Finding Langston
In a debut historical novel about the Great Migration a boy discovers Chicago's postwar South Side and the poetry of Langston Hughes.When 11-year-old Langston's mother dies in 1946, he and his father leave rural Alabama for Chicago's brown belt as a part of what came to be known as the Great Migration. It's lonely in the small apartment with just the two of them, and at school Langston is bullied. But his new home has one fantastic thing. Unlike the whites-only library in Alabama, the local public library welcomes everyone. There, hiding out after school, Langston discovers another Langston, a poet whom he learns inspired his mother enough to name her only son after him.

Finding Langston Details

TitleFinding Langston
Author
ReleaseAug 14th, 2018
PublisherHoliday House
ISBN-139780823439607
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Childrens, Middle Grade, Poetry, Cultural, African American, Juvenile, Fiction

Finding Langston Review

  • Laura Harrison
    January 1, 1970
    One of my top favorite middle grade readers of the year. Beautifully written, warm and one children will enjoy. I hope it wins an award or two!
  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this story about a young boy reawakening his love of reading thanks to a public library and the poetry of his namesake.
  • Cortney (cortingbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Mini Me Rating & Review: The first part was really entertaining but I started to lose interest towards the end.
  • Joanne Kelleher
    January 1, 1970
    This is such a special book, well-deserving of its Newbery Honor Medal. Cline-Ransome packed so much in a scant 112 pages!! Of course, what appealed to my nerdy self was all the library love. It is a love letter to the George Cleveland Hall branch of the Chicago Public Library, where Langston found himself in the writings of his famous namesake. It also portrays librarians in the very best light! <3<3 The poems featured in the book were accessible for middle grade readers and provide a spr This is such a special book, well-deserving of its Newbery Honor Medal. Cline-Ransome packed so much in a scant 112 pages!! Of course, what appealed to my nerdy self was all the library love. It is a love letter to the George Cleveland Hall branch of the Chicago Public Library, where Langston found himself in the writings of his famous namesake. It also portrays librarians in the very best light! <3<3 The poems featured in the book were accessible for middle grade readers and provide a springboard for further exploration of the works of Langston Hughes. But it's not just a story about a kid at the library; it is a multi-layered story that includes bullying, racism, missing a parent, a father-son relationship, and a little bit of history about the Great Migration and the Harlem Renaissance, never feeling forced or overdone. It is a deceptively simple story with so much to offer.
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  • DaNae
    January 1, 1970
    One more "important" book in a year of "important" books. Shines a light on the Great Migration through a displaced southern boy in post-war Chicago. Can't help but love the library scenes. Otherwise, the story felt bland and something to get through and check off the box.
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  • MaryAnne
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful story.In 1946, Langston and his Dad move to Chicago from rural Alabama. His mother recently passed away and he is feeling a little lost in this big city. The city is so noisy and everyone calls him “Country boy” because he has an accent and wears overalls. He hasn’t made any friends and is experiencing bullying from a few kids in his class. In order to avoid the bullies, one day he goes a different way home from school and discovers the George Cleveland Hall Branch Library. The libra A beautiful story.In 1946, Langston and his Dad move to Chicago from rural Alabama. His mother recently passed away and he is feeling a little lost in this big city. The city is so noisy and everyone calls him “Country boy” because he has an accent and wears overalls. He hasn’t made any friends and is experiencing bullying from a few kids in his class. In order to avoid the bullies, one day he goes a different way home from school and discovers the George Cleveland Hall Branch Library. The library becomes his home away from home. He never imagined such a wonderful place and they allow colored folks! The first book he finds is by Langston Hughes and he wonders if he was named after him? He finds he has a lot in common with Mr. Hughes and soon discovers more poetry and writings by other Negro writers. Langston’s journey to discovering himself is beautifully written by Ms. Cline-Ransome. This is truly a lovely book. It’s a love story for libraries and writers. And, it’s a story about the Great Migration when many blacks from the South migrated to the North after World War II.
