Dopesick
The only book to fully chart the devastating opioid crisis in America: An unforgettable portrait of the families and first responders on the front lines, from a New York Times bestselling author and journalist who has lived through it. In this masterful work, Beth Macy takes us into the epicenter of America's twenty-plus year struggle with opioid addiction. From distressed small communities in Central Appalachia to wealthy suburbs; from disparate cities to once-idyllic farm towns; it's a heartbreaking trajectory that illustrates how this national crisis has persisted for so long and become so firmly entrenched. Beginning with a single dealer who lands in a small Virginia town and sets about turning high school football stars into heroin overdose statistics, Macy endeavors to answer a grieving mother's question-why her only son died-and comes away with a harrowing story of greed and need. From the introduction of OxyContin in 1996, Macy parses how America embraced a medical culture where overtreatment with painkillers became the norm. In some of the same distressed communities featured in her bestselling book Factory Man, the unemployed use painkillers both to numb the pain of joblessness and pay their bills, while privileged teens trade pills in cul-de-sacs, and even high school standouts fall prey to prostitution, jail, and death.Through unsparing, yet deeply human portraits of the families and first responders struggling to ameliorate this epidemic, each facet of the crisis comes into focus. In these politically fragmented times, Beth Macy shows, astonishingly, that the only thing that unites Americans across geographic and class lines is opioid drug abuse. But in a country unable to provide basic healthcare for all, Macy still finds reason to hope-and signs of the spirit and tenacity necessary in those facing addiction to build a better future for themselves and their families."Everyone should read Beth Macy's story of the American opioid epidemic" -- Professor Anne C Case, Professor Emeritus at Princeton University and Sir Angus Deaton, winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics

Dopesick Details

TitleDopesick
Author
ReleaseAug 7th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316523172
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Politics, Health

Dopesick Review

  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    In 2012, author and investigative social journalist, Beth Macy began writing about the worst drug (heroin) epidemic in world history. “Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and The Drug Company That Addicted America” began in the hills and valleys of Appalachia, the mid-western rust belt, rural Maine before rapidly spreading throughout the U.S. In 2016, 64,000 Americans perished from drug related causes and overdoses-- outnumbering the total of those killed during the Viet Nam War. Macy explored the terri In 2012, author and investigative social journalist, Beth Macy began writing about the worst drug (heroin) epidemic in world history. “Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and The Drug Company That Addicted America” began in the hills and valleys of Appalachia, the mid-western rust belt, rural Maine before rapidly spreading throughout the U.S. In 2016, 64,000 Americans perished from drug related causes and overdoses-- outnumbering the total of those killed during the Viet Nam War. Macy explored the terrible destructive impact on society, those who have helped and harmed, and the brave individuals sharing their own stories of tragedy and loss, casting aside stigma and shame to alert and help others.In the late 1990’s, Appalachian country doctor (St. Charles, Virginia) Art Van Zee M.D. was among the first to sound the urgent alarm how OxyContin had infiltrated his community and region. Patients were admitted to hospital ER’s in record numbers from drug related causes. Rates of infectious disease including Hepatitis C, along with petty and violent crime had increased substantially, a police car was fire-bombed—addicts were desperate for cash to support their drug habit, an elderly patient had resorted to selling pills from his nursing home bed. Van Zee called public meetings to advocate and alert others of the opioid health crisis, and didn’t hesitate to file complaints against Purdue Pharma for aggressive marketing campaigns promoting OxyContin. By 2001, he and Sister Beth Davies were attending two funerals per day of the addicted dead.In 2007, with over $2.8 billion USD earned in drug profits, Purdue Pharmaceuticals was found guilty in federal and civil criminal courts for their role/responsibility for creating the opioid epidemic, for “misbranding OxyContin”: with aggressive marketing techniques that downplayed and minimized the potential for addiction. The $600 million USD fine was worth the risk for