The Nag Hammadi Scriptures
s/t: The Revised & Updated Translation of Sacred Gnostic Texts Complete in One VolumeThis is the most complete, up-to-date, one-volume, English-language edition of the renowned library of fourth-century Gnostic manuscripts discovered in Egypt in 1945, which rivaled the Dead Sea Scrolls find in significance.

The Nag Hammadi Scriptures Details

TitleThe Nag Hammadi Scriptures
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 26th, 2009
PublisherHarperOne
ISBN0061626007
ISBN-139780061626005
Number of pages844 pages
Rating
GenreReligion, Nonfiction, History, Reference, Spirituality, Gnosticism, Philosophy, Christianity, Theology, Fantasy, Mythology

The Nag Hammadi Scriptures Review

  • Spencer
    March 17, 2014
    It's all very interesting. The Gnostics are often closer to what feels true than more exoteric Christianity, but at the same time, some of it really does seem far-fetched, even if it is supposed to be "symbolic."
  • Rhina M. Finley
    January 15, 2013
    I thought it was odd how these scriptures were found. They didn't stay hidden inside the caves, they were meant to be discover. I've been reading this on and off over the past couple of years and the Dead Sea Scrolls.
  • Junkie for the Written Word
    July 21, 2010
    I can't say that I read the book in it's entirety but I did read the actual texts and a few of the explanatory passages that accompanied them. Very eye opening. I can see why they were not included in the Bible.
  • Ariadne Green
    January 14, 2014
    Have read and studied the Nag Hammadi Library for 20 years. The codices are beautifully translated with minimum commentaries. It is The Bible of Gnostic Christianity. To be cherished and studied regularly.
  • Velma Sampson
    February 3, 2013
    Great resource of scriptures that never made it into today's versions of the Bible/Torah. It's not something you sit down and "read" in one sitting. It is a great book for cross-referencing with today's versions of the Bible if you are trying to figure out what was "actually" written or said!
    more
  • Dusan
    March 17, 2013
    Why does a person read The Nag Hammadi Library? One can feel the fire of change, almost a revolutionary knife edge that since the church has dulled into the most backward reactionary worship of crucified god.... in the Testimony of Truth stands, "For no one who is under the Law will be able to look up to the truth, for they will not be able to serve two masters. For the defilement of the Law is manifest; but undefilement belongs to the light."
    more
  • Maureen
    March 2, 2012
    "When I came down, no one saw me, for I kept changing my forms on high, transforming from shape to shape, so when I was at their gates, I assumed their likeness. I passed by them quietly. I saw their realms, but I was not afraid or ashamed, because I was pure. I was speaking with them and mingling with them, through those who are mine" (480).
    more
  • Rhonda
    February 12, 2009
    Typically when one does any scholarship, he or she uses source material relatively close to the font of that source. In this particular case, all of these books or letters were written in the second century. In addition, there is not any record that any of the writers of the epistles actually knew Jesus. We have names which imply that actual apostles wrote them, but there is no evidence whatsoever to support this and in fact, considerable evidence against it. In addition, these texts were found Typically when one does any scholarship, he or she uses source material relatively close to the font of that source. In this particular case, all of these books or letters were written in the second century. In addition, there is not any record that any of the writers of the epistles actually knew Jesus. We have names which imply that actual apostles wrote them, but there is no evidence whatsoever to support this and in fact, considerable evidence against it. In addition, these texts were found buried in Egypt. While it is true that there was a large contingent of Jews in Alexandria, there is no evidence to support that any of this was even remotely mainstream, even in Egypt, much less in Israel before or after the dispersion.The worst criticism of Gnosticism which one can bring is exactly what another review lauds, that there are hierarchies of knowledge of God. These occur because one comes to "experience" God inwardly in a way in which others, not yet as “experienced,” cannot know. In this way, Gnosticism is appealing to people who prefer, say Scientology to Christianity. The only