinor has a list to follow while she's writing, and checks it off as she goes:- funny, likable heroine - check!- quirky parent, or other family member - check!- w I've been an Elinor Lipman fan since I read her first book Then She Found Me way back in 1990. Since then, I've read most of her work, and at one time I probably would have listed her as a favorite author. And, I still get a kick out of her stuff . . . just not as much as I once did. This story seems, well, familiar. It's almost as if Elinor has a list to follow while she's writing, and checks it off as she goes:- funny, likable heroine - check!- quirky parent, or other family member - check!- wacky situation with which heroine must cope - check!- interesting new man for heroine to bed - well, duh! It goes without saying.And, there you have this book. It was fine . . . pleasant, in fact. I just feel that Lipman is capable of much, much more than light, romantic comedy.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    Update: New review 12/14/18Daphne Maritch, finally free of Pickering, New Hampshire and stupid mistakes made even here in NYC, has read that book about decluttering your home and hugging your stuff to see if they bring you joy or hate or painful memories that may lead to eating a pint of ice cream with a half cup of bourbon on top. This will then lead you to the trash or recycle bins in the basement of your apartment building to throw out all the meaningless stuff you’ve collected, including the Update: New review 12/14/18Daphne Maritch, finally free of Pickering, New Hampshire and stupid mistakes made even here in NYC, has read that book about decluttering your home and hugging your stuff to see if they bring you joy or hate or painful memories that may lead to eating a pint of ice cream with a half cup of bourbon on top. This will then lead you to the trash or recycle bins in the basement of your apartment building to throw out all the meaningless stuff you’ve collected, including the yearbook your mother left you in her will, God knows why, of the Class of 1968 from Pickering NHHS, her first teaching job right after college, that they dedicated to her, their yearbook advisor!Worst are the notes and comments she added over the next 30 years after going to every one of the class’s reunions. Included within is a system of letters by each person’s picture indicating Marriage, Divorce, Skinny, Fat, Bald, etc. I mean, who does this?! Satisfied with the free, clean space in her tiny apartment, Daphne’s bliss is ruined several days later by a note slipped under her door from a neighbor she hardly knows. Some Geneva person, retrieved, no stole her mother’s yearbook out of the recycle bin and now wants to discuss with Daphne!The foundation of, “Good Riddance” is the sweet story above, told to the reader in snarky, funny and often snorting good laughter, (as in piggy laugh) dialog. Geneva Wisenkorn, is the neighbor from down the hall, whose social boundaries do not exist. Daphne’s responses to her are priceless and the sort you want to remember for when you are in any situation with an aggressive, no-nonsense person. (I bet one pops to mind right now!)The only tidbit I’ll tell you now is that Geneva wants to make a documentary about the people in the yearbook, especially Daphne’s mother. Oh, and Geneva will not give Daphne the yearbook back; employing grade school rules: say it with me, “Finders Keepers.” If I say any more, I would ruin three-fourths of the book for you. I can’t do that, really it gets better and better. You’ll meet Jeremy, an actor who lives across the hall from Daphne, and is sympathetic to her cause with Geneva. Also, her father, Frank Maritch, now a widow, all around good guy and former HS principal at that HS in Pickering, NH. He moves to NYC and starts phase two of his life as well. Think of him as the Tom Hanks of this book. Those are the main characters, but you’ll meet a few more who will play some surprising roles in our funny little story. The plot is very good, all characters well developed, very well developed; and I was never bored.I recommend this book for a lively, enjoyable read!Thank you NetGalley, Houghton, Mifflin Harcourt, and Elinor Lipman
