Carnet de Voyage
Craig Thompson spent three months traveling through Barcelona, the Alps, and France, as well as Morocco, researching his next graphic novel, Habibi. Spontaneous sketches and a travelogue diary document his adventures and quiet moments, creating a raw and intimate portrait of countries, culture and the wandering artist.

Carnet de Voyage Details

TitleCarnet de Voyage
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 3rd, 2004
PublisherTop Shelf Productions
ISBN-139781891830600
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Travel, Nonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Graphic Novels Comics

Carnet de Voyage Review

  • notyourmonkey
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those ratings that I fully admit may not be equally applicable to everyone picking up this book. Yes, it's very, very good, but what makes it a five star for me may not hold true for everyone else. But oh. For me? For me, this is the book I never knew I wanted to read until I held it in my hands, and once I did, I couldn't imagine not having read it before, much less not known about it before. It's a graphic novel (check) slash travel journal (check) that's as much about a mental This is one of those ratings that I fully admit may not be equally applicable to everyone picking up this book. Yes, it's very, very good, but what makes it a five star for me may not hold true for everyone else. But oh. For me? For me, this is the book I never knew I wanted to read until I held it in my hands, and once I did, I couldn't imagine not having read it before, much less not known about it before. It's a graphic novel (check) slash travel journal (check) that's as much about a mental journey as a physical one (check) through France (check), Morocco (check), and Spain (check) among others, with a particular emphasis on what it's like to travel alone (check), the glories and the mundanities of being an American in Europe and North Africa (check), the amazing food (check), and cats (check). Seriously. This feels like a story I could have written, if, you know, I were a dude with artistic talent and a heartrending love back home. I love this book because it rings so very true for me from some of the very similar adventures I have had. I love this book because it is the graphic art equivalent of so much that I've tried to do with the written journals and photography I've done during my travel. I love this book because of how much better (and shorter) it says things I've tried to capture for myself. I love this book for the sense of "I've been there! I've done that! So true! Sotruesotruesotrue!" it gives me. It's raw and it's personal and it's not perfect, and even though it was composed (drawn? written? both?) knowing that there would be an audience in mind, it still feels a bit like rereading my own journals from Brussels, from Marrakesh, from Granada, from Dijon all those years ago. And did I mention the food? The lovingly detailed drawings and descriptions of the food? Because yes.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Thompson makes the point of stating that this is not his "next book" but a nice diversion in his catalog. That being said, I don't know why he decided to publish his travel diary. I have a few travel diaries, the most recent of which was recorded while hitchhiking across Canada. It's full of the interesting characters I met and the strange activities I engaged in (being picked up by a drunk driver, sleeping in a cemetery in downtown Regina etc.) Maybe I should publish it too!! All I'd need to do Thompson makes the point of stating that this is not his "next book" but a nice diversion in his catalog. That being said, I don't know why he decided to publish his travel diary. I have a few travel diaries, the most recent of which was recorded while hitchhiking across Canada. It's full of the interesting characters I met and the strange activities I engaged in (being picked up by a drunk driver, sleeping in a cemetery in downtown Regina etc.) Maybe I should publish it too!! All I'd need to do is throw in some character sketches and a few scenery sketches (I suppose I could just use the photos I took) and BLAM! I have a book.But I wouldn't want to give my own book a one-star rating, so I will refrain just as Thompson should have. This would have been interesting as a blog, or something I guess.
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  • Rebecca Foster
    January 1, 1970
    A sketchbook Thompson kept on his combined European book tour for Blankets and research trip for Habibi in March–May 2004. It doesn’t really work as a stand-alone graphic memoir because there isn’t much of a narrative, just a series of book signings, random encounters with friends and strangers, and tourism. My favorite two-page spread is about a camel ride he took into the Moroccan desert. I could also sympathize with his crippling hand pain (from all that drawing) and his “chaos tolerance” o A sketchbook Thompson kept on his combined European book tour for Blankets and research trip for Habibi in March–May 2004. It doesn’t really work as a stand-alone graphic memoir because there isn’t much of a narrative, just a series of book signings, random encounters with friends and strangers, and tourism. My favorite two-page spread is about a camel ride he took into the Moroccan desert. I could also sympathize with his crippling hand pain (from all that drawing) and his “chaos tolerance” overload from the stress of travel.
