Crying Laughing
Winnie Friedman has been waiting for the world to catch on to what she already knows: she's hilarious.It might be a long wait, though. After bombing a stand-up set at her own bat mitzvah, Winnie has kept her jokes to herself. Well, to herself and her dad, a former comedian and her inspiration.Then, on the second day of tenth grade, the funniest guy in school actually laughs at a comment she makes in the lunch line and asks her to join the improv troupe. Maybe he's even . . . flirting?Just when Winnie's ready to say yes to comedy again, her father reveals that he's been diagnosed with ALS. That is . . . not funny. Her dad's still making jokes, though, which feels like a good thing. And Winnie's prepared to be his straight man if that's what he wants. But is it what he needs?Caught up in a spiral of epically bad dates, bad news, and bad performances, Winnie's struggling to see the humor in it all. But finding a way to laugh is exactly what will see her through.

Crying Laughing Details

TitleCrying Laughing
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Realistic Fiction, Contemporary, Fiction

Crying Laughing Review

  • Lance Rubin
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote this book. I am really proud of it, and I hope you enjoy. (This review is actually 4.5 stars but I rounded up to 5 because I wrote it.)
  • Nenia ⚡ Aspiring Evil Overlord ⚡ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    I'm getting an ARC! Emoji on books is so late-2000s, but I'll accept it.
  • 🌈⭐️RoseOfRainbows⭐️🌈💕
    January 1, 1970
    Laugh out loud funny, witty and has an all encompassing warm fuzzy feeling to it from the very first page, to the last goodbye. Absolutely 5/5 stars for being he new comedic read of the century.
  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    This should have been a great year for Winnie. She had her two best friends at her side, a cute older boy was showing interest in her, and she was going to attempt performing again, but then, things started to unravel. Friend drama, boy drama, epic comedy fails, and worst of all, her father's ALS diagnosis had Winnie wondering where she could find any humor in her life, but with love, and yes, comedy, Winnie was able to find her way.I think my first update for this book was about how I had This should have been a great year for Winnie. She had her two best friends at her side, a cute older boy was showing interest in her, and she was going to attempt performing again, but then, things started to unravel. Friend drama, boy drama, epic comedy fails, and worst of all, her father's ALS diagnosis had Winnie wondering where she could find any humor in her life, but with love, and yes, comedy, Winnie was able to find her way.I think my first update for this book was about how I had already laughed and cried. Rubin did a wonderful job blending the light and heavy in this beautiful story, which delivered quite an emotional punch.Five Things I Loved About Crying Laughing:• Winnie was a little spark plug. I found her witty and charming, and she did indeed, make me laugh. Her journey over the course of this book was not an easy one, but she took each lesson to heart, and learned from her mistakes, as well as, the mistakes of others. She opened her eyes a little wider, and began to see the world in a bit more detail. • I think I have only read one other YA book that featured improv, but not to the depth encountered in this book. Rubin really delivered an education on the art of improv, and I enjoyed learning more about it. It was also a nice parallel to how Winnie needed to begin listening more and living in the moment. She had to challenge herself to not think about her father's end, but rather, treasure the moments she still had with him. • When I took my adolescent psychology class, I remember discussing how this was a time in a teen's life, when they realize their parents were only human. They made mistakes and were simply mere mortals. Winnie had to face this about her father, who she sort of hero worshipped. She first had to accept, that he would probably be gone in 2 - 5 years, and then she learned some more hard truths about her parents, which she had to deal with. Rubin handled this part quite thoughtfully, and spared no emotional impact as he did so. • The relationship between Winnie and her father was very special. I loved seeing them interact and joke around, but I also found their deeper discussions quite touching. These two filled me with feels and brought me to tears. • I loved the friendship that Winnie shared with Asmaa and Leili. They had some ups and downs over the course of the story, but that only made it seem more authentic. Fletcher was also a good friend, and all three were a source of comfort and support for Winnie as she attempted to deal with her father's failing health and family situation. "Laughing and crying, you know it's the same release." - Joni Mitchell (from Laughing Crying)As promised, this book made me laugh and cry, but it also was a great reminder to hold onto the ones you love, while you can, to listen to each other, and to be present.*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Sarvenaz Tash
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a love letter to comedy even (and especially) in the most trying times and it succeeds on every level. I was in awe of how easy it was to get swept up in the highs and lows of Winnie's performances--not an easy feat for a book to accomplish, but this one 100% does. It's also the most aptly titled book ever as there are genuine, laugh-out-loud moments layered over a complex story of a devastating diagnosis and its profound effect on a family's dynamics. Most importantly, Winnie This book is a love letter to comedy even (and especially) in the most trying times and it succeeds on every level. I was in awe of how easy it was to get swept up in the highs and lows of Winnie's performances--not an easy feat for a book to accomplish, but this one 100% does. It's also the most aptly titled book ever as there are genuine, laugh-out-loud moments layered over a complex story of a devastating diagnosis and its profound effect on a family's dynamics. Most importantly, Winnie Friedman is a character you'll root for from page one and finish the book feeling like you made a (hilarious) new friend.
