The Sisters Mederos
Two sisters fight with manners, magic, and mayhem to reclaim their family's name, in this captivating historical fantasy adventure.House Mederos was once the wealthiest merchant family in Port Saint Frey. Now the family is disgraced, impoverished, and humbled by the powerful Merchants Guild. Daughters Yvienne and Tesara Mederos are determined to uncover who was behind their family's downfall and get revenge. But Tesara has a secret - could it have been her wild magic that caused the storm that destroyed the family's merchant fleet? The sisters' schemes quickly get out of hand - gambling is one thing, but robbing people is another...Together the sisters must trust each another to keep their secrets and save their family.File Under: Fantasy [ A Family’s Honour | The Fleet That Was Lost | Pistols in the Dark | An Ace at Cards ]

The Sisters Mederos Details

TitleThe Sisters Mederos
Author
ReleaseApr 3rd, 2018
PublisherAngry Robot
ISBN-139780857667755
Rating
GenreFantasy, Historical Fiction, Historical Fantasy, Adult, Adventure

The Sisters Mederos Review

  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book from EdelweissIn hindsight, this does have quite a few overused tropes and maybe wrapped up a bit too quickly at the end, but I had a lot of fun reading it and I loved Tessa and Yvienne so I think that is what bumped it up from 3 to 4 stars for me. Overall it was a really fun story about two very different girls working together to investigate and clear their family name. If you're looking for a fun YA fantasy read that focuses on family over romance then I wo I received a free copy of this book from EdelweissIn hindsight, this does have quite a few overused tropes and maybe wrapped up a bit too quickly at the end, but I had a lot of fun reading it and I loved Tessa and Yvienne so I think that is what bumped it up from 3 to 4 stars for me. Overall it was a really fun story about two very different girls working together to investigate and clear their family name. If you're looking for a fun YA fantasy read that focuses on family over romance then I would definitely recommend this. There are some loose ends left hanging at the end but since this is the first in a series I'm assuming they will come into play in the next book, which I will definitely be reading!
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  • Crazy4Books
    January 1, 1970
    This is a historical fantasy about two sisters from one of the most prestigious houses in Port Saint Frey who decided to fight back and reclaim their family name after the Merchant Guild took everything from them. One turns to thievery and the other to gambling while they look for information as to why their house was targeted by the Guild. I was wary going into this because Im not the biggest reader of historical fiction, but I wanted to try something different.The little world building I did g This is a historical fantasy about two sisters from one of the most prestigious houses in Port Saint Frey who decided to fight back and reclaim their family name after the Merchant Guild took everything from them. One turns to thievery and the other to gambling while they look for information as to why their house was targeted by the Guild. I was wary going into this because Im not the biggest reader of historical fiction, but I wanted to try something different.The little world building I did get felt pretty generic. Nothing about it stood out to me. The magic didnt have much of explanation. The plot lost its direction with the sisters gambling and stealing needlessly instead of actually looking into the reason their house was targeted. This slowed down the pace for me and made me lose interest, especially since nothing really unpredictable happened. The writing flowed nicely and I was able to follow the switch it points of view between the two sisters easily.I enjoyed our two main characters Tesera and Yvienne, but their sense of priviledge was a little annoying. If you can spend your money on a housemaid you're not that bad off. Seeing these sisters transform into the badasses I saw on the cover was the best part of the story, but it was still a bit underwhelming. I wish they would have communicated to each other more and been more focused on their goal. I also didnt understand Teseras reaction to getting her magic back. Not to mention it came back out of nowhere. The sisters parents and uncle were very flawed people who treated the girls unfairly, but I still liked them as characters. I also liked their housemaid and how she didnt tolerate any nonsense from their uncle. I also appreciated the disabilty representation with one of the main characters having a disabled hand, but I dont know how accurate it was. Im happy she didnt let it deter her. She even used it to her advantage while gambling. The ending wasnt very satisfying, especially where the culprit and Teseras new friendships are concerned.*received for review consideration*
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  • Nadine
    January 1, 1970
    Full spoiler-free review now on my blogThis story ist mostly set in a harbour city called Port Saint Frey and there is little to no explanation about its exact location or the world surrounding it. While this irks me a lot in other fantasy novels because I'm a huge fan of intricate and immersive world-building, it surprisingly didn't bother me in this case. The story is very character-focused and we follow the Mederos family only for a little while in their life, so there are no epic adventures Full spoiler-free review now on my blogThis story ist mostly set in a harbour city called Port Saint Frey and there is little to no explanation about its exact location or the world surrounding it. While this irks me a lot in other fantasy novels because I'm a huge fan of intricate and immersive world-building, it surprisingly didn't bother me in this case. The story is very character-focused and we follow the Mederos family only for a little while in their life, so there are no epic adventures or long journeys through the country that would call for more worldbuilding. However, we learn that the two sisters are send to a school for girls in another city after the family's downfall and later on we get some information about a different culture and its status in Port Saint Frey. The latter part felt a bit strange for me since we don't get any other information about different cultures or countries throughout the whole book and this information served only to explain one point in Yvienne's storyline. As mentioned earlier, this story is very character-driven. It is told from both Yvienne's and Tesara's point of view and I liked that each sister has a unique voice and character. Through their eyes, we see how their parents Alinesse and Brevart and their uncle Samwell cope with the current situation. Tesara is the more rebellious of the two sisters and thus isn't very appreciated by her parents. She used to have a very good relationship