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  • Ma'Belle
    January 1, 1970
    I read this not knowing what to expect, knowing that it would be a side project illustrated travel diary, and that the author has inserted a great, humble disclaimer as the introduction.This would be the second book I'd read by Craig Thompson; the first was Blankets, which astounded me with its honest and affectionate autobiographical depictions of adolescence in Fundamentalist Evangelical American culture in the Midwest. More than anything, my jaw dropped and alternately lifted into a smile bec I read this not knowing what to expect, knowing that it would be a side project illustrated travel diary, and that the author has inserted a great, humble disclaimer as the introduction.This would be the second book I'd read by Craig Thompson; the first was Blankets, which astounded me with its honest and affectionate autobiographical depictions of adolescence in Fundamentalist Evangelical American culture in the Midwest. More than anything, my jaw dropped and alternately lifted into a smile because of the similarities of the author's life to mine and the empathy subsequently evoked in me.Once again, in Carnet de Voyage, I was blown away by Craig Thompson's introspective nature, his humility, and his ability to capture both people and the places that surround them. The brief experiences and consistent themes (the loneliness of traveling solo in foreign lands) that Thompson narrates flow with vulnerability, dry suspense, and subtlety.I happened to be traveling Europe solo not too long before Thompson's own experience (Spring '04), so many nostalgic thoughts and emotions were stirred up in me by reading this.All in all, I'm glad Craig put this out there for us to enjoy.
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  • Malvika
    January 1, 1970
    Confession: I am in love with Craig Thompson a bit too much, I think it's even getting unhealthy. (Kidding, love for art is never too much.) I have loved Blankets and Habibi, each for different reasons, and also because they are stories told by Craig, who is a fabulous narrator along with being one of the best goddamned artists alive. So obviously, I loved poring over his travel journal. I envy the way Craig Thompson draws his emotions on the page, so simple, elegant, and intense. As always, an Confession: I am in love with Craig Thompson a bit too much, I think it's even getting unhealthy. (Kidding, love for art is never too much.) I have loved Blankets and Habibi, each for different reasons, and also because they are stories told by Craig, who is a fabulous narrator along with being one of the best goddamned artists alive. So obviously, I loved poring over his travel journal. I envy the way Craig Thompson draws his emotions on the page, so simple, elegant, and intense. As always, an absolute pleasure to look at his sketches, especially his female forms (what are these fab skills even?) and the cats! Thanks, CT. <3
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  • Bandit
    January 1, 1970
    Random reading selection. I love both travelogues and graphic novels, though this was the first time I've come across of combination of the two in one book. Mixed results. The author does state that this is merely his travel journal and not really a book and it reads as such, as in not much of a story outside of a fairly reluctant traveler, encountering some civilized enjoyable locales and other much less so. Morroco is presented in a pretty bleak realistic way, it's refreshing to see someone no Random reading selection. I love both travelogues and graphic novels, though this was the first time I've come across of combination of the two in one book. Mixed results. The author does state that this is merely his travel journal and not really a book and it reads as such, as in not much of a story outside of a fairly reluctant traveler, encountering some civilized enjoyable locales and other much less so. Morroco is presented in a pretty bleak realistic way, it's refreshing to see someone not glorifying the eastern mystique and just seeing the place for what it is. Europe is...well, Europe. Not much of a story, really, though the black and white sketches are lovely.