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  • Sharon Roat
    January 1, 1970
    Such a beautiful story... with heartbreaking and heartwarming insights into the issues and emotions surrounding an ALS diagnosis, and some delightful improv scenes. Winnie and her friends and improv troupe-mates make for a wonderful and rich cast of characters. Also Winnie's mom and dad. I'm adding Russ and Dana to my list of favorite YA parents. Put this one on your pre-order list... it comes out in November 2019!
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  • Catherine Tinker
    January 1, 1970
    *eyes my own comedy nerd YA WIP, sweats nervously*
  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight 4.5* I won't lie, titling a bookCrying Laughing is setting the bar pretty high, right? You're gonna make me laughand cry, book? You promise? Well, it definitely didn't lie, because I absolutely genuinely did both. It starts out mostly funny- but I assure you there are tears, and not just our main girl Winnie's. I shed a few myself by the end, no question. So let us talk about what made You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight 4.5* I won't lie, titling a book Crying Laughing is setting the bar pretty high, right? You're gonna make me laugh and cry, book? You promise? Well, it definitely didn't lie, because I absolutely genuinely did both. It starts out mostly funny- but I assure you there are tears, and not just our main girl Winnie's. I shed a few myself by the end, no question. So let us talk about what made this book work so well for me! What I Loved: • Winnie is just a really relatable main character. Her experiences felt so... utterly normal. Make no mistake, the author makes us care about Winnie's daily life, but that's what it is ultimately. A coming-of-age story about a girl who's just trying to discover who she really wants to be, in the midst of the usual struggles. She's got friendship stuff happening, romantic turmoil, and is going through a lot with her family, which we'll expand on more. She's dealing with the mundane academic expectations, finding extracurriculars that appeal, thinking of her future. Stuff that a great majority of us will certainly relate to. And through it all, she keeps her sense of humor, which is a lesson for us all tbh. • Comedy being such a huge focus is such a fresh take! I've read countless books with school plays, musical events, various sports, dancing, you name it. But never have I read one where comedy- let alone improv!- is a big plot point. It's awesome because it lends itself to being humorous, but it's the witty writing that drives the humor home over and over again. • Winnie's boyfriend is pretty much a flaming pile of garbage. "Wait!" you exclaim. "How can this be a positive?!" Well, I will explain. I think it is so damn helpful to present a young woman who has some doubts about herself, who is flattered by the attention of a boy who is seemingly not a troll. A young woman who, despite the red flags that the reader can see from miles away, sweeps them under the rug because she's enamored with the thought of being in a relationship, of being wanted. I could say this is especially important to present to the young adult audience, but I'm going to go ahead and say that this is a lesson all women- nay, all humans could use to read. We're all worth more than the first random asshat who throws us a look of attraction. And I won't tell you how Winnie's story ends up, but I promise that the author handles this fabulously.  • The family is the absolute heart and soul of this book. And hot damn, it's real. Very honest, the whole family. They have some ups and downs, and everyone makes mistakes throughout. But at the core is a whole lot of love. And a father who has been diagnosed with ALS. This is a gut punch to the whole family, and you know what? They don't always handle it gracefully. Because they're human. And that is why I loved it so much, it's so honest, it's how real and actual families behave. And I am here for it. Bottom Line: A heartwarming and heartbreaking story of a young woman trying to find her passions, build relationships, and cherish her family and doing it all with a healthy dose of humor.
