Batman
Bruce Wainwright, a comic book-reading kid obssessed with the Caped Crusader, loses his parents in a violent crime...and in the real world, no superheroes exist to save the day.BATMAN: CREATURE OF THE NIGHT, written by Kurt Busiek (ASTRO CITY) and drawn by John Paul Leon (MOTHER PANIC) is a stand-alone story set outside of regular continuity in 1968 Boston, MA. The victim of the brutal murder of his family, young Bruce sees grief and rage build inside himself...until something strange starts taking wing in the Gotham night! Something similar to the comics he's been reading his whole life. As life begins to imitate art, will Bruce Wainwright be able to live up to his fictional namesake?A deliberatel spiritual companion to the beloved SUPERMAN: SECRET IDENTITY, BATMAN: CREATURE OF THE NIGHT puts a new spin you've never seen before on the legend of Batman--and the dark emotions that drive him!This volume collects issues #1-4 of the critically acclaimed miniseries.

Batman Details

TitleBatman
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 31st, 2020
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401280635
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Dc Comics, Batman, Superheroes, Comic Book

Batman Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my gawd - and I cant emphasise this enough - this book was sooooooo boring! You dont need to read the rest of this review because thats all you need to know: Batman: Creature of the Night is a pillow book because it will put you to sleep! But if you wanted to know more about why I think that so years ago I heard about the premise to Kurt Busiek and Stuart Immonens Superman: Secret Identity and laffed because it did not sound good. A real(ish) world alternate take on the Man of Steels Oh my gawd - and I can’t emphasise this enough - this book was sooooooo boring! You don’t need to read the rest of this review because that’s all you need to know: Batman: Creature of the Night is a pillow book because it will put you to sleep! But if you wanted to know more about why I think that… … so years ago I heard about the premise to Kurt Busiek and Stuart Immonen’s Superman: Secret Identity and laffed because it did not sound good. A real(ish) world alternate take on the Man of Steel’s origins? Nuh to the uh. And I was so wrong because that book was incredible. So imagine my excitement when I heard Busiek was returning to write a similar treatment for Batman! And, to be fair, that first issue was very promising. I liked the slightly askewed setup, the mystery of who Batman was, the slow burn - but then read in conjunction with the other three 48 page issues? Man, it is a whole nuther experience - a much worse one in fact. Because here’s what the book reads like: Bruce Wayne does business, Batman fights crime, albeit as two separate entities rather than two sides of the same coin - or are they?! We find out who “Batman” really is, and that’s it. Almost all of it is reading about Bruce doing business through the years. SO DUCKING DULL. Busiek makes a few changes to the familiar origin: Bruce Wayne is now Bruce Wainwright who exists in a world where Batman is a comic book character, just like our world. His parents - not as rich as the Waynes, but wealthy - get killed during a robbery gone wrong and poor Bruce is scarred for life. His “uncle” Alton Frederick - geddit, Al-Fred? - grows his inheritance into a sizable fortune while Officer Gordon (not Commissioner) sorta looks for Bruce’s parents’ killer. There’s a “Robin” (some girl Bruce takes pity on) and then Batman - albeit a scarier version of him - appears in Bruce’s life. I kinda liked the fourth wall-breaking detail of Batman as a comic book character but there’s really nothing else to say about that setup beyond it not being terribly imaginative. Batman though? That reveal just plain confuddled me. (view spoiler)[Batman is distinctly other to Bruce for most of this story, even though Bruce can see through his eyes somehow, and also very real - others can definitely see him. But towards the end Busiek starts introducing an unconvincing mental health element to the setup - is Bruce just coconuts and “Batman” is a figment of his imagination? No - because others can obviously see him and his actions are keenly felt for decades. Then it’s revealed “Batman” is Bruce’s dead brother Thomas, who died as a baby. Ok - bizarre mystical element to this supposedly more “realistic” take on the character. I’m not even gonna question how this came about because it’s never properly answered. But I’m willing to go along with Thomas being Bruce’s guardian angel for no other reason than because they bonded in the womb or something. But then how does Thomas know to take the form of Batman when Bruce didn’t become a Batman fan until years later? And how does Thomas know what needs to be done to make Bruce successful at business - how does a dead baby ghost understand the complexities of adult relationships and professions?? And then at the end he develops elemental tornado powers because whatever… (hide spoiler)] Even if you skipped my thoughts on the weirdly dog-like Batman above, all you need to know is that Busiek’s take on Batman is a mess here. There’s an attempt at a surprise plot twist involving Gordon that’s too little too late and a banal observation of how fighting crime isn’t as easy as it appears in the comics - duh! That’s why I don’t think superhero stories should try to be too real because they’re so obviously fantasy - and that’s it. Good gravy, Creature of the Night is boring, boring, boring and not worth the effort. I wouldn’t bother.
