The Dreaming Stars (Axiom, #2)
Ancient aliens, the Axiom, will kill us all – when they wake up. In deep space, a swarm of nanoparticles threatens the colonies, transforming everything it meets into computronium – including the colonists. The crew of the White Raven investigate, and discover an Axiom facility filled with aliens hibernating while their minds roam a vast virtual reality. The treacherous Sebastien wakes up, claiming his altered brain architecture can help the crew deactivate the swarm – from inside the Axiom simulation. To protect humanity, beleaguered Captain Callie Machedo must trust him, but if Sebastien still plans to dominate the universe using Axiom tech, they could be in a whole lot of trouble.

The Dreaming Stars (Axiom, #2) Details

TitleThe Dreaming Stars (Axiom, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 4th, 2018
PublisherAngry Robot
ISBN-139780857667670
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Fantasy

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The Dreaming Stars (Axiom, #2) Review

  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    [Spoiler Alert: If you haven’t read the first book in the series - The Wrong Stars - I give away some key plot points here]Tim Pratt’s The Wrong Stars was something of a masterclass in how an author should stitch their worldbuilding into a novel’s plot and character growth. Having a character – in this case 500-year-old cryo-sleeper Elena Oh – who needs everything explained to them is not a new trick; the fun of the rest of the novel revolves around the explainers learning that everything they t [Spoiler Alert: If you haven’t read the first book in the series - The Wrong Stars - I give away some key plot points here]Tim Pratt’s The Wrong Stars was something of a masterclass in how an author should stitch their worldbuilding into a novel’s plot and character growth. Having a character – in this case 500-year-old cryo-sleeper Elena Oh – who needs everything explained to them is not a new trick; the fun of the rest of the novel revolves around the explainers learning that everything they thought they knew about their world was actually wrong.At the beginning of The Wrong Stars, Elena is rescued from her derelict ship by the crew of the salvage ship White Raven and its captain Callie Machedo. Elena spins a tale of barely escaping an encounter with terrifying alien beings who abducted her crew and altered her ship, a seed vessel sent out five centuries ago to find habitable worlds before faster than light travel was discovered. Callie informs her that humans have made contact with alien beings (who they call the Liars, because they literally lie about everything) who are anything but terrifying, and as far as they know, humans and Liars are the only intelligent species in the universe. A whole lot happens between that and the end of the novel (and if you haven’t read it yet, do so, then come back here), so if we skip to the new status quo established at the end of The Wrong Stars, the crew of the White Raven learns that there is a race of megalomaniacal superbeings called the Axiom who are sleeping while some unknown grand scheme is coming to fruition, and the Liars (most of them unknowingly) serve the Axiom by keeping humans away from the Axiom’s areas of space. The White Raven acquires some very advanced Axiom tech and hijacks a pirate base on an asteroid (the pirates totally had it coming) and use it as a base of operations to learn about and thwart the Axiom’s plans.There was no reason to expect The Dreaming Stars to duplicate the fiendish pace and table-turning plotting of its predecessor; narrative high-jumping can get tiresome as a baseline, and there are only so many times you can alter your readers’ understanding of the world you’re constructing without giving them plot-twist fatigue. The Wrong Stars ended right where it needed to, with our heroes and their companions reaching a firm understanding of the new rules of the game and their role in playing it. Not that there aren’t a few fun twists and surprises abound in The Dreaming Stars – they’re just more the plot-shaking rather than reality-shaking variety.The Dreaming Stars picks up soon after the end of the first book, with the crew settling into their new home, dealing with the fallout from running afoul of the powerful Liar shadow government that serves the Axiom. Elena and Callie are firmly a couple now and are feeling out the terms of their relationship. Their Liar ally, Lantern, confirms that their involvement in the incident that put them at odds with the Elders, the Liars’ Axiom-serving secret sect, has been purged from all records and the individual Liars who know of their participation are all dead. Free to emerge from the shadows, Callie crashes her own funeral, and learns from her corporate honcho ex-husband that some of their ships operating near a new deep space colony have gone missing in a region of space Lantern flagged for possible Axiom activity. The prospect of getting paid to investigate the disappearances, while secretly looking into the Axiom, proves too enticing to pass up, so to the Taliesen system the White Raven goes. What they find there is definitely Axiom, and an immediate threat to the nearby planetary system.If The Wrong Stars served as the equivalent of a “pilot episode”, The Dreaming Stars is the episode that primes the reader’s expectations for how the series will develop from book to book, and in that sense Pratt develops a comfortable pace and