Lady Mary
By turns thrilling, dramatic and touching, this is the story of Henry the Eighth and Catherine of Aragon's divorce as you've never heard it before - from the eyes of their daughter, Princess Mary.More than anything Mary just wants her family to stay together; for her mother and her father - and for her - to all be in the same place at once. But when her father announces that his marriage to her mother was void and by turns that Mary doesn't really count as his child, she realises things will never be as she hoped.Things only get worse when her father marries again. Separated from her mother and forced to work as a servant for her new sister, Mary must dig deep to find the strength to stand up against those who wish to bring her down. Despite what anyone says, she will always be a princess. She has the blood of a princess and she is ready to fight for what is rightfully hers.

Lady Mary Details

TitleLady Mary
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 5th, 2018
PublisherBloomsbury Children's Books
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Fiction, English History, Tudor Period

Lady Mary Review

  • Abbie (boneseasonofglass)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 (I received this book in return for review by the publisher, but this doesn't affect my views and opinions) Generally I enjoyed reading this, it flowed well and it was nice to see this side of Mary, because most historical stuff I've read/seen focuses on her reign as queen and how she was quite ruthless, so it was nice seeing the perspective of her being young, naive and vulnerable The Tudors period was pretty crazy tbh, and I want to read more about them again and learn more. It was a nic 3.5 (I received this book in return for review by the publisher, but this doesn't affect my views and opinions) Generally I enjoyed reading this, it flowed well and it was nice to see this side of Mary, because most historical stuff I've read/seen focuses on her reign as queen and how she was quite ruthless, so it was nice seeing the perspective of her being young, naive and vulnerable The Tudors period was pretty crazy tbh, and I want to read more about them again and learn more. It was a nice change to read some historical fiction, and it actually taught me some stuff I didn't know before, because even though this is 'fiction' it is based on events that actually happened The beginning and middle were pretty slow going, it picked up a little bit more in the middle, but not much really happened in some parts, which I understand, because it's based on real history, but the last section of the book was so much better, and I wish this section was longer, and the first two maybe slightly shorter, just to make the pace a little betterEach chapter or so changes time period, either through months, and sometimes years, which was kind of strange to get used to, but it was necessary I suppose to set the background of Mary's life and the events that lead up to her situation. You don't really get to know much about what is happening in the country and court politics so much, which is kind of frustrating, because it kind of teases you with bits of information, but I think that's done purposefully, because Mary isn't told much, and just finds out little bits of information here and there and tries to figure out what's happening, so we're with Mary, not really sure what's happening around her, and not know what people's intentions are and trying to figure it out. Overall, I enjoyed reading this! I'd recommend reading this if you have an interest in Tudor History or Mary I :)
    more
  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    I’m not normally a huge fan of Tudor historical fiction- partly because in a general sense I know the Tudor period quite well. I live near Hampton Court and went to school at a place called Nonsuch ( so named by Elizabeth I) and learned about the Tudors at school. On the other hand, I dislike this period of history because of all the names. I get so confused with them all.So Lady Mary was a real breath of fresh air because it was written for children. It was simply told. It was an aspect of Tudo I’m not normally a huge fan of Tudor historical fiction- partly because in a general sense I know the Tudor period quite well. I live near Hampton Court and went to school at a place called Nonsuch ( so named by Elizabeth I) and learned about the Tudors at school. On the other hand, I dislike this period of history because of all the names. I get so confused with them all.So Lady Mary was a real breath of fresh air because it was written for children. It was simply told. It was an aspect of Tudor history I had never considered before. Lucy Worsley says in the post script that Mary Tudor (aka Bloody Mary) has been unfairly and biasedly portrayed by anti- Catholic sentiment. Actually I believe this to be true. Mary, in her rule, is responsible for many Protestant deaths, but no more than Catholics condemned to death under her father’s rule. I hadn’t perceived it that way- more that Elizabeth was prettier and wore better dresses! I certainly never felt particularly sorry for her!This story in this book though, happens before Mary’s reign and starts with Mary as a nine year old, when Henry is starting to sniff around Anne Boleyn. The story ends just after Edward’s birth. It was well told and although written for children, is an interesting and informative read for adults too- well this adult anyway!
    more
  • Trish at Between My Lines
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.Hello, my name is Trish and I’m Tudor obsessed. So reading Lady Mary by Lucy Worsley was a forgone conclusion for me. And within the pages, I discovered a fascinating blend of Tudor trickery and human insight into a character that I grew to like and admire.***Full review in April, nearer to publication date***
    more
  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    I got sent this book in exchange for a honest review, all my opinions are my own and thank you so much to the publishers for sending me this book!This was a really good story about Mary Tudor. I love history so much and reading this kinda twist in the story was super fun and enjoyable.
    more
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this, although some of the characters are very black and white, with a slimey Thomas Cromwell and an ogress Anne Boleyn, while others (especially Henry VIII and Mary herself) didn't feel particularly real. None of Mary's religious devotion is depicted here, although her loneliness and despair are dealt with well. She also grows to adulthood through the book but her voice remains the same. This is a Young Adult novel but I think younger readers, possibly pre-teen, will enjoy it the most I enjoyed this, although some of the characters are very black and white, with a slimey Thomas Cromwell and an ogress Anne Boleyn, while others (especially Henry VIII and Mary herself) didn't feel particularly real. None of Mary's religious devotion is depicted here, although her loneliness and despair are dealt with well. She also grows to adulthood through the book but her voice remains the same. This is a Young Adult novel but I think younger readers, possibly pre-teen, will enjoy it the most. Full review to follow shortly on For Winter Nights. 3-3.5 stars.