Purdue; the executives charged were forced to listen to victim impact statements, and were compared to Adolf Hitler and the mass destruction of humanity, yet these men served no jail time. Both Doctor Van Zee and Sister Davies were outraged that none of the fine was allocated for drug recovery and addiction programs. Instead, it was appropriated for Medicaid/Medicare reimbursement and for criminal justice and law enforcement. Macy documents the vast suffering, heartbreak of the families, friends, medical staff and first responders, the foster parents, clergy left behind to carry on after destruction and death had taken its toll. The closed down factories, lumber mills, furniture manufacturing warehouses and stores, coal mines-- jobs that had once sustained the middle class were grim reminders that for the average American-- life would never be the same again. Some desperate families impacted by “the disease of despair” had lost life savings attempting to pay for costly drug rehabilitation programs for loved ones, only to realize addiction was a lifelong process and the likelihood of relapse might be a day away. Providers of rehab facilities were not in agreement over MAT (medication assisted treatment) though medical experts contend that MAT is absolutely necessary to battle the intense cravings of addiction and increase the rates of successful treatment. Many of the stories were harsh and brutal. Too many politicians and policy makers believe addiction is a personal moral failing and criminal offense rather than a treatable disease that robs victims of their dignity and freedom of choice. Macy’s book easily compares to Sam Quiones outstanding award winning book “Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic” (2015). Macy is the author of the bestselling “Factory Man” (2014) and “Truevine” (2016). ** With thanks and appreciation to Little Brown and Company via NetGalley for the DRC for the purpose of review.
    more
  • Ang
    January 1, 1970
    This was ridiculously excellent. Macy is a fantastic writer, and she is so good at getting you to care about the people and issues in this book. I read Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic but didn't think it was particularly good, in terms of helping me understand WTF was going on with the opioid crisis. Macy's book is just SO. MUCH. BETTER. at that aspect of this, while including narrative and biography.(Abandon Hope All Ye Who Enter Here. This is not at all hopeful, and there This was ridiculously excellent. Macy is a fantastic writer, and she is so good at getting you to care about the people and issues in this book. I read Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic but didn't think it was particularly good, in terms of helping me understand WTF was going on with the opioid crisis. Macy's book is just SO. MUCH. BETTER. at that aspect of this, while including narrative and biography.(Abandon Hope All Ye Who Enter Here. This is not at all hopeful, and there's not much redemption to be found in its pages, sadly.)Thanks to the publisher for the ARC! (Picked up at PLA.)
    more
  • Geoffrey
    January 1, 1970
    (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley.)Beth Macy has crafted a work that expertly utilizes both a grander narrative and the personal tragic tales of numerous figures and families, all to great effect to show how the ongoing epidemic came to be. This is a work that will tear out your heart before filling you with a ferocious fury. Fury at the shameless drug companies who targeted economically depressed communities with their painkillers. Fury over the co (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley.)Beth Macy has crafted a work that expertly utilizes both a grander narrative and the personal tragic tales of numerous figures and families, all to great effect to show how the ongoing epidemic came to be. This is a work that will tear out your heart before filling you with a ferocious fury. Fury at the shameless drug companies who targeted economically depressed communities with their painkillers. Fury over the countless warnings from men and women about the new and growing crisis that went ignored until addiction crept from devastated rural areas and into the suburbs and cities. Fury over the absurdly patchworked American healthcare system that makes it so difficult for the addicted to get the care they need. Fury over a system that punishes the victims of the epidemic far more than the perpetrators ever could be. Fury over the countless parade of tragedies that affect the families covered in this work. "Dopesick" just will not stop filling you with rage alongside your new knowledge until you've reached the very last page. In other words, Macy has done her job incredibly well here. If you want to better understand the opioid epidemic that still burns on, this is THE book to read.