tone for the reader. It takes a little longer than expected for the plot’s inciting incident to establish a clear goal for our heroes, a forgivable offense one can chalk up to the new story formulations falling into place. Besides, we already like these characters and the world they inhabit; spending a little extra time with them living their lives is a welcome detour before the action and intensity takes over. The second half of the novel employs one of my favorite narrative devices: the “countdown clock”, in which the heroes face a time crunch on their way to annihilation, and limited resources to deploy. I don’t think the author quite exploits all the potential the countdown structure has to offer, but it does (self-consciously) serve up an enjoyable riff on Iain Banks’ classic The Player of Games.There are plenty of other bonuses to be had in this first sequel. Pratt delves into some of the cultural angles that were only hinted at – a jaunt to jupiter’s moons shows us how human’s live when they’re not zipping around the galaxy in spaceships, and ship doctor Stephen’s hallucinogenic drug-centered religion The Church of the Ecstatic Divine is explored in greater detail. So too do the Axiom’s designs begin to unpeel, but not so much that we aren’t thirsting for the next installment. The Dreaming Stars may lack the manic buzz that defined its predecessor, but its steadiness inspires confidence that this series is built to last.
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  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    This book was not to my taste. I found it rather generic and bland. I did not finish and will not be reading more of this series. I will not be doing a full review on my blog.
  • Sarah (CoolCurryBooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Tim Pratt’s The Wrong Stars was exactly the sort of book I was looking for — a fun space opera with some truly great aliens and queer protagonists. The Dreaming Stars is everything I could ask for from a sequel. However, if you haven’t read The Wrong Stars I suggest you go pick up a copy before diving into The Dreaming Stars. Also, this review will contain spoilers for the first book in the series.Humanity has no idea the danger it is in. An ancient alien race, the Axiom, ruled the entire univer Tim Pratt’s The Wrong Stars was exactly the sort of book I was looking for — a fun space opera with some truly great aliens and queer protagonists. The Dreaming Stars is everything I could ask for from a sequel. However, if you haven’t read The Wrong Stars I suggest you go pick up a copy before diving into The Dreaming Stars. Also, this review will contain spoilers for the first book in the series.Humanity has no idea the danger it is in. An ancient alien race, the Axiom, ruled the entire universe. At the moment, they are sleeping, but if they are alerted to humanity’s existence, they will be sure to destroy us.The crew of the White Raven are the only humans that know the truth, and they believe that this is a chance to destroy the Axiom once and for all. Only, that’s easier said than done, giving that the Axiom are into casually destroying planets. Even while they sleep, they have some hellish defense mechanisms. Case in point, ships start to go missing out by a secret Axiom base, and the Liar sect in the area has gone totally silent. The crew of the White Raven is off to investigate, and what they find poses an imminent danger to all of humanity.The Dreaming Stars has lots of hints towards things that I think will be important later. Take Stephan’s church — how is it that they the visions they experience during their rituals are shared to such a degree? It’s not like they’re plugging their minds together… so are they really tapping into some underlying force? And what about the flashes of something Callie sees in the warp jumps? The existence of the Axiom may have been revealed, but I’m sure this series has more surprises in store for us.On a similar topic, I find the plotting deliciously twisty and always fun. In particular, the latter half of the novel contains a development that made me so happy! It was such a cool idea and executed so well. I’m definitely not forgetting The Dreaming Stars any time soon. The beginning of the novel might have been a bit slower, but wow does it pick up speed as it goes along. At about the halfway mark you start getting into mortal peril… and I got so excited that I literally started laughing? I guess I have odd reactions to characters I love being in danger, but this is a series I trust to carry me through it and not give me heartbreak.At the end of last book, Elena’s murderous ex Sebastian was put into a medically induced coma, after he tried to take over the entire galaxy. Elena has no intention of ever getting back together with him (besides, she’s with Callie now), but she hasn’t given up hope that whatever the Axiom machines did to his brain can be fixed and Sebastian can be restored to his old self. But how will they tell when Sebastian is “cured”? And how much of his behavior was due to the Axiom’s interference and how much of it was Sebastian himself? Like all the crew of the White Raven, you the reader have no idea whether or not you can trust him, and it sure keeps you on your toes.In my review of the last book, I mentioned that the romance between Elena and Callie did seem to happen very quickly. But for me, that wasn’t as much of an issue here, probably because they’re an established couple at the beginning of the novel. Also, there’s no forced, B.S. romance drama!The main reason I love this series is that it’s just so fun. It’s reliably fun. Sometimes, you need a book that you can trust to be truly and utterly fun, and that’s The Dreaming Stars. The Dreaming Stars proves that this series will always leave me with a smile.I received an ARC in exchange for a free and honest review.Review from The Illustrated Page.