with her uncle, but they don't get along very well since it was discovered that he didn't insure their merchant fleet, wich makes him partly responsible for the family's downfall. Interestingly, Tesara is able to call storms with her hands, which is the only magical element to the story. However, she hasn't been able to feel the magic for a long time, since a teacher at the school she was sent to deliberately crippled her fingers.Yvienne is very intelligent and well-loved by her family. She is seen as the more reasonable of the two sisters and tries to negotiate between the adults and Tesara. When the family needs a new maid, she takes it in her own hands to find a new one and make her parents' life as confortable as possible under the circumstances.We only get to see the rest of the family through the eyes of both sisters. Their parents try in their own ways to block out their fall into disgrace. Alinesse reminded me a lot of Nesta from A court of Throns and Roses with her self-righteous and unfair attitude towards Tesara. Brevart on the other hand has lost his spirit and character after the downfall and is only a shell of his former self. I loved that we get to follow both sisters individually as they find their own ways to uncover the real circumstances of their family's downfall and try to restore the family's wealth and social status. It's especially great because each sister chooses a path that you would probably associate with the other sister and both grow so much because of this. And even though they keep some secrets from each other, they know they can still rely on one another in the end.Since the focus lies so heavily on the characters and their adventures, the plot itself looses itself a bit along the way. Even though I enjoyed following the sisters around town, it got a bit repetitive in the second half of the book and I would have liked some more plot depth instead. The ending felt a bit rushed and not everything is completely solved at the end of the story. I don't know if Sarath plans a second book in this world and chose therefore to omit some conclusions. It's especially unfortunate because some side characters just disappear from the story and you are left wondering about them. Overall I enjoyed the story and our two main characters, but the story itself could have had some more depth for me. If you enjoy character-driven historical fantasy with strong female leads and a touch of magic, this could definitely be a book for you!I received a digital advanced review copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley. However, all opinions are my own.
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    *Source* NetGalley*Genre* Fantasy / Historical*Rating* 3.5*Thoughts*The Sisters Mederos, by new to me author Patrice Sarath, is a twisted tale of two sisters, Yvienne and Tesara Mederos, who try to bring their family back from the brink of destitution with cunning, daring, and through counting on one another as they face challenge after challenge. The Mederos' are considered one of the founding families of Port Saint Frey. They were once the wealthiest merchant family in the city as well. Then s *Source* NetGalley*Genre* Fantasy / Historical*Rating* 3.5*Thoughts*The Sisters Mederos, by new to me author Patrice Sarath, is a twisted tale of two sisters, Yvienne and Tesara Mederos, who try to bring their family back from the brink of destitution with cunning, daring, and through counting on one another as they face challenge after challenge. The Mederos' are considered one of the founding families of Port Saint Frey. They were once the wealthiest merchant family in the city as well. Then someone went full out betrayal and destroyed the families reputation and their fortune.*Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews*http://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/201...
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I was immediately interested in this book because it’s a fantasy of manners which is one of my favorite sub-genres of fantasy. I enjoy stories about folks navigating society, especially if they also point out that society’s constraints and issues there may be within it. I was not disappointed as The Sisters Mederos does a great job at both of these aspects of the genre.This is very much a character driven book. In it we have two point of view characters, sisters Tesara (the younger) and Yvienne I was immediately interested in this book because it’s a fantasy of manners which is one of my favorite sub-genres of fantasy. I enjoy stories about folks navigating society, especially if they also point out that society’s constraints and issues there may be within it. I was not disappointed as The Sisters Mederos does a great job at both of these aspects of the genre.This is very much a character driven book. In it we have two point of view characters, sisters Tesara (the younger) and Yvienne (the elder). Once at the top of their town’s society, the Mederos family became impoverished when the girls were children and they were sent away to school. Six years later they’ve returned home and are determined to investigate the manner of their family’s downfall and restore them to them to their former place in Port Saint Frey society.tsm-coverThe bond between the two sisters is really the highlight of the story. One thing that stood out was their loyalty to each other and their desire to see justice done for their family. Even though at times they kept secrets from each other, holding back for fear of what the other would think of their brazen actions, the best part was when they were working together toward a common goal. Tesara finds herself attending society events, having rekindled an old friendship, and spending her nights fleecing people at the card table. While Yvienne gets mixed up in secretly encouraging a revolt against the merchant guild while robbing the rich folks in town as a gentleman bandit. Adventures ensue.The family dynamics in this story is interesting because they’re complex and they also drive most of the plot. Both sisters are unhappy with their circumstances, their family is not only poor, but shunned those they once called friends. Tesara especially is angry at having been sent away to school, believing they were abandoned by their family to the cruelty of the headmistress. Their parents and uncle are bitter at their downfall as well. Yvienne is seen as the perfect, biddable daughter by their mother, which is far from the truth. Tesara is seen as a troublemaker, and while she does get into some situations, up until those events she is continuously blamed for things that are perhaps not her fault. Their uncle is always chasing the help, and their father seems to have given up on caring about much of anything. It was nice to read a fantasy novel where both parents are very much alive but I wish the family would have been more a little more likable. (That may have also been the point, but it left me a bit wanting.)I found