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  • Stephanie Bange
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story of a boy finding out who he is after the death of his mother.Langston feels he was ripped from his home in Alabama and forced to move to Chicago with his father for a "fresh start". He feels alien in the city, it is so different from his country home in the South. While trying to avoid a bully at school, he stumbles upon the public library. Once Langston discovers the beauty of poetry by his namesake, Langston Hughes, and other Black poets, he is able to turn his world around.In This is a story of a boy finding out who he is after the death of his mother.Langston feels he was ripped from his home in Alabama and forced to move to Chicago with his father for a "fresh start". He feels alien in the city, it is so different from his country home in the South. While trying to avoid a bully at school, he stumbles upon the public library. Once Langston discovers the beauty of poetry by his namesake, Langston Hughes, and other Black poets, he is able to turn his world around.In a word, beautiful! Cline-Ransome's story set in 1940's Chicago is charming and on-target. Langston is moody and broody, just as tween boys are. He is two steps from manhood, yet two steps from still being a young boy. Growing up as a "mama's boy", he never really knew his father until they moved to Chicago. Langston grows immensely in both his sensibilities and self-confidence as the story unfolds. The conversations between Langston and others is just right. I found that my heart went out to this young man who was just trying to understand the world around him, but felt that it was against him. Once he started taking risks and extending himself, his world grew.Highly Recommended for grades 4-8.
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  • Sherry Guice
    January 1, 1970
    It has been a long time since I've read such a moving book--short and lyrical and filled with pain and longing. Langston and his father move to Chicago after the death of Langston's mother. He discovers Langston Hughes and poetry as he copes with the pain and loneliness of his new life, far from Alabama and without his mother.
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  • MaryLibrarianOH
    January 1, 1970
    The writing is top shelf. Langston is a character to love and he is three dimensional with supportive adults and a class full of realistic behaving kids. Love the window to the world the library plays in the story.
  • Kari
    January 1, 1970
    So lovely! Short but packs a punch.
  • Leah Agirlandaboy
    January 1, 1970
    I highly recommend this perfect little book, and the audio version is exquisite. Just...wonderful all around. (It inspired my 6yo to run into the library and check out a book of kid-friendly Langston Hughes poems this morning, and if that’s not strong praise I don’t know what is.)
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those rare children's books that are so much more than just a cute story for kids. On top of the historical aspect of it, it's also an enjoyable read for anyone who loves books and libraries in general. It deals with important subjects like bullying and grief, but does it in a way that doesn't feel overwhelming or too emotionally charged. The pace is a bit slow, but in my opinion that added to its charm. For a quick little read, I was very impressed with this book.
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  • Susan Dove Lempke
    January 1, 1970
    A historical fiction novel set in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago right after World War II. The main character (whose name we don't learn until part way through) deeply misses his late mother, and misses their Alabama home. Bullied at school and left alone a lot in the very bleak apartment he shares with his silent father, he finds comfort in the neighborhood library. For a librarian, this was a treat to read, and Cline-Ransome evokes the time, the place, and the poignant characters beau A historical fiction novel set in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago right after World War II. The main character (whose name we don't learn until part way through) deeply misses his late mother, and misses their Alabama home. Bullied at school and left alone a lot in the very bleak apartment he shares with his silent father, he finds comfort in the neighborhood library. For a librarian, this was a treat to read, and Cline-Ransome evokes the time, the place, and the poignant characters beautifully.
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  • Leonard Kim
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Listened to audiobook. I suppose there aren’t a lot of surprises in this book and everything in it has been “done before” but it engaged me and I really responded to it.