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so torn here. On the one hand, I love the concept. It's unique, it's interesting, and the book is well-written.On the other hand...it's really hard to care about Daphne. She threw the yearbook away when it was the one thing she got from her dead mother, and she did it barely a year after Mom passed. That's pretty cold. I'd have liked the book infinitely better if the yearbook were lost due to carelessness or thrown out by a friend by mistake or something. I hated that Daphne threw it away - I'm so torn here. On the one hand, I love the concept. It's unique, it's interesting, and the book is well-written.On the other hand...it's really hard to care about Daphne. She threw the yearbook away when it was the one thing she got from her dead mother, and she did it barely a year after Mom passed. That's pretty cold. I'd have liked the book infinitely better if the yearbook were lost due to carelessness or thrown out by a friend by mistake or something. I hated that Daphne threw it away - partly because she completely loses the moral high ground by doing that. Most of her tension with Geneva comes from wanting the yearbook back, but she really didn't have any right to it.(view spoiler)[ The fact that she destroyed the yearbook at the end? UGH. No matter what Geneva did, Daphne's mom deserved better. I also kind of hated that, after all her fighting with Geneva over making a documentary or podcast, she creates her own one woman show. Especially when the acting classes were Jeremy's idea. He basically manipulated her. And I loathe that she lied to Peter at the end almost as much as I loathe the fact that he apparently believed her with no proof at all. (hide spoiler)]I liked the subplots with Jeremy (mostly) and Daphne's dad. Dad is probably the best character, especially at the end. The book was an enjoyable read. I just spent too much of it annoyed with Daphne, so I'm not sure I really could recommend it. I started out thinking 3 stars, but the more I type all the things I didn't like, the more I wonder if it should be 2. I wish I could give 2.5 stars.**Review based on ARC from Netgalley**
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    I typically love Elinor Lipman witty and satisfying “feel good” books, which are very often romantic and literary social comedies, focusing largely on quirky heroines who navigate a confusing world.But this one is just too contrived. The basics of the plot without spoilers: Daphne Maritch “inherits” her deceased mom’s yearbook, which is filled with notes about the 1968 class. After she decides to toss it out, it falls into the hands of a nosy, trash-diving neighbor Geneva who is determined to re I typically love Elinor Lipman witty and satisfying “feel good” books, which are very often romantic and literary social comedies, focusing largely on quirky heroines who navigate a confusing world.But this one is just too contrived. The basics of the plot without spoilers: Daphne Maritch “inherits” her deceased mom’s yearbook, which is filled with notes about the 1968 class. After she decides to toss it out, it falls into the hands of a nosy, trash-diving neighbor Geneva who is determined to research the class, reveal Daphne’s mother’s juicy secrets, and turn it into a docu-drama film project. In the meantime, Daphne tries to protect her widowed father, a recent New York transplant, from the fall-out, and navigate a “friends with benefits” relationship with the handsome and young TV actor who lives across the hall.Among the problems I had was the character of Geneva, who I often wanted to slap! Although Ms. Lipman often pairs repressed and loveable heroines with flamboyant “others”, Geneva’s nosiness and lack of empathy made her someone that most people would stay a mile away from. Daphne, on the other hand, embraces her and even when she realizes her trust is misplaced, she still flies around her like a moth to a frame (for example, accompanying her to the 1968 class reunion, which can’t end well.)There are some preposterous turns of events, particularly as the book winds down. Elinor Lipman’s fluid and entertaining style kept me reading on – this author knows how to build and keep suspense. It’s fun to read but just doesn’t compare to some of this author’s other books.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Good Riddance. The title of this book pretty much sums up how I felt when I finally finished it. This is billed as a funny romance novel, but it feels like a rambling mess that's neither romantic nor overly funny. Daphne, a thirty-something not long out of a failed marriage and with no obvious job skills, throws away her mother's yearbook. It's subsequently retrieved by a nosy and ambitious neighbor that sees it as her path to success in the documentary/podcast industry. In her desperate attempt Good Riddance. The title of this book pretty much sums up how I felt when I finally finished it. This is billed as a funny romance novel, but it feels like a rambling mess that's neither romantic nor overly funny. Daphne, a thirty-something not long out of a failed marriage and with no obvious job skills, throws away her mother's yearbook. It's subsequently retrieved by a nosy and ambitious neighbor that sees it as her path to success in the documentary/podcast industry. In her desperate attempts to get the yearbook back Daphne stumbles into a relationship with another neighbor, bonds with her dad and learns about her mother's past. Even though all this happens, it doesn't really feel like anything happens because there doesn't seems to be any gravitas attached, just a shrill, panicky Daphne in my head.
