History Vs Women
Rebels, rulers, scientists, artists, warriors and villainsWomen are, and have always been, all these things and more.Looking through the ages and across the globe, Anita Sarkeesian, founder of Feminist Frequency, along with Ebony Adams PHD, have reclaimed the stories of twenty-five remarkable women who dared to defy history and change the world around them. From Mongolian princesses to Chinese pirates, Native American ballerinas to Egyptian scientists, Japanese novelists to British Prime Ministers, History vs Women will reframe the history that you thought you knew.Featuring beautiful full-color illustrations of each woman and a bold graphic design, this standout nonfiction title is the perfect read for teens (or adults!) who want the true stories of phenomenal women from around the world and insight into how their lives and accomplishments impacted both their societies and our own.

History Vs Women Details

TitleHistory Vs Women
Author
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherFeiwel & Friends
ISBN-139781250146731
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Feminism

History Vs Women Review

  • R
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very well written, well researched, beautifully illustrated book that highlighted twenty five remarkable women who were certainly defiant, but they were also women that made history with their dynamic exploits, especially in times when submissiveness was the norm. They defied the odds and made a name for themselves, and now thanks to the authors, their names and place in history will no longer be silent or ignored. This is the type of book that should be in classrooms (14-18 age group This was a very well written, well researched, beautifully illustrated book that highlighted twenty five remarkable women who were certainly defiant, but they were also women that made history with their dynamic exploits, especially in times when submissiveness was the norm. They defied the odds and made a name for themselves, and now thanks to the authors, their names and place in history will no longer be silent or ignored. This is the type of book that should be in classrooms (14-18 age group) and prominently showcased, especially during the celebration of Women’s History month in March. These women have earned that right.Very highly recommended!
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    Tired of damsels in distress? Ready for some rebels, artists, scholars, amazons, and even villains? Then this is the book for you. Some of the women profiled within these pages may be familiar - Margaret Thatcher, Annie Easley - but others you have probably never heard of. How about Wang Zhenyi, a poet from the Qing Dynasty? She was born in 1768 and studied everything from astronomy to martial arts. In 1994 a crater on the planet Venus was named for her. "When you look into the night sky, seek o Tired of damsels in distress? Ready for some rebels, artists, scholars, amazons, and even villains? Then this is the book for you. Some of the women profiled within these pages may be familiar - Margaret Thatcher, Annie Easley - but others you have probably never heard of. How about Wang Zhenyi, a poet from the Qing Dynasty? She was born in 1768 and studied everything from astronomy to martial arts. In 1994 a crater on the planet Venus was named for her. "When you look into the night sky, seek out Venus and be dazzled by the celestial body and the woman who saw the stars and felt the wonder of the universe." If stargazing isn't your style, perhaps you prefer the arts? Maria Tallchief and her brilliant performance as Ballanchine's Firebird may be more to your tastes. The first Native American prima ballerina explained her achievements by saying, "You do what you have to do, and when you must, then you do a little more." Or there is Murasaki Shikibu, who wrote The Tale of Genji around the year 1000, and it is considered the first modern novel. She "filled her novel with multifaceted female characters who provided a rare glimpse into how it felt to be a woman in her world."After something more aggressive? What about Khutulun of Mongolia (born around 1260), who was even mentioned in the journals of Marco Polo? He was impressed with the way she would ride into battle with her father's troops and could capture an enemy "as deftly as a hawk pounces on a bird." She was also a champion wrestler and refused to marry anyone who could not defeat her. There are also tales of a female pirate who commanded an entire fleet, women who were directors and producers in the early days of Hollywood, and those who stood against the practices of lynching during Jim Crow.Recommended for anyone with an interest in women's history or feminism. I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who follows Feminist Frequency's work, I was excited to see Anita and Ebony had this book coming out. I preordered it immediately and knew I would enjoy it. I wasn't wrong. History vs Women was my night book for about a week; it is not a book that will take up much of your time. The chapters are relatively short, each covering five women with each entry about two pages or more. The writing is informative while also maintain a critical feminist lens on the women covered and how we st As someone who follows Feminist Frequency's work, I was excited to see Anita and Ebony had this book coming out. I preordered it immediately and knew I would enjoy it. I wasn't wrong. History vs Women was my night book for about a week; it is not a book that will take up much of your time. The chapters are relatively short, each covering five women with each entry about two pages or more. The writing is informative while also maintain a critical feminist lens on the women covered and how we study women in history. The women selected were mostly new to me; each entry is well-researched and footnoted. I almost wish this book was longer because I wanted to know more, but maybe we will get a Volume Two. I would be here for that. Overall, History vs Women is an interesting and informative read that highlights several women we should remember in history. If you're a feminist, a history nerd, or better yet both, History vs Women should be on your bookshelf.