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  • Rec-It Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    as advertisedi criedi laughedi laughed while cryingya is really that time where you're discovering yourself but theres that extra element in this where it's a rediscovery of people you've known your whole life (ie parents) now that you process complex information differently
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    It takes some guts to write a book about a funny person. Even more guts to have that funny person join an improv troupe - how do you make written improv funny? And even more gutsy, to then write that character bomb as often as they kill. While DENTON LITTLE was truly laugh out loud funny to me, every giggle was a surprise; for CRYING LAUGHING I went in worried, tense that being told I’m supposed to find Winnie Friedman funny would inadvertently make it hard for me to laugh. I shouldn’t have It takes some guts to write a book about a funny person. Even more guts to have that funny person join an improv troupe - how do you make written improv funny? And even more gutsy, to then write that character bomb as often as they kill. While DENTON LITTLE was truly laugh out loud funny to me, every giggle was a surprise; for CRYING LAUGHING I went in worried, tense that being told I’m supposed to find Winnie Friedman funny would inadvertently make it hard for me to laugh. I shouldn’t have doubted though, because what Lance Rubin does is show the humor in the sad, and show the humanity behind the jokes. Once this book settles in (and it does, I must say, take a few chapters to get settled) it is utterly propulsive. Winnie’s relationship with her parents - a father suffering from ALS, a mother who seems like a joykill until her many shades are revealed later in the book - is so lovingly explored. Her friendships are real and earned. And the elements of romance are so delightfully sophomoric (literally - Winnie is a sophomore) and perfectly relatable for that age. I also found myself virtually fist bumping Rubin throughout at the subtle but unapologetic conversations about consent, and feminism, and politics. Slyly teachable moments. I see what you did there, Lance. And I dig it.
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  • Leelynn (Sometimes Leelynn Reads) ❤
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Thank you to Fantastic Flying Book Club, Netgalley and Knopf for this free copy. All quotes in this review are taken from the Advanced Reader Copy and may change in final publication.Okay but seriously I was not expecting this book to hit me the way it did, and wow. Sometimes part of me forgets that contemporary characters can go through some difficult things in their life, not just Disclaimer: I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Thank you to Fantastic Flying Book Club, Netgalley and Knopf for this free copy. All quotes in this review are taken from the Advanced Reader Copy and may change in final publication.Okay but seriously I was not expecting this book to hit me the way it did, and wow. Sometimes part of me forgets that contemporary characters can go through some difficult things in their life, not just the big “having to save the world” type of issues that fantasy books usually have. Sometimes, the real life big issues are just as hard to read about and deal with, and may seem even larger than life than the other stuff.I get how it feels to have someone close to you, especially a parent or grandparent, get diagnosed with an illness that has no cure, that ends in their death… I know we all end up leaving this life at one point or another, but having that added factor doesn’t make it any easier. For those of you that want more information on ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), feel free to go here.Sometimes one needs to rely on humor in order to take their mind away from the really shitty stuff, and that’s what Winnie does. Even before her father was diagnosed with ALS. She’s actually very punny, as evidenced from the very first chapter – actually the very first two pages quite honestly. And I think that is what made me almost immediately feel for her. I don’t always like a character so quickly, or continue to like a character after the beginning, so it was nice to have another MC that I wanted to care for and just give her a shoulder to cry on and support like at all times.I think about what Winnie had to go through as a teenager trying to deal with her father’s sickness, and trying to bring some sort of joy and laughter into his life since he can’t give the same amount of level that he used to. I mean, her father is her role model, her inspiration as to why she got into comedy in the first place. She actually wants to do entertaining and good comedy, not jokes that only deal with farts, sex, or cruelty.No joke.I’m just thoroughly impressed with this book, and I’m so glad I had an opportunity to read this novel.Be right back, though. I’m still crying.