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  • Hannah Grace || BookNerdNative
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you HMH Books for sending me a copy of GOOD RIDDANCE in exchange for an honest review. This one was light and sweet, but not for me. I couldn’t get along with the main protagonist, or figure out who she was or what she wanted (#relateable though haha). Little plot progression, and a romance that felt forced. I really enjoyed the relationship between the father and daughter, however, bumping up my rating a bit. I think you’ll like this one if you’re a fan of Lipman’s other work, unlikable f Thank you HMH Books for sending me a copy of GOOD RIDDANCE in exchange for an honest review. This one was light and sweet, but not for me. I couldn’t get along with the main protagonist, or figure out who she was or what she wanted (#relateable though haha). Little plot progression, and a romance that felt forced. I really enjoyed the relationship between the father and daughter, however, bumping up my rating a bit. I think you’ll like this one if you’re a fan of Lipman’s other work, unlikable female leads, and if you can take or leave the romance.Out FEB 5!
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  • Sally Koslow
    January 1, 1970
    Playful, witty, smart. The perfect novel to turn to if you need a break from scary suspense, World War II and even uplifting memoirs. Elinor Lipman is a smooth writer and sharp observer of popular culture.
  • Jill Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    I never thought I’d give an Elinor Lipman book anything less than four or five stars...at least til I read her newest novel. Here’s my two star review.”Elinor Lipman basically writes the same book with every one she writes. The main character is usually a young woman who is emeshed in a large family and milieu filled with colorful and lovable people. While there is usually a problem the young woman has to solve, the books always end happily. Sometimes tragedy will strike a minor character, but t I never thought I’d give an Elinor Lipman book anything less than four or five stars...at least til I read her newest novel. Here’s my two star review.”Elinor Lipman basically writes the same book with every one she writes. The main character is usually a young woman who is emeshed in a large family and milieu filled with colorful and lovable people. While there is usually a problem the young woman has to solve, the books always end happily. Sometimes tragedy will strike a minor character, but things still turn out well. Lipman is also a novelist who works mostly with dialogue to move her plots forward and she’s a master at the technique. She’s so good that even a poor book like “Good Riddance” is fun to read (at least til you think about it).“Lipman’s latest book can be combined with two previous novels - “The Pursuit of Alice Thrift” and “The Ladies Man” - in the category of poor. The main character- Daphne Maritch - is the typical Lipman protagonist. She’s fled her quiet life in small town New Hampshire to an exciting life in New York City. She has an ill-advised first marriage which ends in an early divorce. She has a typical “cute meet” with her neighbor, an actor a few years her junior. But her life goes a bit berserk when her mother dies back in New Hampshire, leaving Daphne a highly annotated 1968 high school yearbook. What did all the notes mean? Daphne deep sixes the yearbook in her apartment recycling bin, where it’s taken by a Lipman-eccentric villain. Things come to a head when Daphne’s widower father moves to New York City, fulfilling a lifelong desire to live in the big city.“ I hate to say that “Good Riddance” is a mess of a book, but I will say it, “it’s a disaster”. The characters are fine but Lipman can’t seem to figure out what to with them. Everybody mills around like lost actors on stage in a bad play. I wish I could say it’s worth reading, but it really isn’t.”