    more
  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted on The Nerd Daily | Review by Tasya“Press a little harder with the pen, Mary. Your letters are all faint,” is the first sentence of Lucy Worsley’s intriguing new YA novel, Lady Mary, which follows the daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon.The England Tudor period has long been the center of attention in history, especially during the Henry VIII reign. You may remember him for having six wives in hopes to produce a male heir, along with how he formed the Church of Engla Originally posted on The Nerd Daily | Review by Tasya“Press a little harder with the pen, Mary. Your letters are all faint,” is the first sentence of Lucy Worsley’s intriguing new YA novel, Lady Mary, which follows the daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon.The England Tudor period has long been the center of attention in history, especially during the Henry VIII reign. You may remember him for having six wives in hopes to produce a male heir, along with how he formed the Church of England. Ironically, in the end, the throne only passed shortly to his son before passing to his daughters, Mary and Elizabeth. In fact, Elizabeth I led England to what is widely known as the golden age or Elizabethan era. Because of this, Queen Mary is often forgotten by history and dubbed “Bloody Mary” due to persecuting many in an attempt to reverse the reformation. Henry VIII and Elizabeth also persecuted many, yet neither of them received the same garish title…Now enough with the history lessons! The forgotten Queen Mary is why I was so excited to read this book to get a glimpse at her albeit fictional life. I am always curious on how she reacted to her mother’s downfall, the following throng of mothers, and relationship with her father. Even though this book is fictional, it did offer a glimpse within these area.If you are expecting court intrigue in this book, you will not find it. This book tells the story of Mary’s childhood over the course of her teenage years, meaning she only spent a short time at the court before being exiled by her father. I don’t usually enjoy reading from children’s perspective, but I really enjoyed Mary’s perspective. She was her father’s daughter, but at the same time, Henry always came across as though he had no child. Her mother, Catherine of Aragon, both shielded her and loved her at the same time as Catherine played a dangerous game at the court.After their separation, Mary was immediately sent away and we could see how much she had to mature and adapt in such a short time; from being a princess, heir presumptive to the throne, she became a prisoner and lady-in-waiting. She learned how to play at court, while maintaining her childhood naivety, as seen through her several missteps throughout the book. But the point is, she learned from her mistakes and showed immense growth by the end of the book.At the same time, the focus on the character and the chosen time period provided little room for interesting storylines to unfold. Since Mary was in exile, all the intrigue and scheming happened at court with Mary merely a pawn in battle for the Queen’s seat and the war between religions. As the title suggests, this book focuses on her time as Lady Mary and stops after Jane Seymour’s death, which means we never seen her wield her power and position to eventually get that Queen title. There are some historical characters that play an important part in the effort to restore Mary, but they only appear occasionally and other than that, not much happens except for waiting and thinking for Mary.I truly enjoyed how this book paints a picture of monarchy status and alliance at that time. Catherine and Henry’s divorce was a messy affair due the fact that Catherine is a princess of Spain in her own right, sister of the ruler at that time. Henry’s decision to marry Anne Boleyn, who grew up in France, made the alliance between France and England seem stronger, but at the same time weakened England alliance with Spain and Rome. Not to mention the long time animosity between Spain and France. Add that Catherine’s nephew was the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire at that time, it seemed the battle lines were drawn between the supporters of Henry and Catherine. If only we could have seen more of Catherine’s scheming somehow.While I love the focus on characters and inner turmoil of Mary was enjoyable, I had hoped to see more intrigue and scheming, as well as some court richness being shown. The lack of storyline caused this book to be pretty unmemorable to me, as the pages and story blurred together in forming Mary’s waiting day in exile.However, I still recommend this if you are interested in the Tudor’s era, want to learn more about the era, or just plain curious about the life of Queen Mary!
    more
  • Inge
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI'm not a history buff by any means, but I think everyone knows about Queen Mary's dark and bloody stories. In Lady Mary, we meet an entirely different side of her. I don't know how much of this is based on facts and how much is the author's creativity, but I thought it was refreshing. We see Mary grow up through a divorce and a tyrannical stepmother among other things. With the influence of her mother, she is still very headstrong and adamant on keeping her right to the throne, but the 3.5 starsI'm not a history buff by any means, but I think everyone knows about Queen Mary's dark and bloody stories. In Lady Mary, we meet an entirely different side of her. I don't know how much of this is based on facts and how much is the author's creativity, but I thought it was refreshing. We see Mary grow up through a divorce and a tyrannical stepmother among other things. With the influence of her mother, she is still very headstrong and adamant on keeping her right to the throne, but there is also a kindness in her that you don't hear about in the history books. I would have liked to see Mary's relationships with her father's other wives (this is the notorious Henry VIII), but overall it was a nice story, and I think readers with a bigger affinity for history (and the Tudor era) will eat their hearts out.Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with a copy
    more
  • Paula
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review Reseña en español, aquí Mary Tudor made a mistake at birth, she was a girl, and that determined the kind of life she was going to lead with a father like Henry VIII and a mother like Catherine of Aragon. It was not easy to be the daughter of these two greats. On the one hand, her father had a highly selfish vision of life, which did not prevent him from being a great political strategist. On the other hand her mother, Spani I read this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review Reseña en español, aquí Mary Tudor made a mistake at birth, she was a girl, and that determined the kind of life she was going to lead with a father like Henry VIII and a mother like Catherine of Aragon. It was not easy to be the daughter of these two greats. On the one hand, her father had a highly selfish vision of life, which did not prevent him from being a great political strategist. On the other hand her mother, Spanish to the core and daughter of the greatest woman of his time as was Isabel I of Castile. All that weighed on Mary’s blood.As a child Mary noticed great indifference on the part of her father, although she herself denied that such a thing was true, as a measure of self-protection. Her mother was always by her side and certainly loved her and covered her need for affection, but she always prioritized her duties as queen, wife, (Catholic) Christian