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  • Khurram
    January 1, 1970
    A good else world Batman type story. Start off is the "real" world but take a bit of a supernatural turn. One of the quotes I would like to highlight is:"reading all those comics, I am sure took him to a height reading lever for his age".As a dyslexic person I can attest to this starting in comics in later life got my reading level up definitely. Bruce Wainwright is a huge Batman fan. However no Batman fan would wish his origin on anyone. When young Bruce faces his crisis, life moves on and he A good else world Batman type story. Start off is the "real" world but take a bit of a supernatural turn. One of the quotes I would like to highlight is:"reading all those comics, I am sure took him to a height reading lever for his age".As a dyslexic person I can attest to this starting in comics in later life got my reading level up definitely. Bruce Wainwright is a huge Batman fan. However no Batman fan would wish his origin on anyone. When young Bruce faces his crisis, life moves on and he must choose his own way to fight. Can a creature of the night fight for the light? Who and what is this worlds Dark Knight. A lot of familiar names, but different lives. Bruce must learn the really world does not have comic book endings.An enjoyable story the right amount of Batmsn lore and enough differences to be it's own story.
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  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    A spiritual sequel to Busiek Superman story, but this time Batman gets the spin of not actually Bruce but a real life bruce who focuses his life on...well Batman. The character here is a kid who lost his parents in a robbery. It's similar to the way Bruce in the comics lost his parents. Our main character grew up reading all about Batman and when his parents were killed wanted nothing more than for the "batman" to show up. But this is real life, and well, those things don't happen. However, this A spiritual sequel to Busiek Superman story, but this time Batman gets the spin of not actually Bruce but a real life bruce who focuses his life on...well Batman. The character here is a kid who lost his parents in a robbery. It's similar to the way Bruce in the comics lost his parents. Our main character grew up reading all about Batman and when his parents were killed wanted nothing more than for the "batman" to show up. But this is real life, and well, those things don't happen. However, this kid wouldn't sit down till it happened, and out pops a mysterious creature bat who attacks "bad" people. A little bit about the injustice of the world, mental health, loss, and compassion, this book hits a lot of big notes and mostly successeds on all of them. While I felt Secret Identity was probably better crafted and better paced, this holds alot of solid themes and dialogue. The art works well here, able to capture a old 60's and 70's feel. I also enjoyed the characters and was shocked by some of the twist presented. While not the perfect Batman book, mostly due to the pacing at points, it is still a very interesting one. Don't expect a typical Batman story. There is no rogue gallery. But if looking for a book to capture the overall tone and themes of Batman and what he is, this might do it for you. A 4 out of 5.