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  • Lorilin
    January 1, 1970
    Daphne Maritch is going through a rough patch. She’s 31 and freshly divorced (after a whirlwind romance…and even shorter marriage). Her recently widowed father is also struggling, so, in an effort to support each other and make a fresh start, the two decide to move to New York to see what new adventures await them.While unpacking boxes, Daphne uncovers a yearbook her late mother left to her in her will. It’s very worn, with all kinds of, hm, colorful notes written in the margins. It’s no secret Daphne Maritch is going through a rough patch. She’s 31 and freshly divorced (after a whirlwind romance…and even shorter marriage). Her recently widowed father is also struggling, so, in an effort to support each other and make a fresh start, the two decide to move to New York to see what new adventures await them.While unpacking boxes, Daphne uncovers a yearbook her late mother left to her in her will. It’s very worn, with all kinds of, hm, colorful notes written in the margins. It’s no secret that June Maritch was one of the most popular teachers at the high school where she taught many years back. In fact, this particular yearbook was even dedicated to her. But Daphne isn’t the sentimental type, so she throws it away. Unfortunately for her, it falls into the hands of her nosy neighbor (and aspiring documentary film maker) Geneva, who concludes that the yearbook is full of untapped drama and decides to further investigate June and her relationships with her former students. Drama, predictably, ensues.This book has such an interesting premise, and I was so looking forward to reading it. Unfortunately, between the wholly unsympathetic characters and unbelievable plot twists, I had a hard time connecting with it. I wanted to be on Daphne’s side, but man-oh-man, the girl sure can whine. Even over the smallest grievances, she works herself up into an adolescent tizzy. She’s moody, quick-tempered, and lazy, and I just couldn’t get past her unfailing ability to demonstrate a complete lack of common sense in nearly every quasi-problematic situation. Her steamy, dreamy, younger neighbor, Jeremy, admittedly does provide a refreshing foil to her predictably dramatic outbursts. I enjoyed reading the back and forth between the two of them. I only wish Jeremy had a stronger presence in the story.There are, however, two bright and shining characters who I absolutely loved: Daphne’s father and her (now deceased) mother. Her father is grounded, sweet, and relatable. And her mother. Wow, I wish the whole book had been about her. I wanted to know more of her story, even up until the end. She comes across as smart, mysterious, beguiling. I wish I could have peeled back the layers of her life more fully.Despite my grievances with Good Riddance, I still zipped through it in no time. It’s a light and fluffy story, and even though it didn’t deliver as well as it could have, I never considered not finishing it. This is one of those books you pick up at the airport, read for a few hours on the plane, and never think about again. It’s not a life-changing book, but it’s enjoyable in its way.See more of my reviews at www.bugbugbooks.com!Big thank you to Edelweiss for the ARC.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. Good Riddance is zany, madcap chick-lit, and an enjoyable light read. The story begins when Daphne Maritch throws out her mother's yearbook from her first year of teaching, in which she has made notes about former students at every reunion for nearly 50 years. When Daphne's neighbor takes possession of the yearbook and decides she wants to make a documentary about it, all sorts of hijinks ensue.This book was fun--I enjoyed the wry style and there were laugh-out-loud funny moments, but 3.5 stars. Good Riddance is zany, madcap chick-lit, and an enjoyable light read. The story begins when Daphne Maritch throws out her mother's yearbook from her first year of teaching, in which she has made notes about former students at every reunion for nearly 50 years. When Daphne's neighbor takes possession of the yearbook and decides she wants to make a documentary about it, all sorts of hijinks ensue.This book was fun--I enjoyed the wry style and there were laugh-out-loud funny moments, but there were also directions the plot took that I didn't like, and things Daphne did that annoyed me. I would definitely recommend it to readers who like quirky romantic comedies, although I don't think it's the very best of the bunch.*I received a free ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**Used for PopSugar 2019 Reading Challenge prompt "A book with a two-word title."
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  • Lorrea - WhatChaReadin'?