  • Katelyn Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Cline-Ransome, L. (2018). Finding Langston. New York City, NY: Holiday House, Incorporated.Miller, D., & Anderson, J. (2011). The book whisperer: Awakening the inner reader in every child. New York, NY: Scholastic.The alternative assessment that I chose for this book was to create a birthday list for Langston. By choosing this alternative assessment, students will be reading the book in order to understand the characters of the book. Donalyn Miller talked about how assigning a comprehension Cline-Ransome, L. (2018). Finding Langston. New York City, NY: Holiday House, Incorporated.Miller, D., & Anderson, J. (2011). The book whisperer: Awakening the inner reader in every child. New York, NY: Scholastic.The alternative assessment that I chose for this book was to create a birthday list for Langston. By choosing this alternative assessment, students will be reading the book in order to understand the characters of the book. Donalyn Miller talked about how assigning a comprehension test deters students from reading for pleasure, instead they are reading in order to pass the test (Miller & Anderson, 2011). By allowing students to be creative and create a list of presents the main character wants for her/his birthday, they are more likely to enjoy what they are reading. By reading the following birthday list for Langston, the teacher will be able to see that the student understood what the character stood for and what he was like. **Suppose you had written to a character in your book and asked him/her what he/she would like for their birthday. Make a list of ten presents and explain why the character would want them.**1. Air freshener/Fresh Lavender – Langston would want something to freshen up his apartment. He mentioned multiple times how it smells of last night’s dinner and his dad’s dirty work clothes. He mentions how lavender grows along of edge of his roads back in Alabama so I think he would like fresh lavender or an air freshener that smells of that scent. 2. New Clothes Langston’s nickname at his new school in Chicago is “country boy” because of his old shoes and overalls he still wore. He would like to get new clothes that do not have holes in them and are clean in order to no longer make him look like a country boy.3. ShoesLangston’s shoes are falling apart. He would like to get new shoes before winter comes. Coming from Alabama, he had never experienced the cold, snowy winter before. Since he now lives in Chicago, he will need shoes to protect his feet from the snow. He would like to get a pair of boots “with shiny black leather and thick, strong laces” (Cline-Ransome, 2018, p. 91).4. Gloves, Hat, and CoatOn one cold and windy day, Langston shoves some of his Daddy’s old gloves in his pocket to use later when he walks to school. I assume that since he came from Alabama and he does not have any gloves of his own, that he also does not have a hat or coat either. He would love to receive a new pair of gloves, a hat and a coat. 5. RadioLangston mentioned multiple times how loud his dad stores and how it prohibits him from falling asleep. Having a radio to play at night would help drown out the snoring noises, in addition to drown out the noises of the bugs in the walls and the sound of his neighbor’s radio. Langston also talks about how his mom and dad used to dance to blues music. Langston being able to listen to blues music would remind him of happy memories back in Alabama. 6. HeaterLangston says that “Daddy says the landlord turns on the heat only when he’s in the mood, so I guess he ain’t in the mood today” (Cline-Ransome, 2018, p. 92). Having a heater in the apartment would make sure it stays warm in the cold Chicago winters even when the landlord is not “in the mood”.7. FanLangston mentions that the apartment that he lives in gets super hot and stuffy at times even with the windows open. Having a fan in the apartment would help circulate the air flow to make the whole apartment cooler. It would also help keep the apartment warmer in the winter by circulating the warm air from the heater. 8. CandyIn the book, Langston goes to the country store to buy some candy with the few pennies he has. Since he only had a few pennies and he spent it on candy, I think he would like to receive some more candy for his birthday.9. Southern MealIt was mentioned 7 times in the book how much Langston misses his mother’s southern cooking. For a birthday gift/meal, Langston would love to have a meal that reminds him of home. It would include some of his favorites foods which are potato salad, fried chicken, gravy, cornbread, pie, macaroni and cheese, fried okra, biscuits, green beans and sweet tea.10. BooksSince Langston goes to the library every day after school, he would love to get some books of his own. He would love to get books from his favorite author Langston Hughes and poetry books. His mom loved to read also so by him getting his own books to keep, he can read them and be reminded of his mother.