several of the minor characters interesting as well, and only wish that a couple of them had either been more important to the story or had been a little more well-developed. Also, I feel like the main villain was perhaps of the mustache-twirly variety, but that didn’t bother me too much because it fit in with the tone of the rest of the story.The setting was well written, feeling much like a mid-eighteenth century to late nineteenth century port city in Europe. The would building was detailed enough to support the story and I enjoyed the descriptions of the city as the sisters navigated around its streets during their escapades. It definitely felt like a world you could step right into.Overall, there was much to be enjoyed in this book. The girl’s adventures and boldness in taking things into their own hands was quite fun to read about and I’d happily read more about the two of them. If you like fantasy of manners, or stories of adventurous young ladies, this might be a book to look out for. Note: I received an ARC copy of this book from the publisher through netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • All Things Urban Fantasy
    January 1, 1970
    Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy.While I enjoyed THE SISTERS MEDEROS, I feel the description might have oversold it a tiny bit - while there are definitely manners and some mayhem, there is way less magic than I would have hoped. The historical nature is in feel only, as Port Saint Frey, where nearly the entire book takes place, is a fictional place, and no year is ever given. But don't let that stop you, as THE SISTERS MEDEROS is an enjoyable fantasy of manners with interesting chara Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy.While I enjoyed THE SISTERS MEDEROS, I feel the description might have oversold it a tiny bit - while there are definitely manners and some mayhem, there is way less magic than I would have hoped. The historical nature is in feel only, as Port Saint Frey, where nearly the entire book takes place, is a fictional place, and no year is ever given. But don't let that stop you, as THE SISTERS MEDEROS is an enjoyable fantasy of manners with interesting characters at its heart.My biggest complaint about THE SISTERS MEDEROS is that the middle drags a bit. It feels a bit repetitive. Tesara and Yvienne both have their individual schemes, and the middle of the book is filled with descriptions of Tesara going to parties and gambling and Yvienne going about her sneaky business. It did not feel like each incident added to the plot - things happened, but they didn't really seem to matter later in the book. There was also not a ton of explanation of the Mederos world, for example, the mysterious Guild that seems to rule the city was never really explained very well.Tesera and Yvienne were both intriguing characters, and I enjoyed reading about them and their separate motivations for going about their plans of revenge. I especially liked that each had their own faults, and they never felt invincible. There were times when I was genuinely worried for their welfare, as they weren't the type of super-powered characters we sometimes come up against in fantasy novels. It made them feel more real and believable.Overall, THE SISTERS MEDEROS is very much driven by Tesara and Yvienne as characters, with a loose plot that, in my opinion, wraps up way too quickly at the end. Luckily, Tesara and Yvienne both have the strength to carry the novel and keep a reader interested throughout. I'm certainly curious about where this world is going and where the author will take the characters next, so I will likely continue on with the series.Sexual content: N/A
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  • Abi (The Knights Who Say Book)
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an advance reader copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*Cool, so this was a disappointment.For about the first 15% of the book I had trouble with the writing. Something about the formal style made me keep having to reread sentences. And I would say that it took me until about halfway through to actually start enjoying the plot more than I was bothered by the blandness. This book and I just were not clicking, despite how much I wanted to love the setting and Yvienne's nig *I received an advance reader copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*Cool, so this was a disappointment.For about the first 15% of the book I had trouble with the writing. Something about the formal style made me keep having to reread sentences. And I would say that it took me until about halfway through to actually start enjoying the plot more than I was bothered by the blandness. This book and I just were not clicking, despite how much I wanted to love the setting and Yvienne's nighttime adventures.I think, and it's hard to say because of how much I slogged through it, that the book needed to be longer. The things that were interesting — Yvienne becoming the Gentleman Bandit, her search for answers to the downfall of her family — felt too shallow. We didn't see enough of these things that could have been really exciting. I can hardly even say what we were seeing instead of these things. Endless identical scenes of the Mederos family being stressed and grumpy, I guess? Better focus, that’s what this book needs.There were some genuinely exciting moments, and a few times the book surprised me about where it took the plot. I didn't expect the answer of what happened to House Mederos, although I obviously called which the bad guy was responsible, because it was so blindingly obvious I assumed it was information we just started with? So the fact that Yvienne didn't know was just... really weird?But all too often the book just tried to cash in on concepts it hadn't developed enough to deserve. Tesara's struggle to regain her magic and control it had a few moments of "Oh! I get it now!" and very little else. This is important to her character? Prove it.Even her relationship with the two friends she makes at merchant parties, which I actually really liked (Girls being friends? Actually very common in this book, despite the snide background characters! And there wasn't a forced romance for either sister, which flat out amazed me), got sort of dropped off without resolution at the end of the book. Would have loved to see their reaction to the sisters figuring out the mystery, or how Tesara's almost-engagement turns out, or what Yvienne ends up doing about feeling trapped in a gilded cage. The ending almost tricked me because I was enjoying it so much more by that point, but it was still too abrupt. Nothing in this book was fully, purely good.The Sisters Mederos thinks it's a lot more badass than it is. And it's a shame, because with more development it could have actually gotten there. Just one question: how can you have a fallen merchant girl disguise herself as a dashing robber during the night and barely focus on it?? Poor form.