    January 1, 1970
    Daphne has just inherited her mother's yearbook from the class of 1968 at Pickering High School in New Hampshire. That year her mother was not only the English teacher, but also the yearbook advisor. Mrs. Maritch has gone to every reunion and each year she has added notations to the yearbook to all of the students. Daphne has no need or room for the yearbook in her small New York City apartment, so she puts it in the recycling. A neighbor who is also a budding documentarian finds the yearbook, a Daphne has just inherited her mother's yearbook from the class of 1968 at Pickering High School in New Hampshire. That year her mother was not only the English teacher, but also the yearbook advisor. Mrs. Maritch has gone to every reunion and each year she has added notations to the yearbook to all of the students. Daphne has no need or room for the yearbook in her small New York City apartment, so she puts it in the recycling. A neighbor who is also a budding documentarian finds the yearbook, and is determined to make a movie with her findings. When Daphne finds out a dark secret at the 50th reunion they attend, she will stop at nothing to make sure the yearbook is not made public. With family secrets around each corner, Daphne will try her best to keep her mother's legacy in tact and her father's heart from being broken. Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the opportunity to read and review this book. I remember the thrill of getting my yearbook from middle school all through high school and having all of my friends sign it. I don't think that I ever had or even wanted any of my teachers to sign it though. And I've been to one or two of my reunions and I surely didn't go back and makes notes on what everyone is up to now. This was a quirky story that had quite a few different elements in it. A little bit of romance, some mystery, and an annoying neighbor. Daphne is newly divorced and trying to find her way in New York City. Her apartment is small and there isn't any room for much more than her. She is going to school to be a chocolatier, but that's not really working out. She tries going back to teaching at Montessori school which she did before she was married. But with the contents of the yearbook and rumors about her mother maybe reaching the public Daphne's plate seems to be overflowing. Can she keep her mom's legacy alive and keep herself from going crazy at the same time?
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  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to HMH for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review| Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest |
  • Patricia Karounos
    January 1, 1970
    more like GOOD RIDDANCE TO THIS BOOK
  • Shelleyrae at Book'd Out
    January 1, 1970
    Meh. I was underwhelmed by ‘Good Riddance’. The yearbook, and it’s potential, was a great hook for a story, but I found the plot superficial and banal. So too was Daphne, Lipman’s main protagonist.It was her father, Tom, that I liked most, and who I thought had the most complete character arc.A quick, easy read, but not one I’d recommend unless you are a particular fan of the author.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Wanted it to be better and it was nice "uplit" but the ending just was OK to me.
  • Mary-Beth
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very sweet book, about the pleasantly dysfunctional family and love life of 31 year old Daphne Maritch.
  • Charlie Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure: If, as in this novel, someone started sending me $5000 every three months --- TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS A YEAR --- not only would I dance for joy until I no doubt had a coronary event --- but NEVER would I EVER tell them to stop sending me that money. Twenty thousand dollars a year is more than I have made in a year, hell, sometimes two or three years, for most of my adult life. Seriously, if someone sent me $5000 AT ALL, my life would be about a million times easier. And a regula Full disclosure: If, as in this novel, someone started sending me $5000 every three months --- TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS A YEAR --- not only would I dance for joy until I no doubt had a coronary event --- but NEVER would I EVER tell them to stop sending me that money. Twenty thousand dollars a year is more than I have made in a year, hell, sometimes two or three years, for most of my adult life. Seriously, if someone sent me $5000 AT ALL, my life would be about a million times easier. And a regular $5000 would solve most of my day-to-day worries and issues. So, right away, this part of the plot put me in a WTF ARE YOU DOING? NEVER! sort of a bad mood.I open the