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Not a bad follow up to the first book in the series, however, I found that when at its core not a whole lot happens that expands of what the Axiom are and what they are doing. Granted we get a glimpse, but not nearly what I was expecting after having this monster race of space dominators introduced previously. In fact, nothing really happens for the first half of the book that could not have been rewritten. Much are the bulk of the novel is superfluous romantic fluff. It seems that the relations Not a bad follow up to the first book in the series, however, I found that when at its core not a whole lot happens that expands of what the Axiom are and what they are doing. Granted we get a glimpse, but not nearly what I was expecting after having this monster race of space dominators introduced previously. In fact, nothing really happens for the first half of the book that could not have been rewritten. Much are the bulk of the novel is superfluous romantic fluff. It seems that the relationship between Calie and Elena takes precedence over the grander story at hand rather than be developed alongside. The last nagging issue is how neatly everything gets wrapped up along the way... dont want to spoil anymore
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  • Adri Joy
    January 1, 1970
    A less intense book than its predecessor, but one that leaves me very excited for where the series is going. The Wrong Stars was an unexpected hit with me, taking a ton of entertaining space opera ingredients reminiscent of everything from The Expanse to Douglas Adams and blending them into something unique and entertaining. The humans of Pratt's world had made their way into the solar system when a jellyfish-like race made contact, telling grand stories of the wider galaxy and promising extraor A less intense book than its predecessor, but one that leaves me very excited for where the series is going. The Wrong Stars was an unexpected hit with me, taking a ton of entertaining space opera ingredients reminiscent of everything from The Expanse to Douglas Adams and blending them into something unique and entertaining. The humans of Pratt's world had made their way into the solar system when a jellyfish-like race made contact, telling grand stories of the wider galaxy and promising extraordinary technology in return for a base on Venus. The technology (and the base on Venus) materialised; the truth behind the grand stories did not, and after several encounters with different delegations, humanity branded its new sentient friends the Liars and fell into a good-natured but sceptical relationship with them. Now plugged in to a network of gates giving them access to nearly thirty different star systems, humanity happily develops in its new, larger sandbox. However, events involving Kalea "Callie" Machado and the crew of the White Raven, alongside five-hundred-year-old Elena Oh, sole surviving member of an ancient sub-light terraforming mission, and a surprisingly honest Liar named Lantern, have exposed this freedom for the lie it is. Now the crew of the White Raven are party to an ancient secret involving a dormant, all-powerful race of sadists who could wipe out humanity in a moment once we come to their notice - and, humanity being the curious-to-a-fault won't-take-no-for-an-answer race of stroppy teenagers we are, that's not so much a case of "if", but "when".There's probably enough background in The Dreaming Stars to make it accessible to anyone who hasn't already read the first book. We are re-introduced to the Liars and the now-expanded White Raven gang, who have spent the months since the end of The Wrong Stars getting progressively more bored in close confinement with each other. The book fills us in very effectively on the rest of the backstory too - the now not-so-mysterious (but still quite mysterious) Axiom, the fate of Meditreme Station, the relationships among the main characters and their respective histories with sociopathy-inducing brain spiders, and the other events that have led to our multi-temporal heroes hanging out on their cool but limited zero-g asteroid base. Despite its generously informative start, I hesitate to recommend jumping in here even if you're normally content to start mid-series, because what follows is an enormous amount of processing and follow-up to previous events. There's relationship conversations! And time refugee conversations! And post-traumatic event grief conversations! And some more relationship conversations! And some Fun with Simulators and Gravity! And then some more relationship conversations, and suddenly I'm wondering how we are so far through the book without any clear plan beyond "let's go see Callie's serially unfaithful ex husband". There's a method to all of this, and I'm not saying there aren't some charming moments: Callie and Elena's relationship is gorgeously well-negotiated and straightforward, and any scene with Ashok, the chief engineer, is an instant favourite of mine...Full review here: http://www.nerds-feather.com/2018/09/...