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  • Lynn Williams
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 of 5 starsI have to say from the outset that I had good fun reading The Sisters Mederos. This is a fantasy of manners with two sisters, raised with privilege, whose family loses everything, and who, using their wits and determination seek to reinstate their family’s good name and fortune.There’s not too much to go into in relation to the plot (don’t intend that to be disparaging btw). The Mederos family was one of the most influential and wealthy merchant houses in Port Saint Frey until the 3.5 of 5 starsI have to say from the outset that I had good fun reading The Sisters Mederos. This is a fantasy of manners with two sisters, raised with privilege, whose family loses everything, and who, using their wits and determination seek to reinstate their family’s good name and fortune.There’s not too much to go into in relation to the plot (don’t intend that to be disparaging btw). The Mederos family was one of the most influential and wealthy merchant houses in Port Saint Frey until the fleet was sunk and it was discovered there was no insurance. Their fall from grace was as spectacular as it was speedy and clearly somebody orchestrated the whole affair. The sisters are determined to find out who is to blame although at the same time they need to take action to keep their family afloat.As the story sets off we meet the Mederos family as they’re in the process of being accused. The family home is taken from them, the girl’s uncle is imprisoned and the two girls are sent to boarding school. When we next meet up with them the sisters have been returned home to their family after an absence of six years. Times have changed, none of their former friends speak to them, they are impoverished and without any prospects reduced to bickering amongst themselves. Thankfully the two sisters still have some ideas and enough guts to take matters into their own hands.Yvienne is the elder sister and probably my favourite of the story. She’s definitely the brains of the piece and has a plan for revealing those behind her family’s downfall. She already has ideas about what happened but she needs time to uncover more. Becoming a governess helps her to come up with an alibi for being out of the house without raising her family’s suspicion and dressing in boys clothing enables her to experience a new degree of freedom at the same time as helping her to come up with a new persona in the form of the Gentleman Bandit. Tesara on the other hand is a little like the black sheep of the family. She keeps secret the magic that she is capable of and blames herself for the storm that caused the fleet’s destruction out at sea. Tesara always seems to be in trouble with the family and longs for relief which comes in the form of invitations to parties – her families notoriety giving her a certain level of entertainment value. Using these invitations and the friendship of a couple of young people who are not too worried about reputation Tesara eventually finds her forte is gambling. Unfortunately as she moves in these circles she is starting to attract notice from parties that she would be better off not coming to the attention of. Both girls take risks, they were scared, but they put their fear behind them and I have to say I admired their pluck.Eventually both the sisters become deeper embroiled in their own webs of deceit until the final showdown where everything will either fall into place or a greater price paid. The sisters thought they’d lost everything but their lives are at stake now.This is a period drama but being set in an alternate world it doesn’t necessarily mimic the rules of propriety as strictly as a novel set in our world might do. Both the sisters manage to get out and about with far fewer restrictions than you might expect but I liked that, it gave them a bit more agency to achieve things. The place itself is only really briefly drawn but I didn’t find that a problem either as it felt easy enough to imagine a small seaside town of the era.I think my main reservations with the story came in the form of the family ties. I wouldn’t say that I really got a feel for them caring about each other, even the sisters. If they’d communicated a little more with each other they might have been able to work together as oppose to going off independently at tangents and sometimes almost working against the other and adding to the risk. It felt like they could have come up with a more cogent plan for action, two heads being better than one. The magic was also not really elaborated on and felt almost tacked on to add more of a ‘fantasy’ element – I’d like to see this explored a little more.However, in spite of reservations and a few, what felt like, unfinished storylines, I found this an entertaining read. Yes, certain storylines were left open but I’m figuring that maybe they’ll be focused on in future books and I would definitely be interested in reading more to see how the sisters develop and what adventures they get tied into next.I received a copy through Netgalley, courtesy of the publisher, for which my thanks. The above is my own opinion.
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  • Rike @ RikeRandom
    January 1, 1970
    "The Sisters Mederos" is a dashing cloak & dagger / fantasy of manners novel about the eponymous Mederos sisters who are seeking revenge after their family fell from grace.The story is told from the switching perspectives of the two sisters and there are some flashbacks - which were not my favourites, mostly because they were difficult to distinguish from the rest of the story. But I quite liked the writing, even though there were some strange colloquialisms here and there, that didn't reall "The Sisters Mederos" is a dashing cloak & dagger / fantasy of manners novel about the eponymous Mederos sisters who are seeking revenge after their family fell from grace.The story is told from the switching perspectives of the two sisters and there are some flashbacks - which were not my favourites, mostly because they were difficult to distinguish from the rest of the story. But I quite liked the writing, even though there were some strange colloquialisms here and there, that didn't really match the setting, but overall the language is fitting and works well for the novel. It's mostly unobtrusive so the story itself was in the foreground. And that story was quite good. It started out rather slowly but once the pace picks up it's pretty captivating even though there weren't many surprises or plot twists. I didn't connect with Tesara at all. Even though the book starts from her perspective, for the first half of the book she was just a distant, one dimensional figure and I couldn't bring myself to care about her. That changed a bit over the course of the book and she became a bit more tangible but by then I just couldn't be bothered. Yvienne however is an entirely different story, I liked here almost immediately, even though I first thought that she would be stuck up and annoying - thanks to her sister's pov. But then the perspective switched and she turned out to be awesome. Sure, there were also some things I didn't like about her, but they were minor and overall she was an amazing, kick-ass heroine. And she just seemed way more mature than her sister, who often appeared to be quite childish.Still, all in all I really enjoyed "The Sisters Mederos" - their adventure is a solidly told tale of revenge, robbery and magic with some flaws but also a lot of awesomeness.