covers of an Elinor Lipman novel with some confidence what I'll find. We have those understandings with certain authors: I will read your every release and you will deliver me your regular fare. This isn't to say that said fare is boring, rote, or without surprise and delight. It's simply, at least in the case of Elinor Lipman, I know there will be an interesting premise around which will be built a romantic-usually cute meet-happy get together in the end main plot, with interesting sub-plots and secondary characters; there will be some quirk, some smirk, some snark, and none of it will be mean-spirited or too emotionally demanding.It will be a fast read. And so it was with "Good Riddance" --- and thus I am left with the question, "WHY AM I SO ANNOYED?"It boils down to a few things. Our heroine, Daphne, recently divorced after less than a year from a p.o.s. trust fund baby who wed her just to get his inheritance released, has had to relocate to a tiny apartment in Manhattan, during which process she downsizes her belongings, tossing what (ugh, this crap again) "does not bring her joy" --- a list which includes a yearbook her deceased mother, a school teacher, left to her specifically in her will. The yearbook was dedicated by the graduating class that year to Daphne's mother, and her mother had attended many of the class reunions, making notes beside the names of students about what they had and had not become.Daphne's crazy neighbor (here's some of that Lipman quirkiness) rescues the yearbook from the trash and decides it would make a good basis for a documentary. Daphne is not happy. And all of this leads to the revealing of secrets (none of which come as any surprise) and, too, Daphne's involvement with the neighbor across the hall, an actor who plays a small role on "Riverdale".Okay, FIRST, that actor lives in/owns(?) a nice Manhattan apartment when he's basically an extra, who has a publicist? And, he's ALWAYS there, which, would be impossible since "Riverdale" shoots in Vancouver, three thousand miles and a six hour plane ride away. So, that makes no sense. At all.Second, the secrets revealed by the yearbook/documentary shenanigans have to do with the family, and Daphne never actually shares them with some family members, which seems impossibly false to me. Third, and MOST ANNOYINGLY UNBELIEVABLE TO ME --- that $5000/$20,000 issue with which I started.Now listen, I am as eager and happy to suspend disbelief as the next reader of happily-ever-after novels. I am. Believe me, I will take all the happily ever after-ing I can get. BUT, there's a difference between asking readers to suspend their disbelief and asking them to move into fairy-tale realm of magic realism, which those three things sort of ask of the reader. It felt lazy to me, and a little too much of an ask.And so, two stars. Because. Well, I want that $5000. That's just how shallow I am. (Not to mention, I have a thing for EVERY SINGLE MALE ACTOR on "Riverdale" and that Daphne gets both that money --- and foolishly rejects it --- and to sex it up with a "Riverdale" actor. No. I have suffered enough in life that those things should be mine.)
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    In 1991 I picked up a book by an author I had never read before, Elinor Lipman, it was THEN SHE FOUND ME, and I have been her most devoted fan ever since. GOOD RIDDANCE is right up there with my favorite Lipman books. It does harken back to the parental confusion and loyalty issues that occurred in her first novel. Again, she creates a delightful, ditzy, totally sympathetic heroine in Daphne Matrich. I quite literally could not put down the book. I cared about Daphne and her family. Lipman skill In 1991 I picked up a book by an author I had never read before, Elinor Lipman, it was THEN SHE FOUND ME, and I have been her most devoted fan ever since. GOOD RIDDANCE is right up there with my favorite Lipman books. It does harken back to the parental confusion and loyalty issues that occurred in her first novel. Again, she creates a delightful, ditzy, totally sympathetic heroine in Daphne Matrich. I quite literally could not put down the book. I cared about Daphne and her family. Lipman skillfully creates a whacky romance after a whackier marriage for Daphne. Then she stirs in a villain, only one who is not very villainous. I laughed out loud at some of the funny moments. The plot is totally original and the characters are so perfectly drawn that I could count all of as potential friends. Without a doubt, Lipman is our Jane Austen and this is another delightful novel about modern mores. For full disclosure, I have written her fan letters, and despite a lack of agreement with critics, I even loved the film made of THEN. SHE FOUND ME. Don’t miss this novel, enjoy!
