Terminal Uprising (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse, #2)
It’s been four months since Marion “Mops” Adamopoulos learned the truth. Four months since she and her team of hygiene and sanitation specialists stole the EMCS Pufferfish and stopped a bioterrorism attack against the Krakau homeworld. Four months since she set out to find proof of what really happened on Earth all those years ago.Between trying to protect their secrets and fighting the xenocidal Prodryans, who’ve been escalating their war against everyone who isn’t Prodryan, the Krakau have their tentacles full.Mops’ mission changes when she learns of a secret Krakau laboratory on Earth. A small group under command of Fleet Admiral Belle-Bonne Sage is working to create a new weapon, one that could bring victory over the Prodryans … or drown the galaxy in chaos.To discover the truth, Mops and her rogue cleaning crew will have to do the one thing she fears most: return to Earth, a world overrun by feral apes, wild dogs, savage humans, and worse. (After all, the planet hasn’t been cleaned in a century and a half!) What Mops finds in the filthy ruins of humanity could change everything, assuming she survives long enough to share it.Perhaps humanity isn’t as dead as the galaxy thought.

Terminal Uprising (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse, #2) Details

TitleTerminal Uprising (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 12th, 2019
PublisherDAW Books
ISBN-139780756412777
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Humor, Space, Space Opera, Aliens, Fiction, Adventure

Terminal Uprising (Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse, #2) Review

  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    Book 2 does not disappoint as the janitors head to the most dangerous place in the universe...Earth.It's like Jim C. Hines looked into my soul and saw exactly what I wanted in a military space opera.I love milSFF, but I've been so damn tired of the over-used grunt/pilot tropes that float around. Yes yes yes, infantry and pilots are the fighters, but hear me out on this. In current times, we've got four support personnel for every 1 grunt dude (honestly the number is probably higher but I'm too l Book 2 does not disappoint as the janitors head to the most dangerous place in the universe...Earth.It's like Jim C. Hines looked into my soul and saw exactly what I wanted in a military space opera.I love milSFF, but I've been so damn tired of the over-used grunt/pilot tropes that float around. Yes yes yes, infantry and pilots are the fighters, but hear me out on this. In current times, we've got four support personnel for every 1 grunt dude (honestly the number is probably higher but I'm too lazy to look it up)...and that four people includes air crew and pilots. But do we have a lot of fiction (SFF or otherwise) that reflects the support personnel? Think of all the stories featuring SEALs, Force Recon, Delta Force, CIA boom-booms, Rangers, fighter pilots and other high-speed, low-drag bubbas and their SF counterparts.Can you think of one military space opera where the MC isn't infantry/pilot/gunner person?Nope.(view spoiler)[Ok, I can think of a couple, but most were written a while ago—and the point stands: there's a 10,000 to 1 ratio. (hide spoiler)](view spoiler)[And no, Star Trek doesn't count. (hide spoiler)]So I'm super excited by military space janitors. And the concept works so damn well too.Also, I felt like this book really came into its own. The first book was a little jarring and disjointed, but this one flowed smoothly. There was the usual bumbling, but it didn't feel like they were blindly staggering from incident to incident. There was a purpose and an active plotline throughout the story.Of course, I could be biased because (view spoiler)[there are librarians who are the saviors of the remains of humanity and I um, am a librarian (hide spoiler)] but eh.Just read it.The stakes are higher. The action is more intense. And it's a fun ride all the way through.Oh, and Puffy gets an upgrade.A maniacal, scary upgrade.That may or may not involve a battle mop.Yeah. You read that right.Battle. Mop.I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Hines’ second outing with the hero Janitors involves Mops and crew going back to Earth. There are references to Farscape (living ships), Willard Scott, and sports (as well as possible current US politics). I like the sports in this book. It is also a love novel to books and libraries. While I didn’t find the novel as funny the first one in the series, it is still an excellent book. In part, this is because, like Terry Pratchett, Jim C Hines’ heroes are those that would not have even been mention Hines’ second outing with the hero Janitors involves Mops and crew going back to Earth. There are references to Farscape (living ships), Willard Scott, and sports (as well as possible current US politics). I like the sports in this book. It is also a love novel to books and libraries. While I didn’t find the novel as funny the first one in the series, it is still an excellent book. In part, this is because, like Terry Pratchett, Jim C Hines’ heroes are those that would not have even been mentioned in the epic fantasy or sci-fi. This is only one reason why Hines is really deserves the title of America’s Answer to Terry Pratchett. Mops and her crew of janitors are heroes with such a level of doneness that it is wonderful. The janitor crew travels to Earth because of certain rumors involving whether or not there might be change in feral humans. They discover a bit more about the lies that were revealed in the first book. Hines also gives a solution to that plot and brings up another plot thread to lead into the next book. (The ending report of this book is so wonderfully funny). It is also important to note that unlike much writing where the motives of the evil doers are never fully examined, Hines does the opposite. The motivates of the head boss are examined. This is something that is rarely done. Furthermore, this is a book where the ones in command positions are all female. But honesty, the price of the book is well worth reading Doc’s interrogation scene.