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  • Maria Anneliese
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. The setting and characters were so charming and fun that throughout reading I knew I was going to give it at least four stars. Trade wars, scheming nobility, domestic spies, murdered journalists, a Dickensian vibe, and good, confident writing made me sure it was all going to come together beautifully.But the book overpromises and under-delivers. In the last 20% it rushes to try to tie all its developments together and sort of does but only by offering really simplistic explanations (o 2.5 stars. The setting and characters were so charming and fun that throughout reading I knew I was going to give it at least four stars. Trade wars, scheming nobility, domestic spies, murdered journalists, a Dickensian vibe, and good, confident writing made me sure it was all going to come together beautifully.But the book overpromises and under-delivers. In the last 20% it rushes to try to tie all its developments together and sort of does but only by offering really simplistic explanations (or downright dropping several plot developments) that aren’t satisfying and lack the complexity and thoughtfulness I expect in adult fantasy. If this was middle grade or lower YA (though I think it’s too simple for YA as well), this wouldn’t have bothered me as much, but it was so unexpectedly elementary that I felt disappointed.Without giving too much away, it seems as though there’s a complex, dastardly conspiracy afoot and if the two (very cool!) heroines can only figure out which thread to pull, they can unravel their enemies’ secrets and redeem their family. It makes for great tension throughout, but then… there just isn’t anything there. It takes about a paragraph to explain the conspiracy against them (but no real believable motive) and does so in a way that renders the rest of the story pointless. Tesara's powers? The Gentleman Bandit? The cave full of loot? The mysterious gambling shark? The enigmatic mistress? Yvienne's lecherous employer? Tesara's engagement? The murdered journalist? Not one matters by the end of the story. I could go on and explain why with spoiler tags, but this book has taken enough of my time already.Wonderful characters and world hobbled by a weak, half-baked story. Many thanks to Netgalley for the ARC.
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  • Gabrielle Mathieu
    January 1, 1970
    There is something almost sweetly Victorian about the new fantasy novel by Patrice Sarath, which concerns two young sisters enduring misfortune. The opening chapters reminded me of the childhood classic, The Little Princess, published in 1905. Yvienne and her magical sister, Tesera, daughters of a once rich trading family, are sent to a school for paupers, when their family is accused by creditors hungry for their downfall. In the traditional of some YA novels, Yvienne and Tesera’s parents are i There is something almost sweetly Victorian about the new fantasy novel by Patrice Sarath, which concerns two young sisters enduring misfortune. The opening chapters reminded me of the childhood classic, The Little Princess, published in 1905. Yvienne and her magical sister, Tesera, daughters of a once rich trading family, are sent to a school for paupers, when their family is accused by creditors hungry for their downfall. In the traditional of some YA novels, Yvienne and Tesera’s parents are inept and depressed, and their uncle is a foolish lecher, forcing the young girls to shoulder responsibility for each other. Into their miserable lives comes Mathilde, a cheery housekeeper who knows how to do much on a shoestring budget, and is capable of putting Uncle Samwell in his place.This charming novel avoids disturbing and tragic scenes: the worst that happens is that one heroine is forced to serve some merchants dinner while wearing a maid’s uniform and being mocked. Amorous adventures are discreetly referred to as sparking, without more graphic details. We may have come up with the analogue of the cozy mystery here; a tale gripping enough to keep you reading at night, and hoping for exposure of the villain, but a story that takes place in a familiar and nostalgic setting, even if it is an imaginary one. I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in return for an honest review.
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  • Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book also as an advanced reader's copy and from beginning to end, this was an adventure that was worth not putting down. The relationship between Yvienne and Tesara was intriguing to follow and the whole story of the Mederos family was one to remember. I picture it as Adams Family meets beautiful creatures in the City of Bones. This will definitely be an option for our young adult section in our library. 5 stars!
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  • Danya
    January 1, 1970
    The plot was a little half-baked, honestly, but I can forgive anything when the protagonists are as cool as Tesara and Yvienne! Full review to come.
  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)We all know I came for the sister relationship. I am such a sucker for books that deal with sisterhood and the relationship between them. I was not at all disappointed by them! (And while we're on this, look at the cover - it is the perfect cover for this book!). But furthermore, this book is also about family and what we will do for justice. characters: 4 plot: 4 writing: 3 world (Disclaimer: I received this free book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)We all know I came for the sister relationship. I am such a sucker for books that deal with sisterhood and the relationship between them. I was not at all disappointed by them! (And while we're on this, look at the cover - it is the perfect cover for this book!). But furthermore, this book is also about family and what we will do for justice. characters: 4 plot: 4 writing: 3 world building: 3full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Elizabeth Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    There are a lot of exciting elements in The Sisters Mederos: a game of cat-and-mouse with a shadowy enemy, wild parties, double lives and a good old-fashioned dose of revenge. Unfortunately, these elements don't manage to blend into a solid story.The story opens with the girls being packed off to boarding school as the Merchants' Guild break into the family's home to charge them with trumped up crimes. We then flash forward to the girls' return home. Thanks to persecution from the Guild, they no There are a lot of exciting elements in The Sisters Mederos: a game of cat-and-mouse with a shadowy enemy, wild parties, double lives and a good old-fashioned dose of revenge. Unfortunately, these elements don't manage to blend into a solid story.The story opens with the girls being packed off to boarding school as the Merchants' Guild break into the family's home to charge them with trumped up crimes. We then flash forward to the girls' return home. Thanks to persecution from the Guild, they now live in greatly reduced circumstances and are struggling to put food on the table. While their parents and uncle struggle to cope, the girls each privately vow to discover the truth of who's responsible for their situation and make them pay.They go about this in very different