thing missing is the language of being clear.Does Gnosticism make its version of Christianity more appealing? I think it does simply because it promotes inner spiritual awareness and does away with a lot of silly rules that we encounter elsewhere such as in Romans 13: 8-9. However the greatest criticism of Gnosticism is this: Gnosticism does away with Jesus Christ. No more virgin birth, no more women at the tomb, no more visiting the underworld and no more ascension to heaven. The good part is that it cuts down on one’s obligations: your truth remains what you experience, what you learn about God inside yourself. It’s an old song in a different guise. Secular humanism didn’t invent itself last century.It is unfortunate that Gnostic writings are inconsistent with the Biblical scheme of things which founds itself directly on Christ’s teachings of the first century. Despite what one hears from itinerant atheists posing as college professors, there is no evidence whatsoever to suppose that Biblical accounts are not so. This, of course, does not deny that there are arguments about certain passages of Biblical scripture. However, not one of these arguments does away with a single message of Christ as the one and only son of God. Secularists have been pounding on these Gnostic writings for years, maintaining that there was a secret collaboration from the church to suppress the truth. Da Vinci Code anyone? I fully understand why one would enjoy getting rid of Jesus as the one and only son of God: that would make religion much freer and open to interpretation. Thus God becomes somewhat of a bumbling idiot presented in so many secular views of this age. The one problem of course, is that these views aren’t new. They always show up with a new name, each maintaining themselves to be correct.It is true that these books were deliberately not included when the Bible was compiled, chiefly by Jerome in 405 and you can read why if you want to understand. Its compilation and translation to the Latin Vulgate is not without issue, but that is certainly a larger topic; his dismissal of the so-called Gnostic Gospels is not an effort of subterfuge, but one of consistency and sense. Far from agreeing with the canon of our New Testament, the Gnostic Gospels are inconsistent with the Old Testament also.Lastly, these Gnostic texts should be read. Each person interested should not read a book about these books, but read the original text, just as he or she should read the Bible as we know it, either Catholic or Protestant versions. To do anything else is to give disservice to the fundamental spiritual truths of him or herself. The truth of Jesus Christ is about spiritual life, one which rises above our natural inclinations. This requires considerable humility. I am unable to do that alone.On the other hand, if you have no desire to do anything other than dream, you can follow Gnostic texts as gospel. Gnosticism costs a little more these days but what’s spiritual clarity worth on the open market? Christ gives it to you for free, but it requires personal change. If paying for spiritual clarity is more your style, enjoy your trance-like states, believe the Gnostic gospels and please say hello to L. Ron Hubbard for me.
    more
  • Tess Rupprecht
    May 2, 2009
    While listening to the preaching of Pastor David Jeremiah, he mentioned that while the Apocrypha is not part of the canonical books of the bible it is nonetheless accurate and historical. I got really interested to find out which other books did not make it to the bible. So I did a research on these books which were read and studied by early Christians. Then one Saturday while the kids and I were in our local library I chance upon this book called "The Nag Hammadi Scriptures". This book turned o While listening to the preaching of Pastor David Jeremiah, he mentioned that while the Apocrypha is not part of the canonical books of the bible it is nonetheless accurate and historical. I got really interested to find out which other books did not make it to the bible. So I did a research on these books which were read and studied by early Christians. Then one Saturday while the kids and I were in our local library I chance upon this book called "The Nag Hammadi Scriptures". This book turned out to be a collection of ancient gospels around 50 texts which were read as sacred literature. It was an interesting since it gives me a glimpse of what other Christians read during the early days of Christianity. It is not a book for everybody since some of them were banned by the church fathers and bishops of old.