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  • Jodie
    January 1, 1970
    I particularly liked how Lesa Cline-Ransome describes how the main character, an 11-year-old boy, enjoys reading poetry. Usually there's a stereotype in many books that boys don't like poetry. But in Finding Langston, the main character (named Langston) discovers that reading poetry is a way to help him understand his loneliness as he and his father moved to Chicago in 1946 during the Great Migration after his mother had recently died in Alabama. They're seeking a better life and Langston doesn' I particularly liked how Lesa Cline-Ransome describes how the main character, an 11-year-old boy, enjoys reading poetry. Usually there's a stereotype in many books that boys don't like poetry. But in Finding Langston, the main character (named Langston) discovers that reading poetry is a way to help him understand his loneliness as he and his father moved to Chicago in 1946 during the Great Migration after his mother had recently died in Alabama. They're seeking a better life and Langston doesn't think things are much better in Chicago. Until he literally runs into the public library in Bronzeville as he's escaping bullies. The boy had never been to a library in Alabama because he was told they were for whites only, so it a thrill for him to wander the library and check out books.The library is an oasis, a treasure, a respite and a source of culture and confidence for Langston, who begins to read poetry by Langston Hughes. The coincidence of his name being the same as a powerful African-American poet becomes a source of intrigue for him. This is a short chapter book that would be appropriate for good readers beginning in second grade, but would still be interesting for junior high students.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    First sentence: Never really thought much about Alabama's red dirt roads, but now, all I can think about is kicking up their dust.Premise/plot: Langston, our hero, has moved with his father to Chicago from Alabama. It wasn't his choice--but his father's. (Alabama reminded him too much of his late wife.) This coming of age novel is set in Chicago in 1946.Finding Langston is an Coretta Scott King Honor book in the author category for 2019. My thoughts: I really found this a quick, compelling read. First sentence: Never really thought much about Alabama's red dirt roads, but now, all I can think about is kicking up their dust.Premise/plot: Langston, our hero, has moved with his father to Chicago from Alabama. It wasn't his choice--but his father's. (Alabama reminded him too much of his late wife.) This coming of age novel is set in Chicago in 1946.Finding Langston is an Coretta Scott King Honor book in the author category for 2019. My thoughts: I really found this a quick, compelling read. Langston is struggling to make Chicago his home. He misses the life he knew. And he hasn't really made any friends yet. In fact, he's been bullied by others; he's a COUNTRY BOY. Langston hates just about everything in Chicago BUT the local library branch where he is welcomed. Langston discovers the other Langston--Langston Hughes--and finds his "home" between the covers of the books he reads. I love reading books where the main characters love to read.
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  • Anna Spears
    January 1, 1970
    Alternative assessmentFor this book, I chose to write a poem about the main character of the book. I chose this because throughout the book, Langston discovers himself through poetry. He is really lost in his journey from Alabama to Chicago, but through poetry learns about himself, his mother, and even his father. "Reading lacks personal significance for students who see the book report as the reason for reading" (Miller, 2009. Pg. 135). By creating a poem, students are being inspired by what th Alternative assessmentFor this book, I chose to write a poem about the main character of the book. I chose this because throughout the book, Langston discovers himself through poetry. He is really lost in his journey from Alabama to Chicago, but through poetry learns about himself, his mother, and even his father. "Reading lacks personal significance for students who see the book report as the reason for reading" (Miller, 2009. Pg. 135). By creating a poem, students are being inspired by what they have read instead of reading as a chore to complete a necessary report. Langston Hughes, country boymisses his familiar worldmourning his mother, missing his grandmaFather has become a strangerNew school, no friendsfinds safety in wordsthe library becomes home away from homeand he begins to find himself againDiscovers his mothers secretsopens up to his fatherstands up for himselflearns that not everyone is what they seemLangston Hughes, country boyfinds the city may not be so badreconnecting with fathercreating new friendshipsseeing hope for his future.Citations:Cline-Ransome, L. (2018). Finding Langston. York, PA: Holiday House, Incorporated.Miller, D. (2009). The book whisperer: Awakening the inner reader in every child. New York, NY: Scholastic.
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  • Penny Peck
    January 1, 1970
    In this brief but emotionally truthful novel for grades 4-8, Langston has moved to Chicago with his father from rural Alabama in post-WWII after the death of his mother. He has trouble adjusting to school but appreciates that in Chicago, African-Americans are allowed to use the public library. This is a great story about father-son, dealing with loss, making friends after a move, dealing with bullies, etc. It is a plus that some historical information is also included (but doesn't overwhelm), su In this brief but emotionally truthful novel for grades 4-8, Langston has moved to Chicago with his father from rural Alabama in post-WWII after the death of his mother. He has trouble adjusting to school but appreciates that in Chicago, African-Americans are allowed to use the public library. This is a great story about father-son, dealing with loss, making friends after a move, dealing with bullies, etc. It is a plus that some historical information is also included (but doesn't overwhelm), such as the Great Migration and the library system in Chicago. Great for a classroom read-aloud for 5th grade, and for tweens who need a 'skinny' book. But it is more than that; the honesty of Langston's feelings is so clear that this really resonates.