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  • Václav
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this is a hard one. Three issues, each with different feeling and viewpoint, but together one continuous story. It starts with a similar premise as Dark Night (but without the "based on the real story"). There is the orphaned kid and no Batman. All completely real. Busiek wants you to embrace the serious real-world setting. Only to start poking and cracking it with the next two issues. Comics like this usually goes from mysterious through leads to reality and explanation. Not this time. Well, this is a hard one. Three issues, each with different feeling and viewpoint, but together one continuous story. It starts with a similar premise as Dark Night (but without the "based on the real story"). There is the orphaned kid and no Batman. All completely real. Busiek wants you to embrace the serious real-world setting. Only to start poking and cracking it with the next two issues. Comics like this usually goes from mysterious through leads to reality and explanation. Not this time. Because Busiek decided to take it another way around. And well, it is weird. I can not explain more without serious spoilers. But at least I'll spill my feelings here. I didn't like it. I kinda hate it. It annoys me. But I also have the feeling that I read something interesting. Something engaging. Something different. Nothing about this comics is comforting. The story, characters, gloomy art - nothing. It's weird, unsettling and annoying. And in weirdly, this is the best thing on this comics.
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  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    The fourth issue of Creature of the Night has finally arrived after a year+ of delays and it was almost worth the wait. Kurt Busiek tries to capture the same magic that he created with Superman: Secret Identity and he mostly succeeds. The story of Bruce Wainwright hits all of the right Batman notes while also changing things up enough to remain interesting. A huge focus has been placed on Bruce's mental health and it really illustrates problems with Batman as a popular character. This is, The fourth issue of Creature of the Night has finally arrived after a year+ of delays and it was almost worth the wait. Kurt Busiek tries to capture the same magic that he created with Superman: Secret Identity and he mostly succeeds. The story of Bruce Wainwright hits all of the right Batman notes while also changing things up enough to remain interesting. A huge focus has been placed on Bruce's mental health and it really illustrates problems with Batman as a popular character. This is, perhaps, the most interesting part of Batman: Creature of the Night.Most of this comic's faults involve the formula Busiek uses. While the plot is completely different from Superman: Secret Identity, the way it has been crafted is not. Since Batman comics exist in this universe, Busiek creates analogous characters in his world which coincidentally have links to a real-world Batman. It works, but the skeleton shares so much of the same DNA with Busiek's legendary Superman story that the similarities between Creature of the Night and Secret Identity are difficult to overlook. The most glaring flaw in Creature of the Night is the lettering for all of Alfred's internal dialog; it's tiny fucking cursive and it's difficult to read. The letterer made a horrible decision with the lettering in that regard. Thankfully, the lettering for other characters and dialog is fine. Gripes aside, Creature of the Night is an interesting and beautiful comic that is worth a read for a different take on Batman. Kurt Busiek doesn't quite reach the same heights he did in Secret Identity, but he gets close. Batman traditionalists may not care for this interpretation of Batman, however, those with an open mind may find something to enjoy.
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  • SuperSillySerra
    January 1, 1970
    Im not completely sure if you can call this a Batman story...A young boys parents are murdered, leaving him with a man named Alfred, lots of money and a secret kept alive by his obsession for justice. No, not Bruce Wayne, Bruce Wainwright! So, the story is really about a boy who sees a lot of similarities between himself and the cape crusader. He wants to be like Batman and help save the world. He finds himself his own Batman cast and takes flight, leaving reality behind him. It had some good I’m not completely sure if you can call this a Batman story...A young boys parents are murdered, leaving him with a man named Alfred, lots of money and a secret kept alive by his obsession for justice. No, not Bruce Wayne, Bruce Wainwright! So, the story is really about a boy who sees a lot of similarities between himself and the cape crusader. He wants to be like Batman and help save the world. He finds himself his own “Batman” cast and takes flight, leaving reality behind him. It had some good twist and turns, some supernatural elements as well having a decent view on mental health. The art was amazing. Great colors. Lots of action! There were times something wild would happen and I had to remind myself it wasnt Bruce Wayne. Now, I’m not saying this isn’t a Batman book, but if you’re excepting any of the usual characters from Gotham, you’re out of luck. This is a boy who has lost, who is projecting a creature to right wrongs. As time goes on he bends his truths so the creature is justified to come back. It gets deep, I’m a little bummed this took so long to come out, but it was pretty good and I enjoyed the back of the last issue. It had each issue broken down and explained.
