Angelic, Vol. 1
Centuries after humanity has disappeared, the Earth belongs to our leftovers: the animals, genetically modified for a war they don't remember, guarding a world they don't understand. But for one young winged monkey the repressive tribal routines are unbearable. Her name is QORA. She yearns to explore, to discover... to fly free.Eisner nominee SIMON SPURRIER (The Spire, CRY HAVOC, X-Men Legacy) and star artist CASPAR WIJNGAARD (LIMBO, Dark Souls, Assassin's Creed) unite for an all-ages-friendly fable about teenage rebellion and animal antics amidst the ruins of civilization.Collects ANGELIC issues 1-6.

Angelic, Vol. 1 Details

TitleAngelic, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 15th, 2018
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534306639
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Animals, Graphic Novels Comics

Angelic, Vol. 1 Review

  • Tiago
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a unique comic book, everything from the story to the art was a fantastic surprise, top quality stuff, and don't get fooled by the cutesy art style and dialogue, because once the story starts revealing itself, it is actually quite deep and tell us a lot about our role as humans on this planet.Avoid reading the previews and the reviews and go straight for it, I think any hints and spoilers would ruin some of the sense of discovery that this book has, I highly recommend this one and This was such a unique comic book, everything from the story to the art was a fantastic surprise, top quality stuff, and don't get fooled by the cutesy art style and dialogue, because once the story starts revealing itself, it is actually quite deep and tell us a lot about our role as humans on this planet.Avoid reading the previews and the reviews and go straight for it, I think any hints and spoilers would ruin some of the sense of discovery that this book has, I highly recommend this one and I can't wait for the second volume.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]Simon Spurrier is warped in the head, and I love everything about his writing. His particular brand of world building and dialogue really hits the right buttons for me, and it's on full display here.Angelic tells the story of a post apocalypic world in which animals rule the Earth; the main tribes are the Monks, flying monkeys who praise the long-dead humans, and the Mans, technologically enhanced manatees that worship Aye, a mysterious artificial intelligence. When the tw [Read as single issues]Simon Spurrier is warped in the head, and I love everything about his writing. His particular brand of world building and dialogue really hits the right buttons for me, and it's on full display here.Angelic tells the story of a post apocalypic world in which animals rule the Earth; the main tribes are the Monks, flying monkeys who praise the long-dead humans, and the Mans, technologically enhanced manatees that worship Aye, a mysterious artificial intelligence. When the two worlds collide, everything changes (and I actually mean it when I say it for a change).Spurrier unfolds the world of Angelic in a natural way, blending exposition and character beats together effortlessly and telling a complete story in six issues with plenty of room to grow afterwards. It's beautifully innocent at its outset, and highlights how much the main characters grow through the six issues because of how far they've come by the end.The art from Caspar Wijngaard fits perfectly; everything's almost like a storybook illustration, which makes the hard hitting story beats even harder and the wonderment that the characters have of exploring the world around them really shine through.Angelic is a beautiful tale, gorgeously illustrated, that you owe it to yourself to experience. I hope Spurrier revisits this one soon. (I'm still waiting on Cry Havoc Volume 2, Si!)
