Wild Escape
On June 6, 2015, inmates Richard Matt and David Sweat escaped from New York State’s largest maximum security prison, Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora. The media became instantly obsessed with the story: two convicted murderers sliced their way through the brick and steel wall of their cells, meandered through a maze of tunnels, popped out of a manhole, and walked off into the night. Only a handful of inmates had successfully broken out of Clinton since the facility opened in 1845, and not many have made the attempt. Barbed wire, concrete walls, and the wilderness of the Adirondacks all serve as physical and psychological barriers to freedom. The seemingly impossible Shawshank-esque escape had the makings of a Hollywood film, and the public hung on to every twist and turn in the developing plot. After nearly three weeks on the run, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agent Christopher Voss shot and killed Matt June 26, 2015. Two days later New York State Police Sgt. Jay Cook shot Sweat twice in the back. He survived. While we have come to learn how Matt and Sweat pulled off perhaps the most elaborate modern day prison break, no reporter, except Chelsia Rose Marcius, has talked directly to Sweat to ask perhaps the most important question in the case: Why?

Wild Escape Details

TitleWild Escape
Author
ReleaseFeb 13th, 2018
PublisherDiversion Books
Rating
GenreCrime, True Crime, Nonfiction, Mystery, History, Autobiography, Memoir, Literature, American

Wild Escape Review

  • Valerity (Val)
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this fairly fast read about the escape of two men who used a female prison employee to help them break out from Clinton prison in upstate New York. The book eventually came to be written much afterward by the author with the help of one of the escapees who survived it. It is exciting, filled with inside details that could only be told by one who was there from the beginning and made it through the entire ordeal. It's perfect for the true crime reader who enjoys non-fiction n I thoroughly enjoyed this fairly fast read about the escape of two men who used a female prison employee to help them break out from Clinton prison in upstate New York. The book eventually came to be written much afterward by the author with the help of one of the escapees who survived it. It is exciting, filled with inside details that could only be told by one who was there from the beginning and made it through the entire ordeal. It's perfect for the true crime reader who enjoys non-fiction narratives and may remember some of when this story was in the headlines involving a married female employee that was charged in the escape plot who was also caught.An advance digital copy was provided by NetGalley, Chelsia Rose Marcius, and Diversion Books for my honest review. The publication date is Feb. 13, 2018
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  • Kayo
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating and intriguing, this book kept me riveted to the very end. Though you read about it in the news, this told the story you didn't get to hear. Great book.Thanks to author, Diversion Books and NetGalley for the chance to read this book. While I got the book for free, it had no bearing on the rating I gave it.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    Sped through this book in a day. Marcius’ literary nonfiction writing is riveting and hard to put down. This book is a fast, but detailed, depiction of the famous prison escape in the small town that is Dannemora. Even the footnotes include the smallest details, including disparities between what Sweat said versus what the official report said; in these situations, I am glad Marcius went with what Sweat said since his word holds more weight than a paper written after-the-fact. It’s sad how close Sped through this book in a day. Marcius’ literary nonfiction writing is riveting and hard to put down. This book is a fast, but detailed, depiction of the famous prison escape in the small town that is Dannemora. Even the footnotes include the smallest details, including disparities between what Sweat said versus what the official report said; in these situations, I am glad Marcius went with what Sweat said since his word holds more weight than a paper written after-the-fact. It’s sad how close Sweat got; a large part of me wishes he didn’t get caught.... I wish there were more details on Joyce Mitchell, but if she didn’t talk to Marcius then there is only so much to be said. Love this book and can’t wait to read it again.
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  • Chris Witkowski
    January 1, 1970
    This is a straightforward account of the incredible escape from Dannemora Prison of David Sweat and Richard Matt in June, 2015. Written by a reporter for the New York Daily News, the book follows the ill fated escape, and provides some background on the sorry life of Sweat. Not a great piece of writing (in fact, the number of typos is startling - no editor?) but the fascinating story makes up for it. Now I am just waiting for the movie that is in the works to come out.
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  • Neil Evans
    January 1, 1970
    In the tradition of In Cold Blood, this non-fiction narrative follows the twenty-three day’s between the prison break and the capture of David Sweat. The author is the only journalist to interview Sweat and she writes in explicit detail about the period the two escapees were on the run and the manhunt by over a thousand law enforcement officials. It’s obvious the author was obsessed with these prisoners and the events and her obsession is contagious. There’s a certain immediacy to her writing si In the tradition of In Cold Blood, this non-fiction narrative follows the twenty-three day’s between the prison break and the capture of David Sweat. The author is the only journalist to interview Sweat and she writes in explicit detail about the period the two escapees were on the run and the manhunt by over a thousand law enforcement officials. It’s obvious the author was obsessed with these prisoners and the events and her obsession is contagious. There’s a certain immediacy to her writing since the book was published within about 18 months of the escape and capture.