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  • Jamie Connolly
    January 1, 1970
    Well considering I don't remember any of books 1-3 I'm just gonna give it four stars and leave the reviewing alone. Not sure what the story is with waiting over a year to finish the last book but I imagine he didn't do it just to annoy his fans. He didn't right? 4 stars.
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  • AV
    January 1, 1970
    What if Bart and Hugo but Batman and meta? What if Bruce Wayne would just take some antidepressants, would he stop being Batman? We have a weird tulpa Batman drawn like a horse/chupacabras, which reminded me of the McKean design in Arkham Asylum. The whole time I was afraid he was going for a Tommy Westphall twist. This isn't the first attempt to psychoanalize Batman, or superheroes in general, and probably not the last. Superheroes are ripe fruit for cheap psychoanalysis since the fantasies in What if Bart and Hugo but Batman and meta? What if Bruce Wayne would just take some antidepressants, would he stop being Batman? We have a weird tulpa Batman drawn like a horse/chupacabras, which reminded me of the McKean design in Arkham Asylum. The whole time I was afraid he was going for a Tommy Westphall twist. This isn't the first attempt to psychoanalize Batman, or superheroes in general, and probably not the last. Superheroes are ripe fruit for cheap psychoanalysis since the fantasies in play are very transparent. Batman represents trauma and fetish, Superman is projection, Wonder Woman is sexual repression (from the male POV). I didn't feel like the writer was succesful in showing an original aspect of Batman's psychology that we haven't seen in other "serious" type stories. An interesting side to this, though, is the brief moment when Bruce kissed the Robin figure, playing up the whole gay subtext that's trailed Batman all this time, while keeping it no homo by making Robin a girl. I never truly got the overall point Busiek was trying to make, is this about comicbook readers refusing to grow up? About obsessive fans refusing the same? About unhealthy fixation? About immature fans? Couldn't tell. The real monsters are those inside ourselves, apparently. By the end it turns a bit farcical, like Thomas, a supernatural entity, literally handing Bruce his pills to treat him. Also when he kept asking him "safe?" it seemed like he was asking him "safe bruv?"Really enjoyed the art most of all, very realistic, full of details and convincing architecture, it drew me in and immersed me in its reality, and of a piece with the supernatural elements. Reminded me of Sean Phillips style. The color work gave it a consistent somber atmosphere. So 3 stars for a fresh take on Batman (to me as least) and great art, but ultimately disappointing and confused story. Take your pills, kids.
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  • Nate
    January 1, 1970
    Initially conceived 15 years ago after the success of Superman: Secret Identity (one of my favorite comics ever), this book is a long time coming. The four issues trickled out over the past two years, and it was more than worth the wait because Busiek and Leon put together a great story here. Like Secret Identity, it takes place in the real world where Batman exists as a fictional character. And the protagonist is a guy whose life contains more than a few parallels with his idol: his name is Initially conceived 15 years ago after the success of Superman: Secret Identity (one of my favorite comics ever), this book is a long time coming. The four issues trickled out over the past two years, and it was more than worth the wait because Busiek and Leon put together a great story here. Like Secret Identity, it takes place in the “real world” where Batman exists as a fictional character. And the protagonist is a guy whose life contains more than a few parallels with his idol: his name is Bruce Wainwright, he witnesses his parents’ murder at a young age, his great uncle Alfred looks after him, he corresponds with a cop named Gordon, and eventually heads a business corporation. Unlike Secret Identity, however, Creature of the Night is a psychological horror story that follows Bruce at different points in his life. I’m not sure if I was expecting another compassionate superhero life saga, but I shouldn’t have been surprised at the tonal shift given the title character. To that end, I was most curious how Batman would manifest here. Would this Bruce train himself physically and fight criminals in a bat costume? Well, not exactly. Without giving much away, there’s a supernatural element to the story that I did not expect. It didn’t click with me at first, but by the third issue, I was taken with the approach and found it highly effective. Especially in light of Busiek’s notes at the end of issue four, where he puts into words Batman’s character that never occurred to me before. I usually don’t suggest reading an author’s essay to help understand a book, but I think it’s a must in this case (hopefully it’ll be in collected editions).My only real negative is a storytelling choice. Throughout the story, Busiek switches between narrators. It makes for clunky reading at times, with some jumps in narration more abrupt than others. But his writing is strong enough that it’s hardly a bother. John Paul Leon’s art, too, smoothes over any structural problems. His beautiful noir style perfectly captures the crime, horror, and everyday life aspects of the story. I especially like his depiction of Batman, and several images towards the end are striking.Is Creature of the Night as good as Secret Identity? No. But then, few things are. In the end, this book is a fascinating examination of Batman that simply could not be done in main continuity. It’s worth reading for that reason alone.