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  • -RadioActiveBookWorm-
    January 1, 1970
    Goodreads Synopsis:Centuries after humanity has disappeared, the Earth belongs to our leftovers: the animals, genetically modified for a war they don't remember, guarding a world they don't understand. But for one young winged monkey the repressive tribal routines are unbearable. Her name is QORA. She yearns to explore, to discover... to fly free.Eisner nominee SIMON SPURRIER (The Spire, CRY HAVOC, X-Men Legacy) and star artist CASPAR WIJNGAARD (LIMBO, Dark Souls, Assassin's Creed) unite for an Goodreads Synopsis:Centuries after humanity has disappeared, the Earth belongs to our leftovers: the animals, genetically modified for a war they don't remember, guarding a world they don't understand. But for one young winged monkey the repressive tribal routines are unbearable. Her name is QORA. She yearns to explore, to discover... to fly free.Eisner nominee SIMON SPURRIER (The Spire, CRY HAVOC, X-Men Legacy) and star artist CASPAR WIJNGAARD (LIMBO, Dark Souls, Assassin's Creed) unite for an all-ages-friendly fable about teenage rebellion and animal antics amidst the ruins of civilization.Collects ANGELIC issues 1-6.My Review:First of all, let me say how much I just love the style of this book. It's so colourful, and a lot different than any of the other comics I've read lately. It begins with a bunch of Monks getting worked up over Dolts invading on their territory. They want to keep them away because they're not their own species, and that makes them not natural, although they do speak very formal English. They're trying to protect the center of their home, the roost, because it's kind of like a religious thing for them. Without it and the ritual, they say they would have babies born without wings, thumbs, or the ability to talk. It's quirky and I have to say I wasn't sure what was going on for the first probably quarter of the book, but it didn't make me love it any less.The main character is a girlmonk named Qora, who will soon lose her wings due to the ritual and become a mother for the tribe. She runs away and is attacked by a kind of cat, but is saved by the Mans and the Dolts. The Mans says that they're not trying to attack them when they send Dolts, they're just looking for a piece of their god, a little robot called Ay. They say if they can get their piece back he can clear the world of tox clouds and make enough space and food for everyone. This book then takes a completely different turn, showing a secret hideaway full of bio and humans in dream stasis, which is completely different from anything they know. Overall I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and I can't wait for volume two. The story was just so interesting, and it was an easy read. Although the characters aren't really relatable, they make up for it with the way they continue on the story. I definitely recommend you check it out. Here's a link to the author and artist's Twitter, and another link to the book on Amazon.https://twitter.com/sispurrierhttps://twitter.com/Casparnovahttps://www.amazon.ca/Angelic-Heirs-G...Thanks for reading! Check out this review and more at my blog.(Radioactivebookreviews.wordpress.com)
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I read Angelic as single issues. Angelic is a new series from Image, and I’ve got to say it’s got a pretty unique concept going for it. It’s set in the far future, where humans are officially out of the picture. Instead sentient animals rule the world. They have technology, religion, everything. If you thought that Animal Farm was disturbing, in the human elements that the animals picked up, then you’ll be equally disturbed (but fascinated) here. This series was created by Simon Spurrier (Cry I read Angelic as single issues. Angelic is a new series from Image, and I’ve got to say it’s got a pretty unique concept going for it. It’s set in the far future, where humans are officially out of the picture. Instead sentient animals rule the world. They have technology, religion, everything. If you thought that Animal Farm was disturbing, in the human elements that the animals picked up, then you’ll be equally disturbed (but fascinated) here. This series was created by Simon Spurrier (Cry Havoc, The Spire, X-Men Legacy) and Caspar Wijngaard (Dark Souls, Assassin’s Creed, Limbo). The plot is brilliant and innovated, and the artwork is absolutely striking (and in truth is the thing that originally caught my attention for this series).(view spoiler)[ I still can’t get over how unique and innovative this series was. When I picked up the first issue of this series, I really wasn’t sure what to expect (other than perhaps a few flying monkey jokes – which I actually never ended up getting…and I’m okay with that). It’s easy to look at a series about animals and assume that it’s going to be this comfortable little tale (no pun intended) about nothing. But if you go into this series expecting that, you’re going to be in for quite the shock… The main characters name is Qora, she’s adorable, feisty, stubborn, and more than anything in the world she wants to be able to choose her own path in life. She doesn’t want to become a flightless mother (and yes, the implications are just as horrible as they sound). She wants to be a warrior, an explorer. In short, she wants to be more than her culture will allow her to be. It’s hard not to immediately feel for Qora and the position she’s in. Actually, I was almost afraid to read the second issue of this story – I was afraid that I would learn that something horrible happened to her. It doesn’t take a crazy imagination to wonder why I’d fear that. Qora’s adventures end up showing us (and her own people) that there is so much more to this world than meets the eye. Lies became secrets, secrets became lore, and lore faded away. To see the path her society had taken, where and how they originated, and what they became, was a fascinating study on human (and animal…I suppose sentient is a better fit here) nature. At the end of this series there’s a little blurb from the author here, and I highly suggest you read it instead of skipping over it (I know it’s tempting for some, but trust me here). I was utterly fascinated to read of the inspiration for this plot, and honestly I almost wish