Where Are You From?
In which a girl who is asked where she's really from turns to her abuelo for the answer.

Where Are You From? Details

TitleWhere Are You From?
Author
ReleaseJul 1st, 2019
PublisherHarperCollins
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Family, Cultural

Where Are You From? Review

  • Yamile Méndez
    January 1, 1970
    It's such a rush of emotion to see my book on goodreads! I can't wait to share it with the world!
  • Monique Fields
    January 1, 1970
    Where Are You From? is a beautiful and lyrical answer to such a simple question that multiracial hear every day. The book starts with the question and provides answer after answer for where the little girl is from. In the end, she decides she is from all of those places as well. I especially loved how Abuelo was involved. Grandpas really do know everything.
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  • David Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    Books and stories like these are going to play an important role in my son's life. Children need to see people who represent them in tv, books, and movies. I also feel that my son needs to know where he or his dad came from. He will be able to read my stories but others' will help too.
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  • Julie Kirchner
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful message with lovely illustrations. This will definitely be one I will share with my students.
  • Kim Chaffee
    January 1, 1970
    This lyrical picture book about self identity and home will touch your heart. The illustrations pop off the page. The color palette is exquisite. Take the journey with this little girl and her Abuelo as they explore the answer to the question, where are you from?
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    This is beautiful. In message and visuals. Much love for this one!!
  • Jolyn Danielson
    January 1, 1970
    The content of this book is so relevant at this moment in time. The illustrations were marvelous and I could really "feel" the colors.I will definitely be getting this for my Library and reading it to my students as well.
  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    When classmates and acquaintances persistently ask her where she is from, refusing to accept her answer that she is from here, a young girl turns to her Abuelo (grandfather) for answers in this lovely new picture-book from author Yamile Saied Méndez and illustrator Jaime Kim. His poetic answers allude to the young girl's Argentine and (possible) Puerto Rican heritage, but when she persists in her question, he replies that she is from his heart, and from the heart of all her ancestors...A picture When classmates and acquaintances persistently ask her where she is from, refusing to accept her answer that she is from here, a young girl turns to her Abuelo (grandfather) for answers in this lovely new picture-book from author Yamile Saied Méndez and illustrator Jaime Kim. His poetic answers allude to the young girl's Argentine and (possible) Puerto Rican heritage, but when she persists in her question, he replies that she is from his heart, and from the heart of all her ancestors...A picture-book debut from Méndez, Where Are You From? highlights the unfortunate fact that some American citizens face rather insensitive questions about their heritage, questions that imply that somehow they (the ones being questioned) are less American than others. I appreciated the wisdom of Abuelo's replies, but I also appreciated the fact that the young girl here continues to question, in the face of those replies. Curiosity is natural, and much like her own interrogators, the girl wants definite answers. I'm not sure that parallel was one the author intended to highlight, but I thought it was interesting nevertheless. It's clear from various references - mention of the pampas and the condor in the text, a memorial to the May Revolution in the artwork - that the girl is part Argentine. Given that Méndez is married to a Puerto Rican, I would assume that the references here to a Caribbean island indicate that the girl is also of that heritage. This makes me think that perhaps the girl is one of the author's own children, and that perhaps this story reflects an experience she had?Whatever the case may be, Where Are You From? is a lovely book, one which offers affirmation to children who may have confronted this kind of experience. It highlights the idea that while it's important to know where we come from, from a cultural heritage perspective, it is just as important to know that our families love us. The artwork from Jaime Kim, who also worked on Kate DiCamillo's La La La: A Story of Hope , is beautiful, boasting a deep and vibrant color palette and cute, stylized figures. Recommended to children who may have confronted this kind of questioning, or to anyone looking for children's stories exploring identity and heritage.