ways. Yvienne, the oldest, takes to writing anonymous and inflammatory opinion pieces for one of the local newspapers while using her position as a governess to investigate the paper trail surrounding her House's downfall. She also discovers she makes quite a successful robber and starts holding up the city's nobility under the cover of night. Being the quiet, responsible one of the sisters, her family never suspects her and even her sister is surprised by the icy depths of her resolve. She is a person who gets things done and I enjoyed that about her.In contrast, Tesara has a reputation as the naughty and mischievous sister. Strange things have a way of happening around her--sudden squalls of wind when she's upset, the tablecloth ripping itself off the table. However, her family refuses to acknowledge any possibility of magic but instead blames Tesara for what is not entirely in her control. Resentful, Tesara sneaks out one night to a party with an old friend... and rediscovers her talent for counting cards. She puts these skills and her flighty reputation to good use by fleecing the nobility of their wealth. It was immensely satisfying to watch her turn the stereotype to her advantage.Although the sisters are compelling characters, they are let down by their family. Their mother is a bitter woman, turning her sharp tongue on the rest of the family at the slightest provocation. Their father has become a vague and anxious man, aged too quickly by the family's travails. And their Uncle is an unpleasant sort of man, desperate to be part of the old boys club again and prone to sexually harassing the help. Such an unlikable cast of characters makes it difficult to root for the family's restoration. However, I also recognise it's a difficult line to walk because without their self-absorption it would be hard to justify their obliviousness to the activities of the sisters.The unlikeability of the family undermines any chance of making "family before all else" a convincing theme. It also never quite manages to create a sense of the sisters binding together against the world. They're too busy keeping secrets from each other; even at the very end they're still not wholly transparent with each other. So, despite their obvious affection for each other, there's still a sense that their alliance is only temporary.This wasn't the only part of the plot and world-building that felt weak. The villain's motivation in targeting House Mederos was insufficiently convincing and they didn't have much of a presence throughout most of the story. Tesara's magic also never had much of an impact on the plot and I was never quite clear on if there was supposed to be some mystery over whether she actually possessed any power. The ending wrapped up quite quickly, dropping elements left and right. Being the first book in a series, it's possible that some of these elements will receive some more attention in subsequent books. But by and large, it felt like the Mederos tale had been intended to stand on its own and had reached its natural conclusion. I would therefore be surprised to see future books focus on the family.I'm hesitant to describe the story as a historical fantasy. Not only does it appear to be set in a secondary world, the time period it's based on seemed to shift around. The majority of the story has a Regency influence, shown in the fashion and social conventions. However, the parties Tesara attends had more of a 1920s vibe in terms of the extravagance and fashion. While I quite enjoyed this blending of periods, it's not going to be to everyone's taste.All in all, The Sisters Mederos was a book that promised a lot but ultimately failed to satisfy.This review first appeared on Earl Grey Editing.
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  • K.J. Harrowick
    January 1, 1970
    Why I picked up this book:I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. When I first read the description, it sounded like a fun adventure book. Couple that with Angry Robot as a publisher, I was certain it would have some fantastic adult themes. At least, that was the hope.This review may contain spoilers.What I loved:Terk the gambler and Mrs. Fayres the mistress were the two most interesting characters in this book. Both had a strong presence and I wish the story spent Why I picked up this book:I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. When I first read the description, it sounded like a fun adventure book. Couple that with Angry Robot as a publisher, I was certain it would have some fantastic adult themes. At least, that was the hope.This review may contain spoilers.What I loved:Terk the gambler and Mrs. Fayres the mistress were the two most interesting characters in this book. Both had a strong presence and I wish the story spent more time on who they were and how they fit into to the story.Of the two sisters, Yvienne was the far more interesting one. She had a lot of depth to her personality, and overall complexity—an adventurous spirit under a prim and proper lady, and it made her tons of fun to read.Areas needing a touch of refinement:Coming from Angry Robot, I expected this to be an adult adventure, but it felt very YA. The girls are 18 & 20, but a significant portion of the story is watching them be submissive to their parents and hearing the family bickering around them. It was a bit too childish for my tastes and really took away from the sisters and their story.The prologue read as MG and was just a lot of names thrown at the reader, most of which I forgot by the time any story started. I'm not certain it adds the right amount of impact.The story hid a lot of information from the reader. I don’t mean in the ‘try to figure out the mystery’ sense, more of a lack of enough data. I have no idea how the magic system in this world works apart from a few sparks on Tesara’s fingertips and her doing things to fit the story. There’s also a moment when the sisters decide to work together, but it’s not really clear. More ‘okay, let’s do stuff’, but the motivation was a little lost. And the cave felt like a consistent deus ex-machina. Yvienne stocked it with supplies and it was ready… but that’s it. The reader wasn’t clued into what it looked like inside, what supplies she stocked, etc, and through the narrative the cave became a place to sleep or change clothes, but glossed over that she still had to swim out… yet she always returned home dry.Overall:To be honest, I’m not sure how I feel about this story. It was a cute read, and the premise is fantastic, but I feel like so much more could have been done here.