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  • Michael Emond
    January 1, 1970
    This was a solid series by the master of deconstructing heroes - Busiek. The art is beyond gorgeous and reminded my of Lark from Gotham Central. The thing that held this back from greatness were two things - the length. I don't think every issue needed to be 50 pages. It started to over-extend itself. And the premise itself got muddy after a while. You can see from the notes at the back of the book what the theme of each book was (obsession...obsession taking over...obsession being overcome) but This was a solid series by the master of deconstructing heroes - Busiek. The art is beyond gorgeous and reminded my of Lark from Gotham Central. The thing that held this back from greatness were two things - the length. I don't think every issue needed to be 50 pages. It started to over-extend itself. And the premise itself got muddy after a while. You can see from the notes at the back of the book what the theme of each book was (obsession...obsession taking over...obsession being overcome) but we have a child (Bruce) whose parents were murdered and then a magic Batman manifests itself to help the boy. We never get a resolution as to what this thing is (although we think it might have to do with his brother) but even if you accept the fact this boy has this powerful magic it is odd how people just accept it. This is supposed to be a world like ours - without magic or super-heroes - but people are waaaay too accepting of seeing the creature and finding out Bruce has this power. Also, the obsession Bruce starts to get "how do I help the world!", Busiek is trying to say a 9 year old's version of a good world can never be achieved in the real world (true) but it is odd Bruce the man is so slow to see this. It is also odd how the story then becomes about Bruce needing to take medication to stop it. Is this a story about a boy's loss of his parents? About what is good? About taking medicine when you have a mental illness? About how this Batman came into being? How people should try to make the world a better place? In the end - I wasn't sure - so that's why I feel the premise became muddy. Also, the fact we have an unreliable narrator in Bruce also made things VERY confusing. It was still very creative and interesting but the excellence I saw in the first chapter got lost the further the story went on.
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  • patri
    January 1, 1970
    Batman, at heart, taps into something younger and simpler - its a childs rage at the world for being unfair, and that childs inarticulate desire to control the world, to make it fair by force of will.Someone on Twitter reminded me this comic existed and that's the only reason I finished it, but I'm glad I did. Overall I really like what Busiek has to say about the character, this mirror-like version of Batman, the whole deconstruction and examination of Bruces obsession (focusing a lot on his “Batman, at heart, taps into something younger and simpler - it’s a child’s rage at the world for being unfair, and that child’s inarticulate desire to control the world, to make it fair by force of will.”Someone on Twitter reminded me this comic existed and that's the only reason I finished it, but I'm glad I did. Overall I really like what Busiek has to say about the character, this mirror-like version of Batman, the whole deconstruction and examination of Bruce’s obsession (focusing a lot on his mental health) and the impact of comics and comic book characters. The horror/supernatural elements were also a nice touch, I like the idea of Batman being a protective spirit but the open ending leaves you a bit... dry. The end just fell a bit flat for me. Maybe it was the two years wait for the last issue.