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  • Hillary
    January 1, 1970
    I probably preferred this to Blankets, partially because of lowered expectations, due to the form, a loose travel journal/sketchbook. Also, it helps that Thompson seems to have become a little less uptight, and the whining tends to be undercut with self-conscious acknowledgment and mocking of it. That's not true, however, for his use of the term "lover" throughout, which makes me cringe, accurate or not. The art is pretty wonderful, though, and inspiring (it would be more so if I could or wanted I probably preferred this to Blankets, partially because of lowered expectations, due to the form, a loose travel journal/sketchbook. Also, it helps that Thompson seems to have become a little less uptight, and the whining tends to be undercut with self-conscious acknowledgment and mocking of it. That's not true, however, for his use of the term "lover" throughout, which makes me cringe, accurate or not. The art is pretty wonderful, though, and inspiring (it would be more so if I could or wanted to draw at all, but, as is, it does make me want to travel--not necessarily to the desert on a camel but at least to go eat delicious things), and the Lewis Trondheim cameo (they play laser tag and Trondheim draws himself) is wonderful and funny and makes me think of how much I love Trondheim. It's also wisely ended at the point it is. Much more complaining about his hands hurting and his homesickness and how much he misses his now ex-girlfriend would have countered its charms, swinging my overall impression of the book to negative rather than positive.
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  • Kristy
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't mean to read this loosely formatted travel journal of comic artist Craig Thompson's 2004 European book tour as quickly as I did, and honestly, I didn't expect it to be as engaging as it was. Thompson is such an emotionally touching artist -- his drawings of scenes in Morocco, Paris, Barcelona, and elsewhere are more real than any photograph, and his drawings of the friends and strangers he meets along the way give the reader an immediate sense of the real person behind the drawing. Havi I didn't mean to read this loosely formatted travel journal of comic artist Craig Thompson's 2004 European book tour as quickly as I did, and honestly, I didn't expect it to be as engaging as it was. Thompson is such an emotionally touching artist -- his drawings of scenes in Morocco, Paris, Barcelona, and elsewhere are more real than any photograph, and his drawings of the friends and strangers he meets along the way give the reader an immediate sense of the real person behind the drawing. Having read Thompson's autobiographical Blankets, this is almost like a continuation of the "Thompson" character. Definitely worth a read for Thompson fans.
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  • Rubi
    January 1, 1970
    Los dibujos son muy buenos; con ellos me he sentido como si estuviera en las ciudades que describen. Pero... una novela gráfica, es eso, una combinación de ambas cosas y desgraciadamente, la parte de novela se queda cortísima. Un diario monótono en el que el autor no deja de autocompadecerse y de quejarse. Sí, pobre, su amante pasó de él, pero no creo que sea como para que nos lo esté diciendo constantemente.En fin, que vale como cuaderno de viaje porque los dibujos se salvan; pero desde luego, Los dibujos son muy buenos; con ellos me he sentido como si estuviera en las ciudades que describen. Pero... una novela gráfica, es eso, una combinación de ambas cosas y desgraciadamente, la parte de novela se queda cortísima. Un diario monótono en el que el autor no deja de autocompadecerse y de quejarse. Sí, pobre, su amante pasó de él, pero no creo que sea como para que nos lo esté diciendo constantemente.En fin, que vale como cuaderno de viaje porque los dibujos se salvan; pero desde luego, podría haber contado un millón de cosas y no lo ha hecho. Se queda con cosas muy mundanas... Un diario es algo más que eso (en mi opinión).
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  • Sooraya Evans
    January 1, 1970
    Loved his work on Blankets.That's why I decided to give this one a try.Overall, disappointed.It's just boring. Artwork still OK though...
  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderfully enjoyable travelogue and an endearingly self-deprecating insight into Craig Thompson's mind.