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I went into this somewhat hesitantly; "wealthy merchant house has a great fall, daughters seek revenge" isn't, to me, the most instantly promising premise. In the event, I liked it. The daughters are skilled and determined; they take a lot of risks, but that's a thing that real young people do, and they carry it off. They're willing to brave a lot in order to unwind the mystery and gain their vengeance, though, in the event, the specific ways in which they invest most of their effort (gaining mo I went into this somewhat hesitantly; "wealthy merchant house has a great fall, daughters seek revenge" isn't, to me, the most instantly promising premise. In the event, I liked it. The daughters are skilled and determined; they take a lot of risks, but that's a thing that real young people do, and they carry it off. They're willing to brave a lot in order to unwind the mystery and gain their vengeance, though, in the event, the specific ways in which they invest most of their effort (gaining money from their former peers both by winning money at gambling and by robbing them at the point of never-adequately-accounted-for guns) don't turn out to be important to the plot's resolution. When the resolution does come, it comes somewhat abruptly and thoroughly. The question of who can be trusted and who is on their side is prominent throughout, and the answers change a lot, sometimes suddenly and without much preparation, at other times with some foreshadowing. Although the sisters do keep some secrets from each other, at least for a while, the plot doesn't rely on this to create conflict, and they mostly confide in each other and work together. On the whole, I felt the plot and characterization were competent and well handled, and the tension was maintained well. It isn't my new favorite, but it's a decent effort.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Patrice Sarath's tale of two sisters is exciting, fun, and intriguing with an interesting developing magic system and fun characters who are constantly up to mischief in order to restore their family name.This was a fun book. Yvienne and Tesara are wonderful characters with a lot of personality and the adventures they get up to are intriguing and delightful to read about. I loved seeing how they each tried to solve their families problems. Plus, I'm a sucker for books about Victorian women break Patrice Sarath's tale of two sisters is exciting, fun, and intriguing with an interesting developing magic system and fun characters who are constantly up to mischief in order to restore their family name.This was a fun book. Yvienne and Tesara are wonderful characters with a lot of personality and the adventures they get up to are intriguing and delightful to read about. I loved seeing how they each tried to solve their families problems. Plus, I'm a sucker for books about Victorian women breaking the rules.What this book lacked, however, was more detail on what the sisters did for their families. There were many instances where the sisters didn't give each other enough details (which made me grumble a bit). And there were also instances where the author kept information from the readers until the last minute. I don't feel like this information made the ending any more dramatic. Instead, it made things seems disjointed -kind of a "Guess what! You didn't know this, but she's secretly been working on X for the last several months!" It made the characters feel more distant and less realistic since the author rarely provided our heroines with time to pursue these things. Overall, this is a fun fantasy story that I think YA readers would enjoy more than most other readers.
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Much to my dismay, DNF 33%.I gave this one hell of an effort, but it was such a struggle to read. The premise sounded fantastic, but I'm over a quarter of the way in and nothing is happening, nor is anything that IS happening making sense. I felt so confused, because it was one of those reveals where they try and give you so many little bits here and there that in the end, it amounts to nothing. The writing style is not to my taste either. The way I can describe it is as the author started writi Much to my dismay, DNF 33%.I gave this one hell of an effort, but it was such a struggle to read. The premise sounded fantastic, but I'm over a quarter of the way in and nothing is happening, nor is anything that IS happening making sense. I felt so confused, because it was one of those reveals where they try and give you so many little bits here and there that in the end, it amounts to nothing. The writing style is not to my taste either. The way I can describe it is as the author started writing fantasy in the 1970's and then never adapted to the ways of the modern world. It's stuffy and not smooth to read. I'm also bothered by how little the dual POV is used to its advantage. Dual POV works for suspense. You end the chapter on a crazy cliffhanger, and when you turn the page excited to see what happens you are suddenly in with the other character, so you're desperate to carry on. Not the case here. You get five chapters with Tesara, with no real surprises or desire to carry on, then switch to Yvienne. It made the book boring and impossible to read.
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  • Nicki Markus
    January 1, 1970
    The Sisters Mederos has an interesting premise, which is what prompted me to request it on NetGalley. Overall, the idea does work. I liked the characters of Yvienne and Tesera, and the world building for the world of Port Saint Frey was good. However, there were a few things that let down the story for me. Tesara's magic is never fully explained, and although it is introduced as a major plot point, it ends up having very little bearing on the story. Meanwhile, after a long build-up, I was disapp The Sisters Mederos has an interesting premise, which is what prompted me to request it on NetGalley. Overall, the idea does work. I liked the characters of Yvienne and Tesera, and the world building for the world of Port Saint Frey was good. However, there were a few things that let down the story for me. Tesara's magic is never fully explained, and although it is introduced as a major plot point, it ends up having very little bearing on the story. Meanwhile, after a long build-up, I was disappointed with the ease and swiftness of the tale's resolution. Nonetheless, there is plenty of swashbuckling action and enjoyable games of manners, so if you enjoy those things, coupled with two strong female leads, you are bound to find something to appreciate in this book. I did also like the fact that Sarath didn't feel she had to concentrate on a romance angle, and showed the sisters able to act without boys/men being the be all and end all. 3.5 stars.I received this book as a free eBook ARC via NetGalley.
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  • Becca
    January 1, 1970
    There was a lot of potential here, but not much payoff. The idea of a wealthy family fallen from grace, with a daughter who's got some sort of magic latent ability, is interesting. But after the fall, the family is awful to each other and it gets so tiring to read that dynamic as it's unchanging. The solutions to their problems come too easily, after too long of a build up, to be narratively satisfying. More importantly, I really get annoyed when a magic talent of some sort is included, only to There was a lot of potential here, but not much payoff. The idea of a wealthy family fallen from grace, with a daughter who's got some sort of magic latent ability, is interesting. But after the fall, the family is awful to each other and it gets so tiring to read that dynamic as it's unchanging. The solutions to their problems come too easily, after too long of a build up, to be narratively satisfying. More importantly, I really get annoyed when a magic talent of some sort is included, only to be utilized so inconsistently. The power is used as a plot convenience more than anything - when the author needs a quick solution. I wanted to root for the relationship between the sisters, but too much of the book was spent keeping them apart from one another. Overall, it wasn't that fun of a read.