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  • Jeffrey
    January 1, 1970
    In “Terminal Alliance” Jim Hines sensational space opera, a motley crew of bio-engineered janitors is forced to step up and save the universe. After a bio-weapon decimates the alien Krakau command crew on the space cruiser EMCS Pufferfish, Marion “Mops” Adamopoulos, the senior, and very smart, janitor, and her small crew of cleanup specialists thwarts the savage alien Prodryan’s plan for universal conquest, while learning the truth about what caused humanity's descent into feral cannibalistic be In “Terminal Alliance” Jim Hines sensational space opera, a motley crew of bio-engineered janitors is forced to step up and save the universe. After a bio-weapon decimates the alien Krakau command crew on the space cruiser EMCS Pufferfish, Marion “Mops” Adamopoulos, the senior, and very smart, janitor, and her small crew of cleanup specialists thwarts the savage alien Prodryan’s plan for universal conquest, while learning the truth about what caused humanity's descent into feral cannibalistic behavior on Earth (hint it was not because of something humans did, there was an outside agency involved) and simultaneously having to figure out how to pilot and defend the ship in space battles. While Hines milks the entire janitor motif to the hilt, he combines a sharp wit and sly humor as he skewers a lot of sf tropes in this super fun read. We need more books like Terminal Alliance in science fiction. “Terminal Uprising”, Hines humorous follow-up to the terrific “Terminal Alliance” continues Mops and her crew’s adventures. Now free from Krakuan dominance, Mops and her crew are piloting their stolen space cruiser, the Pufferfish, but running into issues with supplies. Admiral Pachelbel, a Krakuan, who wants to do the right thing has provided information to Mops, which requires them to pick up Cate, a Prodryan lawyer, with all the nasty lawyer tricks, with a secret agenda (and everyone has a secret agenda). Pachelbel wants Mops to go back to Earth, which is guarded by the Krakua space force, because there have been sightings on Earth of non-feral humans. During her trip to get Cate, Mops slyly defeats an Krakua armada trying to capture her ship with another awesome display of alien anatomy and janitorial knowledge. Continuing their journey to Earth, Mops continues her talent for milking all of the alien races fear of human warrior talents. One of the story elements of Terminal Alliance is that the Krakuan's bio-engineered most humans into ferocious unstoppable space warriors, who they have been using to dominate the universe. While they breach the Krakuan space barrier surrounding on Earth, Mops, Cate, Monroe and Wolf, one of her crewmates, and a woman who really wants to be a warrior, if she only could shoot straight, get to the surface, but lose their shuttle, while the rest of the crew hide in space.On Earth, Mops and her cohort find the non-feral survivors living in fortified underground towns. Its not that people have found a cure. Rather, some people were just immune from the bio- weapon that decimated Earth's populous. But Mops and her crew and the earthlings come under attack from Krakuan forces illegally on Earth. It seems like there is another secret plot afoot to keep the Krakuans in power. Since Mops crew defeated the Procydans, some Krakuans think they need help to stop the surging Procydans from destroying the universe. In the ensuing confrontation, the human survivors of Earth and Mops ragtag group of janitors will have to use all of their wits and strategically placed cleaning supplies to defeat the Krakuan traitors. There are some very good scenes here. Confrontations between Mops and the evil Krakuans and between Wolf and the earthlings. Besides Hines' witty prose and humor, what made Terminal Alliance such a fun read was three things - the juxtaposition of Mops lowly janitor position with the saving the universe plot, the likability of the characters and a fast moving adventure story set in different alien locations. In Terminal Uprising, Hines shifts the setting to Earth, and away from space battles, and the action involves a whole new group of characters. There is less journeying around the universe meeting new aliens and more stationary settings. I think this detracted a bit from the freshness of the first book. Maybe it’s just hard to still milk the same jokes as is the first novel. But I think it’s also hard to strike lightning in a bottle. This is a really good novel, a fun read that will keep you fully engaged, and for a second book in a trilogy it more than holds its own against other books out there. Its just not as fun a read as Terminal Alliance.But it’s definitely worth a read. In the crowded field of fantasy, paranormal superheroes and fantasy mystery mashups, it’s good to pick up a fun witty sf space opera novel filled with likable characters and humorous situations. Snap up the pair.
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  • Koeur
    January 1, 1970
    Publishing Date: February 2019Publisher: DAWISBN: 9780756412777Genre: ScFiRating: DNFPublisher’s Description: The Krakau came to Earth in the year 2104. By 2105, humanity had been reduced to shambling, feral monsters. In the Krakau’s defense, it was an accident, and a century later, they did come back and try to fix us. Sort of. It’s been four months since Marion “Mops” Adamopoulos learned the truth of that accident. Four months since she and her team of hygiene and sanitation specialists stole Publishing Date: February 2019Publisher: DAWISBN: 9780756412777Genre: ScFiRating: DNFPublisher’s Description: The Krakau came to Earth in the year 2104. By 2105, humanity had been reduced to shambling, feral monsters. In the Krakau’s defense, it was an accident, and a century later, they did come back and try to fix us. Sort of. It’s been four months since Marion “Mops” Adamopoulos learned the truth of that accident. Four months since she and her team of hygiene and sanitation specialists stole the EMCS Pufferfish and stopped a bioterrorism attack against the Krakau homeworld. Four months since she set out to find proof of what really happened on Earth all those years ago. Between trying to protect their secrets and fighting the xenocidal Prodryans, who’ve been escalating their war against everyone who isn’t Prodryan, the Krakau have their tentacles full. Mops’ mission changes when she learns of a secret Krakau laboratory on Earth. A small group under command of Fleet Admiral Belle-Bonne Sage is working to create a new weapon, one that could bring victory over the Prodryans … or drown the galaxy in chaos. To discover the truth, Mops and her rogue cleaning crew will have to do the one thing she fears most: return to Earth, a world overrun by feral apes, wild dogs, savage humans, and worse. (After all, the planet hasn’t been cleaned in a century and a half!) What Mops finds in the filthy ruins of humanity could change everything, assuming she survives long enough to share it.Perhaps humanity isn’t as dead as the galaxy thought.Review: Wow, they should put spoiler alerts on the Publisher Descriptions.I just couldn’t get through this novel. Too much tongue and cheeky crap that seeks to emulate Douglas Adams in everything but the depth of his characters. A motley cleaning crew of misfits, outwitting everyone and everything while on a quest for righting humanities wrongs. Really? Where have I heard this before?If you like reading bad space opera with characters and situations that are neither believable nor endearing, then by all means, get this.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    As with all of Hines' books, I'm left saying that I need the next one, right now. Love it. When does book 3 come out?