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  • Amazonaute
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyable series. It’s best to start with book 1. I’m going to be looking into his earlier work. I hope it is as good.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I received an Advance Reading Copy of this book through NetGalley for an honest review.I bought the first part of the Axiom series, The Wrong Stars, on a whim in a sale. When I saw the second part, The Dreaming Stars, up for review on NetGalley I couldn’t help myself, and requested it. Luckily I got it, because I really like this series, and can’t wait for part three (tentatively titled The Forbidden Stars).After the adventures of Callie and her crew in The Wrong Stars, they are on the hun Note: I received an Advance Reading Copy of this book through NetGalley for an honest review.I bought the first part of the Axiom series, The Wrong Stars, on a whim in a sale. When I saw the second part, The Dreaming Stars, up for review on NetGalley I couldn’t help myself, and requested it. Luckily I got it, because I really like this series, and can’t wait for part three (tentatively titled The Forbidden Stars).After the adventures of Callie and her crew in The Wrong Stars, they are on the hunt for any Axiom projects, artefact or locations. When news reaches them of crews going missing, and a whole Liar/Free station has gone silent, they must decide if they will go on and investigate. This is of course never a real question, so they all go on to the Taliesen system to check out what is going on. Quickly they stumble upon artefacts that might be Liar, but probably are Axiom. The Axiom artefact they find this time is a lot harder to beat.This second book in the Axiom series continues the great characterization and diversity started in the first book. We learn more about the characters from the Anjou, we meet new characters and learn more about the cultures, planets, galaxies and developments in the universe that Pratt has imagined for us. The adventure in the Taliesen galaxy with the Axiom is even bigger than what happened when the White Raven crew first discovered the Axiom, and to my joy we learn a lot more about this strange and dangerous alien race. We also learn more about the Liars, and indeed about the human developments of the last 500 years. Elena is a wonderful guide for us and I love that Pratt uses this mechanism to introduce all kinds of concepts to us. What can I say, if you liked The Wrong Stars, you’ll like The Dreaming Stars, I know I did. Four out of five stars.
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  • Kam
    January 1, 1970
    This review is based on an ARC given to me for free by the publisher, Angry Robot Books. This does not in any way affect my review.This book is slated for release on September 4, 2018.... The Wrong Stars dealt with a rather weighty set of themes involving history and identity via the alien race called the Liars. The Dreaming Stars, however, is not as weighty, since it focuses less on thematic underpinnings and more on the plot. While it does touch upon questions connected to the neuroscientific This review is based on an ARC given to me for free by the publisher, Angry Robot Books. This does not in any way affect my review.This book is slated for release on September 4, 2018.... The Wrong Stars dealt with a rather weighty set of themes involving history and identity via the alien race called the Liars. The Dreaming Stars, however, is not as weighty, since it focuses less on thematic underpinnings and more on the plot. While it does touch upon questions connected to the neuroscientific nature of morality and ethics, as well as briefly looks into questions of revolution and uprising (“storming the Bastille” indeed), it does not really get into them very much. They are there for readers to find and think upon, but the story does not really get into them very much.That does not, however, make the story less entertaining, nor does it mean that other aspects of the story are not explored. For instance, in The Wrong Stars many of the secondary characters like Stephen got a bit shortchanged in the development, with most of the focus put on Callie, Elena, and Lantern. In The Dreaming Stars, though, that changes a bit, with more emphasis placed on growing the characters based on their interactions with each other. Given the events of the previous novel it’s a given that a portion of the story would be devoted to Callie and Elena’s relationship (which is refreshingly healthy, incidentally), there is also a lot of space devoted to the other characters – to Stephen, in particular. Sebastien’s character is also explored, though the reader is likely to view him in a more ambivalent light, all things considered.Full review here: https://wp.me/p21txV-Gx
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  • Shannon Clark
    January 1, 1970