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  • Les
    January 1, 1970
    MY HEART!!!ugh! this book!admittedly, i was sad that there would be no more denton little but of course, it's very unfair to hold an author (or any artist really) to any of their past projects when they obviously have so much more to give and in this case it was proven because LR did not let me down!!!!life works in such a funny way because i just finished watching "youre the worst" and in that, Edgar joins improv, and i feel like watching that set it up to where i was able to understand this MY HEART!!!ugh! this book!admittedly, i was sad that there would be no more denton little but of course, it's very unfair to hold an author (or any artist really) to any of their past projects when they obviously have so much more to give and in this case it was proven because LR did not let me down!!!!life works in such a funny way because i just finished watching "youre the worst" and in that, Edgar joins improv, and i feel like watching that set it up to where i was able to understand this book a little bit more. (im not any type of comedian and i know that it's pretty straight forward but i'm more of a visual learner so having watched that first helped me see it from Win's POW and helped me understand her emotions going through it all.) i loved this book from beginning to end. by chapter 5 i had laughed so hard that it led to laugh crying to then just plain crying and wow if the title isn't the most fitting thing ever. i love how Rubin references amazing talented comedic women through out the story. i love how PRO women this book is! i love that he set up a situation and resolved it. every single one. at one point (mostly at the end because of a scene i was feeling like "eeeehhhh...." but low and behold, he also solves it instead of just leaving it.i loved that it was funny enough and sad enough without going over the top. open endings dont really bug me. its rare that i wish a book had a more in depth ending but in this case, i love how he left it. do i think there will be continuation, honestly, no but if there is, i'd welcome it with open arms. i love how Win's parents were with her whether they all shared a scene on were one on one. but also Win's mom, gah! (and that's all the context i'll give because i dont want to spoil it.) i love that he makes the characters real. real issues, real conversations....real. i love that Win has her own inner dialogue with herself just like i always do. where she says something and then has her own inner dialogue to add to that one thought.....i just loved everything about this book....i could go on and on but ill stop here because i finished this at work and well, now i need to get to work lol. LR has just became an instant buy for me. (in my defense, i found Denton way after he was released into the wild but i did buy the second book right away!)(thanks Netgalley for the ARC that im still surprised i was able to receive!!!!!)
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    I read this charming, laugh out loud book as part of a Bookstagram/Blog tour for The Fantastic Flying Book Club and I'm so happy I did! Real quick I want to comment on the cover of the book, because although it is fairly simply, it really gets the point across and I think it's so fitting for a YA novel because just about every teenager uses emojis. Okay, back to the actual story. Rubin could not have picked a better title for this book, Crying Laughing, because the majority of the time I spent I read this charming, laugh out loud book as part of a Bookstagram/Blog tour for The Fantastic Flying Book Club and I'm so happy I did! Real quick I want to comment on the cover of the book, because although it is fairly simply, it really gets the point across and I think it's so fitting for a YA novel because just about every teenager uses emojis. Okay, back to the actual story. Rubin could not have picked a better title for this book, Crying Laughing, because the majority of the time I spent reading I was either laughing or crying. When it comes to comedy, the main character, Winnifred Friedman, is everything I wish I could be because she is SO FUNNY! The characters she does throughout the story are hilarious and she's insanely witty. I LOL'd multiple times while reading this, many of those times being in public. Winnie knows that she's funny, too. The problem is that she wants everybody else to realize that too, which is kind of hard when she refuses to every perform in front of people again after completely bombing at her Bat Mitzvah (Also yay for Jewish rep, specifically the MC!). The only person she openly jokes with is her dad, and occassionally her two best friends, Leili and Asmaa (name change in the finished copy). On her second day of sophomore year, Eric, the funniest guy in school, laughs at a comment she makes while they're in the lunch line and he asks her to join the Improv Troupe. She's so ready to jump back in and start doing comedy again, but then she finds out that her dad has ALS. I haven't come across a lot of YA novels, or even adult novels, that have a character who suffers from ALS. We're able to see in this story not only how this disease is affecting Winnie's dad, but also the strain it puts on her and her mom. Although this novel is filled with fantastic jokes and humor, it's so much more than that. It's a story about a girl trying to navigate through 10th grade, which is hard enough before you find out that your dad is suffering from an incurable disease. Winnie learns a lot about herself, her parents, and even her friends throughout this story and you get to really see her grow as a person. She learns that through the really hard times, laughing is the very thing that she needs to pull through. This book was simultaneously tearjerking and heartwarming and I can't recommend it enough. Thank you to NetGalley and Knopf Books for Young Readers for providing me the opportunity to read and review an advanced copy of this book!