  • Chip
    January 1, 1970
    Fun!
  • Melissa Bennett
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved the first book and would have to say I loved this one even more. We go on another adventure with the janitors and they are just as crazy, clean and tough as ever. This time they have their mission... head to earth. It is one of the most terrifying places ever but this team is ready to do what is needed. In the last book, Mops really was a favorite character for me. This time Wolf was the top of my list. She caused many laughing fits throughout the book. I am so ready for their nex I really loved the first book and would have to say I loved this one even more. We go on another adventure with the janitors and they are just as crazy, clean and tough as ever. This time they have their mission... head to earth. It is one of the most terrifying places ever but this team is ready to do what is needed. In the last book, Mops really was a favorite character for me. This time Wolf was the top of my list. She caused many laughing fits throughout the book. I am so ready for their next adventure!
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  • Terri M.
    January 1, 1970
    A worthy follow up to Terminal Rising by Jim C. Hines. Plenty of laugh out loud moments and proof that humanity will not be saved by the rich and powerful, but those who clean our toilets and guard our culture.
  • Liadan
    January 1, 1970
    I read this on a flight across country and it was perfect - lots of action and comedy. The one thing I wished for more of was (view spoiler)[the crew up on the ship. Mops and Wolf dominated the action down on Earth, with Monroe putting in some contributions. But overall, it felt like everyone else was sidelined, and I do really like the crew of the Pufferfish and I wished I'd spent more time with them. But, I understand there were probably plot constraints, and this is a wish not a complaint. I I read this on a flight across country and it was perfect - lots of action and comedy. The one thing I wished for more of was (view spoiler)[the crew up on the ship. Mops and Wolf dominated the action down on Earth, with Monroe putting in some contributions. But overall, it felt like everyone else was sidelined, and I do really like the crew of the Pufferfish and I wished I'd spent more time with them. But, I understand there were probably plot constraints, and this is a wish not a complaint. I still totally enjoyed this book. (hide spoiler)]This is fun Sci Fi at its finest (although it does have some emotional moments). I love the world Hines has created here, and his sense of humor is fantastic. Some of the ways he uses Earth vs. Alien culture really cracked me up (sorry, guy trying to sleep next to me on the plane). I'm not sure if another book is slated to come out in this series, but if that happens, I'm buying it.
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  • P.M.
    January 1, 1970
    How can you not love a book when plumbing supplies are used as weapons? Or how about janitors and librarians as the heroes who save the day? This is the second book in the Janitors in Space series. I was prepared to like this since I really loved the author's Jig the Goblin trilogy. The author did not disappoint as Wolf moved into a title role and the rest of the crew of the Pufferfish uncovered the dastardly plans of Belle-Bonne Sage with the timely assist of Advocate of Violence. It was a grea How can you not love a book when plumbing supplies are used as weapons? Or how about janitors and librarians as the heroes who save the day? This is the second book in the Janitors in Space series. I was prepared to like this since I really loved the author's Jig the Goblin trilogy. The author did not disappoint as Wolf moved into a title role and the rest of the crew of the Pufferfish uncovered the dastardly plans of Belle-Bonne Sage with the timely assist of Advocate of Violence. It was a great way to spend a snowy day.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    The second book in the Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse series is a great read. Humour is difficult, but Jim C Hines has nailed it here with a close to Douglas Adams level of comic invention and absurdity, whilst still providing an excellent story.Humanity has fallen prey to the inevitable zombie apocalypse, and visiting aliens have managed to partially cure some of the zombies, or at least make them sentient again. Naturally the durability of the changed humans makes them perfect as infantry tro The second book in the Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse series is a great read. Humour is difficult, but Jim C Hines has nailed it here with a close to Douglas Adams level of comic invention and absurdity, whilst still providing an excellent story.Humanity has fallen prey to the inevitable zombie apocalypse, and visiting aliens have managed to partially cure some of the zombies, or at least make them sentient again. Naturally the durability of the changed humans makes them perfect as infantry troops to fight a war on behalf of those friendly aliens. Unfortunatley it turns out that the plague was actually caused by them in the first place, so they are in a somewhat morally difficult position. The first book tells this story, along with the introduction of the eponymous janitors who, since the first episode, have been travelling around in a stolen and jury rigged spaceship.Now they are returning ro Earth at the behest of a friendly General who has something of a conscience.Excellent comedy and very decent science fiction.