    So this is the second book in a series (of what feels like more than three books) so it does have the sense of setting things up for the future but not yet answering every question or resolving even concern. And in the interest of full disclosure I know Tim and family through lots of mutual friends and shared attending of various science fiction conventions over the years (long before he had published so much) so while we aren’t close friends he is an author whose books I both enjoy and buy to s So this is the second book in a series (of what feels like more than three books) so it does have the sense of setting things up for the future but not yet answering every question or resolving even concern. And in the interest of full disclosure I know Tim and family through lots of mutual friends and shared attending of various science fiction conventions over the years (long before he had published so much) so while we aren’t close friends he is an author whose books I both enjoy and buy to support a friend. That said this is a very nifty bit of worldbuilding of a vision of a rich, complex, LGBTQ friendly future world. I enjoy both the relationships and the plot (and the mixture of both)If I had a criticism it would be that some parts of the book seem rushed and a bit too pat and easy for the characters. However one of the real challenges of super powerful future tech is how you keep up the tension and when you focus on limitations/restrictions. And this may be my own biases (and knowing that he has written books set in the worlds of roleplaying games) but I keep getting a general sense of the book operating a bit like a roleplaying group - with the author/Shall as the GM/GM npc and the other characters as player characters. They fit into roles often found in a roleplaying group and there is a broad sense of them each having treasures and abilities gained of time (ie leveling up). Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing but it is something I noticed occasionally - especially when “NPCs” are in the scene
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  • Joey Nardinelli
    January 1, 1970
    I thought I’d have read this in about a week given how intensely I liked The Wrong Stars. The last 40% of this one is great and hits the same sort of fun, weird, wild, and exciting watermark of Pratt’s last Axiom novel. The first 60% of the novel just felt like a lot of rehashing and unnecessary character development punctuated by...nothing. There was no interwoven action or plot movement that wasn’t moving from Point A to Point B to Point C. There are some microscopic moments building up to the I thought I’d have read this in about a week given how intensely I liked The Wrong Stars. The last 40% of this one is great and hits the same sort of fun, weird, wild, and exciting watermark of Pratt’s last Axiom novel. The first 60% of the novel just felt like a lot of rehashing and unnecessary character development punctuated by...nothing. There was no interwoven action or plot movement that wasn’t moving from Point A to Point B to Point C. There are some microscopic moments building up to the last two pages, but you probably saw that coming already in the first book (are bad puns spoilers?). I’m still surprised I enjoy these given that while the stakes are high, for the core cast they seem almost non-existent. The witty Whedon-esque banter alone keeps me hooked, but I’m hoping this ends up being the weaker middle chapter in what I’m assuming might be a trilogy. If you like The Expanse and want less death, more wit, and a far greater focus on the creator’s of the protomolecule than the protomolecule itself (or the various infighting factions of humanity), this might be the series for you.
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  • Rafael Morillo
    January 1, 1970
    The Dreaming Stars follows the crew of the White Raven as they embark on another adventure in another system. Callie and her crew travel to the planet Owain where a Human colony has created an environment similar to the one on Earth. The crew of the White Raven is investigating nanoparticles called the swarm, which transform everything into computronium. The crew discovers an Axiom facility with hibernating aliens which are playing in a vast Axiom Virtual Reality. The crew including Sebastien wo The Dreaming Stars follows the crew of the White Raven as they embark on another adventure in another system. Callie and her crew travel to the planet Owain where a Human colony has created an environment similar to the one on Earth. The crew of the White Raven is investigating nanoparticles called the swarm, which transform everything into computronium. The crew discovers an Axiom facility with hibernating aliens which are playing in a vast Axiom Virtual Reality. The crew including Sebastien work together within the Virtual Reality called the Dream to try to save the colony of Owain.This story is not as action-packed as the first novel however, it helped build on the original characters while introducing new characters. I enjoyed learning a little bit more about the characters and Earth in this book and I liked the mystery at the end of the book. I gave this four out of five stars and am looking forward to reading the third book, The Forbidden Stars.