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  • Jeremy Brett
    January 1, 1970
    Patrice Sarath's new novel of intrigue and light fantasy is a wonderfully fun and lively reading experience. The book tells the intertwining stories of two sisters who are members of a once-great trading family that fell and fell HARD. The story is filled with action and is beautifully paced, but to me much of the book's richness comes from the ways the sisters (and their parents) emotionally cope with their loss of money, influence, and status. The shame and embarrassment, the misplaced pride, Patrice Sarath's new novel of intrigue and light fantasy is a wonderfully fun and lively reading experience. The book tells the intertwining stories of two sisters who are members of a once-great trading family that fell and fell HARD. The story is filled with action and is beautifully paced, but to me much of the book's richness comes from the ways the sisters (and their parents) emotionally cope with their loss of money, influence, and status. The shame and embarrassment, the misplaced pride, the overwhelming desire to find a solution and to recover what has been lost - it all adds emotional depth and weight to the story, and gives the characters (particularly, of course, Tesara and Yvienne, the sisters) that much more sympathy and feel of realism. It's such a very fun book, and an exciting work from an exciting and witty author.
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  • Katherine Shepherd
    January 1, 1970
    This book was good and I would give a 3.5 star to be finite. There's a lot of good about this book, I loved the descriptions of fashion, cooking and house keeping. When it comes to action though the book is lacking. whenever something like the triggering of a magic powers the descriptions are a bit thin. I would often go back and reread the one key sentence that held something pivotal like a magic discharge. There was a pattern of setting up for action to unfold only to be skipped and surmised o This book was good and I would give a 3.5 star to be finite. There's a lot of good about this book, I loved the descriptions of fashion, cooking and house keeping. When it comes to action though the book is lacking. whenever something like the triggering of a magic powers the descriptions are a bit thin. I would often go back and reread the one key sentence that held something pivotal like a magic discharge. There was a pattern of setting up for action to unfold only to be skipped and surmised on the next page and it just felt like a missed opportunity. all and all it was an entertaining read and would read more from the author.
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  • Sadie Forsythe
    January 1, 1970
    This started out well and had a fine ending (though the epilogue seemed unneeded), but it felt like the middle dragged quite a lot. I appreciated the two strong female leads, one of which was disfigured and one brainy, and the writing was perfectly functional. But I felt like things came a little too conveniently for the girls and the ‘mystery’ was a bust. The villain was so obvious as to be painful. Lastly, I thought the cross-dressing ‘mistress’ was just queer-baiting. All in all, not bad, but This started out well and had a fine ending (though the epilogue seemed unneeded), but it felt like the middle dragged quite a lot. I appreciated the two strong female leads, one of which was disfigured and one brainy, and the writing was perfectly functional. But I felt like things came a little too conveniently for the girls and the ‘mystery’ was a bust. The villain was so obvious as to be painful. Lastly, I thought the cross-dressing ‘mistress’ was just queer-baiting. All in all, not bad, but not a true winner either.
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  • Karina
    January 1, 1970
    If you liked Georgette Heyer's Regency books but thought they could have benefited from a touch of fantasy, you will enjoy this zestful romp. It has everything - a disgraced once-noble family; two secretly rebellious daughters bent on revenge; cross-dressing and gambling; secrets, lies and disguises; and the Gentleman Bandit relieving the gentry of their bulging wallets...a ton of fun!
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  • Ria Potter
    January 1, 1970
    This book was loads of fun!I thoroughly enjoyed this book! It reminded me of Downton Abbey, if there was magic and spies involved with the series, then this would be a perfect match for that. I loved the sisters, and their drive for bringing back their house to full society's standard after its downfall. I empathized with the characters and the family greatly. I liked both sisters, and I particularly loved the girl who could do magic (not naming names to avoid spoilers) and the servant girl was This book was loads of fun!I thoroughly enjoyed this book! It reminded me of Downton Abbey, if there was magic and spies involved with the series, then this would be a perfect match for that. I loved the sisters, and their drive for bringing back their house to full society's standard after its downfall. I empathized with the characters and the family greatly. I liked both sisters, and I particularly loved the girl who could do magic (not naming names to avoid spoilers) and the servant girl was awesome, and I really enjoyed the adventure and action throughout the book. Spies, magic, and manners...what more could you possibly want? I eagerly anticipate book 2 of the series!
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  • Martin Owton
    January 1, 1970
    This charming book is all about the characterisation which beautifully is handled. It could almost be historical fiction set in the late 18/early 19th century apart from the soupcon of magic and the made-up setting. There is nothing here for the lovers of grimdark battle and bloodshed, but if you enjoy subtly developed characters and a tautly-paced mystery then this could be for you.
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  • Carol Sarath
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it. A real page turner. Girl power, the sisters on their own and together, worked to rescue their family fortune and reputation struggling with self-doubt and family secrets which only make it harder to reach their goal. All without much help from any men around them. Spoiler alert, the author is my talented sister.
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  • Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    I reveived a copy from netgalley in exchange for an honest review.This was ACTION PACKED! i mean this reminds me of braveheart, sherlock holmes, houdini, and assassins creed, not to mention a few others. These sisters are NOT people you want ro mess with!
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  • Rosamarie56 Angelone
    January 1, 1970
    Good ol fashioned adventure novel. Has a story to tell and doesn't waste time going down unnecessary alleys ...Sketches the world so that the actions of the characters make sense and then gets right down to the telling not showing.
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