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  • Kevin Hogan
    January 1, 1970
    Builds on and deepens the world of the first book. Adventure, suspense, humor, characters changing and growing. It's all there.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, so good. The story really gets into the conspiracy and some of the inter-species politics while still having fast-moving adventures for the individual characters. The writing is super funny and imaginative-- I may have convinced my spouse to read it based on how a drain snake and pipe sealant are used in battle scenarios. It feels like there will either be a bit of a cast change in book 3 or [mini-spoiler?] the story focus will expand to cover characters in more places in the galaxy. The nex Oh, so good. The story really gets into the conspiracy and some of the inter-species politics while still having fast-moving adventures for the individual characters. The writing is super funny and imaginative-- I may have convinced my spouse to read it based on how a drain snake and pipe sealant are used in battle scenarios. It feels like there will either be a bit of a cast change in book 3 or [mini-spoiler?] the story focus will expand to cover characters in more places in the galaxy. The next one can't come fast enough!
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  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    This Librarian loved this continuation of the story of Janitors in space and other librarians as well as all other sci-fi fans will too. Great characters, great aliens, great settings, great story. I look forward to the next in the series.
  • Breane Ross
    January 1, 1970
    Received an arc from netgalley. I really enjoyed the first book, Terminal Alliance, and this book is even better in my opinion. Highly recommend it!
  • Minx
    January 1, 1970
    True Rating 4.5 stars!I have been looking forward to reading Terminal Uprising because I couldn’t wait to pick up where the story from Terminal Alliance had left off! Marion “Mops” Adamopoulos is back with her crew but this time they are looking for answers in the most dangerous of places, Earth! In this book, the crew of the EMCS Pufferfish are fugitives with plenty of heat coming down on them. What they should be doing is looking for a place to hide but there are situations brewing that they j True Rating 4.5 stars!I have been looking forward to reading Terminal Uprising because I couldn’t wait to pick up where the story from Terminal Alliance had left off! Marion “Mops” Adamopoulos is back with her crew but this time they are looking for answers in the most dangerous of places, Earth! In this book, the crew of the EMCS Pufferfish are fugitives with plenty of heat coming down on them. What they should be doing is looking for a place to hide but there are situations brewing that they just can’t ignore. There is one Krakau who is actually doing what they can to send the crew information and clues in order to help them reveal some long-hidden truths about humanity as well as expose the secrets of a rather maniacal character. Following the clues and information will lead Mops and her crew into some sticky situations but luckily these scrappy characters have a few surprises of their own.This story has a different tone than the prequel and it was certainly a most enjoyable read! It was everything I was hoping for and more. I really like the direction that the overarching storyline is taking in this series. In addition, I loved all the tongue-in-cheek humor that this novel delivers but there is also a seriousness to what the characters are uncovering and that is what keeps me so intrigued with the Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse series. I will admit that there are so many quotes from the book that I would love to share because they had me laughing out loud but they would be spoilers and I can’t do that. Trust me though, this book will have you cracking up! Lots to love in Terminal Uprising and I know that I am definitely looking forward to the next installment in this series!!This review is based on a complimentary book I received from NetGalley. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating.Find this review and more at The Genre Minx Book Reviews
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of Jim Hines since the first (Gig the Goblin). I can't say this book was his first mis-step because I never finished the Faerie Tale/Charlies Angels novels either.However, this is the first time he's started so strong (Book #1 of this series was exceptional) and wasted all that potential so quickly.Did I hate it? No.... but I didn't care enough about it either.... and given that I already had a pre-existing tie to the characters, that's saying something.
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  • Jessica Whitlatch
    January 1, 1970
    This was so much fun I couldn’t put it down! The characters are so lovable you just gotta see what trouble they can think of next. I can’t wait for the next book!