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  • Lesa
    January 1, 1970
    Last month, there was all kinds of chatter on the Internet about Marie Kondo's book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up when word went around that she suggested throwing out books. The conversations were quite funny. Novelist Elinor Lipman anticipates what could happen if someone throws out the wrong item. Nothing is private and sacred in today's world of social media and podcasts, as Daphne Maritch learns, and regrets, in Good Riddance.A year after her mother's death, Daphne is following the Last month, there was all kinds of chatter on the Internet about Marie Kondo's book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up when word went around that she suggested throwing out books. The conversations were quite funny. Novelist Elinor Lipman anticipates what could happen if someone throws out the wrong item. Nothing is private and sacred in today's world of social media and podcasts, as Daphne Maritch learns, and regrets, in Good Riddance.A year after her mother's death, Daphne is following the advice in a book, and cleaning her tiny Manhattan apartment. Although she inherited a yearbook from her mother, it doesn't bring her any joy, and she puts it in recycling. Why would a thirty-year-old divorced woman want a yearbook her mother cherished from the Pickering High School class of 1968? That class dedicated the yearbook to their teacher and advisor, June Winter Maritch. And, their teacher attended their class reunions, from their fifth to their 45th, and wrote sometimes snarky comments on pictures. To Daphne, it's trash. To Geneva Wisenkorn, one of Daphne's neighbors, that yearbook is a treasure.Geneva wants to know the truth behind the yearbook. What happened to those classmates? And, why was their former teacher obsessed enough with them to attend reunions every five years? Daphne recognizes her mistake as soon as Geneva contacts her, and wants the yearbook back. She sees it as an invasion of privacy, and intrusion on her family and the lives of fellow residents of her hometown. Geneva sees it as source material for a documentary film. And, she's sure Daphne's mother had a reason to stay in touch with that class.Good Riddance doesn't sound like a romantic comedy, does it? Believe me, Daphne has all kinds of issues in her life right now. Her short-lived marriage was a failure. Her father moves to New York City because he always wanted to live there. With Geneva's project, Daphne turns to a neighbor across the hall for advice and help, an actor who plays a teen in a popular TV show. Although the yearbook appears to be a tool for disaster in Daphne's view, the people in her life may save her from killing Geneva. It's not a light, frothy romantic comedy. It's the story of a woman's life turned upside down, and the people who are there for her. As in The Inn at Lake Devine, one of my favorites, and, as in so many of her other books, Lipman takes one simple device as a linchpin for a story that has the potential to spin out of control. Instead, she always points out the humor in life. Lipman is able to take a story just to the point of outrageous before she brings it back to the mistakes we make as ordinary people. Good Riddance is another one of her delightful stories. Elinor Lipman writes social satire with heart.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    https://oneblogtwobroads.blog/2019/02...Daphne’s mom leaves her an old high school yearbook when she passes. It isn’t just any old yearbook, it is from the first year that her mom started teaching at the local high school. Her mom went back to the class of 69’s every single year and every year, she would add little connotations to the names of the students. Daphne, never understanding her mom’s need to do this, tosses the book into the recycling in her building. A neighbor picks it up and this b https://oneblogtwobroads.blog/2019/02...Daphne’s mom leaves her an old high school yearbook when she passes. It isn’t just any old yearbook, it is from the first year that her mom started teaching at the local high school. Her mom went back to the class of 69’s every single year and every year, she would add little connotations to the names of the students. Daphne, never understanding her mom’s need to do this, tosses the book into the recycling in her building. A neighbor picks it up and this begins a story filled with laughter, secrets, and a lot of fun.This is really a delightfully fun read. I was laughing throughout the whole thing. It wasn’t heavy, even as the secrets were revealed, and I really enjoyed that. Daphne is a great character. For what she has gone through, even in her fanatical way of thinking, she really comes out on top. All the characters are great. I loved her interactions with all of them, including the yearbook thief Geneva. With all the heaviness in this crazy world right now, this was the perfect remedy.Thanks to Netgalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for a copy of this book.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Daphne uncovers her mother's yearbook from 68'. A yearbook that held many dear memories and jotted notes.She went on to attend every reunion and noting the likes and dislikes of each and every one.Daphne upon leaving her cozy NYC apartment decides to declutter and you guessed it tossed it out .It's unearthed by a noisy neighbor who feels it's sentimental and has a connection more powerful than words.You could say it takes on a life all its own from here on out.For me I couldn't connect with any Daphne uncovers her mother's yearbook from 68'. A yearbook that held many dear memories and jotted notes.She went on to attend every reunion and noting the likes and dislikes of each and every one.Daphne upon leaving her cozy NYC apartment decides to declutter and you guessed it tossed it out .It's unearthed by a noisy neighbor who feels it's sentimental and has a connection more powerful than words.You could say it takes on a life all its own from here on out.For me I couldn't connect with any of it and had tried to at least connect with Daphne and the relationship she had with her father but to no avail.I hope you feel differently...