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  • Olivia Farr
    January 1, 1970
    See my full review here: http://www.yabookscentral.com/kidsfic...WHERE ARE YOU FROM? is a stunning celebration of heritage/ancestry as well as an acknowledgment of the unnecessary question. A young girl is asked where she is from- really. She believes she is from the same place as everyone else- here. She decides to ask her Abuelo, because he also looks different, like her. Abuelo’s answer is gorgeous and celebrates who we are and the many possibilities of such a question.Importantly, this book See my full review here: http://www.yabookscentral.com/kidsfic...WHERE ARE YOU FROM? is a stunning celebration of heritage/ancestry as well as an acknowledgment of the unnecessary question. A young girl is asked where she is from- really. She believes she is from the same place as everyone else- here. She decides to ask her Abuelo, because he also looks different, like her. Abuelo’s answer is gorgeous and celebrates who we are and the many possibilities of such a question.Importantly, this book can spark discussions about diversity and many ethnicities/races. Regardless, the illustrations are unbelievably gorgeous and the storyline is just beautiful with lush descriptions and lots of familial love.What I loved: The illustrations in this book are stunning, appreciable whether you are a young reader or an adult. The title question which sparks the book is acknowledged for its loaded meanings of not belonging, and Abuelo’s answer is really incredible. This lush and lyrical book is a fantastic read for preschoolers through elementary schoolers and can spark some important conversations.Final verdict: Stunning, beautiful, and unique, this book is a must-read for elementary schoolers who can understand the feeling of not belonging and who can also learn about heritage and this loaded question. The illustrations and gorgeous text will appeal to a wide range of readers.
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  • Kelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Age: Preschool-3rd gradeOur Voices: Argentinian American author (1st gen), Korean American illustrator (1st gen)In several scenarios, a little girl finds it difficult to answer the probing question "where are you from?" especially since it makes her feel like she doesn't belong. Asking the man that knows it all, Abuelo provides a multifaceted answer, drawing from various natural settings that spread across South America--especially Argentina--and the people that settled them. The girl, mirroring Age: Preschool-3rd gradeOur Voices: Argentinian American author (1st gen), Korean American illustrator (1st gen)In several scenarios, a little girl finds it difficult to answer the probing question "where are you from?" especially since it makes her feel like she doesn't belong. Asking the man that knows it all, Abuelo provides a multifaceted answer, drawing from various natural settings that spread across South America--especially Argentina--and the people that settled them. The girl, mirroring the insistence of her friends, asks for a more straight-forward answer--an actual location--and Abuelo points to his heart.A short story perfect for reading aloud to a class or sharing with a family member. At first, I thought this book could benefit from more text and a longer story. But the brevity of Abuelo's answer makes the story accessible to a wider aged audience and allows the audience to indulge in the rich text used to describe the girl's genealogy. One final thought: the reader should invite the listeners (especially those that have never experienced this question) to talk about the appearance of the questioners. Even though they smile and the question isn't malicious, how does it affect the girl?
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  • Margie
    January 1, 1970
    As an educator, as a teacher librarian, all the children in any given school in any given year enter your classroom, the school library. They arrive from an assortment of families, economic conditions, ethnic and racial backgrounds with a range of personalities and potential. They are all beautiful, important and of immeasurable value.Depending on the community in which they live, some of them for reasons of physical characteristics, language, clothing, cultural or religious practices feel as th As an educator, as a teacher librarian, all the children in any given school in any given year enter your classroom, the school library. They arrive from an assortment of families, economic conditions, ethnic and racial backgrounds with a range of personalities and potential. They are all beautiful, important and of immeasurable value.Depending on the community in which they live, some of them for reasons of physical characteristics, language, clothing, cultural or religious practices feel as though they don't belong. They are asked questions they are unable to answer to the satisfaction of other children or adults. Where Are You From? (Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, June 4, 2019) written by Yamile Saied Mendez with illustrations by Jaime Kim gives readers the best and only responses of true worth.My full recommendation: https://librariansquest.blogspot.com/...