  • Federica
    January 1, 1970
    Premessa: chi ha amato “Blankets” (e chi non l’ha amato?) amerà alla follia anche “Carnet di viaggio”.Craig racconta i suoi due mesi e mezzo di viaggi fra Francia, Spagna (per dei tour promozionali) e Marocco, ma non racconta i posti, racconta se stesso e le sue reazioni in base agli stimoli esterni. È un racconto profondamente intimo, e, come in “Blankets”, coraggiosamente onesto. Craig non è felice, e vive il viaggio accompagnato da un costante senso di colpa, da nevrosi e paturnie, di cui si Premessa: chi ha amato “Blankets” (e chi non l’ha amato?) amerà alla follia anche “Carnet di viaggio”.Craig racconta i suoi due mesi e mezzo di viaggi fra Francia, Spagna (per dei tour promozionali) e Marocco, ma non racconta i posti, racconta se stesso e le sue reazioni in base agli stimoli esterni. È un racconto profondamente intimo, e, come in “Blankets”, coraggiosamente onesto. Craig non è felice, e vive il viaggio accompagnato da un costante senso di colpa, da nevrosi e paturnie, di cui si vergogna, ma che non nasconde. Anche lo stile di disegno ricorda tanto “Blankets”, dove spesso la realtà e le figure si piegano all’interpretazione dell’autore, rivelando molto più di quanto potrebbero mai fare le parole.E torna quell’introspezione paurosa, che obbliga a guardar anche dentro di noi... perché se una persona si mette a nudo davanti a te, per empatia, lo fai anche tu.Per questi motivi, per un motivo cronologico e per altri che non posso citare, mi vien da considerare “Carnet di viaggio” il sequel spirituale di “Blankets”... perché dopotutto anche l’effetto che dà la sua lettura è lo stesso: il bisogno, la voglia di stringere Craig fra le braccia e dirgli “grazie”.
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  • Meg
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. His art is amazing, his thoughts interesting....and as a fellow traveler I found myself agreeing with his search for isolation while not wanting to be lonely. Craig travels to France (Lyon! Tu me manques!), Spain and Morocco...and I ate this book up. I would love to record my travels with a pen and a ink....but alas, I do not have the same talent. Read if you love to travel, or you yearn to travel....or just need a break from life. 2017 Reading Challenge: A book with pictures
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  • Larry C
    January 1, 1970
    I understood his depression and loneliness all too well. This was a beautiful experiment that works quite well emotionally.
  • René
    January 1, 1970
    Con un poco de suerte será algo más agradable que una simple sucesión de diapositivas.
  • Axel Barceló
    January 1, 1970
    I am not a big fan of Mr. Thomspon's drawing style and, of course, the American perspective on France, Barcelona and Morocco was quite alien to me; yet, the book ended up winning me over. It is very honest and many aspects of international comics trade shows sounded very similar to the world of international academic meetings, so I identified with him many on those later European chapters.
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved this book. However, I still have critiques, so they must be of reality rather than the book, since it's REAL. So, while reading, I just kept thinking, Dude, you are a shameless womanizer. He's ostensibly in love with his ex-girlfriend, but he strikes up conversations with every pretty girl he sees and ends up in bed or something with a significant number of them (hard to tell sometimes because it's only implied, but still). Then, he proceeds to express how socially incompetent and I really loved this book. However, I still have critiques, so they must be of reality rather than the book, since it's REAL. So, while reading, I just kept thinking, Dude, you are a shameless womanizer. He's ostensibly in love with his ex-girlfriend, but he strikes up conversations with every pretty girl he sees and ends up in bed or something with a significant number of them (hard to tell sometimes because it's only implied, but still). Then, he proceeds to express how socially incompetent and lonesome he is, but the entire thing is about him spending time with people. Friends here, friends there, friends up the wazoo. If you're socially incompetent and lonesome, typically it fundamentally and inherently means that you don't have that many friends and don't make them that quickly. Next, non-French men who sprinkle French into their otherwise English vocabulary bother me, as do men who wear fashionable scarves, and as do Seattle people. It's purely personal, but still. This man exhibits all three traits, thus garnering less sympathy from me. Penultimately, this book detailed the stressful journey of his life doing book tours, interviews, and all manner of such things that you would think would be reserved for worldwide literary sensations like J.K. Rowling and Suzanne Collins. I mean, I had heard of Blankets even before I read it and knew that it was pretty popular among adult graphic novel people especially a few years ago, but somehow that translates into a life of extreme fame and hectic insanity for the author, and I'm not sure how or why. And finally, a huge part of the stress conveyed here was regarding the author's painful, rheumatoid hands. I looked him up at last because I was like, Okay, who is this guy? I wanted to see one of these famed interviews, see whether he was sad and clumsy in actuality (of course, in interviews he appears very professional, outgoing, and composed)-- and I came across a video on Youtube showing him actually drawing one of his lovely drawings. His drawings are truly great. However, when I witnessed how he held the pen to draw, I wished Sassy Gay Friend were there to say, "WHAT. WHAT. WHAT ARE YOU DOING." Who the fuck holds a pen like that???? THAT'S why the guy has painful hands! Seriously. WTF. If you want to keep your hands, you need to do the things you do with them ergonomically. Holy shit.