    more
  • Derek Davis
    December 5, 2016
    If you like the convoluted, mystical and almost impenetrable side of early Christian religion, this is for you, as it is for me. I haven't absorbed all of it by any means, but it reflects the most interior workings of the human mind: the emotional aspect of life subjected to the brutality of reason in an effort to Make Sense of It All. These Gnostic studies and ragtags were unearthed in 1945, roughly 1600 years after being condemned and the very ideas virtually annihilated by the orthodox Church If you like the convoluted, mystical and almost impenetrable side of early Christian religion, this is for you, as it is for me. I haven't absorbed all of it by any means, but it reflects the most interior workings of the human mind: the emotional aspect of life subjected to the brutality of reason in an effort to Make Sense of It All. These Gnostic studies and ragtags were unearthed in 1945, roughly 1600 years after being condemned and the very ideas virtually annihilated by the orthodox Church. What a time that must have been, and what a near two-millennium shame that these exercises to wrench meaning from a resistant universe should have been lost so long.
    more
  • Lisa Lavelle
    July 30, 2010
    Reading the Magdalene Line by Kathleen McGowan piqued my interest in finding out more about Mary Magdalene (and the role of women in religion)... and other aspects of the history of early Christianity.
  • Emma
    May 26, 2014
    I will never understand this book(and I will never finish it).I hate it. And I completely adore it.
  • Misty
    March 27, 2008
    The Nag Hammadi Library was discovered in Egypt in 1945. The Gnostic Gospels had been destroyed, but were found in Nag Hammadi.
  • Bruce Morton
    September 5, 2011
    Want one place to go to understand the original Gnostic Writings? This is it.
  • John
    April 15, 2010
    nonfiction,theology
  • Craig Bolton
    September 23, 2010
    "Nag Hammadi Scriptures, The: The International Edition by Marvin Meyer (2007)"
  • Thomas Walsh
    November 7, 2014
    This is jaw-dropping Theology! These were the book the Church decided NOT to include in the Bible. For some, like Mary Madelene, Peter's Apocalypse and Thomas' Faith, and, yes, Judas, too, it is a great loss to us. But for others, the Church elders may have been correct. With a preface from a religious scholar, Elaine Pagels, these books are a dip into the world of the Essene culture, and can provide a clear preview of Gnosticism. Christ is not just Matthew, Mark Luke and John. O no, like any co This is jaw-dropping Theology! These were the book the Church decided NOT to include in the Bible. For some, like Mary Madelene, Peter's Apocalypse and Thomas' Faith, and, yes, Judas, too, it is a great loss to us. But for others, the Church elders may have been correct. With a preface from a religious scholar, Elaine Pagels, these books are a dip into the world of the Essene culture, and can provide a clear preview of Gnosticism. Christ is not just Matthew, Mark Luke and John. O no, like any complex figure, he has been seen through many eyes.
    more
  • Gregory
    September 2, 2008
    I read this twice.It's one of those things that should be read with an open mind and a prayerful heart.Sifting truth from error is not always an easy task.If you are LDS, you will find many many many items that support Latter-day Saint Doctrine.
  • Deborah
    February 10, 2014
    have another book ! so much to read so little time. My church introduced us to The Interior Castle by St Teresa of Avila. And I 'm on last 2 steps of Joy book . help ! Back to Hammadi scriptures soon.
  • Sharaa
    December 1, 2010
    I have had this book for months and have only just begun reading, as it does contain a lot of research-heavy text. But, also, scriptures that provide alternate perspectives. Always intriguing.
  • Princessofwails
    May 4, 2013
    As others have commented, it's a fascinating book - one for dipping into, rather than reading straight off.
  • Maggie Hall
    October 5, 2016
    Well I now know a lot more about the Gnostics. What a complicated mythology!
  • A.L
    December 8, 2010
    Very interesting!
  • Naomi
    October 21, 2011
    A lovely, complete edition of the Gnostic Christian scriptures. Could do with a bit more editorial comment in places, but otherwise very good.
  • Julie
    November 8, 2016
    A fascinating look into the "heretical" Christian literature, excellent translations and preface for historical context.
Write a review