    more
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    If you want to know the backstory of America's opioid epidemic, look no further than Beth Macy's meticulously researched book. The personal vignettes bring a face to the stories we read about in the paper. I know many people will compare it to Hillbilly Elegy, which I learned a great deal from, but this book raised more questions for me. I think it would be a fantastic book club discussion. It points out a broken health care system that will continue to let people down if we don't make changes s If you want to know the backstory of America's opioid epidemic, look no further than Beth Macy's meticulously researched book. The personal vignettes bring a face to the stories we read about in the paper. I know many people will compare it to Hillbilly Elegy, which I learned a great deal from, but this book raised more questions for me. I think it would be a fantastic book club discussion. It points out a broken health care system that will continue to let people down if we don't make changes soon.I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley. Thank you for the opportunity to read it.
    more
  • lp
    January 1, 1970
    An emotional, powerful, important must-read. This book wasn't trying to do what HILLBILLY ELEGY was trying to do, but it did it, anyway. It did a great job getting close to answering those big questions. I got a huge understanding of the cycle of addiction and struggle in Appalachia. Beth Macy writes with her heart and her skill. Both are enormous.
    more
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    From Roanoke to Maine to Humbolt County, the opioid crisis has swept across the United States with pundits on every side calling for action. Macy cuts through the debate with well-documented research that advocates for a combination of Medication-Assisted Treatment and a twelve step program. Word by word she builds a most striking argument for change. Even in the face of a lack of federal action and the complaints of nimbys, the author provides real solutions and hope. Macy’s work and her writin From Roanoke to Maine to Humbolt County, the opioid crisis has swept across the United States with pundits on every side calling for action. Macy cuts through the debate with well-documented research that advocates for a combination of Medication-Assisted Treatment and a twelve step program. Word by word she builds a most striking argument for change. Even in the face of a lack of federal action and the complaints of nimbys, the author provides real solutions and hope. Macy’s work and her writing is indispensable; this book is a must-read for every politician and parent, and really every American. The Highest Recommendation.Full review can be found here: http://paulspicks.blog/2018/07/09/dop...All reviews can be found on my blog. https://paulspicks.blog
    more
  • Liz Bartek
    January 1, 1970
    Great work by Macy, as always; truly heartbreaking, we're not doing enough to address this epidemic.
  • Betsy Holcombe degolian
    January 1, 1970
    A fascinating look into the history and reality of the opioid epidemic. Macy did her research and compassionately tells the story of those touched and living in the throes of the epidemic.
  • Tfalcone
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Net Galley for the free ARC.I had barely started reading and I was immediatly getting fired up. First of all - the greed of drug companies, salespeople and doctors.Whatever happened to "First do no harm"? I never realized the amount of money that was at stake here. I also did not realize that doctors caved in so easily to drug reps. But then, really in the end the decision to take the drugs lies within each individual. On some level you have got to know that you should not need any opi Thank you Net Galley for the free ARC.I had barely started reading and I was immediatly getting fired up. First of all - the greed of drug companies, salespeople and doctors.Whatever happened to "First do no harm"? I never realized the amount of money that was at stake here. I also did not realize that doctors caved in so easily to drug reps. But then, really in the end the decision to take the drugs lies within each individual. On some level you have got to know that you should not need any opioids four weeks after having your gallbladder out because your scar hurts. You can never justify leaving your baby starving and dehydrated while you are overdosing on heroin. That is a choice and there are no excuses. (I know I am sanctimoniously judging a life I do not understand.) After reading this book, I highly recommend some reading up on the Opium Wars. All of China's economy and much of Britain's was based on opium and it was abundantly grown. At one time, the estimate was that 9 out of 10 Chinese were addicted and they have been dealing with opium addiction for centuries ( Although Mao pretty much eradicated it by hanging all the drug dealers). Other countries that are up there in current addiction rates:Afghanistan (main producer) and Iran (neighbor). Maybe it has something to do with availability??? And speaking of availability, 70 some percent of the heroin comes over the southern border. This complicates things even more. I wonder if anybody has a real solution to stopping the flow of drugs and the reign of drug cartels? Great book, makes you angry, makes you think.