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  • Rizzie
    January 1, 1970
    While I don't think this hits quite as hard as its predecessor (Superman: Secret Identity), it's certainly a worthy followup. Despite having a similar core concept, things play out very differently. It's nice to see mainstream publishers print works with this level of emotional complexity. There's a lot of ambiguity here, a lot of questioning right and wrong in a world that resists change. This is a character focused story at its core, and that is what makes it compelling, but it functions While I don't think this hits quite as hard as its predecessor (Superman: Secret Identity), it's certainly a worthy followup. Despite having a similar core concept, things play out very differently. It's nice to see mainstream publishers print works with this level of emotional complexity. There's a lot of ambiguity here, a lot of questioning right and wrong in a world that resists change. This is a character focused story at its core, and that is what makes it compelling, but it functions incredibly well at the macroscopic level too, capturing a feeling of helplessness in the modern world that I think we all feel from time to time. Using the Batman character to examine that complicated and self-destructive emotion feels like it was meant to be, and Busiek and Leon deliver. Worth the 15 year wait. So Busiek... Wonder Woman next...? Please...?
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  • Norman
    January 1, 1970
    Greatttt writing. Interesting concept for a mirrored real-life Batman. Or I guess a real-life ghost Batman. A good reprieve for the bore that is the current Batman. Reads a bit like a manga in a way. Maybe all the supernatural seriousness of if. All in all, the story revolves around Bruce Wainwrights hard-learned lessons and presented in sections of his life. One of my favorite Batman stories ever I think! Greatttt writing. Interesting concept for a mirrored real-life Batman. Or I guess a real-life ghost Batman. A good reprieve for the bore that is the current Batman. Reads a bit like a manga in a way. Maybe all the supernatural seriousness of if. All in all, the story revolves around Bruce Wainwright’s hard-learned lessons and presented in sections of his life. One of my favorite Batman stories ever I think!
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  • Scott Waldie
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing spin on the Batman mythos with some real emotional punch to it, John Paul Leons art is the perfect vehicle for one of the best stories Ive read from Kurt Busiek in years. I almost want it to go on, to evolve further than it can in just the four issues, but even as it stands its very memorable. An amazing spin on the Batman mythos with some real emotional punch to it, John Paul Leon’s art is the perfect vehicle for one of the best stories I’ve read from Kurt Busiek in years. I almost want it to go on, to evolve further than it can in just the four issues, but even as it stands it’s very memorable.
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  • Zaz
    January 1, 1970
    Having Busiek working on a kind of Batman retelling was interesting, especially as I liked very much when he did the same with Superman. This time, however, the story was probably too dark for my tastes. Mental illness was depicted in an interesting way, well suited with Batmans world, and the art worked nicely with this dark atmosphere. Having Busiek working on a kind of Batman retelling was interesting, especially as I liked very much when he did the same with Superman. This time, however, the story was probably too dark for my tastes. Mental illness was depicted in an interesting way, well suited with Batman’s world, and the art worked nicely with this dark atmosphere.
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  • Kieran Delaney
    January 1, 1970
    This was incredible - I genuinely don't think I've read a better Batman story, this is relentlessly bleak but always remains thoroughly inventive. It really moved me throughout and moved at a great pace. Excellent story telling.
  • Thomas Powell
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. A similar take that Superman: Secret Identity had on that character, but this one didnt quite hit me the same way, maybe because of the darker tone or somewhat jarring supernatural elements that were incorporated into it. Still a solid, enjoyable what if? 3.5 stars. A similar take that Superman: Secret Identity had on that character, but this one didn’t quite hit me the same way, maybe because of the darker tone or somewhat jarring supernatural elements that were incorporated into it. Still a solid, enjoyable “what if?”
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  • Davidbaines
    January 1, 1970
    my exposition in this book is the character is bat man ,and the conflict is that people dont want him fighting crime my exposition in this book is the character is bat man ,and the conflict is that people don´t want him fighting crime
  • Josh Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Really interesting "real world" take that I only wish ended up being even more grounded. But a cool change of pace nonetheless.
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