and educator. In that order. SHe instilled in Mary a strong sense of honor, virtue and dignity, she told her that a daughter of Spain never cried, that she stood firm in the face of adversity. It was probably the same lessons that Isabel of Castile gave her children, and we all know that the Spanish women are as strong or as weak as any other women. But it is important that these notions that Catherine gave her daughter got into her mind, because those were the lessons that helped young Mary survive the adversities, the negligence of her father and the cruelty of Anne Boleyn towards her.Lucy Worsley is a famous English historian. Her work as an academic is less known to the general public but her role as a communicator is priceless. Her documentaries for the BBC are more than recommended. On this occasion she narrates the years between the time when Henry VIII repudiates Catherine of Aragon and the moments after the death of Jane Seymour, Henry’s third wife, who finally gave him a son, Edward, and died in childbirth (Divorced, beheaded, deceased…).But Lucy Worsley does not tell the story, event after event, as if it were a textbook. Worsley focuses her book on Mary, what life meant for her after the separation from her parents, how her mother clung to her faith while preparing her revenge, how Henry separated mother and daughter under the influence of Anne Boleyn, how the lady Boleyn tried to reduce Mary from princess to servant of her own daughter Elizabeth, a baby of months. How Mary rebelled against her stepmother and thus Anne had her locked in an attic denying her more sustenance than a jug of water a day. And still Mary survived. And not only she survived the Anne’s schemes but also the betrayals and deceptions that she suffered from the right hand of the King Thomas Cromwell, a great political strategist who, nevertheless could not defeat Mary.The book goes further, after the fall of Anne, Mary’s father call her’s to court. There she finds a second mother in Jane Seymour, the third queen, but soon loses her when she gives birth to Edward VI.That is the story of Mary, who grows from preadolescent to young woman thanks (in want of a better word) to blows and injustices done to her, because with her parents in tug-of-war, their minds set on a kind of real-life chess; Mary was no more that a pawn without color, a marionette that they threw at each other but who also learned, grew, matured and who was constantly aware of what was happening around her. Even in moments when she was about to die of starvation, Mary watched and learned.Mary I was known as “ Bloody Mary” for the persecution she exercised over the Protestants after the restoration she carried out of the Catholic faith. However, according to Worsley, this treatment of her figure given by later historians is unfair. For all the lessons learned from her mother and everything she learned during her father’s reign, Mary was a great queen. She did nothing that other kings did not do before or after her (for example, Henry had crushed Catholic rebellions and Elizabeth persecuted the Catholics and reinstated the Anglican faith). But the greatness of her sister Elizabeth and the power she retained eclipsed to some extent Mary’s reign. However, again according to Worsley, it is more than possible that Elizabeth learned to be queen from her sister’s example.The book is aimed at a young audience, however anyone can read it because it does not use a condescending speechs as is usual in historical fictionalized books written for young people. What I found somewhat disconcerting is that it is written as if Worsley had transcribed a script for one of her impressive documentaries. It took me a long time to get into the story, but I persisted and in the end it was very interesting.  I’m also convinced that if Lucy Worsley had read the book aloud or had told me the story herself I would have enjoyed it much more.
    more
  • belle ✨(bookishlybelle)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review! This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.3/5 STARSI got my Bachelor's degree in History (concentration in European History), so this book seemed right up my alley. I love historical fiction, and the Tudor period is incredibly interesting to me. I think if I were younger, I might've enjoyed this a bit more. The story follows Mary Tudor (the woman who would become known as "B I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review! This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.3/5 STARSI got my Bachelor's degree in History (concentration in European History), so this book seemed right up my alley. I love historical fiction, and the Tudor period is incredibly interesting to me. I think if I were younger, I might've enjoyed this a bit more. The story follows Mary Tudor (the woman who would become known as "Bloody Mary") from the age of nine until the age of twenty-one. The ages are written no differently, however: twenty-one year old Mary thinks and acts almost exactly the same as nine year old Mary. There is rarely any character development, and the small amount that does occur takes place mostly in the last couple pages. The plot or characters weren't the problem, however; the main issue I had was with the writing. Sometimes it was written simply, to the point of being overly simple. But, as this book is supposed to be for Middle Grade readers, that wasn't a problem. But then the author would throw in a complex word or phrase like "marshy quandry"and "palaver," and I stared in confusion when there was this sentence: "That woman," he said, "is a bitch. A bitch of the highest order." What happened to Middle Grade??????Overall, while it was interesting to see Mary Tudor's story told from a unique perspective, I felt the writing slightly let down the book, with too much focus being on the historical aspects and not enough focus on telling a story in a way that flowed.
    more
  • Kristin Davison
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank netgalley and Bloomsbury Publishing for the opportunity to read this book.I always enjoy Worsley's writing and this book is no different. It tells the story of Mary (future Mary I) during the divorce of her parents, her subsequent exile and readmittance to court. I love that it shows a story that seems to have been largely forgotten.
    more
  • Nadia King
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 STARS. History is so often written by the ‘victors’ that it can be difficult to view historical figures in their proper perspective. Lucy Worsley, in her latest book, Lady Mary gives teen readers a window into the world of Queen Mary I (the daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon).King Henry VIII’s first child was the Princess Mary who later went on to become ‘Bloody Mary’ as history (perhaps unfairly) remembers her. But Mary was once a girl and what was she like?Worsley certainly bri 4.5 STARS. History is so often written by the ‘victors’ that it can be difficult to view historical figures in their proper perspective. Lucy Worsley, in her latest book, Lady Mary gives teen readers a window into the world of Queen Mary I (the daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon).King Henry VIII’s first child was the Princess Mary who later went on to become ‘Bloody Mary’ as history (perhaps unfairly) remembers her. But Mary was once a girl and what was she like?Worsley certainly brings her alive for us in Lady Mary – at a time in history when Mary’s father cast her mother aside for the woman he would later have beheaded.Lady Mary is a fascinating account of Mary’s teens years. It is easy to read and highly recommended for lovers of historical fiction.