    more
  • Lissa
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. It's not often that you read a book that just feels so important and relevant to current society.  This follows the Opioid epidemic from the time that OxyContin was being aggressively hyped to doctors treating overworked mineworkers in Appalachia to the current time as Heroin is being used across class lines.  This is a frightening book and anger-inducing book but I think it is so important for as many people as possible to understand how this happens.  My only quibble is with the str 4.5 stars. It's not often that you read a book that just feels so important and relevant to current society.  This follows the Opioid epidemic from the time that OxyContin was being aggressively hyped to doctors treating overworked mineworkers in Appalachia to the current time as Heroin is being used across class lines.  This is a frightening book and anger-inducing book but I think it is so important for as many people as possible to understand how this happens.  My only quibble is with the structure, which jumps around quite a bit, introducing her interviewees over and over again, but that in no way detracts from the necessity of this book.  I received a digital ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 
    more
  • Jaime
    January 1, 1970
    I could only read this book in short spurts - it’s densely packed with a ton of reportage and research, but Macy brings it to life with compassion and insight. Even if you think you know about the opioid epidemic, this book will tell you more. It should be required reading for everyone.
    more
  • Betsy Kipnis
    January 1, 1970
    I had to go slowly with this book because I wanted to process and organize the data buffering the narrative. Macy does a nice job of showing the geographic trajectory of the Opiod epidemic. She highlights the region, early dealers, underlings and fighters of what would become the rebirth of the next Hepatitis C and AIDS epidemic. She showed how Purdue pharmaceutical corporation made it easy for people to gain access in a medical and governmental environment that viewed pain (chronic or manufactu I had to go slowly with this book because I wanted to process and organize the data buffering the narrative. Macy does a nice job of showing the geographic trajectory of the Opiod epidemic. She highlights the region, early dealers, underlings and fighters of what would become the rebirth of the next Hepatitis C and AIDS epidemic. She showed how Purdue pharmaceutical corporation made it easy for people to gain access in a medical and governmental environment that viewed pain (chronic or manufactured) as the fifth vital sign in deserve of treatment. Macy showed some of the benefits proffered by pharmaceutical sales people and how they got in bed with doctors and dealers if there is such a difference. She also quietly mentions how external cartels jumped on I81 and sold their wares adding fentanyl and other lethal substances to the illegal medicine cabinet. The book’s title is sparkling clear and demonstrates to readers that addiction is a disease with relapse built into it. She shows reader that after the first high it becomes necessary to stay on the drug because the sickness that comes afterward and without it is worse than the life associated with addiction. Macy takes her readers into treatment solution in the local and not federal level. She shows readers how the federal government response unloaded billions of dollars on incarceration when treatment was less costly on every level. Macy quietly points to the FDA and how they and various members of Congress and other federal institutions ignored the danger of OxyContin and received loot, swag and other forms of bribery keeping it in the marketplace for three presidential administrations hardening back to Bush junior up until today when no real discussion is being made as to how to slow the epidemic that continues to spread. There are a couple of case studies that show readers how an addict begins and where they end up in terms of usage and circumstance. By no means is any of it hopeful but the heart breaking story is spread out enough to demonstrate the complexities in finding suitable care, the faith that love can broker and how politics and business continue to pass plates ignoring the displaced peoples in an economy that has abandoned them. Macy shows how the community rolls up their sleeves and ignores our federal elected leaders and passionately fight to recover and heal those who simply made wrong choices for whatever reason. Missing for this reader are specific names of more players who wheeled and dealt from and not just he Purdue executives who took a soft fall. I wanted names of doctors and sales reps, FDA leaders, politicians and doctors, etc. Further some visuals would help readers map the geography and small towns affected. It’s time to lay blame and issue consequences and Macy’s work shows readers how to collect information and organize it just needs to address a wider range of learning modality to capture and sustain the attention of all readers.