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  • Chris Coolman
    January 1, 1970
    One of the perks of being in charge of the Children's area at my library branch is when new books come in, I get first choice. Sometimes I don't have time to read and I begrudgingly put them all out on the shelf, while others call to me. Finding Langston was just such a book. I was finishing the fall semester and stressed when it came across my desk, however I checked it out immediately and have been carrying it around in my bag for the last two weeks.Continued at: https://ccoolman.blogspot.com/
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  • Book Chick (Tori)
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book with my 13 year old. (Can I just say I am so loving that she still lets me lie beside her and read with her!?!!) Anyway, we read it out loud and this book just touched me so much! Not only did Langston's mom die, but then he is moved away from the only home he's ever known in small town Alabama, to big city Chicago. He is lonely. He is bullied. He is in mourning. It just made my heart hurt for him! But then he finds some semblance of joy and belonging in the coolest place ever- I read this book with my 13 year old. (Can I just say I am so loving that she still lets me lie beside her and read with her!?!!) Anyway, we read it out loud and this book just touched me so much! Not only did Langston's mom die, but then he is moved away from the only home he's ever known in small town Alabama, to big city Chicago. He is lonely. He is bullied. He is in mourning. It just made my heart hurt for him! But then he finds some semblance of joy and belonging in the coolest place ever- the library. He also learns more about his dad and learns more about himself. Loved it!
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    The Great Migration, where 7 million blacks relocated north between 1916 to 1970 with hope for a better life. After 11 year old Langston loses his mother, he and his father relocate to Chicago from Alabama. Having trouble making friends and adjusting to city life, Langston finds his way to the public library and the discovery of poetry, through the lens of Langston Hughes, who happened to be just one of many others, like Louis Armstrong and Muddy Waters, who contributed to Chicago's culture scen The Great Migration, where 7 million blacks relocated north between 1916 to 1970 with hope for a better life. After 11 year old Langston loses his mother, he and his father relocate to Chicago from Alabama. Having trouble making friends and adjusting to city life, Langston finds his way to the public library and the discovery of poetry, through the lens of Langston Hughes, who happened to be just one of many others, like Louis Armstrong and Muddy Waters, who contributed to Chicago's culture scene. A moving story with a great message and a brief bit of underrated history.
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  • Betsy Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    Following the death of his mother, Langston & his dad move to Chicago during The Great Migration. Bullied by kids who tease him for being a country boy, Langston finds solace and poetry at the local library. This is a short read, coming in at just over 100 pages. I was drawn to Langston, my fellow introvert. I really enjoyed the author’s note at the end and the rich history of the library she chose to feature in the story. I appreciated the nod to the rich world of poetry and hope young read Following the death of his mother, Langston & his dad move to Chicago during The Great Migration. Bullied by kids who tease him for being a country boy, Langston finds solace and poetry at the local library. This is a short read, coming in at just over 100 pages. I was drawn to Langston, my fellow introvert. I really enjoyed the author’s note at the end and the rich history of the library she chose to feature in the story. I appreciated the nod to the rich world of poetry and hope young readers use this as a springboard to dive into the many authors Langston enjoys!
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  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    You know how, in the course of a read, a character becomes precious to you? Langston is one of those characters. He kind of reminds me of India Opal or Jess Aarons* in that way.It’s 1946, and Langston is grieving the recent loss of his mother, as well as the loss of his home in Alabama. He’s had to leave his Grandma behind, the comforting familiarity of the land, food, people and its rhythms.Langston’s father is seeking a better life (and distance) in Bronzeville Chicago. And the differences bet You know how, in the course of a read, a character becomes precious to you? Langston is one of those characters. He kind of reminds me of India Opal or Jess Aarons* in that way.It’s 1946, and Langston is grieving the recent loss of his mother, as well as the loss of his home in Alabama. He’s had to leave his Grandma behind, the comforting familiarity of the land, food, people and its rhythms.Langston’s father is seeking a better life (and distance) in Bronzeville Chicago. And the differences between the Northern City and the Rural South is not only startling, but haunting. Langston is bullied for being too country and its in avoiding a tormenter that he stumbles across something crucially different between where he is from and where he has come.The George Cleveland Hall Library is for all Chicago Residents—not just white people. Here, Langston discovers a safe haven and a soul-mate. It’s a place Daddy would express concern over but his Mama