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  • Arlen
    January 1, 1970
    Book ReviewCrying Laughing by Lance RubinPublishing date: November 19, 2019Read courtesy of netgalley.com5 If we couldn't get more of Denton Little, at least we have Winnie Friedman. Cleverly written story about comedy without being forced and corny -- quite an achievement. Makes me want to start an improv club for my students!Even though I know a bat mitzvah is for girls and a bar mitzvah is for boys, and the reader is told about the character's bat mitzvah, I still found myself [pleasantly] Book ReviewCrying Laughing by Lance RubinPublishing date: November 19, 2019Read courtesy of netgalley.com5 ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐If we couldn't get more of Denton Little, at least we have Winnie Friedman. Cleverly written story about comedy without being forced and corny -- quite an achievement. Makes me want to start an improv club for my students!Even though I know a bat mitzvah is for girls and a bar mitzvah is for boys, and the reader is told about the character's bat mitzvah, I still found myself [pleasantly] surprised when I absorbed that the protagonist was a female and not a male. This is a good thing since I was able to break myself from stereotypical thinking early in the story. I think that the character is Jewish also makes for a subtle take on the humor that other ethnicities might not have inherent in their culture, the subtleties between puns and sarcasm, which are so integral to Jewish and Yiddish parlance. In other words, this mix of character development worked very well for this story. And speaking of inherent ... sporks are inherently funny. Just sayin'...Teens will relate to the cute humor throughout the story, too. For example, categorizing potential relationships as "hope-will-flirts," "neutral-will-flirts," and "please-don't-flirts" is funny and quite teenager-ish.While the humor carries the story afloat, the author does an a-ma-zing job of showing a teen's understanding of complicated adult conversations. Winnie's father has ALS, and the subject is handled honestly from the patient-, the parent, and the family-perspectives. All of the characters are treated with equal humanness and not made into oversimplified caricatures. The few criticisms I have do not deter from the 5 ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ or the story. There are just a few times where the writing is too PC or 'too' inclusive just to fit in with the contemporary times....Jews, hijabs, and trigger warnings. There are also some contemporary references that might date the book before it's ready to be a thing of the past: Polly-O string cheese (specifically Polly-O), the TV show Parks and Rec, Totes McGotes, and FOMO.Regardless, I loved this book and cannot wait to get it for my high school library!
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  • Emma Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Read my full review here: https://lifesanovelty.blogspot.com/20...Opinions: All in all, Crying Laughing was a thematic but undesirable read. Firstly, while the situation was realistic, the characters were not. Winnie's parents treat Winnie like a friend, chatting casually and apologising needlessly; two things most (but not all) parents do not do with their children. To add on to this, Winnie was also an anxious, forgetful, talentless American teenager who forgets the Pledge of Allegiance. Her Read my full review here: https://lifesanovelty.blogspot.com/20...Opinions: All in all, Crying Laughing was a thematic but undesirable read. Firstly, while the situation was realistic, the characters were not. Winnie's parents treat Winnie like a friend, chatting casually and apologising needlessly; two things most (but not all) parents do not do with their children. To add on to this, Winnie was also an anxious, forgetful, talentless American teenager who forgets the Pledge of Allegiance. Her lack of humour and decisiveness makes it difficult to connect to her. The plot and conflict was also unclear: Rubin was focusing on too many aspects, including sickness, parental relationships, history, romance, friendship, first love, humour, and even more. Because the author was attempting to insert so many positive themes and outlooks, the overall plot experienced a reverse-affect and I as a reader was left grasping for a storyline to hold on to. On the other hand, because most of the themes were evident, Crying Laughing will appeal to younger readers who don't analyse the writing style and situation as much. I suggest you give this book a try, because it may suit you!My Favourite Thing: As I said in Opinions, I recognise and appreciate Rubin's attempts at creating a thematic, inspirational, educational read. There are evident themes regarding friendships, sickness, honesty, loyalty, and growing up that stick with the reader after finishing the book. Even if the characters were silly or the story wasn't compelling, Crying Laughing was worth the read because of what the reader learns!My Least Favourite Thing: Overall, I did not enjoy reading Crying Laughing and I do not plan on reading it again. I found the characters expressionless and incompetent, the relationships unrealistic and awkward, and the writing style simplistic and inexperienced. As a whole, Crying Laughing covered too many topics but still did not take enough risks; we have a very basic and controllable ALS patient, a basic and controllable fifteen-year-old girl, a basic and controllable romantic interest, and more basic, controllable elements. Readers were lost trying to focus on too many things while not being excited with plot twists, drama, or actual conflict.