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  • Alyse Liebovich
    January 1, 1970
    "American girl I look at you and you do nothing!" a robed Moroccan man screeched at me in Tangiers before smacking my ass. The feeling of wandering around Barcelona by myself, becoming immediately obsessed with everything Gaudi, and of meandering around Paris with my best friend, Amy, a few days after the Atocha train bombings in Madrid. These are memories that drifted back into my mind while reading Carnet de Voyage. This is a non-fiction graphic novel I came across at the high school library w "American girl I look at you and you do nothing!" a robed Moroccan man screeched at me in Tangiers before smacking my ass. The feeling of wandering around Barcelona by myself, becoming immediately obsessed with everything Gaudi, and of meandering around Paris with my best friend, Amy, a few days after the Atocha train bombings in Madrid. These are memories that drifted back into my mind while reading Carnet de Voyage. This is a non-fiction graphic novel I came across at the high school library where I work and picked up only because it looked like a quick read and I was familiar with the author/artist from reading "Blankets" last year. Imagine my surprise when I discovered not only is it an illustrated travelogue, but it takes place during the exact time period I was studying abroad in 2004! Thompson narrates his travels with sketches of places and personal portraits of people he encounters, while dealing with being away from family and a recent ex-girlfriend. AND he goes to a bunch of the places I traveled as well (Paris, Barcelona, Morocco), which brought up memories I hadn't thought about in ten years (and still can't believe it's been TEN years since my semester-long adventure). This book made me want to illustrate the journals I kept during that time period...or maybe have my artist boyfriend do it for me ;-)
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  • Lu Limón
    January 1, 1970
    Even though I really liked the author's drawings and sketches (the ones from Morocco are astonishing, and an accurate preview of Habibi), I missed a bit more of storytelling to wrap everything up. I know, it's a travelogue and it isn't supposed to be a narration, but still, sometimes the pictures don't make all the sense without their words. It's what I love about graphic novels: the fact that it's not a fight between writing and drawing, but a truce where they meet and make something stronger, Even though I really liked the author's drawings and sketches (the ones from Morocco are astonishing, and an accurate preview of Habibi), I missed a bit more of storytelling to wrap everything up. I know, it's a travelogue and it isn't supposed to be a narration, but still, sometimes the pictures don't make all the sense without their words. It's what I love about graphic novels: the fact that it's not a fight between writing and drawing, but a truce where they meet and make something stronger, beautiful, fierce. If we take it as what it is, then yes, it's an interesting review of the places he's been, the food he's eaten and situations he has experienced; but after reading his other works you are bound to expect something more that what sees the eye. His reflections are scarce and sometimes disregarded, they're noticeable in his personality but at the same time it seems like he doesn't want to give in to them. But then, what is the use of a travel log?