  • Mari Kurisato
    January 1, 1970
    TLDR; Must Read, well worth it at thrice the price.What would you do if you awoke from a coma in a hospital, and the Doctors’ had told you that you made yourself go insane before, and had mindlessly killed someone? What if the Doctors found you and took you in, fixed your mind, trained you, made you tougher, and gave you a job?Would you feel guilty? Thankful?What would you do if you found out (SPOILER FOR THE FIRST BOOK, TERMINAL ALLIANCE)that in fact it was the Doctors themselves who made you t TLDR; Must Read, well worth it at thrice the price.What would you do if you awoke from a coma in a hospital, and the Doctors’ had told you that you made yourself go insane before, and had mindlessly killed someone? What if the Doctors found you and took you in, fixed your mind, trained you, made you tougher, and gave you a job?Would you feel guilty? Thankful?What would you do if you found out (SPOILER FOR THE FIRST BOOK, TERMINAL ALLIANCE)that in fact it was the Doctors themselves who made you this way, and that you didn’t ruin your own life, but that they did?Jim C Hines’s protagonist, Marion ‘Mops’ Adamopoulos, (who spent twelve years gratefully working in a spaceship; not as a fighter pilot nor a dashing space captain, but as a janitor,) learns that her species’ alien saviors were actually the ones that had caused Humanity to become mindlessly feral and terrifying. This upsets her, because the aliens had remade much of humanity into their grateful foot soldiers. For years much of humanity was nothing more than enlisted grunts rebuilt to kill, die and serve. When something terrible happens that makes a portion of the human crew go feral ‘Mops’ is left in command, but other things happen and things go from worse to really bad. With little to no experience amongst her ragtag survivors, she is thrust into the role of rogue captain of an lawless alien ship.Her former saviors can’t let the galaxy know what really happened to Humanity, so they are very eager to silence the entire crew to keep the universe unaware.Well, I hate to say it but…Mops fails, and her whole crew dies and the second book is about her life as a ghost in space……just kidding. But let me say this, in Book 1, the characters are well developed and thoroughly fleshed out, and people you root for. The ending is innovative, and a fine ending to the premise, but Book II Terminal UPRISING takes that premise and runs out the door with it. It includes action packed scenes, but also a shocking new secret, and characters that you can fall in love with all over again. Mops and her crew face a new challenge with new enemies and new allies, as Adamopoulos is forced to come up with inventive solutions to combat and logistical problems she was never trained for, to guard humanity’s greatest treasures from absolute destruction. And several of her solutions are hilarious. This is not a grim dark struggle, but Terminal Uprising has some good up and downs, and I was constantly surprised by funny scenes.(All I will say about this is look out for the ‘space whales.’)In closing I just want to say that this book is better than the first, and if you liked Alliance, Uprising is an absolute must read. If you’re new, go pick up Book 1 AND 2 so that you don’t miss a beat of this smart, hilarious thrill ride. I cannot wait for book 3!Caveats:Jim is a friend and a mentor, I did this review in exchange for a final proof version to read/ No money changed hands. Or beard.
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  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    Mops and the rest of her ragtag crew of the Pufferfish are following a lead from their Krakau insider. It leads them oddly enough to a Prodryan lawyer with information about something Admiral Sage is hiding on Earth that may help them get more answers about the truth behind the plague that turned humans into ferals. Unfortunately, that means that they have to go to the last place in the universe anyone wants to go...Earth. Oh, and they are quite the wanted little crew of former sanitation specia Mops and the rest of her ragtag crew of the Pufferfish are following a lead from their Krakau insider. It leads them oddly enough to a Prodryan lawyer with information about something Admiral Sage is hiding on Earth that may help them get more answers about the truth behind the plague that turned humans into ferals. Unfortunately, that means that they have to go to the last place in the universe anyone wants to go...Earth. Oh, and they are quite the wanted little crew of former sanitation specialists so just getting there in one piece will be half the fun. And if they somehow manage to survive, evade everyone chasing them, and get to Earth. Then they'll have to descend to a planet overrun by ferals. Oh goody.This was another amazingly enjoyable adventure with Mops, Monroe, Wolf, Grom, and gang. They pick up a new interesting sidekick in Cate, the Prodryan lawyer who makes no qualms about telling them how he'll kill them as soon as he gets a chance...though they more often end up making him utterly miserable entirely by accident and it is utterly delightful to watch. Once again, Mops unconventional thinking gets them out of scrapes in very creative ways...though realistically, some are starting to catch on to how a sanitation specialist thinks and she has to adjust her strategies a bit. (I thought it was actually a great little touch that Hines had her opponents start trying to think like her. It added new twists to the story and is a very believable scenario.) I quite enjoyed the adventures that the crew have on Earth, especially with the inhabitants they meet. (Hines, thank you for making librarians even more awesome in the future.) Hines writing is so very fun. He finds little things to comment on or mention that turn into comedic gold. (The McDonald's speculation was SO funny...and Grom may not be constantly on page but when it/they/whatever does show up, its sure to be a funny moment.) I was a bit sad when I got to the finish because I just wanted the book to keep going. I was enjoying it so. Definitely looking forward to the next one. Recommended to those who like smart but slightly off-the-wall humorous scifi. Notes on content: Mild to moderate language sporadically throughout, and about 10 uses of strong language. No sex scenes. There's some lines about being wary of various species being amorous, and one ship is damaged from a space animal getting romantic, but no details and it is pretty much in those terms. There are a few battles with some injuries and fatalities, only one fatality that is somewhat described with blood. Other non-fatal injuries get a little description. And of course with our sanitation crew, there's some sewage and other gross material involved from time to time.