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  • teleri llinos
    January 1, 1970
    On June 6, 2015, inmates Richard Matt and David Sweat escaped from New York State’s largest maximum security prison, Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora.This book was nothing more than okay, although it started out differently. Despite its constant merry go round theme, reading about them on the run interested me. Hearing about what Matt and Sweat got up to whilst they were on the fun was hooking, no matter how many cabins they broke into. I loved it. Things started to go downhill when th On June 6, 2015, inmates Richard Matt and David Sweat escaped from New York State’s largest maximum security prison, Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora.This book was nothing more than okay, although it started out differently. Despite its constant merry go round theme, reading about them on the run interested me. Hearing about what Matt and Sweat got up to whilst they were on the fun was hooking, no matter how many cabins they broke into. I loved it. Things started to go downhill when the author dragged out the history of Sweat, at least that's what it felt like to me. Every few chapters were separated by Sweat's history from the beginning of his life, and although that can be interesting when done right, cough The Innocent Man by John Grisham cough, this author didn't really pull it off. I was bored, I wanted to hear about them breaking into cabins, and how far away from the police they were, but instead, it was let down a lot by unnecessary chapters, especially the ending.I would have been fine with the book ending after Sweat gets arrested, and we get a keyword little "here's the aftermath for all those involved" but instead the author seemed to do an essay for everyone involved and it was draining and boring. She could have easily ended it a handful of times before she actually did, shame.
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  • Lozzi Counsell
    January 1, 1970
    I liked how although this book is based on real events, it is set out to be like an informative story. I have read others that are more purely informative and these ones have bored me, so it was a relief to find a book that I could learn from whilst also enjoy (as I'm very much into crime.) I hadn't actually heard of this prison escape before, although not sure why. I wonder if it's due to the fact I live in England, as it wouldn't have really affected us over here or maybe it's the fact I don't I liked how although this book is based on real events, it is set out to be like an informative story. I have read others that are more purely informative and these ones have bored me, so it was a relief to find a book that I could learn from whilst also enjoy (as I'm very much into crime.) I hadn't actually heard of this prison escape before, although not sure why. I wonder if it's due to the fact I live in England, as it wouldn't have really affected us over here or maybe it's the fact I don't read newspapers or watch The News. The personalities of the two escapees was shown really well and I enjoyed following them on their escape. I also felt a lot of sympathy for Sweat - from reading this you can see that he's not a bad guy, he just made very bad choices and although I knew he was recaptured before reading this, I may at times have been silently hoping for him to make it. I'm glad that other people involved were also written about to give you the whole story but in the sense of purely the information you need, which was cut precisely before it would have started to get boring.
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  • Charity
    January 1, 1970
    Given that the author, Chelsia Rose Marcius, interviewed one of the escapees, I wondered how accurate it would be. For example, how could David Sweat, the escapee who lived through the escape, remember where exactly he'd been and how things had actually gone down? It happened over a number of weeks and there were A LOT of details! What I learned, however, is that when the author would finish a chapter (or several), there were members of law enforcement who had participated intimately in the manh Given that the author, Chelsia Rose Marcius, interviewed one of the escapees, I wondered how accurate it would be. For example, how could David Sweat, the escapee who lived through the escape, remember where exactly he'd been and how things had actually gone down? It happened over a number of weeks and there were A LOT of details! What I learned, however, is that when the author would finish a chapter (or several), there were members of law enforcement who had participated intimately in the manhunt, who would go over the manuscripts and check them for accuracy and add detail. Between Sweat's account and the contributions of all the other people involved in the story (beginning from the early planning stages of the escape all the way up to the capture), I think this is an accurate, complete account of this event.
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  • Tammy Adams
    January 1, 1970
    I would’ve given this 4 stars but for a few reasons. First, it was a fast-paced and interesting read up until the men were caught. The climax of the story seemed pretty anticlimactic the way it was written. Secondly, I could’ve done without the flashbacks to David’s earlier life. They didn’t seem to advance the story and I found it odd that there was a back story of Sweat but not on Matt. I think both or neither would be better. Lastly, I was very disappointed and confused that there were no pic I would’ve given this 4 stars but for a few reasons. First, it was a fast-paced and interesting read up until the men were caught. The climax of the story seemed pretty anticlimactic the way it was written. Secondly, I could’ve done without the flashbacks to David’s earlier life. They didn’t seem to advance the story and I found it odd that there was a back story of Sweat but not on Matt. I think both or neither would be better. Lastly, I was very disappointed and confused that there were no pictures! What was up with that? I like faces to go with the names when I’m reading a true story. Including pictures of the escapees, the ones who helped them, the police officers, the prison, maps of the area, at least some of the places they stayed, etc should have been a no- brainer.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a fast read and was pretty exciting. It tells the story of the Clinton prison break almost exclusively from David Sweat’s point of view, and as a result, it’s biased in Sweat’s favor. I think I would have had more respect for the book if it spent more time on broader issues like the culture at Clinton or the impact of a three-plus week prison break on Dannemora. Although the book seems well-researched, it is hard to view it as a credible piece of investigative writing. Still, it wa This book was a fast read and was pretty exciting. It tells the story of the Clinton prison break almost exclusively from David Sweat’s point of view, and as a result, it’s biased in Sweat’s favor. I think I would have had more respect for the book if it spent more time on broader issues like the culture at Clinton or the impact of a three-plus week prison break on Dannemora. Although the book seems well-researched, it is hard to view it as a credible piece of investigative writing. Still, it was an interesting story.