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Knopf Books for Young Readers and NetGalley for the e-ARC to read and review.I wanted to read this book because the main character, Winnie, loves comedy and so do I. I was drawn in by comedy being the focus of the novel, which I’ve never seen before in YA. Comedy is extremely subjective and incredibly difficult to be successful in. Lance Rubin does a good job meshing comedy, some of the realities of comedy, and the life of a 15-year-old all together.I wasn’t cracking up or anything Thank you to Knopf Books for Young Readers and NetGalley for the e-ARC to read and review.I wanted to read this book because the main character, Winnie, loves comedy and so do I. I was drawn in by comedy being the focus of the novel, which I’ve never seen before in YA. Comedy is extremely subjective and incredibly difficult to be successful in. Lance Rubin does a good job meshing comedy, some of the realities of comedy, and the life of a 15-year-old all together.I wasn’t cracking up or anything while reading (wasn’t my brand of comedy) but it was still an interesting story. Actually, the true essence of Crying Laughing went far deeper than I thought it would be. The allusions to life as a comedian were strongly on the forefront.I like Winnie and could relate to her not wanting to do something she’s passionate about after one bad experience. I think anyone can relate to that notion in one way or another. She’s not that funny (again, not my brand of comedy). But I enjoyed her journey throughout the story as she rediscovers what makes her special. That was well crafted by the author. My favorite thing about Winnie is how strong her voice comes across. Her tone gave me a clear image of the kind of person she is.I liked viewing Winnie’s home life and how it so seamlessly (post-read) it juxtaposed with school life. There were connections and signs I missed in the beginning or didn’t quite grasp until the end.Winnie and her family are so close but they all still have flaws which is always great to see. The cast of characters is very diverse and I think readers the same age can connect with at least one character in some way.I don’t know much about ALS but what I do know I saw depicted in strong details. The author paints a devastating, crippling, depressing picture. All these bad things happen and create a huge challenge Winnie has to overcome.There are a lot of real-world allusions – for me, too much “product placement” for lack of better words. I do profoundly agree that Tina Fey and Amy Poehler are amazing and comedy gold.I read this book within 3 days because I couldn’t stop reading – nor did I want to. I would read more books by Lance Rubin. He is a very good storyteller.
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  • Lizz Axnick
    January 1, 1970
    This book made me laugh and cry. Good title!Winnie Freidman knows she is funny. She is waiting for the rest of the world to discover this fact. When she gets asked to join her high school's Improve Troupe, she is both excited and terrified. Winnie and her dad have a great relationship. They banter back and forth, playing off each other as seamlessly as Abbott and Costello or Tina Fey and Amy Pohler. Winnie's world is drastically rocked by her father's ALS diagnosis and rapidly progressing This book made me laugh and cry. Good title!Winnie Freidman knows she is funny. She is waiting for the rest of the world to discover this fact. When she gets asked to join her high school's Improve Troupe, she is both excited and terrified. Winnie and her dad have a great relationship. They banter back and forth, playing off each other as seamlessly as Abbott and Costello or Tina Fey and Amy Pohler. Winnie's world is drastically rocked by her father's ALS diagnosis and rapidly progressing symptoms. As she deals with navigating through high school, her first boyfriend, her dad's diagnosis and her desperation to be the funny one, we get a peek into her soul. She is such a wonderful and likeable character, I wish she were real so I could be her friend. The emotions in this book really jump off the page. There are some truly laugh out loud bits (my favorite being the Monopoly man and the monocle) and parts that will leave you trying to hold back tears. I adored this book. I hope there is a sequel. And a sequel to the sequel. This author is truly comedy gifted. What makes the story so endearing are the epic comedy fails because although they fall flat, they are still clever enough to be appreciated. I will read this book over and over again in the years to come. Winnie and her dad's relationship is quite similar to my own with my father and that makes me treasure this book. I highly recommend for anyone who likes hilarious and heartwarming stories.