    more
  • Vee ♔Under Mountain Books♔
    January 1, 1970
    The Tudor "thing" in portraits was to hide subtle messages and clues for the viewer, in fact Elizabeth The First often hid a pelican in her portraits, which was a sign of motherly love for all her subjects. This idea is cleverly continued in the cover of Lady Mary, where you can see knives, birds, coins and poison amongst the leafy background, all things that give subtle clues as to what you will be reading in the book.The writing in this book kept well to the period, sometimes too well. I was t The Tudor "thing" in portraits was to hide subtle messages and clues for the viewer, in fact Elizabeth The First often hid a pelican in her portraits, which was a sign of motherly love for all her subjects. This idea is cleverly continued in the cover of Lady Mary, where you can see knives, birds, coins and poison amongst the leafy background, all things that give subtle clues as to what you will be reading in the book.The writing in this book kept well to the period, sometimes too well. I was trying to read this from a children's perspective as it's stated that this is what it's marketed towards and I had to look up a few words - forswear for one and obsequious, which apparently means "obedient or attentive to an excessive degree"."She knew that her mother would insist that she should detest this baby girl. And yet how could she hate something so weak and powerless. How could God really want her to do that?"The Mary we know as Bloody is a vicious, violent woman, obsessive in her Christian beliefs and she took the throne by force in 1553. She was known for her hatred of Protestants and history paints her as a truly evil Queen. The Mary we meet here however, is a teenager, watching her parents marriage fall apart before almost becoming a servant under Anne Boleyn, a woman who is shown to have a truly cruel side in this book, that I've never seen before.I love books that takes people from history that have become characters, or caricatures in Thomas Cromwell's case, and shows us a different side to the one we know. We know that Mary takes the throne eventually, but watching her suffer as she slowly starves to the brink of death after refusing to sign away her rights to the throne is gut wrenching. She ends up completely alone, in a house she does not know, with servants she does not know."'They should not use you this way in their quarrels. You are a girl. They must let you be a girl!' 'But,' Mary whispered, 'I'm not just a girl. I'm a princess.'"We visit Mary at key points in her life from a young age up to young adulthood, showing us her relationships with her mother, her father and her servants. She comes across as a kind girl, while refusing to act below her station she treats everyone with equal respect and sees no problem with sitting down for dinner with her trusted servants. We also see her relationship with her father, from when she saw him as truly perfect until she started to see him as he truly was.What really shines though, is her strength. She decides she would rather starve than compromise her faith and she knows how much it will disappoint her mother. After being shipped from house to house and losing everyone she loves she comes away with a steely determination that has to be admired. As Lucy points out at the end of the story, Mary's actions against Protestants weren't any different to what Kings before her had done, she was mostly a victim of Catholic propaganda.Blog | Facebook | Twitter
    more
  • raquel
    January 1, 1970
    I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Review in English | Reseña en español (abajo)Lady Mary is an historical fictionalised novel told from the point of view of the young Princess Mary (third-person narrator), first daughter of Henry VIII of England, that covers the events between the ages of nine and twenty one years old in Mary's life. You can read this and more reviews on my blogAlthough I’m not a big fan of historical fiction, the fact that th I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Review in English | Reseña en español (abajo)Lady Mary is an historical fictionalised novel told from the point of view of the young Princess Mary (third-person narrator), first daughter of Henry VIII of England, that covers the events between the ages of nine and twenty one years old in Mary's life. You can read this and more reviews on my blogAlthough I’m not a big fan of historical fiction, the fact that this book was written by a well-known historian and being told by Mary Tudor’s perspective made it really intriguing. Besides, I’ve always loved the Tudor period and specially the marriage between Henry VIII and Catalina of Aragon, so I though I was going to enjoy quite a lot this novel.As I said, we are told about the events in Mary’s life as a princess: her father invalidating his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and the subsequent marriage to Anne Boleyn, the moment when Mary is removed from Court and forced to be a servant to her new sister Elizabeth, her years imprisoned and the refusal of renounce her title as Princess of England,… and although it’s an interesting piece of history, the writing style and pacing is rather dull and I was bored to tears with the story. In addition, I couldn’t empathise with the characters –especially with Lady Mary– and I expected more feelings to be included. I think I’d be better immense in the story if it was told through a first-person narrator.Nevertheless, I’d recommend this book to a younger audience, fans of historical fiction and those who want to know a little bit more about Mary Tudor’s early years.P. S. I'm not English, so if you see any mistakes let me know so I can correct them, please_____{Español}Lady Mary es una novela histórica 'de ficción' contada desde el punto de vista de la joven princesa Mary (narradora en tercera persona), la primera hija del rey Enrique VIII de Inglaterra, donde se nos narran los acontecimientos de la vida de Mary desde que tiene nueve años hasta los veintiuno.Podéis leer esta y más reseñas en mi blogAunque la ficción histórica no me llama especialmente la atención, el hecho de que este libro hubiera sido escrito por una conocida historiadora y que estuviese contado desde la perspectiva de Mary Tudor, lo hacía realmente intrigante. Además, siempre he sentido mucha curiosidad por el periodo Tudor y especialmente por el matrimonio entre Enrique VIII y Catalina de Aragón, así que pensé que iba a disfrutar mucho de esta novela.Como he dicho, en esta novela se nos narran los acontecimientos de la vida de Mary como princesa: cuando su padre anula su matrimonio con Catalina de Aragón y su posterior matrimonio con Ana Bolena, el momento en que Mary es destituida de la Corte y obligada a servir a su nueva hermana Elizabeth, sus años 'prisionera' y su rechazo a renunciar a su titulo de Princesa de Inglaterra…, y aunque es una parte interesante de la Historia, el estilo narrativo de la escritora y el ritmo del libro es bastante plano y aburrido, lo que hizo que me cansase muy rápido de la historia. Además, no llegué a empatizar con los personajes –especialmente con Lady Mary–, y esperaba que se incluyesen más sentimientos y (un poco de salseo). Para mí, hubiera sido mucho mejor esta historia si hubiera estado contada a través de un narrador en primera persona.Dicho todo esto, recomendaría igualmente este libro a un público joven, a los que os guste la ficción histórica y a todos aquellos a los que os apetezca conocer un poco más sobre los primeros años de vida de Mary Tudor.
    more
  • Cassie
    January 1, 1970
    Is there anything that Lucy Worsley can’t do? She’s one of those women who, if I see that she is in any way involved, I know that I’m going to watch / read it and what’s more, I’ll love it. I may be a year or so older than her, but when I grow up, I want to be Lucy Worsley. This book is no different. We have the story of King Henry Viii falling in love with Anne Boleyn, the divorce of Catherine of Aragon and how this is all seen through the eyes of Henry and Catherine’s daughter, Princess Mary.A Is there anything that Lucy Worsley can’t do? She’s one of those women who, if I see that she is in any way involved, I know that I’m going to watch / read it and what’s more, I’ll love it. I may be a year or so older than her, but when I grow up, I want to be Lucy Worsley. This book is no different. We have the story of King Henry Viii falling in love with Anne Boleyn, the divorce of Catherine of Aragon and how this is all seen through the eyes of Henry and Catherine’s daughter, Princess Mary.All Mary wants is to be a family with her mother and father. The attention to detail is as authentic as one would expect from Lucy Worsley and she does well in portraying Mary as a young woman being used as a pawn. A woman who may have been born into royalty but she still has feelings and you can’t help but root for Mary, whether you know the outcome or not. Many thanks to Netgalley for providing a free copy of this book in return for an honest review.