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  • Lynndell
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting read!Thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan Feiwel and Friends for the opportunity to read and review History vs Women: The Defiant Lives That They Don’t Want You To Know by Anita Sarkeesian and Ebony Adams!The chapter titles are Reckless Rebels, Revelatory Scholars, Ruthless Villains, Restless Artists, and Relentless Amazons! The chapter titles made me even more interested in the book! The introduction got me hyped up by a few historical facts about women, such as a Japanese woman invent Interesting read!Thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan Feiwel and Friends for the opportunity to read and review History vs Women: The Defiant Lives That They Don’t Want You To Know by Anita Sarkeesian and Ebony Adams!The chapter titles are Reckless Rebels, Revelatory Scholars, Ruthless Villains, Restless Artists, and Relentless Amazons! The chapter titles made me even more interested in the book! The introduction got me hyped up by a few historical facts about women, such as a Japanese woman invented the novel and a Chinese woman ruled a fleet of 400 pirate ships. This impressive work of history and the women who created it is a gem to read! From a civil rights activist to a prime minister, each story captured my interest and I will purchase this book for the library for research and as a great read, 5 stars!
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  • Alba
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps it was my own excitement pre-release the reason why I was a bit disappointed by this book. I preordered it as soon as I could since I have followed Sarkeesian's steps for a long time now and got to know about Adams through a podcast they both host (with another equally brilliant woman). I expected the book to be thorough but this is more of a coffee table book. The illustrations are gorgeous and it is at its core a very necessary book but it lacked depth to me. I also found the selection Perhaps it was my own excitement pre-release the reason why I was a bit disappointed by this book. I preordered it as soon as I could since I have followed Sarkeesian's steps for a long time now and got to know about Adams through a podcast they both host (with another equally brilliant woman). I expected the book to be thorough but this is more of a coffee table book. The illustrations are gorgeous and it is at its core a very necessary book but it lacked depth to me. I also found the selection of the women in it a bit random overall but I would still recommend this book since it is important that we get to know more about women in history and every little helps.
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  • Erikka
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fantastic, and extremely well organized, glimpse into the lives of 15 amazing and diverse women from history. There's nothing I can say about this book that isn't said 10x more eloquently within its own pages, so I won't try. Just read it, have your girls read it, and especially have your boys read it. A side note on one of the women, artist Artemesia Gentilleschi. If you find her story interesting, read the novel in verse "Blood Water Paint", a lovely story that gives a voice to a fo This was a fantastic, and extremely well organized, glimpse into the lives of 15 amazing and diverse women from history. There's nothing I can say about this book that isn't said 10x more eloquently within its own pages, so I won't try. Just read it, have your girls read it, and especially have your boys read it. A side note on one of the women, artist Artemesia Gentilleschi. If you find her story interesting, read the novel in verse "Blood Water Paint", a lovely story that gives a voice to a forgotten painter of unbelievable talent.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I've greatly appreciated the wave of historical women bio anthologies that have come out recently, and History vs. Women is another satisfying entry in that genre. While some of the women featured were familiar to me due to reading other women's history anthologies a good number of them were not and have inspired me to learn more about their lives outside of these pages. Highly recommended!I received a digital ARC from the publisher via NetGalley.