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  • Aaron Holsberg
    January 1, 1970
    What a gem of a book! I found it engaging, smart, thoughtful, and wise. Winnie Friedman, the endearing 15-year-old narrator, is a funny but shy teen trying to find her voice and navigate flirtations and changing friends, when she’s hit by a bombshell. Winnie’s beloved Dad, the parent she’s closest to, receives a grim diagnosis, upending her family life, as she learns that parents are also people, and that they can be complex, confusing, flawed and scared. At the same time, Winnie, encouraged by What a gem of a book! I found it engaging, smart, thoughtful, and wise. Winnie Friedman, the endearing 15-year-old narrator, is a funny but shy teen trying to find her voice and navigate flirtations and changing friends, when she’s hit by a bombshell. Winnie’s beloved Dad, the parent she’s closest to, receives a grim diagnosis, upending her family life, as she learns that parents are also people, and that they can be complex, confusing, flawed and scared. At the same time, Winnie, encouraged by friends, joins her school’s improv club to try and leave her shell, which leads her to some unexpected places, and is also fascinating and entertaining for the reader, a glimpse into what humor means and how we create it. It’s hard not to root for Winnie as she faces difficult times, holding herself together as best she can with humor and heart. This reads like the diary of a smart and articulate teenage girl – another home run from author Lance Rubin, quite impressively different from his hilarious and thought-provoking speculative debut, Denton Little’s Death Date.
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  • Aubrey
    January 1, 1970
    Crying Laughing by Lance Rubin is a heartfelt tale about friendship, family struggles, and performing. Some of the points I really like about this book are that there is a strong sense of friendship. Winnie struggles with keeping her friendships with her friends, and with becoming friends with other people in her club. Also, she struggles to stay strong, and to keep her family together when she finds out about her father's condition. Furthermore, this book shows Winnie at her greatest, and worst Crying Laughing by Lance Rubin is a heartfelt tale about friendship, family struggles, and performing. Some of the points I really like about this book are that there is a strong sense of friendship. Winnie struggles with keeping her friendships with her friends, and with becoming friends with other people in her club. Also, she struggles to stay strong, and to keep her family together when she finds out about her father's condition. Furthermore, this book shows Winnie at her greatest, and worst performing stages, and how she evolves in performing. Some points I'd like to point out that makes this book not for younger children, is that there is talk of making out with people, and cursing. Not to scare anyone away though, the cursing is just as emphasis or exclamation, and when people are being jerks. Overall, I really enjoyed this book, therefore I would highly recommend this book for people who like theatre/acting. That is why I rate this book a five-star rating.
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  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC! I don't personally know anyone with ALS, but this book hit so close to home for me, living with a completely different disease of my own. The effect that Winnie's dad's diagnosis had on the family broke my heart, and I loved getting to see how they all supported each other along the way. I actually never expected to be too into the humor in this book, maybe the occasional laugh here and there, but I ended up enjoying this so much, especially Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC! I don't personally know anyone with ALS, but this book hit so close to home for me, living with a completely different disease of my own. The effect that Winnie's dad's diagnosis had on the family broke my heart, and I loved getting to see how they all supported each other along the way. I actually never expected to be too into the humor in this book, maybe the occasional laugh here and there, but I ended up enjoying this so much, especially whenever Winnie was involved and trying to sound good! When it didn't always work out for her, it was hilarious what she would do and think. I couldn't get enough of the banter between Winnie and her friends and classmates either. Hands down, Crying Laughing was one of the best books I've read this year. I'd recommend it to anyone needing a quick read but with a ton of heart and laughs to go around!
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  • Katelyn Spedden
    January 1, 1970
    The best part about this book is the fact that Lance Rubin perfectly captures the teenage voice of his characters. You experience everything along with them and everything is so well written that you feel what they do. There is such second hand embarrassment for Winnie at times that it reminded me of the Scotts Tots episode of The Office, but it’s not just that. I cared about everyone in the book and maybe because I’m a little older HATED Evan because I knew he was going to be a jerky teenage The best part about this book is the fact that Lance Rubin perfectly captures the teenage voice of his characters. You experience everything along with them and everything is so well written that you feel what they do. There is such second hand embarrassment for Winnie at times that it reminded me of the Scotts Tots episode of The Office, but it’s not just that. I cared about everyone in the book and maybe because I’m a little older HATED Evan because I knew he was going to be a jerky teenage boy because that’s how he seemed to me from the moment he made Winnie do the announcements without warning her first. And everything that happens with her father is so well done that you’re emotionally invested in everything that happens. I would honestly recommend this novel to everyone. I couldn’t put it down.