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  • Sontaranpr
    January 1, 1970
    Now that our heroes are aware that there's an elder race out there hiding in the black plotting unspeakable schemes using unknown dangerous technologies they're willing to poke around a bit and see what genocidal actions eventuate. Soon enough a new colony reports they're losing people in an asteroid belt. This is confirmed by the xenos on their side who has discovered that their base in the area has gone dark and no longer responds to queries. Time to put on their investigating trousers and see Now that our heroes are aware that there's an elder race out there hiding in the black plotting unspeakable schemes using unknown dangerous technologies they're willing to poke around a bit and see what genocidal actions eventuate. Soon enough a new colony reports they're losing people in an asteroid belt. This is confirmed by the xenos on their side who has discovered that their base in the area has gone dark and no longer responds to queries. Time to put on their investigating trousers and see what's going on. In summary - bad things, many bad things. From nanotech mining machines to a vast VR still populated by the somewhat less than friendly elder race mentioned above. Still, that's what obscene quantities of explosives were invented for.
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  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed the first book in this series and thus had high expectations for this second book. The dreaming stars did not completely up to these expectations. Not that this is a bad book. Far from actually. It contained the trademark fun characters, the open inclusive atmosphere and the witty funny dialogue that makes Tim Pratt one of my favorite writers.The reason this book scores a bit lower then the previous one is because the story is less epic. While in book 1 a galaxy threatening dang I really enjoyed the first book in this series and thus had high expectations for this second book. The dreaming stars did not completely up to these expectations. Not that this is a bad book. Far from actually. It contained the trademark fun characters, the open inclusive atmosphere and the witty funny dialogue that makes Tim Pratt one of my favorite writers.The reason this book scores a bit lower then the previous one is because the story is less epic. While in book 1 a galaxy threatening danger was discovered, in this book they deal with one manifestation of said evil. Book 1 felt like a pilot and this feels like episode 2. Don't get me wrong, this is a good book in a good series. and I can't wait for book three.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second book in the Axiom series by Tim Pratt. The first book, The Wrong Stars, was an action packed space opera. This book was less so. This book is a good read but in this one there is more character building and less action, which is not necessarily a bad thing. You get to find out more about each of the character's backgrounds and their motivations for being on the spaceship White Raven and their mission to destroy the Axiom. Toward the end of the book the action does pick up and This is the second book in the Axiom series by Tim Pratt. The first book, The Wrong Stars, was an action packed space opera. This book was less so. This book is a good read but in this one there is more character building and less action, which is not necessarily a bad thing. You get to find out more about each of the character's backgrounds and their motivations for being on the spaceship White Raven and their mission to destroy the Axiom. Toward the end of the book the action does pick up and leaves an opening for the next book in the series. All in all I would recommend this book to anyone who has read the first book in this series.
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  • Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    Compared to the first book, this one seemed to have some pacing problems for me. The first one was full of action and mystery. This one, you know who the baddies are now, so it loses that little bit of suspense and then on top of that it seems like it takes half the book for the crew to get around to actually dealing with the problem. I was also not really a fan of the whole (view spoiler)[ MMO like game the Axiom were hanging out in. I don't typically care for the in a video game style plot lin Compared to the first book, this one seemed to have some pacing problems for me. The first one was full of action and mystery. This one, you know who the baddies are now, so it loses that little bit of suspense and then on top of that it seems like it takes half the book for the crew to get around to actually dealing with the problem. I was also not really a fan of the whole (view spoiler)[ MMO like game the Axiom were hanging out in. I don't typically care for the in a video game style plot line. (hide spoiler)]. It's still an interesting world with great characters though, and I am 100% ready for the next book.
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  • AliceAnn
    January 1, 1970
    I sat down to start this book around 3 PM...and finished it by 11 PM! I was worried I wouldn't remember anything from book 1, since it had been awhile since I read that, but I figured things out as I went along, both from memory, and from helpful reminders from the story along the way. I knew I loved the characters from book 1, and continued to love them in this volume as well. We get to see a lot more relationship details, along with all the fun science-y bits. Add in plenty of action, and I co I sat down to start this book around 3 PM...and finished it by 11 PM! I was worried I wouldn't remember anything from book 1, since it had been awhile since I read that, but I figured things out as I went along, both from memory, and from helpful reminders from the story along the way. I knew I loved the characters from book 1, and continued to love them in this volume as well. We get to see a lot more relationship details, along with all the fun science-y bits. Add in plenty of action, and I couldn't put the book down. Now I really want the next book in the series, ASAP!