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  • KTC
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished reading, History vs. Women: The Defiant Lives that They Don't Want You to Know, by Anita Sarkeesian and Ebony Adams. From the first page to the last, women whom I had never heard were revealed to me. These women's fascinating lives and amazing accomplishments kept me riveted. Even though I “knew” some of these women from previous study, e.g. Ida B. Wells, Hypatia, and Maria Tallchief, there was so much that I didn't know about them.…more
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Preachy, not as good as other historical women bio anthologies and doesn't stand out among the growing number of them. Hilarious that all the illustrations are of beautiful women when we don't know what many of them looked like -- why can't our heroines look like normal people?
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I really love the take on ruthless villains and the commentary that Sarkeesian and Adams provided on each chapter. It's a fast read with a few women I've never heard of, so all the better.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy from The Galley in exchange for an honest review. History vs women the different lives that they don't want you to know about is the latest in a trend in novels primarily targeted towards Elementary Middle School girls that seek to highlight the accomplishments of women throughout history. This book highlights 25 women that history that have been largely ignored in the history books the authors admit in the and afterward that there is a biased towards White and Western fig I received a free copy from The Galley in exchange for an honest review. History vs women the different lives that they don't want you to know about is the latest in a trend in novels primarily targeted towards Elementary Middle School girls that seek to highlight the accomplishments of women throughout history. This book highlights 25 women that history that have been largely ignored in the history books the authors admit in the and afterward that there is a biased towards White and Western figures because of their own limitations in language that being said it is always important to be able to introduce more powerful and strong women. There parts of the story that were hard for me to read it but that was more of an issue with the digital copy rather than the book itself. Well not necessarily appropriate for older readers this is definitely a great introduction for elementary middle school girls into what it means to be a strong and powerful woman in different fields.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    You do what you have to do, and when you must, then you do a little more- Maria TallchiefHistory vs Women: The Defiant Lives that They Don't Want You to Know by Anita Sarkeesian; Ebony Adams aims to introduce readers to a range of dynamic women across many different races, countries, time periods, and classes. I can wholeheartedly say they achieve this goal. There were a few names in there that I had previous known about but the majority I sadly previously never knew. This was a tour-de-force co You do what you have to do, and when you must, then you do a little more- Maria TallchiefHistory vs Women: The Defiant Lives that They Don't Want You to Know by Anita Sarkeesian; Ebony Adams aims to introduce readers to a range of dynamic women across many different races, countries, time periods, and classes. I can wholeheartedly say they achieve this goal. There were a few names in there that I had previous known about but the majority I sadly previously never knew. This was a tour-de-force collection of women who aspired for greatness despite their biological “setback.” Some of the few standouts for me were:Mai Bhago played a powerful role in preserving the Sikhs religious freedom when Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb tried to eradicate everything but Islam from his empire during the 18th century.Fatima Al-Fihri used her inherited wealth to open an educational mosque in 859 that would eventually become al-Qarawiyin University. It is still a world renowned university into our times. Her and her sister used their wealth to serve Allah because the pursuit of knowledge and devotion to academic study are core principles of the Islamic faith.Annie Jean Easley, dubbed “the human computer” helped send men to space through her incredible skills as a programmer and mathematician. In addition she, her computing skills helped scientists understand galaxies and analyze the ozone layer. Murasaki Shikibu was an 11th century writer from Japan. Her novel, The Tale of Genji, is considered to be the first fictional work.Lastly, but not truly last, there was Jackie Mitchell. She had a huge love of baseball and signed a contract to play with the Chattanooga Lookouts, a minor league baseball team in Tennessee. She played her one and only game on April 2nd 1931 against the New York Yankees for an exhibition game where she struck out both Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig! Her prize? She earned a torn up contract by the commissioner who stated baseball was too strenuous for women and accusations of her skills as being staged! I think this is a great introduction book that can spear head further investigation into the lives of these women. It is sad to think about how many other wonderful achievements are lost to us through the suppression of woman achievement. I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Holy shit. Anita fucking Sarkeesian. Yeah, no. I'm not reading this junk.
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