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  • Katelyn Spedden
    January 1, 1970
    * I received a free ARC of this novel in exchange for an honest Review*The best part about this book is the fact that Lance Rubin perfectly captures the teenage voice of his characters. You experience everything along with them and everything is so well written that you feel what they do. There is such second hand embarrassment for Winnie at times that it reminded me of the Scotts Tots episode of The Office, but it’s not just that. I cared about everyone in the book and maybe because I’m a * I received a free ARC of this novel in exchange for an honest Review*The best part about this book is the fact that Lance Rubin perfectly captures the teenage voice of his characters. You experience everything along with them and everything is so well written that you feel what they do. There is such second hand embarrassment for Winnie at times that it reminded me of the Scotts Tots episode of The Office, but it’s not just that. I cared about everyone in the book and maybe because I’m a little older HATED Evan because I knew he was going to be a jerky teenage boy because that’s how he seemed to me from the moment he made Winnie do the announcements without warning her first. And everything that happens with her father is so well done that you’re emotionally invested in everything that happens. I would honestly recommend this novel to everyone. I couldn’t put it down.
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  • jbgbookgirl
    January 1, 1970
    Winnie is your typical teenager dealing with typical teenager things until one thing becomes anything but typical, her father’s diagnosis with ALS. The title is fitting. They story flows very well between the typical funny teenager issues and the less than funny, heartbreaking reality, having to accept her dad’s heartbreaking diagnosis. The main character is obsessed with comedy and tries her hand at improv, following the sin the steps of her comedic heroes. While she steps into the unknown she Winnie is your typical teenager dealing with typical teenager things until one thing becomes anything but typical, her father’s diagnosis with ALS. The title is fitting. They story flows very well between the typical funny teenager issues and the less than funny, heartbreaking reality, having to accept her dad’s heartbreaking diagnosis. The main character is obsessed with comedy and tries her hand at improv, following the sin the steps of her comedic heroes. While she steps into the unknown she also learns that life isn’t simple as it appears and not everything can be solved with a joke. It’s a darling YA book.Thank you to #netgalley for an ARC of #cryinglaughing
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  • Brandi Collins
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this story very much. Winnie is such a likable character because she seems real to me. She's a 15-year-old girl trying to navigate her family issues, friendship evolutions, and love life problems while trying to keep her sense of humor during her sophomore year of high school. High school alone is a good reason to need a sense of humor even without all the issues Winnie must deal with, especially her father's medical crisis. While reading the story, I wanted to jump into the pages and I enjoyed this story very much. Winnie is such a likable character because she seems real to me. She's a 15-year-old girl trying to navigate her family issues, friendship evolutions, and love life problems while trying to keep her sense of humor during her sophomore year of high school. High school alone is a good reason to need a sense of humor even without all the issues Winnie must deal with, especially her father's medical crisis. While reading the story, I wanted to jump into the pages and give poor Winnie a hug.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a while to get into this one but I did quite enjoy it at the end. For whatever reason all the references really jumped out at me and made it hard for me to stay in the world and I wasn't necessarily laughing at any of the comedy. But the scene in Chili's and the resulting scenes really moved me. Thank you to NetGalley, Random House Children's, and Lance Rubin for the eARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    [I received an electronic review copy of this from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.]An emotional journey with Winnie through friend drama, boyfriend stuff, and her dad's diagnosis of ALS. There are some fun moments, and there's some humor, along with lots of honest emotions. I loved the ways the improv troupe backed Winnie up. Great wrap up of the story. (Language, LGBTQ+)
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  • Kerry
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, oh, how I loved this book. It is laugh-out-loud funny and tender and heartbreaking and life-affirming and real, and best of all, infused with so much love and heart that reading it feels like a hug. So many perfect author choices I'd like to comment on but I don't want to spoil anything! Big five stars, huge recommend.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I hate the cover, but really liked the book and the narrator. Although I cared about most of the bigger characters in the book, Evan was just unlikeable and I found it hard to keep reading earlier in the story just because he irritated me so much.
  • Cristie Underwood
    January 1, 1970
    Great read. The author wrote a story that was interesting and moved at a pace that kept me engaged. The characters were easy to invest in.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars
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