would love. It becomes a secret that threatens a troubling distance with his father, but one that binds him closer to his mother. Langston’s discovery of Hughes reveals his Mama to him in new ways.The first book he pulls from the shelf shares his name. And is Langston Hughes his namesake like the Librarian wonders? The little mystery the question of naming inspires allows Langston to find a way to think about his mother in this new city.Any of lover of poetry (or storytelling) will respond to how Cline-Ransome writes Langston’s reaction to Hughes, “Feels like reading words from my heart” (22); “I have to stop. I can feel the choking in my throat that always starts right before the tears” (30); “This lady said the Langston who wrote these words is a poet. Seems more like a magician to me, pulling words from my heart I never knew I had” (32). There is more, and more poets.You feel you learn more about both Langstons through the way Cline-Ransome writes their relationship. You are invited to imagine Hughes as a boy like Langston (possibly in Alabama, though we are reminded later that he is from Missouri and Kansas). Likewise, you can better understand some of Langston’s longings, culture and context in the language of the poet. Langston begins to adopt Hughes words to express his feelings in a moment when the concrete/setting description of that moment seems inadequate: “Sometimes when I’m lonely,/Don’t know why,/Keep thinkin’ I won’t be lonely/By and by.”Cline-Ransome realizes even the most distant characters for the reader. You mourn the loss of a mother and Grandma and their home because you’ve developed a second-hand fondness. You feel the struggle of Langston’s father. You engage in the shift of perception of the neighbor Miss Fulton alongside (because of) our narrator’s shift. Even the quick sketch (time-wise) of the setting, the teacher and librarians, are marvelously effective. All this in 104 pages of storytelling (smallish margins, long paragraphing).Cline-Ransome also packs a lot of the historical into those 104 pages, and just as smoothly as her characterization. I do not pity any young person who would have to write a paper inspired by this book. Cline-Ransome includes an “Author’s Note” to expand on the historical and cultural context and settings of the novel. I know she has written a number of picture books, but I hope Cline-Ransome writes more historical novels for young people, Finding Langston is so rich and compelling. The voices she writes and settings she describes are engaging.His discovery of Langston Hughes and the George Cleveland Hall Library finds Langston (re)connecting with a number of people and places, learning new things about himself, his history, and a possible new future. This discovery, too, leads to an unexpected new turn for Langston and his father. Their distance was present from even before Chicago—Langston always shown to be closer to his mother in time-spent and interests—but their present circumstances create a greater strain. The question is whether Hughes or the Library will close the gap like it does for other relationships in the book. Because one of the most beautiful struggles in this book is the longing and effort both father and son bring to their relationship. You learn and understand where each of them are coming from, so much informed by the culture of the time and their difference. You never doubt they love each other, and damn, but that scene to close the book. Maybe a poet and a library will bring them closer together.*Opal is from DiCamillo’s Because of Winn-Dixie and Jess Aarons is from Paterson’s Bridge to Terabithia.You know, there are decent film-versions of Because of Winn-Dixie (2005) and Bridge to Terabithia (2007)…I wouldn’t mind seeing Finding Langston on screen. We need to talk to Oprah. In the meantime, you can find it in your library, and if you the young reader in your life cannot find it in their school library, I’d recommend its purchase (or just buy it for them).Recommended for all the readers, not just the historical fiction reader; this is a good choice for the reluctant reader. Obviously this is a good one for April/National Poetry Month, and the classroom.https://contemplatrix.wordpress.com/2...
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  • Donna Borgerding
    January 1, 1970
    This is a poignant story about a boy who loses his mother and then is uprooted from family and the only home he has ever known. He and his father are part of the Great Migration, an important period in the history African Americans. He stumbles upon a library and discovers a world of poetry and specifically Langston Hughes. I really liked this beautiful story.
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  • Teresa Grabs
    January 1, 1970
    Langston moved from Alabama to Chicago after his mother's death. As his father searches for a new meaning and to do the best he can for his son, Langston searches for meaning in his new world. His mother's secrets open doors that Langston never knew existed. Fantastic read!
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  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    An honest, engaging, affecting historical novel.
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    A love letter to books, libraries, and librarians.
  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars.Audible.
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    1946, Chicago, a young boy and his father, the Great Migration, longing, and the power of poetry to heal. The library as refuge. A wonderful story for young readers.
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