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  • Steve Tetreault
    January 1, 1970
    What it's about: Janitors... In... SPACE...! Part... Two...! This book picks up a few months after the previous volume. (There have been several hundred books between when I read the first book and this one, so I wasn't sure if some of the "Here's what's been happening" was actually in the first book or whether it was off-stage action.) Our intrepid Shipboard Hygiene and Sanitation crew is on the run from the Krakau alliance - they're hopelessly outmanned, outgunned, and running out places to hi What it's about: Janitors... In... SPACE...! Part... Two...! This book picks up a few months after the previous volume. (There have been several hundred books between when I read the first book and this one, so I wasn't sure if some of the "Here's what's been happening" was actually in the first book or whether it was off-stage action.) Our intrepid Shipboard Hygiene and Sanitation crew is on the run from the Krakau alliance - they're hopelessly outmanned, outgunned, and running out places to hide. When their "inside man" has them pick up an alien lawyer/spy, their pursuers are even more assured of the dastardly mien of our beloved protagonists. And their latest mission brings them to the most dangerous place in the known galaxy: Earth. What I thought: I am probably going to pick up every book Hines writes from here on out, and at some point, I'll go back and check out some his stuff that is not in this series or the Ex Libris series. He has a nice way of creating and capturing interesting characters, and he often provides multidimensional antagonists - they often have a good reason to be doing what they're doing. Also, his stories are creative in their use of the non-traditional roles his characters inhabit (like librarians and janitors). Speaking of librarians, and having done zero research, I have to assume Hines either is/was a librarian, or a close family member is/was. He not only created a series about them, but he's also managed to incorporate them into this volume of future space janitors as important and respected figures. Why I rated it like I did: This second book didn't grab me as much as the first. It was still a good book, but it felt to me like it was more trying to move the plot along, which happened in a relatively linear fashion; the last book felt a bit more unpredictable and engaging. Part of that might just be that the first book was introducing an entirely new universe, while the second book was not only already picking up from there, but it was extremely limited in setting. This book had a little less humor, and definitely upped the ante to some serious stakes and topics for some of the characters. Overall, it was less fun, though still a good action-adventure story.
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  • Shane Jardine
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted at www.archeddoorway.comI’ve been a fan of Jim C. Hines ever since I first stumbled across his Magic Ex Libris series a few years ago and have yet to dislike a single book of his that I’ve read. So I was pretty excited to receive a copy of this book a few weeks ago. I actually made it around a quarter of the way through the story before I realized this was the second book in a series but by that point, I couldn’t stop reading. Terminal Uprising was a fun and action-packed read Originally posted at www.archeddoorway.comI’ve been a fan of Jim C. Hines ever since I first stumbled across his Magic Ex Libris series a few years ago and have yet to dislike a single book of his that I’ve read. So I was pretty excited to receive a copy of this book a few weeks ago. I actually made it around a quarter of the way through the story before I realized this was the second book in a series but by that point, I couldn’t stop reading. Terminal Uprising was a fun and action-packed read that had me laughing the entire way through despite not really understanding what was going on early int he book.I think the thing I love most about this author is the way he takes some of the most ridiculous plot ideas and turns them into books that are all but impossible to put down. I don’t know of anyone other authors except maybe Brandon Sanderson who could take something as mundane as a group of janitors and turn them into galaxy traveling heroes and have the concept work so well.The other thing that I think Jim C. Hines did really well in Terminal Uprising (And the previous book I’m assuming) was create surprisingly realistic characters for such a ridiculous story and setting. I loved reading about Marion “Mops” Adamopoulos and her entire crew and thought the way the whole book was filtered through the dirt and grime seeking gaze of a bunch of janitors was just fantastic. I think it really says something about this book and it’s characters that I enjoyed them so much despite skipping the first book entirely.All in all, I thought Terminal Uprising was a fantastic read and I can’t wait to see what happens next in the series. I’ve already started listening to the audiobook of Terminal Alliance so that I can catch up on the events that lead up to this story. I only wish this book was available as an audiobook as well so that I can experience it again in a new medium.I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Max
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second novel in the 'Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse' series picking up about 4 months after the original. In this book, Mops and her crew of sanitation workers (and one fugitive from a race that isn't supposed to exist) get contacted from a high ranking sympathetic admiral and are enlisted to return to Earth. Their mission? Track down a human believed to be actually cured entirely instead of just the normal partial cure that EMC humans are these days.Of course things are never that This is the second novel in the 'Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse' series picking up about 4 months after the original. In this book, Mops and her crew of sanitation workers (and one fugitive from a race that isn't supposed to exist) get contacted from a high ranking sympathetic admiral and are enlisted to return to Earth. Their mission? Track down a human believed to be actually cured entirely instead of just the normal partial cure that EMC humans are these days.Of course things are never that simple! Mops manages to not only enlist a xenocidal Prodryan lawyer as part of her crew, but also gets shot down before even landing on Earth. Never one to quit, she continues on and makes a series of discoveries that shake up not just Earth and humanity, but potentially the entire Alliance itself.After all, who better to clean up the trash than a team of janitors?This novel was fantastic, there's no better way to describe it. It has Jim C. Hines typical blend of humor and seriousness while maintaining an excellent sense of pace. It slows when you need a bit of a breather and speeds back up when the action gets going. The only real downside is that at the very end it almost feels like things get wrapped up just a tad bit too quickly and it could've done with another 20-50 pages. That said, it didn't feel rushed and if anything this showed just how far our heroes have come from their bumbling in the first novel.One final plug, if you read this book and do not fall in love with Greensleeves when she shows up, you probably aren't this book's target audience. She is far and away one of my favorite new characters to come out of this book and considering the plethora of interesting new human protagonists, fun villain antagonists, and a few cool ferals...it really says something that the single new janitor character is FUN with her few scenes!