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  • Terry ~ Huntress of Erudition
    January 1, 1970
    Good Riddance is how I can sum up this book - I started, then put it down several times before I finally read it just to get rid of it.The narrative is just not that funny to make reading it seem anything but pointless. I couldn't figure out what it was really about for the longest time - there was no reason to care either way about what happened to the high school yearbook she threw out, so why try to force a story out of it?
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  • Melinda Worfolk
    January 1, 1970
    Once again, Elinor Lipman has provided a likeable cast of characters, a zany and slightly unbelievable plot full of coincidences, family secrets, and lightly thwarted, but ultimately triumphant, sweet romance. Fluffy but well written and enjoyable comedy with a bit of romance (not central to the plot) thrown in.
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  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    Picked up at the library for the cover. I have never read the author so didn’t know what to expect. Saw romance so I assumed this is what the book would be. I’m disappointed because the book is a bit of a mess... so many storylines and not a lot more of fleshing out. Daphne is an okay character... Jeremy is a meh love interest... the only character I love is Daphne’s dad. Can’t be too disappointed with no expectations for this book, but I don’t think I’ll be picking up this author again.
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  • Ciara Wilkie
    January 1, 1970
    It was ok. I'd say the first half was great but the second half dragged on and lost my interest. This was probably a 2.5 star books but I'll give it 3 as it was a the first audiobook I finished in a long time.
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    The concept of the book sounded fun. But once I started reading and further along that the story was all it was , became disappointed. Just wasn’t compelling enough, the characters and the story behind the yearbook and what came from it was just boring Just 1.75 stars
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  • Jan Polep
    January 1, 1970
    I love books with plots that use old letters, diaries, scrapbooks, etc., so I was all in to love Lipman's latest Rom-Com based on an old yearbook with copious notes about the class to '68. First half was zippy and funny as this small town high school yearbook ping pongs between people who do or do not want it be made into a documentary, podcast, movie, or play. The action and plot slows down in the second half. Great premise. Wish somebody else would give it a try.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Elinor Lipman can always be counted on for a good solid romp of a read that usually includes a few romps in the bedroom, as well! Good Riddance doesn't disappoint. Daphne, a divorcee living in a NYC apartment building, goes on a cleaning binge and throws away the high school yearbook that her mother willed to her. Seemingly a benign act, yet this being her mother's prized possession, of course there was deeper meaning to this marked up old yearbook. Geneva, a filmmaker and fellow resident of the Elinor Lipman can always be counted on for a good solid romp of a read that usually includes a few romps in the bedroom, as well! Good Riddance doesn't disappoint. Daphne, a divorcee living in a NYC apartment building, goes on a cleaning binge and throws away the high school yearbook that her mother willed to her. Seemingly a benign act, yet this being her mother's prized possession, of course there was deeper meaning to this marked up old yearbook. Geneva, a filmmaker and fellow resident of the building, digs the book out of the trash and decides to investigate because she thinks the Pinkerton High School students within are fodder for her next documentary. This was the school where Daphne’s mother was yearbook advisor, not a student, but she had affinity for her students, documented their achievements and progression in life within its pages, and attended their high school reunions. Geneva convinces Daphne to attend the reunion where secrets are indeed revealed, the sort that one doesn’t want made into a documentary film. Other characters include Daphne’s father, who relocates to NYC after his wife’s death to start a new life alongside his daughter, as well as love interests for both of them (did I mention romps in bed?), and an alumnus from Pinkerton High School that is the reason behind why the yearbook was willed to Daphne. Not the best book you’ll ever read, but it was thoroughly entertaining and definitely had an unusual premise – a solid 3.5 stars. #GoodRiddance #NetGalley
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