    more
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure: I received this book as the winner of the Goodreads Giveaway! Everyone needs to r ead this book! Drug overdose is the leading cause of death for Americans under age 50! Everyone is either an addict or knows someone who is. Beth Macy,s "Dopesick" is a well research account of the epidemic's roots in the Appalachia coalfields through the suburbs to finally leaving no one untouched by its sting. She documents the part that Purdue Pharma played advertising that Oxycontin was impossi Full disclosure: I received this book as the winner of the Goodreads Giveaway! Everyone needs to r ead this book! Drug overdose is the leading cause of death for Americans under age 50! Everyone is either an addict or knows someone who is. Beth Macy,s "Dopesick" is a well research account of the epidemic's roots in the Appalachia coalfields through the suburbs to finally leaving no one untouched by its sting. She documents the part that Purdue Pharma played advertising that Oxycontin was impossible to "get hooked on" and then ignored the signs when they were proved wrong. I appreciated how Beth sprinkles her hard statistics with the human side of the story. The points out the difficulty of criminalizing this problem. Most of the time, the dealers are just addicts trying to avoid getting "dopesick!" Our policies have to change if we have any hope of finding a solution. Reading this book will be a great first step to helping everyone see the big picture!
    more
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Calling Beth Macy a "great" writer is akin to saying that His Holiness the Dalai Lama is a "nice guy." This amazingly well-written book tackles the opioid crisis from all perspectives.
  • R.K. Cowles
    January 1, 1970
    3 1/2 stars. A Goodreads giveaway. There has been plenty of books on these subjects. This one focus on certain incidents with much info from them. I liked this book but not as much as most of the other readers that has reviewed it.
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    A very important book. Well reached and written, Macy has brought the story of our Opioid Crisis to the forefront and there are a lot of things to blame and very few ways to fix it.
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways. Though exceptionally well-researched and very well written, this book is so hard to read. Watching the progression of how greed and inaction and corporate greed all combined to make and spread the opioid crisis is heartbreaking and astonishing. The stories of those affected, whether by their own addiction or by the recovery process or loss to overdose of a loved one, are reported truthfully but with much empathy. Highly recommended re I received a free copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways. Though exceptionally well-researched and very well written, this book is so hard to read. Watching the progression of how greed and inaction and corporate greed all combined to make and spread the opioid crisis is heartbreaking and astonishing. The stories of those affected, whether by their own addiction or by the recovery process or loss to overdose of a loved one, are reported truthfully but with much empathy. Highly recommended read for everyone, regardless of whether the epidemic has affected you—and it likely has, even if you’re unaware of it.
    more
  • Scott Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Was honored to read a review copy. A haunting, timely narrative of how economic circumstances and pharma company greed conspired to poison large swaths of urban and rural America alike. Even if you think you know a lot about the opioid epidemic, this book will enhance your understanding of the toll this crisis has taken on families and communities. Beth Macy's prose always flows so well that you think you could be reading a classic novel, but every word of this is true and hard hitting. The stor Was honored to read a review copy. A haunting, timely narrative of how economic circumstances and pharma company greed conspired to poison large swaths of urban and rural America alike. Even if you think you know a lot about the opioid epidemic, this book will enhance your understanding of the toll this crisis has taken on families and communities. Beth Macy's prose always flows so well that you think you could be reading a classic novel, but every word of this is true and hard hitting. The story of Tess will linger with readers for a long, long time...as it should.
    more
  • margaret newkirk
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand where the opioid disaster came from and how it got to where it is now. It shows how the public -- and the Virgnia and West Virginia public in particular -- were left to deal with the epidemic by themselves, as drug companies fought off accountabiliy for years. It shows how the public is still largely on its own as entrenched treatment models and interests compete with what actually might work. It's compellingly written, which makes up for th This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand where the opioid disaster came from and how it got to where it is now. It shows how the public -- and the Virgnia and West Virginia public in particular -- were left to deal with the epidemic by themselves, as drug companies fought off accountabiliy for years. It shows how the public is still largely on its own as entrenched treatment models and interests compete with what actually might work. It's compellingly written, which makes up for the bleakness of its subject. It makes you mad and sad, but has a cast of heros, too. I read it at the beach and couldn't put it down. I've seen it compared to Hillbilly Elegy. It's better than that. It reminded me of Evicted, in taking a public policy issue and giving it a voice, a setting and a face. I highly recommend it - as you might have guessed.