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    As a rule, I don't read books set after the Apocalypse nor books featuring zombies. But I really have been enjoying this series.In book one, an alien bioweapon wipes out the starship Pufferfish Krakau command crew and turns all humans feral (basically your mindless savages). Lt. Mops and her crew happened to already be in their hazmat suits doing their janitorial job and so were spared both death and becoming feral. In book two, Lt. Mops (now Captain Mops) and her crew are sent to Earth for a de As a rule, I don't read books set after the Apocalypse nor books featuring zombies. But I really have been enjoying this series.In book one, an alien bioweapon wipes out the starship Pufferfish Krakau command crew and turns all humans feral (basically your mindless savages). Lt. Mops and her crew happened to already be in their hazmat suits doing their janitorial job and so were spared both death and becoming feral. In book two, Lt. Mops (now Captain Mops) and her crew are sent to Earth for a desperate mission. Earth, of course, was conquered long ago by said Krakau (except one of them is actually secretly on Mops' side!).This is a terrific Space Opera series because you have ships & space battles, you have undercover work, and you have many species working together (on Mops' side voluntarily). And you have janitors armed with both conventional weapons and janitorial supplies, the latter surprisingly effective in close quarters battle!I have to say that Advocate of Violence (a Prodrayan who keeps repeating that his is the superior species and will conquer all in the end, even if he refrains from killing everyone in Mops' crew today. He makes no bones about his firm intention to slaughter them all eventually.) is my favorite character in this book. (The Krakau and the humans are currently at war with the Prodrayans, by the way.) Advocate of Violence is on Mops' side just so long as their interests are in common. The moment that changes they will be enemies, in truth, again. But it is just so refreshing how honest Advocate of Violence is about his (in his own mind) absolute superiority regarding other alien species.Highly recommended for all who enjoy good Space Opera and rooting for the underdogs!
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  • Jill Furedy
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't remember how I felt about the first book, but I do remember thinking that I didn't like it as well as the Stepsister or Goblin series. I looked back and for some reason I marked it read and didn't review it. So I don't remember much more about my thoughts on that one. As I got to reading this one, I thought it was entertaining enough. There were funny moments, though nothing laugh out loud. I liked that they had to return to earth on this mission, and of course what they find in the l I couldn't remember how I felt about the first book, but I do remember thinking that I didn't like it as well as the Stepsister or Goblin series. I looked back and for some reason I marked it read and didn't review it. So I don't remember much more about my thoughts on that one. As I got to reading this one, I thought it was entertaining enough. There were funny moments, though nothing laugh out loud. I liked that they had to return to earth on this mission, and of course what they find in the libraries of earth among the feral population. I get that the janitors are using unusual strategies that the militarily minded don't anticipate well, but it does seem like the people (used loosely since they are alien species in most cases) they are fighting are pretty bad at their jobs. However, I enjoyed seeing how they got around their challenges and I did think that it was interesting to see how Wolf's character evolved into something a little more human and less one dimensional after her experiences on earth. None of the characters are deeply developed, these stories are more about the action than about connecting with a character. Which the characters are usually the part that pulls me in, so that is likely why I don't connect as much with these books yet. The world is fairly well devloped without getting into the some of the epic sci-fi world building that I have a hard time getting through. So it's fun, it has some creative new species and worlds that I found interesting. It's not going to make its way into my list of favorite series, but it's one I'll continue to pick up to see what is going on with them now.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    The Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse series is hilarious, poignant, and inventive. Mops and her crew have so much personality, particularly evident as they try to adapt to running a spaceship on their own. They have to make frequent use of the delightful tutorial programs as well as Mops’s personal AI, Doc. They cleverly use their experience and supplies (from floor polish to sealant to industrial lubricant to cleaning solutions that should not be mixed) to achieve their goals. They also adapt as The Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse series is hilarious, poignant, and inventive. Mops and her crew have so much personality, particularly evident as they try to adapt to running a spaceship on their own. They have to make frequent use of the delightful tutorial programs as well as Mops’s personal AI, Doc. They cleverly use their experience and supplies (from floor polish to sealant to industrial lubricant to cleaning solutions that should not be mixed) to achieve their goals. They also adapt as their enemies–Mops is now known as a traitor to the Alliance–cotton on to their strategies. Once they find more people to work with, they have to adapt to being soldiers and leaders as well as janitors. Just to up the difficulty level, Mops of course does not want to kill any humans if she can avoid it, even when they’re sent after her and her crew.I’m giddy over what Mops finds on Earth: librarians! (Leave it to Hines to incorporate the lure of books into his tale.) She also finds evidence that Admiral Sage is up to some unexpected, and fascinating, stuff. There’s plenty of inventive action scenes to keep things entertaining, including escapes, fire-fights, delaying actions, and rescues. The pacing is wonderful, ramping up and getting quite exciting.If you enjoy a good dose of humor with your heart-warming science fiction, the Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse is a fantastic series to read. I absolutely recommend it. Note that this book includes a wonderfully diverse cast, including various skin colors, gender preferences, and sexualities.Original review posted on my blog: http://www.errantdreams.com/2019/02/r...