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  • Karole Petty
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed the book and the author did a diligent job checking the facts that were told to her by Sweat but, I felt she was a little bias toward Sweat. We have no way of knowing if what the interactions between him and Matt were while they were "on vacation" as Matt is not alive to either confirm or deny . Over all I would recommend the book as the author was very thorough as laying out the timeline of events for all involved.
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  • Fredrick Danysh
    January 1, 1970
    In June 2015, two inmates escaped from Clinton Correctional Facility in New York State. After three weeks, one was dead and the other recaptured. Assigned to cover the escape for her newspaper, the author did extensive research and interviews with the surviving escapee to piece together the whys and how of the story. A good read on crime and the penal system. This was a free advance read copy through Goodreads.com.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    The author did a great job researching the prison break at Clinton Correctional in 2015. For those of us who experienced it sitting glued to the TV day after day, the book added the many details we wanted to hear. Knowing this area well, the book was respectful and captured the essence of an area caught in the glare of National and international media.
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  • Peg
    January 1, 1970
    Didn't want to put it down because it was so well written. Author got first hand account of the convicts time on the run in the mountains, after escaping from Dannemora, making that the best part of the book.
  • Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars: There’s a lot of typos in the Kindle edition. ANNOYING. It’s an easy book to read and I finished it in 2 days. But the author is almost too objective and there was something about the tone of the book that I found unsettling.
  • Betzy Nichols
    January 1, 1970
    Ok readNot completely accurate. I live in Malone and from your descriptions of days 20-22 sweat couldn't have done what did and ended up on Finney Road, Burke. Not a bad recount but doesn't come close to the emotions of that time
  • Kenny Payne
    January 1, 1970
    This a pretty cool story but could of have been much better by someone else.
  • Anita
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed reading this book. It kept you interested throughout the entire book.
  • Mary Jo Lazzaro
    January 1, 1970
    Couldn't stop reading!Superb writing and research on this true event.If you enjoy reading about true crime, this book is worth the read.
  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    Poorly executed.
  • Shawna
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely well researched and thorough. Wish I'd read it before seeing the movie since I already knew most of the story.
  • Nick Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic read, a complete page turner.
  • Kathleen Nalley
    January 1, 1970
    A reporter writes the story of the Clinton Correctional Facility known as Dannemora in New York State.
  • Tate
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved it! I had never heard about this escape and now I cannot get enough of it. I was so entranced throughout the book and couldn't put it down or atop thinking about it. what an amazing read. Very interesting and well written.
  • Jim Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    This was a real page turner. Read it in two days. A lot of insight that I had not heard before. Highly recommend.
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    The pacing and organization of the book is well thought out. Marcius quickly sets up the the men's escape, and then their time as fugitives is woven with telling background information. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in true crime and our nation's prison system.Full review on my blog here: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/03/05/wi...Link to my site: https://paulspicks.blogPlease check it out!
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  • Lisabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley, the publisher. and the author for allowing me to read and review a digital copy of this book. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in true crime and our nation's prison system.
  • Sharon May
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks so much to NetGalley, Diversion Books, and Chelsia Rose Marcius for the opportunity to read and review this book.While probably most of the country is familiar with the subjects of this book - two escaped convicts from a maximum security prison in Upstate New York - the telling of this story really pushed this into a great read. I was thoroughly impressed by the author - a New York Times columnist - and the drive to be as accurate as possible in the telling of this story. Where there were Thanks so much to NetGalley, Diversion Books, and Chelsia Rose Marcius for the opportunity to read and review this book.While probably most of the country is familiar with the subjects of this book - two escaped convicts from a maximum security prison in Upstate New York - the telling of this story really pushed this into a great read. I was thoroughly impressed by the author - a New York Times columnist - and the drive to be as accurate as possible in the telling of this story. Where there were two conflicting stories from different sources, she stated that and didn't push the story one way or the other. It would have been so easy to write a different book, glomming onto the tale that the prison seamstress wanted her husband killed. Maybe yes, maybe no. But the facts were put out as they were known period. The background into David Sweat was also interesting - not for excusing any of his behavior but just for clarity and understanding.It certainly took me back to the weeks that these two criminals were on the loose. Living just a couple hours south in the southern foothills of the Adirondacks, a remember the constant media coverage and general fear that gripped this part of the country especially.Bravo for a well-researched, well-written account!
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    Well written, couldn't put it down. It's nice to come across a true crime book that doesn't read like a dry history text. You can tell the author put many hours into research and development of her sources, and cares about the story.
  • Tate
    January 1, 1970
    I honestly could not put this book down. It was extremely intriguing from the first sentence until the final word. I was engulfed by this book and could not consume it fast enough. I absolutely love the story and the way it was written. I am sad that I am finished reading because I was so entranced throughout the book and now I am done. I highly recommend this book!
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