    more
  • MBP
    January 1, 1970
    (4.5) A great book, but not surprisingly, a heartbreaker. Looks at the opioid epidemic from many angles: the culpability of Big Pharma; the socioeconomic conditions that made opiates attractive; the dogged work of doctors, counselors, law enforcement and parents to fight back; and the stories of the users. Well written & researched. Only drawback is that it's sometimes confusing to keep track of the many strands as they're dropped and interwoven. I would have liked a timeline and a list of c (4.5) A great book, but not surprisingly, a heartbreaker. Looks at the opioid epidemic from many angles: the culpability of Big Pharma; the socioeconomic conditions that made opiates attractive; the dogged work of doctors, counselors, law enforcement and parents to fight back; and the stories of the users. Well written & researched. Only drawback is that it's sometimes confusing to keep track of the many strands as they're dropped and interwoven. I would have liked a timeline and a list of characters. Even so, highly recommended.
    more
  • Lauren Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    *Received as a Goodreads Giveaway* Dopesick is a must read as it details the causes of the opiod epidemic, the current national emergency, and the best hopes for recovery. It focuses on Appalachia, and Western Virginia specifically. Macy spoke with doctors, pharmacists, addicts, family members, law enforcement personnel, and rescue workers over many years. Macy makes the opiod crisis heartbreakingly real and urgent.
    more
  • Dree
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and Little, Brown, and Company for providing me with this galley in exchange for an honest review.—————This book is both fascinating and infuriating. Macy looks at the history of opium and its various iterations over the last 200+ years. She then traces the origins of Oxycodone, the drug that began the current opioid epidemic ravaging our country. She examines Purdue Pharma's marketing of the drug: claiming it was not addictive, claiming it was needed because too many people Thanks to NetGalley and Little, Brown, and Company for providing me with this galley in exchange for an honest review.—————This book is both fascinating and infuriating. Macy looks at the history of opium and its various iterations over the last 200+ years. She then traces the origins of Oxycodone, the drug that began the current opioid epidemic ravaging our country. She examines Purdue Pharma's marketing of the drug: claiming it was not addictive, claiming it was needed because too many people were suffering from pain, having sales reps push the drug to doctors who then prescribed it to anyone. Its use in the "left behind " (her words) towns of Appalachia and Maine, as jobs dried up and people went on disability and were given Oxycodone for "pain". She continues down this timeline--how doctors created addicts, and then cut them off. In their desperation to avoid dopesickness (diarrhea, the shakes, pain--it's physical and very real and very miserable), they went underground. To stealing pills, stealing and selling anything, buying pills on the black market, and finally heroin. And the overprescribing spread across the country, as doctors and law enforcement and judicial systems and govt offices refused to listen to sufferers and their survivors. They still believed the drug company. And while the drug company did finally lose a case in court, the epidemic has continued. Who in this country cannot name someone who has died of an opioid overdose? (Usually because of fentanyl, now being imported from China per Macy.) Macy follows the trajectories of addicts, dealers, parents, recovery workers, doctors, and more in the Roanoke area as she looks at where this epidemic is might be going and what might be done to slow or stop it.Apparently the final print version of this book has pictures--these were not in my Galley. I would love to see them.I did have some issues with this book and had a few questions that were not addressed.• Macy has a chip on her shoulder regarding poor people in Appalachia. She thinks this epidemic happened because the government does not care about poor white people. I would argue that the government cares more about corporations (Purdue Pharma) than ANY citizens. It was not until heroin became big (it's cheap) and the production and selling was therefor completely illegal that the government did anything--punishing regular people. Punishing users and small-time dealers and occasionally slightly bigger dealers. But still not punishing the corporation that started it all with their lies and marketing--they are still legally selling the legal version.• How did people in these small towns get on disability so easily? Where I am at it is incredibly difficult and takes years--and they are constantly reviewing to kick people off. How did these people get on and just get handed so many drugs? Were the doctors trying to scam the government? I would have liked more info on this.• In chapter 12 she suggests sending released felons to "friendlier" places with more services, like Seattle, where low-level drug and prostitution offenders are diverted from prosecution. I have SO MUCH I could say about this (none of it nice), but first she complains about "left-behind towns" (again, her words) where people survive on disability and various charities (churches, the health wagon, etc) because there is no work (yet those still there choose to stay and be "left behind"), and now she thinks released felons should be shipped to out-of-state cities to take advantage of the programs in other jurisdictions, that other people in other states pay taxes for? Just wow. Maybe Virginia should start such programs if they are so successful. She does not actually go into why felons should be shipped out of state rather than have such programs started in-state. Perhaps other people should be the ones to pay for them?