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  • Matt Richter
    January 1, 1970
    i found this illustrated travel journal utterly engrossing! It's a brutally intimate, open and honest insight into so much more than just Craig Thompson's travels through Europe and Morocco. It basically acts as a window into his very soul, allowing the reader to see incredible personal depth. When I read Thompson's master-work 'Blankets' a few years ago, I remember feeling such a strong connection with him and I felt every bit the same way reading this Carnet. My enjoyment reading this was heig i found this illustrated travel journal utterly engrossing! It's a brutally intimate, open and honest insight into so much more than just Craig Thompson's travels through Europe and Morocco. It basically acts as a window into his very soul, allowing the reader to see incredible personal depth. When I read Thompson's master-work 'Blankets' a few years ago, I remember feeling such a strong connection with him and I felt every bit the same way reading this Carnet. My enjoyment reading this was heightened further by the fact that I read some of it while I was traveling myself, so the connection felt even stronger. I so love his drawing style too. It inspires me. I guess this book is considered a minor work in comparison to "Blankets" (and his upcoming "Habibi") but I'm so glad his publisher saw the value in publishing this (even if Craig himself didn't necessarily think it was a great idea initially). I'm eagerly anticipating his upcoming book.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    It is strange to think of Craig in the context of each of his books. Goodbye, Chunky Rice still sticks out from the others in my mind. Maybe because of all the animals. Anyway, Craig is still pretty privileged. Not only as a guy who's way has been paid through all of his travels, but also because he is a man. He mentions meeting a solo girl in Morocco who says she enjoyed it but would return with a friend (a.k.a. body guard!) next time. Also he's always meeting tons of people. Do guys do that? O It is strange to think of Craig in the context of each of his books. Goodbye, Chunky Rice still sticks out from the others in my mind. Maybe because of all the animals. Anyway, Craig is still pretty privileged. Not only as a guy who's way has been paid through all of his travels, but also because he is a man. He mentions meeting a solo girl in Morocco who says she enjoyed it but would return with a friend (a.k.a. body guard!) next time. Also he's always meeting tons of people. Do guys do that? Or is that just Craig being super cool? He is super cool despite all of his privilege. Also where was the research he claimed to be doing? I was expecting more discussion of Arabic and the religion there as it appeared in Habibi, but maybe it was more of a muse thing. He mentioned Raina a couple times but more focused on his "ex-lover" which is sad-making because even though Raina is a Manic Pixie Dream Girl, her and Craig are my OTP.
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  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    This book reminded me of two things that I wish I could do/do more often-draw and travel, respectively. Seeing as how neither of those are likely to occur in the near future, "Carnet de Voyage" provided the perfect escape to foreign and exotic locales, namely, France, Barcelona, Morocco and the Alps. Intended to be a sort of in-between breather to award-winning, "Blankets" and his highly-anticipated upcoming novel, "Habibi," I thought "Carnet" was the perfect interlude between the two. It was a This book reminded me of two things that I wish I could do/do more often-draw and travel, respectively. Seeing as how neither of those are likely to occur in the near future, "Carnet de Voyage" provided the perfect escape to foreign and exotic locales, namely, France, Barcelona, Morocco and the Alps. Intended to be a sort of in-between breather to award-winning, "Blankets" and his highly-anticipated upcoming novel, "Habibi," I thought "Carnet" was the perfect interlude between the two. It was a tidy 224-page travel log chalk-full of his beautiful and at times, painful, drawings and musings. C. Thompson's got a knack for being brutally honest with his experiences (which can drive you nuts, especially with regards to the fairer sex) but I think that's why his books are so good. They're that much more human. I can't wait for "Habibi!"
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  • Walker
    January 1, 1970
    Posing as a travel diary, this book ends up being about two thirds as much of a confessional bit of autobiography as was Blankets. Craig Thompson is a pretty likeable guy, at least on paper, and there's no reason not to root for him as he stumbles through a book tour of France and research trip through Morocco, plagued by loneliness, arthritis, and heartbreak.I suppose this was the right time for me to read Carnet de Voyage, since I am also in a foreign country where I don't know many people, an Posing as a travel diary, this book ends up being about two thirds as much of a confessional bit of autobiography as was Blankets. Craig Thompson is a pretty likeable guy, at least on paper, and there's no reason not to root for him as he stumbles through a book tour of France and research trip through Morocco, plagued by loneliness, arthritis, and heartbreak.I suppose this was the right time for me to read Carnet de Voyage, since I am also in a foreign country where I don't know many people, and feeling a bit lost and unclear as to my general purpose/plan. To be fair, the UK is plenty more familiar than France or Morocco, but there's a common sense of being a little out-of-place that I find whenever I travel abroad. Anyway, it is a fine book (and I mean it's a comic book, you will read it in one sitting, it's not that big a committment you guys).