    more
  • Lena (The Printed Girl)
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading this book because I absolutely loved the idea of taking the incredibly famous story of "Bloody Mary" and looking at it from a point of view not many people ever thought of. After I read the summary, I actually really wanted to know how Mary felt during her parents divorce. I don't think the people of that time really considered the consequence a divorce has on a child, because absolutely no one divorced back then. I love the combination of fiction and non-fiction, it's a really I started reading this book because I absolutely loved the idea of taking the incredibly famous story of "Bloody Mary" and looking at it from a point of view not many people ever thought of. After I read the summary, I actually really wanted to know how Mary felt during her parents divorce. I don't think the people of that time really considered the consequence a divorce has on a child, because absolutely no one divorced back then. I love the combination of fiction and non-fiction, it's a really great mix.Other than Mary, who is a small child at the beginning of this book and a woman at the end, there isn't much character development. her mother and father aren't that much in the picture most of the time and their character stays more or less the same. But, I love how the writing changes when Marie grows up. Sometimes it did sound a bit too young I think, Children back then grew up faster than they do know and even if Mary had been a child that lived today, it felt a bit like 9 year old Mary actually was a 6 year old.I loved how fast paced this book was. Historical fiction can be a bit boring if the story goes too slow (at least for me it can be boring). everything happened quite fast and that made it more enjoyable and it also made it easier to focus on this book. I think sometimes it went a bit too fast and it can be a downside for other people, but I liked this ritme a lot.I think I would have loved this book a little bit more if it the story would have ended later in her life. Now the book had quite an open ending. Of course it's not really an open ending because if you don't know how her story ends you can just read the Wikipedia page about her, but obviously that's not the same.Blog | Tumblr | Instagram | Twitter
    more
  • Hanna (lapetiteboleyn)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a refreshing, well thought out book. Cleverly plotted, it maintains focus on Mary Tudor (remembered by history as 'Bloody Mary') as a young woman, and how the breakdown of the relationship with her parents influenced her. Lucy Worsley beautifully captures Mary's relationship with her mother, taking a different approach to many writers and showing instead Catherine as someone prideful and stubborn, who loves like a lioness rather than a mother. I found their relationship to be one of the This was a refreshing, well thought out book. Cleverly plotted, it maintains focus on Mary Tudor (remembered by history as 'Bloody Mary') as a young woman, and how the breakdown of the relationship with her parents influenced her. Lucy Worsley beautifully captures Mary's relationship with her mother, taking a different approach to many writers and showing instead Catherine as someone prideful and stubborn, who loves like a lioness rather than a mother. I found their relationship to be one of the most poignant and believable aspects of the book.The pacing was sometimes jarring, there are gaps of years between each chapter, and that sometimes makes aspects of the plot feel hurried or just glossed over. An example would be that later in the book, on learning of Anne's death, Mary thinks of her as someone she sat with many times - but as a reader I had only seen Anne in two scenes! Her presence in the book is as a constant threat more than a personality, which made the scenes after her death feel a little disingenuous.Overall, I would definitely recommend this book. Lucy Worsley has found a new way to retell one of the most famous stories in English history, and it's wonderful. It's telling that when I finished, the only real criticism that came to mind was just "isn't there more?"
    more
  • Kei • lovelypagesreviews •
    January 1, 1970
    2 stars.There's three things this book wants to make perfectly clear:1) Anne = slut2) Catherine = scorned3) Mary = victimAnd that's... pretty much it. The blurb calls it thrilling and dramatic, there's nothing thrilling about this but the drama is in abundance.Young Mary even as a child is a whiny little brat straight out of Mean Girls. Often I found myself just wanting her to shut up, and that never changed. In theory this should have been a fascinating POV of a broadly known story, no matter y 2 stars.There's three things this book wants to make perfectly clear:1) Anne = slut2) Catherine = scorned3) Mary = victimAnd that's... pretty much it. The blurb calls it thrilling and dramatic, there's nothing thrilling about this but the drama is in abundance.Young Mary even as a child is a whiny little brat straight out of Mean Girls. Often I found myself just wanting her to shut up, and that never changed. In theory this should have been a fascinating POV of a broadly known story, no matter your source there's not a single character of this time you haven't heard of if you're into history. That being said, the characters were more caricatures than anything else.Catherine of Aragon was portrayed as this fierce woman who cared for nothing but her husband but he was an asshole, she was bold and loud and so damn dramatic in every scene. Anne Boleyn was written as a villain - didn't shock me at all to be honest - and Mary remained a child from start to finish obsessed and mad that everyone kept calling her Lady instead of Princess.I only enjoyed Anne Boleyn, the more the author portrayed her as this awful woman, the more I loved her.
    more
  • Katy Noyes
    January 1, 1970
    Another 'female perspective' for younger readers. Tudor history brought home to teenagers.I've read and loved all of Lucy Worsley's other YA/children's books, she has a knack, a little like Jacqueline Wilson, for bringing out the voice - the desires, the frustrations, the idiosyncrasies - of real historical figures in their youth and breathing life into them for contemporary readers. Worlsey returns to the Tudors, this time heading straight for the controversial Queen Mary, when she was a girl. Another 'female perspective' for younger readers. Tudor history brought home to teenagers.I've read and loved all of Lucy Worsley's other YA/children's books, she has a knack, a little like Jacqueline Wilson, for bringing out the voice - the desires, the frustrations, the idiosyncrasies - of real historical figures in their youth and breathing life into them for contemporary readers. Worlsey returns to the Tudors, this time heading straight for the controversial Queen Mary, when she was a girl. Readers will be fascinated by the story of her separated parents, the second wife of the King, her mother's political striving and struggles. And Mary's own demotion from royalty as punishment for not accepting the situation. The spirit she shows here, while we may not have proof of every action, does give rise to a feeling that Mary must have acted unlike most women of her time. Mary is born an heir, but eh tempestuous situation of her youth, such a key time in history, gives this book many tense and surprising times, as Mary is treated in ways readers will be shocked at.With social history and details aplenty, this will be much loved by history teachers (even if it strays from truth into speculation here and there) and any young reader who likes tales set in the past. I began re-watching 'The Tudors' while reading this, and it also inspired me to learn more about some of the figures presented within it (Cromwell, Anne Boleyn), and I love books that encourage me to consider well-known stories from perspectives I hadn't given much credence. Lucy Worsley seems to write naturally for her readers, the style personal and flowing, without resorting to old-fashioned language but giving plenty of historical detail to bring the scenes around them to life. This was a fairly short but engaging historical read, one I'd be recommending in a school library to Years 7-9 particularly. With thanks to Netgalley for the sample e-copy, provided for review purposes.