    more
  • Elizabeth Jamison
    January 1, 1970
    You can count on any book by Beth Macy to be a master class in excellent research and reporting, while never losing sight of the most important element of any story - the people at its center. In this regard, Macy's Dopesick continues her streak of excellence while tackling the brutal topic of opioid addition and the insidious way that it is has invaded our nation's communities by using three Virginia communities as the book's heartbeat. The perspectives Macy brings to the discussion are the way You can count on any book by Beth Macy to be a master class in excellent research and reporting, while never losing sight of the most important element of any story - the people at its center. In this regard, Macy's Dopesick continues her streak of excellence while tackling the brutal topic of opioid addition and the insidious way that it is has invaded our nation's communities by using three Virginia communities as the book's heartbeat. The perspectives Macy brings to the discussion are the ways in which structures of power have fed and encouraged this epidemic in ways that have been largely invisible to the American public - until now. Macy educates her readers on the interdependent roles that Big Pharma, medicine, traditional addiction treatment approaches, illicit drug trade and the fear of community social stigma play to weave a web from which few of its victims escape, but many could have been prevented. Beth Macy breaks your heart by showing us that all of these factors have been right in front of us the whole time. Dopesick may be Macy's most timely and gripping work yet. It is so incredibly devastating that I found myself wondering how she found the strength to stay in this world long enough to write it. This book was so impactful in so many ways, it is difficult to put into words. If you live in a community you care about, you must read this book. Dopesick will change how you see the community that's been right in front of you - and the difference is literally life and death.
    more
  • An
    January 1, 1970
    According to the NIH, over 115 people in the United States die from opioid overdoses every day. That is a staggering number, especially when one considers how suddenly it started. Beth Macy traces the beginning of the opioid epidemic to the release of OxyContin by Purdue Pharma in the mid-1990s. Hailed as a medical breakthrough, OxyContin was designed to heal and relieve moderate to severe pain. However, it is also highly addictive and can serve as a gateway drug to harder substances like heroin According to the NIH, over 115 people in the United States die from opioid overdoses every day. That is a staggering number, especially when one considers how suddenly it started. Beth Macy traces the beginning of the opioid epidemic to the release of OxyContin by Purdue Pharma in the mid-1990s. Hailed as a medical breakthrough, OxyContin was designed to heal and relieve moderate to severe pain. However, it is also highly addictive and can serve as a gateway drug to harder substances like heroin. Within the past two decades, opioid-related deaths have increased by more than 500%. Dopesick is a sobering look at the medical, legal, and social factors that enabled so many people to become addicted. Macy's book is meticulously researched and filled with startling statistics: "[Drug overdose] is now the leading cause of death for Americans under the age of fifty, killing more people than guns or car accidents, at a rate higher than the HIV epidemic at its peak."Disclaimer: I received a free copy of Dopesick by Beth Macy from Goodreads' Giveaways. Dopesick will be available in bookstores on August 7, 2018.
    more
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Impeccable research provides insight to the opioid epidemic. Excellent.
  • Paul Greenberg
    January 1, 1970
    Engrossing, readable, heart wrenching account of the opioid crisis in America. Highly recommended.
Write a review