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    In our multi-cultural world it is important to remember it is more appropriate to ask someone “what is your family heritage?” than to ask “where are you from?” In this story you are led to believe the little girl is an American who’s heritage is quite varied. She asks her grandfather to help her understand where she is from because so many people ask her. He uses poetry to describe that she is from lands far and wide but ultimately she is from his heart “from my love and the love of all those be In our multi-cultural world it is important to remember it is more appropriate to ask someone “what is your family heritage?” than to ask “where are you from?” In this story you are led to believe the little girl is an American who’s heritage is quite varied. She asks her grandfather to help her understand where she is from because so many people ask her. He uses poetry to describe that she is from lands far and wide but ultimately she is from his heart “from my love and the love of all those before us.” While a very sweet story, it would require an adult to interpret because the author eludes to various South American and and possibly Polynesian locales as well as utilizes English and Spanish and references Senõr Cielo, which I had to look up. It could be a reference to God or heaven, but it might also be a reference to a myth about a cyclops in the sky.
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  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    The question "Where are you from?" is often asked to newcomers as a way to be conversational. But it can also be a subtle, and maybe even unconscious, way of trying to place the newcomer in a box or separate them from us as "other" or "different". With friends and neighbors that come into our communities from places near and far, it's never been more important to realize that in order to build relationship we need to consider where we're from in ways that unite us, rather than paint us as differ The question "Where are you from?" is often asked to newcomers as a way to be conversational. But it can also be a subtle, and maybe even unconscious, way of trying to place the newcomer in a box or separate them from us as "other" or "different". With friends and neighbors that come into our communities from places near and far, it's never been more important to realize that in order to build relationship we need to consider where we're from in ways that unite us, rather than paint us as different from each other. The grandfather/abuelo in this story has a beautiful answer to this question. Illustrated with beautiful digital paintings, this story tells us where we're all from. This would be a terrific book to share with young readers as the beginning of the school year to help build unity in classrooms.
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  • Austin Gullett
    January 1, 1970
    A very beautiful response to a question that many children get from their peers. I read this almost like a freeform poem; any adult could read this as one, too. The language might be a little bit elevated for a beginning reader to read on their own, but this is a perfect book to read together and over which to have a conversation with a child on either side of the titular question.
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  • Mary Lee
    January 1, 1970
    "I ask Abuelo because he knows everything, and like me, he looks like he doesn't belong." Ouch, but #truth. This is a great book to add to our Where I'm From texts for identity work at the beginning of the year.
  • Beverly
    January 1, 1970
    This lyrical text may encourage young children to ask their parents or grandparents about their family's history and origins. The watercolor and digital illustrations are warm and inviting, and move the text along admirably.
  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    When a child is asked where she is from? This question sets her off on a quest to find the true answers. When she asks her Abuelo, he gives her answers that she didn't quite expect. This story covers the importance of knowing, understanding and embracing one's heritage and culture.
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  • Raven Black
    January 1, 1970
    As much as I enjoy good poetic prose, there was something missing for me. But over all the illustrations are fabulous, the text sweet and fun. This is more of a 4.5 or even 4.8 as the "bumps" I have are relatively small in compared to the overall goodness of the book.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful message about discovering who you are and embracing your heritage.
  • Ms Threlkeld
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful story about identity and history. Some of the illustrations took my breath away.
  • Ann Williams
    January 1, 1970
    Love, love, love! The message AND the illustrations. Mrs. Richards will have to get this one for the book room.
  • Rebecca Caufman
    January 1, 1970
    The artwork is stunning. The message is heart warming. I just wish there would be a footnote as to each location grandpa explains so I could know more.
  • Aliza Werner
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful sentiments about where we’re all from, not necessarily a place. Also deflating the othering those do to people they deem “not American enough”.
  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful exploration of family that will move you even if you’re not from an immigrant family like the narrator. Lovely language and exquisite illustrations.
  • Kris
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous!
  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    What a lovely book, with really gorgeous artwork!
  • Earl
    January 1, 1970
    For fans of Islandborn and How Alma Got Her Name, this picture book explores the rich history of a little girl's life of where she came from.
  • Julianne
    January 1, 1970
    Great community read aloud. Short but powerful message. Wouldn’t use it for analysis but would read to all ages as a community builder.
  • Vee
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful children's book-- there's an English version and a Spanish version (both were available at my local bookstore!), which I liked, given the content.
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful book that answers a child’s question of “Where Are You from?”
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