    more
  • Elena
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Actual rating: 2.5 stars.I really enjoy Lucy Worsley's programmes, so I was excited to try a historical novel by her, especially because I like Mary Tudor and I think her bad reputation is largely undeserved.Unfortunately, this book did not work so well for me. First of all, it felt not very historical: the characters spoke very freely and their actions often felt too modern. The characterization of some historical figures was I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Actual rating: 2.5 stars.I really enjoy Lucy Worsley's programmes, so I was excited to try a historical novel by her, especially because I like Mary Tudor and I think her bad reputation is largely undeserved.Unfortunately, this book did not work so well for me. First of all, it felt not very historical: the characters spoke very freely and their actions often felt too modern. The characterization of some historical figures was disappointing as well. Catherine of Aragon was portrayed as a very proud and bold woman who mainly cared about her status, and not so much for her daughter. On one hand, I appreciated Worsley's trying to paint her more strongly and not only as a meek and devoted wife, but on the other hand she didn't convince me. Anne Boleyn was instead similar to a villain from fairytales, and, while I was expecting it, it still made me roll my eyes. The plot was also quite slow. I liked the first and the third part, but the second part dragged a lot and I felt bored at times. I think the book could have been shorter over all.That being said, I think Mary's characterization was quite well done. She went through a lot during the book and it was easy to sympathize with her. Her desire for a normal family, and her pain at being used as a pawn by her own parents and everyone else, felt real and understandable. I also appreciated the relationships she formed with Lady Shelton, which was unexpected but well portrayed, and Jane Seymour, another character which was remarkably well portrayed despite appearing so little. All in all, not a satisfying read for me, but I think younger readers, and maybe readers who want to start reading historical fiction, might enjoy it more.
    more
  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy from Net Galley. This story follows a young Mary Tudor. I haven't read novels that follow Mary when she is a child as they usually tend to focus on her reign as Queen. I have read Lucy's other novels that she has written; Eliza Rose and My Name Is Victoria and I must say although I did enjoy this one it is probably my least favourite out of the three. We see Mary go through a lot from the divorce of her parents, to her banishment from court by Anne Boleyn and reconnecting with I received a copy from Net Galley. This story follows a young Mary Tudor. I haven't read novels that follow Mary when she is a child as they usually tend to focus on her reign as Queen. I have read Lucy's other novels that she has written; Eliza Rose and My Name Is Victoria and I must say although I did enjoy this one it is probably my least favourite out of the three. We see Mary go through a lot from the divorce of her parents, to her banishment from court by Anne Boleyn and reconnecting with the King when he marries Jane Seymour. Due to the nature of what happened to Mary, she spent a lot of time by herself away from the action of the court. This made the book a bit slow in places and not a lot happened. I always like Lucy's books as although they are works of fiction you can tell that a lot of research goes into them and the story feels as if it could be real. I really liked this interpretation of events. I am hoping that Lucy will write more books like this as I really enjoy them.
    more
  • gem
    January 1, 1970
    A fascinating look into the early life of the now infamous Mary I, Bloody Mary.Told with Lucy Watson’s superb eye for detail coupled with historically accurate insight into the early life of Mary Tudor, this book really made me think about her in an entirely new light. She is, at the heart of the matter, a young girl who’s parents are splitting up and she no longer knows where her place in her own family let alone the world. This would be a superb introduction to the Tudor period and hopefully f A fascinating look into the early life of the now infamous Mary I, Bloody Mary.Told with Lucy Watson’s superb eye for detail coupled with historically accurate insight into the early life of Mary Tudor, this book really made me think about her in an entirely new light. She is, at the heart of the matter, a young girl who’s parents are splitting up and she no longer knows where her place in her own family let alone the world. This would be a superb introduction to the Tudor period and hopefully fuel readers into a love of historical fiction and non-fiction alike.Thank you to Netgalley for the chance to read this.
    more
  • Plain Fox books
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book for a honest review.What sold this book to me was a quote from the Times; "Wolf Hall for the Skins generation” - I found this quite funny after reading this book, because it feels like whoever wrote this never watched Skins before, because this book is nowhere close to this description.I did enjoy this book. I love reading historical fiction, and I love stories about King Henry VIII. It was very interesting reading a book with Mary's point of view, specially when y I received an ARC of this book for a honest review.What sold this book to me was a quote from the Times; "Wolf Hall for the Skins generation” - I found this quite funny after reading this book, because it feels like whoever wrote this never watched Skins before, because this book is nowhere close to this description.I did enjoy this book. I love reading historical fiction, and I love stories about King Henry VIII. It was very interesting reading a book with Mary's point of view, specially when you know what she was like historically. Though reading from her point of view made me quite sad. This book is history through a child/teenagers eyes, and it's just sad to think that is what she actually went through. I don't know how much of this book is historically correct, but it shows the possibility of what point of view Mary might had as a child looks like.