there was more information to go off of here. I never would have guessed that a childhood moment would have sparked something this profound and beautiful…but it absolutely did just that. (hide spoiler)]For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to try not to 'gush' here, but Spurrier and Wijngaard's Angelic, is one of the freshest and most imaginative new titles I've read for a long while. From the off, it's clear that things are not as they should be: monkeys have wings, gibbons have supersonic screams, and dolphins are supped up flying war machines. Each tribe of animals keep to themselves with their own hierarchy, laws and mission. Interestingly though, humans or 'Makers' are nowhere to be seen.Our main protagonist is Qora I'm going to try not to 'gush' here, but Spurrier and Wijngaard's Angelic, is one of the freshest and most imaginative new titles I've read for a long while. From the off, it's clear that things are not as they should be: monkeys have wings, gibbons have supersonic screams, and dolphins are supped up flying war machines. Each tribe of animals keep to themselves with their own hierarchy, laws and mission. Interestingly though, humans or 'Makers' are nowhere to be seen.Our main protagonist is Qora, and young, curious and rebellious monkey who, because of her constant questioning of the regime she lives under, is due to lose her wings and become a breeder with vicious patriarch Alfer. Soon, she meets up with the 'Mans' (manatees that travel in their own pods that are connected to a higher consciousness) and they ask her to go on a secret mission with an 'expendable' Man called Complainer. He too questions the logic of his tribe and is sent away with Qora to find the missing piece of their higher-being 'Ay'. This gets Qora away from Alfer and her imminent servitude, but lands them both into a whole heap of trouble.In the author notes at the end of Angelic, Spurrier states that the comic isn't about racism as such, but more about learned behaviours and attitudes and that comes across all the way through the six issues. Within the storyline are characters dealing with humiliation, sexism, racism, mental health while trying to fight the system that created them. If that's not an allegory for modern life in 2018 then I don't know what is?Wijngaard's art is nothing short of breath-taking throughout the comic, with his use of pastels bringing an other-worldly feel to everything and showing that you don't have to rely on the usual 'dystopia palette' of browns and greys to tell a story with meaning and depth. Characters are well defined, and easily recognisable - not easy when you have panels full of monkeys - and he doesn't over-dose them with 'cuteness' either.Spurrier's creations are funny, intelligent, and purposeful, and he writes them with a good mix of genuine humour (there's several laugh-out-loud moments), pathos, and anger without them ever veering towards clichés. While Qora and Complainer are the heart of the story, special mention must go the awesome FazeCat - a creation I expect to see merch of at cons for many years.Angelic, Vol 1 has an open ending, and I'm hoping that Image commission this for more, as it's certainly got the potential to run for another few volumes yet.Copy supplied by Image Comics for independent and unbiased review.
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  • Imogene
    January 1, 1970
    I hate human beings because I see the truth in this book.I love human beings because we are capable of something this beautiful, and devastating.Genetically modified animals, tortured, experimented on, brain-washed and left behind by human beings after a battle with a homicidal AI.The protagonist is a young female monkey, a girl-monk, who wants more, is nobedient Her quest is beautiful and heartbreaking, and I need to be a better person right now.The language is great. The slight shifts in words I hate human beings because I see the truth in this book.I love human beings because we are capable of something this beautiful, and devastating.Genetically modified animals, tortured, experimented on, brain-washed and left behind by human beings after a battle with a homicidal AI.The protagonist is a young female monkey, a girl-monk, who wants more, is nobedient Her quest is beautiful and heartbreaking, and I need to be a better person right now.The language is great. The slight shifts in words and meanings.
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  • Paul Decker
    January 1, 1970
    *I received this book as an eARC from Image Comics via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review*This graphic novel starts out with talking flying monkeys and robotic dolphins! There is so much creativity in the worldbuilding of this world. There are hermit crabs in human skulls, manatees in hovering spheres, toxic clouds, and more! The basis of the story is an adventure quest that questions the world's established beliefs. It reminds of the movie A.I.. The artwork is ridiculously beautiful and *I received this book as an eARC from Image Comics via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review*This graphic novel starts out with talking flying monkeys and robotic dolphins! There is so much creativity in the worldbuilding of this world. There are hermit crabs in human skulls, manatees in hovering spheres, toxic clouds, and more! The basis of the story is an adventure quest that questions the world's established beliefs. It reminds of the movie A.I.. The artwork is ridiculously beautiful and so imaginative. I give this first volume a 4/5. I'd love to see more of this world!
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    Winged multi-coloured monkeys you can't tell apart, flying robot dolphins, and demon cat things – yes, if all of that combined with a rich, explanation-free myth and lore, and some quite poor artwork, floats your boat, then welcome. You are indeed welcome to it.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    Spurrier's writing is incredibly imaginative and clever. The wordplay alone makes this worth reading, but combined with Wijngaard's striking visuals, this deserves a spot on my list of favorite comics of 2018.
  • Jon Huff
    January 1, 1970
    Really unique world building. Lovely art.
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