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  • pie
    January 1, 1970
    this wasn't quite as good as the previous one (lazy plot compression around how the relationship between Stephen and Q develops in particular), but i enjoyed it a great deal just the same. this series has a lot in common with the Wayfarers series (The Long Way To A Small, Angry Planet/A Closed And Common Orbit), so if you liked this and The Wrong Stars, you'll probably like those too (and vise-versa). i'd say Axiom is more plot-driven and Wayfarers is more character-driven, but neither is missin this wasn't quite as good as the previous one (lazy plot compression around how the relationship between Stephen and Q develops in particular), but i enjoyed it a great deal just the same. this series has a lot in common with the Wayfarers series (The Long Way To A Small, Angry Planet/A Closed And Common Orbit), so if you liked this and The Wrong Stars, you'll probably like those too (and vise-versa). i'd say Axiom is more plot-driven and Wayfarers is more character-driven, but neither is missing too much of the other.
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  • Lyle Blosser
    January 1, 1970
    I was a bit concerned when the first part of the book appeared to be dedicated to exploring certain relationships and got a bit too *personal/emotional* for my tastes, but then the action and the danger ratcheted upward (as did the neat-o extrapolations into just what an alien virtual reality might be like) and everything reached the excellent level I'd been hoping for since the first book in the series. The resolution was very satisfying, and delivered with clarity and inventiveness.
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  • Arbys Mom
    January 1, 1970
    The second book in the Axiom series is just as wonderful, crazy, intense, funny, thrilling, amazing and fantastic as the first one was. I enjoyed this story, and this world, so much! I'm very happy to know there will be yet another book in the series. The writing is impeccable, both with characters and world building. I was totally immersed, in the best possible way. The book starts off with a bang and just doesn't let up, not even on the last page. The author has become one of my favorites.
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  • Vincent Archer
    January 1, 1970
    A bit worse than the first book.The internal dynamic of the crew are ok, but my main beef is that the Axiom are rendered as caricatures of villains. You have those awesome evil master of the universe, and the first time we "meet" them, the little you see is one-dimensional psychopathic children.Hopefully, the next book may use interesting concepts...
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Lost a star for being so talkytalky...but otherwise a rockem sockem episode, with some close encounters with the Axiom so we can see how grody they really are. I still think they’re just too powerful a threat to give humanity a chance...unless they turn out to have some Achilles heel. Well, wait and see.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    The Wrong Stars was one of my favorite books of 2017, so I anxiously awaited this sequel. All the characters from book one are back, but literally nothing of consequence happens throughout the first 50% of the book. Pages and pages of infodump. Nearly insurmountable odds are overcome tidily in a few pages. Overall, disappointed.
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  • Paul Skelding
    January 1, 1970
    As good as the first and I'm looking forward to #3. I really enjoy the characters and the interplay between them. I was able to tell my wife a few of the jokes out of context and she laughed. That's some good writing right there when you can do that. Write faster Tim, I read your books quickly because they're so good!
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  • mybluesunset
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 I enjoyed it, but it took a while for me to remember why I cared about the main characters. The Dream storyline was engaging & Sebastien is an interesting character, but this book as a whole felt a little less weighty than the last one
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Very fun, satisfying second installment. I loved my time with the crew of the White Raven. I don't feel as though this book was quite as tightly plotted at the first novel, but it was still a heck of a lot of fun!
  • Eric Schudy
    January 1, 1970
    Better than the firstMuch less social construct nonsense except for one very out of place paragraph about how everyone agrees that the sex of a person is completely a social construct and choice, or some idiocy like that.He's a good story teller if he leaves the BS out.
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  • Bryan
    January 1, 1970
    Another rollicking space adventure for the crew of the White Raven, as they work to (literally) save the Galaxy. At times a tad on the uneventful side, but otherwise fun and creative. A bit of Becky Chambers and a bit of Alastair Reynolds, but mostly pure Tim Pratt. Can’t wait for book three.
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  • James Carter
    January 1, 1970
    Another exciting adventure!Every bit as insane and awesome as the first book!!! Looking forward to following this series religiously!!! What will our rag tag team of heroes gonna face next!?
  • John McKell
    January 1, 1970
    Relationships... In Spaaaace!
  • Will
    January 1, 1970
    Space Opera with a small crew that is trying to hack the Affront.
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