    more
  • Laura Newsholme
    January 1, 1970
    The much maligned Mary Tudor is given a fair shake in this novel by Lucy Worsley. It covers Mary's teenage years, during which she was separated from her mother and forced to sign away her succession to the throne by her father. The prose is really accessible, which I found appealing and I think this would be a great book for children to get their teeth into. The story is fascinating and Worsley's enthusiasm for her subject shines through, making this a really compelling read. I do think that Ma The much maligned Mary Tudor is given a fair shake in this novel by Lucy Worsley. It covers Mary's teenage years, during which she was separated from her mother and forced to sign away her succession to the throne by her father. The prose is really accessible, which I found appealing and I think this would be a great book for children to get their teeth into. The story is fascinating and Worsley's enthusiasm for her subject shines through, making this a really compelling read. I do think that Mary is the most misunderstood of the Tudor monarchs and Worsley does a great job of providing us with another side to her story. There are times when Mary still comes across as a bit of a whiner and she certainly has a selfish streak, but given her situation and upbringing, this isn't surprising. All in all, this was a fun and easy read that kids should enjoy.I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
    more
  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    This book is absolutely brilliant.Okay, it’s probably not aimed at 21 year olds, but who cares?? It’s a fantastic take on Mary Tudor, and presents her in a new light. Not only that, but it features moments from Tudor history a lot of people would recognise, from the point of view of someone in the thick of it. I love Lucy Worsley’s books anyway, but this was exceptional. It’s made me want to read more about Mary, and the Tudors in general. I also love the “epilogue” that explains to the reader i This book is absolutely brilliant.Okay, it’s probably not aimed at 21 year olds, but who cares?? It’s a fantastic take on Mary Tudor, and presents her in a new light. Not only that, but it features moments from Tudor history a lot of people would recognise, from the point of view of someone in the thick of it. I love Lucy Worsley’s books anyway, but this was exceptional. It’s made me want to read more about Mary, and the Tudors in general. I also love the “epilogue” that explains to the reader it’s not entirely accurate, but is based on real events, with personal experience thrown in. I’d recommend it to anyone, of any age, with an interest in history!
    more
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    (originally posted on The Writing Hufflepuff)Disclaimer: I was given an ARC of this book by Netgalley and the publisher (thank you!) in return for an honest reviewFor someone who claims to love history I don't read enough historical fiction. So when I saw this title on Netgalley I just had to request it** Plus that cover?? SO PRETTYGoing in I didn't know anything about Mary, so learning about her was definitely interesting, though I was bored quite a bit, because for most of the book I felt like (originally posted on The Writing Hufflepuff)Disclaimer: I was given an ARC of this book by Netgalley and the publisher (thank you!) in return for an honest reviewFor someone who claims to love history I don't read enough historical fiction. So when I saw this title on Netgalley I just had to request it** Plus that cover?? SO PRETTYGoing in I didn't know anything about Mary, so learning about her was definitely interesting, though I was bored quite a bit, because for most of the book I felt like not much was happening. Just when things were starting to get interesting, it was over. I think I would've liked a little less detail on her childhood and teenage years, and a little bit more on her return to court. Not that her childhood and teenage years weren't interesting, but most of the time there just wasn't much happening? I don't know if that's because of a lack of sources on what was happening during that time, or a choice of the author. Maybe I would've felt different about this if I had connected with the writing style better, which is my next point.The writing style was a bit too simple for me - it might be aimed at younger readers, but I don't think writing for younger teens/kids has to be simple. Just look at Harry Potter and Percy Jackson for example, both books read and loved by those older than the main younger audience. I also found it a bit weird how naive fifteen year old Anne was. Sometimes it felt like she still didn't understand how things at court worked, which I found a bit unrealistic. Not to mention that I even forgot that she was supposed to be fifteen at that point. She did grow a lot through the book as she grew older and she really stood up for herself, which was nice to see. I'm not going to call her an 'inspiration' or anything like that, as older Mary is responsible for putting a lot of Protestants to death. Just like her father and sister Elizabeth I put Catholics to death, as the author rightfully points out in her afterword. It's interesting, as she points out, that Mary has been quite vilified for doing something her father and sister did as well, just because Protestant historians told her story and she got the nickname 'Bloody Mary'. Of course all three of them were horrible for what they did, but it was interesting to read about Mary and find out what kind of person she was. And to see the affair between Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn from her eyes.Also if you ever thought Henry VIII was awful,, well boy are you in for a ride! The things Mary went through were inhumane and he didn't even acknowledge it for the most part? Or really apologise?(view spoiler)[He did finally see it at the end of the book, apologises and finally gives her the status she deserves, though I don't know if that actually happened and I'm too lazy to find out haha. The author is a historian though, so maybe it did happen? (hide spoiler)]While reading the book I couldn't help but read up a bit more about Mary, since I'm curious like that, and Lady Mary seems like a very accurate portrayal.If you have an interest in the Tudors, or just in history in general, I say give this a go! It's definitely an interesting read and liking the writing style or not is very subjective.
    more
  • Sophie Meulemans
    January 1, 1970
    Although I have read many books about Mary, daughter of Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon, there has not been one book yet, which made my sympathy for Mary this great. It was intriguing to read about her, in her younger years, or rather to read from her. The relationship between mother and daughter was nevertheless central to this book. She loved her mothert the moon and back, but in her younger years she became tired of her mother and her 'fanatical' royal behavior. She did not understand how Although I have read many books about Mary, daughter of Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon, there has not been one book yet, which made my sympathy for Mary this great. It was intriguing to read about her, in her younger years, or rather to read from her. The relationship between mother and daughter was nevertheless central to this book. She loved her mothert the moon and back, but in her younger years she became tired of her mother and her 'fanatical' royal behavior. She did not understand how important it was for her to always put her royal descent first ,and to defend it at all cost. She had to 'fight till the death' her mother told her so many times. To hear it over and over again made her get tired over it and irritated ( but she did remember it when her time came to fight till the Death came ). The way her life turned around when Anne came to the throne is to terrible, really terrible. The way she was send to Hatfield with a very small room for her living. Lucy made this situation real for me ... I could totally imagine the room where she had to stay, and I wonder if there really is such a room with a small door? tucked away in a corner. This book made it clear to me (again), what a jerk Henry actually was, as a man but especially as a father. Girls were and remained nothing in his eyes, a daughter just did not matter, something she constantly felt and noticed in the smallest things. And this must have been terrible for Mary, it's just abuse. My sympathy has greatly increased for Mary, her actions in the future when she wears the crown on her head are more explicable because of the things she had to go through in her youth. Thanks to Lucy Worsley for this blink in Mary's life, it was a wonderfull experience