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  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    This book is really either for people who already love Craig Thompson's work, or for those who love travel writing. This is an illustrated travel diary of the several months Thompson spent in France and Morocco. He writes about his emotional state and about his impressions freely, and the illustrations are gorgeous and skillful, even when he admits that he's drawing with crappy felt-tip pens because his other supplies have disappeared. Some people might find his fits of depression and self-loath This book is really either for people who already love Craig Thompson's work, or for those who love travel writing. This is an illustrated travel diary of the several months Thompson spent in France and Morocco. He writes about his emotional state and about his impressions freely, and the illustrations are gorgeous and skillful, even when he admits that he's drawing with crappy felt-tip pens because his other supplies have disappeared. Some people might find his fits of depression and self-loathing tiresome, but for the most part I identified with his thoughts and fears and his sense of dislocation. Thompson describes this as a treat for his fans in between "real" books, and that's probably apt, but I really enjoyed this little book and I'm glad I picked it up.
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  • Kaimynas
    January 1, 1970
    Very strange ( in a good way for visual novel) read. It's basically 3 months long travelers journal which is mostly about authors mental journey while still traveling physical one. You don't really have to know or like any other Thompson's work in order to appreciate it's art, though knowing that it's mostly diary with drawings is mandatory as you can be disappointed if you picked it after reading Habibi or Blankets expecting another great story. That doesn't mean that writing in this one is bad Very strange ( in a good way for visual novel) read. It's basically 3 months long travelers journal which is mostly about authors mental journey while still traveling physical one. You don't really have to know or like any other Thompson's work in order to appreciate it's art, though knowing that it's mostly diary with drawings is mandatory as you can be disappointed if you picked it after reading Habibi or Blankets expecting another great story. That doesn't mean that writing in this one is bad, no it's very interesting to read and it synergies with drawing in very cool ways. It's very sincere, Thompson mocks himself in many occasions, not a read for everyone, but you might try it.
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  • Ginny
    January 1, 1970
    The sketches are gorgeous -- Thompson is clearly talented. This is his travel journal, so he's clearly allowed to feel how ever he wants to feel, but he's awfully whiny (on an amazing adventure traveling to amazing foreign countries!), and is self-aware enough to notice, but not enough to do anything about it. Odd. Also, I found it frustrating that he was only really happy traveling after he had hooked up with some girl. Relationships should help you be a happier person, that's true, but life's The sketches are gorgeous -- Thompson is clearly talented. This is his travel journal, so he's clearly allowed to feel how ever he wants to feel, but he's awfully whiny (on an amazing adventure traveling to amazing foreign countries!), and is self-aware enough to notice, but not enough to do anything about it. Odd. Also, I found it frustrating that he was only really happy traveling after he had hooked up with some girl. Relationships should help you be a happier person, that's true, but life's too short to be unhappy alone!
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  • Emma Sea
    January 1, 1970
    Although ostensibly it's a travel journal, it's probably more accurate to say it's a diary of an internal voyage, more than an external one. There's more angst in here than in an m/m novel, but I do like the open endedness, and the subtle exploration of various purposes to life.I'm not a huge fan of the line quality from those Pentel brush pens Thompson uses. The pages from Morocco where he loses them and has to use a substitute are by far my favourite in the book.
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    I rather enjoyed this book, it is written and illustrated as a travelogue as Thompson tours France, Spain and Morocco promoting his book, Blankets. It is open and honest and shows the joys and difficulties of life on the road and the pressures (and pains) of many many signings and PR events. I love Thompson's artwork and illustration style as he captures the essence of the places he visits and the people he meets in a simple and understated while still making an impression on the reader.
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  • Sérgio
    January 1, 1970
    That was a really pleasant read, between sketchbook and auto-bio comic. Craig Thompson's art (Blutch influenced) is really beautiful and I liked his encounters with other cartoonists. It's a little bit too lightweight in my opinion, thought.It's amazing that he did such a quality book during a couple of months while traveling.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    It may not be a wholly together narrative piece like Blankets or Habibi, but this is still quite a raw intimate glimpse into Craig Thompson, his life and his art.Travel and art are two of my favourite things, so to go on journey with him whilst experiencing both of these things through his sketchbook was really lovely.
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