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  • Reviews & Robots
    January 1, 1970
    Terminal Uprising features the kind of universe that’s infinite in its reach, originality, and hilarity. The cast of characters making up the crew is downright brilliant, showcasing a dynamic somewhere between friendship and annoyance. Everything about the book is intriguing, and it left me desperate to read whatever comes next in the series.It’s the inexperience of the crew that made the novel shine in my eyes. This is a group thrust into their current roles unexpectedly, forced to captain, fly Terminal Uprising features the kind of universe that’s infinite in its reach, originality, and hilarity. The cast of characters making up the crew is downright brilliant, showcasing a dynamic somewhere between friendship and annoyance. Everything about the book is intriguing, and it left me desperate to read whatever comes next in the series.It’s the inexperience of the crew that made the novel shine in my eyes. This is a group thrust into their current roles unexpectedly, forced to captain, fly, navigate, and fire back at enemies with no more training than a few hours reading manuals. They’re taking it a day at a time and we get to see them grow, individually and as a team. I’m a sucker for a good creature feature, especially space whales (see this review for reference). Hines has ENORMOUS space whales with alien inhabitants living in their organs. That’s an A+ in my book. Earth’s evolved fauna also cause a few much deserved laughs (two words: dachshund horde). That humor is central to Hines’ charm as a writer, giving us any number of asides and hilarious moments. The combination of slapstick and witty banter is infectious, especially amidst this rag-tag bunch. This is a great addition to Hines’ Janitors of the Post-Apocalypse series, but can definitely be read as a standalone novel. Look to Terminal Uprising if you’re ready to chase mayhem and danger while laughing all the way.NOTE: I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest, unbiased review.
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  • Ziggy Nixon
    January 1, 1970
    4 strong stars! Another really fun read from author Jim C. Hines following everyone's favorite motley crew of janitors and more!I think if I had to pick between 'Alliance' and 'Uprising', I'd have to give the edge to Book 1 (which I re-read before starting on this, my 2019 Father's Day present!). The sheer newness of this new series as well as the excellent sci-fi setting and story-line were just amazing in the first story and only got better with my second read-through! Not to say 'Uprising' is 4 strong stars! Another really fun read from author Jim C. Hines following everyone's favorite motley crew of janitors and more!I think if I had to pick between 'Alliance' and 'Uprising', I'd have to give the edge to Book 1 (which I re-read before starting on this, my 2019 Father's Day present!). The sheer newness of this new series as well as the excellent sci-fi setting and story-line were just amazing in the first story and only got better with my second read-through! Not to say 'Uprising' isn't fun, but I'm not sure I'd have taken the crew out of space so soon and into the dystopian setting of Earth (no spoilers, it's all right there in the promo blurb!). The humor is again quite good - and subtle, too, so extra points for that! - and Mops and her team do not disappoint. Still, I felt this one had more of a 'setting things up for the next chapter' feel to it than did book 1 and was missing the wild mix of alien species and their various interactions that we were just getting to know!However, Hines keeps this galactic tale of intrigue and even deception moving at a brisk pace. His characterizations are superb and it'll be interesting to see where we go from here. I'm sorry to see some cast members checking out (or are they?) but the set up for the next book(s) make me only hope publication comes sooner rather than later! Conclusion: be like this grateful Dad and read this series and give the others in JCH's collection a look, too!
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  • Ben Hammerslag
    January 1, 1970
    Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book as an ARC from the publisher.If you liked “Terminal Alliance”, you’ll love “Terminal Uprising”. If, like me, you were more on the fence about “Alliance”, I’d certainly encourage you to give “Terminal Uprising a try. “Uprising” is much more certain of its characters and the world around them. Where I thought that “Alliance” often used humor as a crutch to help prop up the plot (They’re janitors! Look at everything we can do with cleaning supplies! I Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book as an ARC from the publisher.If you liked “Terminal Alliance”, you’ll love “Terminal Uprising”. If, like me, you were more on the fence about “Alliance”, I’d certainly encourage you to give “Terminal Uprising a try. “Uprising” is much more certain of its characters and the world around them. Where I thought that “Alliance” often used humor as a crutch to help prop up the plot (They’re janitors! Look at everything we can do with cleaning supplies! Isn’t that fun!?), “Uprising” easily stands on its characters and plot alone. There’s certainly still some jokes, but they’re much less central to enjoying the book. That alone is worth a one-star upgrade from “Alliance”.About those characters, though: all of our heroes from “Alliance” are back, and we meet some new faces along the way. Unfortunately, some characters get substantially more pages than others. I would have preferred a little more balance, unfortunately. As I said at the start: If you liked or loved “Terminal Alliance”, “Terminal Uprising” is a must. If you had more mixed feelings about “Alliance” but are curious about where the story goes (like me!), I’ll give “Uprising” my recommend.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    As with the first, a great mix of humor, a richly assorted cast (old and new) of various genders and species (including a wary, temporary alliance with one of the genocidal-in-the-long-term Prodryans, and some painfully acquired character growth for Wolf), exciting and clever "underdog" action (outnumbered, underequipped, but not giving up), and "points to ponder". In addition to the normal narrative, there are hilarious inserted documents such as manuals and mission reports. I found this volume As with the first, a great mix of humor, a richly assorted cast (old and new) of various genders and species (including a wary, temporary alliance with one of the genocidal-in-the-long-term Prodryans, and some painfully acquired character growth for Wolf), exciting and clever "underdog" action (outnumbered, underequipped, but not giving up), and "points to ponder". In addition to the normal narrative, there are hilarious inserted documents such as manuals and mission reports. I found this volume better in the sense of less beating-a-dead-horse repetition of jokes such as the "cured" humans' names — though there are still plenty of bits about native earth culture (such as theme parks), fauna (such as something small, black-&-white, and not to be underestimated), etc., and Alliance/EMC ignorance thereof — plus the fact that in addition to janitor heroes, we now also have librarian heroes, which is always a win. There's a satisfying resolution to several major plot threads, and an indication of where the story (though I'm not saying which of the cast) will be heading next. I look forward to it!
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