    more
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Okay so maybe Mary wasn’t so bad after all; you’ll believe me when you read this. Even if you weren’t familiar with how many lives Mary’s reign might have destroyed with her seemingly aggressive approach, you’ll definitely be familiar with the theory, and certainly those surrounding Henry VIII and his many wives! What’s interesting about this story though, alongside that perfect blend of fact and fiction, is the relationships between key players during this time and how these relationships may h Okay so maybe Mary wasn’t so bad after all; you’ll believe me when you read this. Even if you weren’t familiar with how many lives Mary’s reign might have destroyed with her seemingly aggressive approach, you’ll definitely be familiar with the theory, and certainly those surrounding Henry VIII and his many wives! What’s interesting about this story though, alongside that perfect blend of fact and fiction, is the relationships between key players during this time and how these relationships may have shaped Mary, and perhaps even her successors, to become the vengeful ruler she was alleged to be. True or not, it’s definitely some fun food for thought and it’s fun to imagine these well known figures interacting with each other more personally than a non-fiction book or documentary could capture. I hadn’t even considered much of what is included in this book and the creativity with the storyline, whilst still holding true to things historians know to have happened, really made me question if Mary was just misunderstood, or maybe if I just understand the method behind her madness now! I loved Mary and her relationship with her mother most of all. This book perfectly captures the bond between mother and daughter, but also the allies we often find in our parents, and this really made the characters shine for me.An interesting book, with a slightly slow pace, but a really compelling character in Mary.ARC provided free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars *Non-spoiler review*This book was kindly given to me by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is also posted to my blog: HannahandherlittleblogofbooksDespite being slow in some places, I really enjoyed this book! The writing was beautiful, and I found it very easy to slip into the mind of Mary, and to be swept up into her complex world. My knowledge of Mary I is- shamefully- very limited, so it was really interesting to learn about her, and especially have the divorce betwee 3.5 stars *Non-spoiler review*This book was kindly given to me by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is also posted to my blog: HannahandherlittleblogofbooksDespite being slow in some places, I really enjoyed this book! The writing was beautiful, and I found it very easy to slip into the mind of Mary, and to be swept up into her complex world. My knowledge of Mary I is- shamefully- very limited, so it was really interesting to learn about her, and especially have the divorce between her parents told through her perspective.I loved how we followed Mary from a young age right through to her in her twenties. My favourite part was watching Mary grow throughout the book. We see her go from a naive child into a stubborn adolescent to a determined adult- her relentless determination to stay true to herself and her beliefs was very inspiring.Her character development was done really well and I felt the story had a satisfying ending.I loved the relationships Mary formed throughout her journey, especially towards the end when she came to accept her step-mother Jane- I only wish we'd seen more of them together because their interactions were very sweet. I also wish there had been more political and court intrigue but overall I had a fun time reading this book and highly recommend to anyone with an interest in the Tudor period. 
    more
  • Judith Moore
    January 1, 1970
    Full review up on my blog: https://chaininteraction.wordpress.co...This book isn’t my normal read, other than alternative histories like And I Darken I haven’t really delved into the world of historical fiction, odd for an ex-history student! This book deals with the childhood and teenage years of Mary the first, also known as Bloody Mary. I’ll confess I knew very little about ‘Bloody Mary’ before reading this, as most of my Tudor knowledge is Elizabeth I centred. As a result, I can’t speak to t Full review up on my blog: https://chaininteraction.wordpress.co...This book isn’t my normal read, other than alternative histories like And I Darken I haven’t really delved into the world of historical fiction, odd for an ex-history student! This book deals with the childhood and teenage years of Mary the first, also known as Bloody Mary. I’ll confess I knew very little about ‘Bloody Mary’ before reading this, as most of my Tudor knowledge is Elizabeth I centred. As a result, I can’t speak to the historical accuracy of this book, but I do think it was clever to make Mary the main character of this story, as it was interesting to see how her character might have been corrupted by Church history throughout the years.When this book first started I thought I was really going to hate Mary, she was written as quite a whiny individual, dependant on others to make decisions for her. I think that’s partly because I’m not used to reading characters who are so young, particularly not in a first-person narrative. However, Mary grows into her own pretty quickly and she quickly becomes a strong-willed individual. I’m actually quite glad she started out as unlikeable (for me) as it’s a fun experience for a reader to grow to love the main character. I’m reminded a little of Emma and how you have to be willing to like the character.What I particularly enjoyed about reading this book was the huge sense of dramatic irony you get from reading it, knowing a bit of the background to the Tudor age. It’s heartbreaking to see Mary’s parents divorce through her eyes, especially knowing Henry the eighth isn’t even started yet, so many more women are going to end up hurt. I think this would be a great book to read if you knew absolutely nothing about this period (I don’t know how much they teach the Tudors in schools outside England) but it’s got a certain power to it when you do have that additional knowledge.This is a powerful story of the role of women (for there are more women than just Mary in this story) in a time which most people write off as being just for the men. Mary, Elizabeth and their subsequent female monarchs did huge things while in power (obviously not all of them good) and this book goes some way to showing that Mary was exceptional even before she was made Queen.Should you read this? If you enjoy a good bit of political intrigue and some strong-willed ladies then I would say so. As a fantasy reader, I could have done with more dragons, but maybe I’m just being picky.My rating: 4 starsThis book comes out on April 5th 2018.I did receive a digital advanced review copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
    more
  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    Lady Mary is told from the point of view of a young Princess Mary, first daughter of Henry the 8th.It covers the events between the ages of nine and twenty one years old in Mary's life, including her father concluding that his marriage to Catherine of Aragon was invalid which allowed him to divorce and marry Anne Bolyen. At this point Anne has Henry's ear and has Mary removed from court and banished to be a servant to her new sister Elizabeth. Mary, taught by her mother to be strong, refuses to Lady Mary is told from the point of view of a young Princess Mary, first daughter of Henry the 8th.It covers the events between the ages of nine and twenty one years old in Mary's life, including her father concluding that his marriage to Catherine of Aragon was invalid which allowed him to divorce and marry Anne Bolyen. At this point Anne has Henry's ear and has Mary removed from court and banished to be a servant to her new sister Elizabeth. Mary, taught by her mother to be strong, refuses to acknowledge her sister and renounce her title and therefore becomes a prisoner in her new surroundings. Whilst it's an interesting piece of history and I now know more about Mary's childhood, the story is rather dull. Not sure if that is the circumstances with the period of history being depicted, as the dialogue was so stilted and lacking. Some of the descriptions of the places seemed cliche.Being aimed at teens I expected more feelings to be included, as they may empathise with Mary's situation being cast aside for a fathers new wife and child.I received this book from netgalley in return from a honest review.
    more
Write a review