Winning Miss Winthrop (Regency Brides: A Promise of Hope #1)
Catherine Winthrop has cried out to God too many times to count. Years ago, the man who stole her heart rejected her--and she's never recovered. Now tragedy has brought him back into her life. This time it isn't her heart he's taking, it's her home and her family's good name--and she has no one to share her grief.Jonathan Carlew's life may look enviable from the outside--wealthy, handsome, landed--but the mystery surrounding his birth has shadowed his entire life. Now as he ascends to the barony, fresh challenges await, including a scheming mama who wants him to embrace power, even at the cost of losing love. How can he remain the kind, honorable man he strives to be and still meet the demands of his new society responsibilities?These two broken hearts must decide whether their painful past and bitter present will be all they can share, or if forgiveness can provide a path to freedom for the future.Set in the sumptuous salons of Bath, Regency England's royal breeding ground for gossip, Winning Miss Winthrop is the first volume in Carolyn Miller's new series. Fans of the wholesome and richly drawn first series won’t want to miss this new set of characters.

Winning Miss Winthrop (Regency Brides: A Promise of Hope #1) Details

TitleWinning Miss Winthrop (Regency Brides: A Promise of Hope #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 27th, 2018
PublisherKregel Publications
ISBN-139780825445330
Rating
GenreHistorical, Regency, Romance, Historical Fiction, Christian, Christian Fiction, European Literature, British Literature, Fiction

Winning Miss Winthrop (Regency Brides: A Promise of Hope #1) Review

  • Deanne Patterson
    January 1, 1970
    One things that's evident when reading this author's books is that she REALLY loves the Regency period. She really drew me into the regency world, from the description of the clothing to the atmosphere to the dialogue to the etiquette. I could not turn the pages quickly enough. You will not be disappointed with this rich in historical detail novel set in Bath, Regency England. You'll be enriched reading about new characters while enjoying reuniting with characters in past books. Then first in th One things that's evident when reading this author's books is that she REALLY loves the Regency period. She really drew me into the regency world, from the description of the clothing to the atmosphere to the dialogue to the etiquette. I could not turn the pages quickly enough. You will not be disappointed with this rich in historical detail novel set in Bath, Regency England. You'll be enriched reading about new characters while enjoying reuniting with characters in past books. Then first in the A Promise of Hope series I look forward to the next book.Pub Date 27 Mar 2018 I received a complimentary copy from Kregel Publications through NetGalley. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautifully written story! If you like Jane Austen's "Persuasion," you will love "Winning Miss Winthrop!" "Winning Miss Winthrop" is the first book in a new series called "Regency Brides: A Promise of Hope." Ms. Miller writes a great story filled with a lot of faith content. I appreciate that she doesn't shy away from putting Christianity into her story. Faith plays such a big role in many of the characters’ lives and there are many important lessons learned as the characters grow in thei What a beautifully written story! If you like Jane Austen's "Persuasion," you will love "Winning Miss Winthrop!" "Winning Miss Winthrop" is the first book in a new series called "Regency Brides: A Promise of Hope." Ms. Miller writes a great story filled with a lot of faith content. I appreciate that she doesn't shy away from putting Christianity into her story. Faith plays such a big role in many of the characters’ lives and there are many important lessons learned as the characters grow in their faith. I love that Ms. Miller’s characters pray, read the Bible, have devotions and recall Scripture. I also enjoy the little similarities to Austen’s novels sprinkled throughout, especially the parallels to her novel “Persuasion.”"Winning Miss Winthrop" has relatable and down-to-earth characters. Our heroine, Catherine, loses so much and feels abandoned by God in the beginning of the book. Her struggles and faith journey are very realistic. She has a slight stammer when she is intimidated and she is not always described as being very pretty. I love that she realizes she can be happy even when she thinks the man she loves has chosen someone else for a bride. Catherine learns great lessons about not getting stuck in the past, being the heroine of her story and choosing to live life to the fullest.You won't be sorry if you pick up this novel. It's sure to give you plenty of entertainment while encouraging you in your faith--“Winning Miss Winthrop” is a definite win-win. Content: This book is a clean read overall with a PG rating for a little content. Some examples of the content are: talk of a person possibly being illegitimate; talk of a man who has gambled; characters drink alcohol; reference to a man possibly propositioning a woman; reference to a lady being large bosomed; talk of a man being unfaithful.Rating: I give this book 4.5 stars.Genre: Christian fiction; Regency; Romance; HistoricalI want to thank Carolyn Miller and Kregal Publications for the complimentary copy of this book for review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are my own. This is in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s CFR 16, Part 255.
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  • Susan Snodgrass
    January 1, 1970
    "How could she bless others when God had removed all blessings from her?"Carolyn Miller's debut novel last year, The Elusive Miss Ellison, proved to this reader that she could do a Regency well indeed. My opinion has only been solidified with each successive book. I love a good Regency and I am most satisfied with each offering from Miller's pen.Miller begins a new series with Winning Miss Winthrop and already, after closing the last page of the book, looking forward to the next in the series. C "How could she bless others when God had removed all blessings from her?"Carolyn Miller's debut novel last year, The Elusive Miss Ellison, proved to this reader that she could do a Regency well indeed. My opinion has only been solidified with each successive book. I love a good Regency and I am most satisfied with each offering from Miller's pen.Miller begins a new series with Winning Miss Winthrop and already, after closing the last page of the book, looking forward to the next in the series. Catherine Winthrop's father has died and suddenly she finds herself in quite different circumstances. She and her mother must remove themselves from Winthrop Manor and into the dower cottage on the estate, which is a far cry from what they are used to. It seems her father had serious debt and now they must pay the price for his lapses in judgment.Jonathan Carlew has a connection to trade and has always dealt with rumors about his birth, and now he finds himself the new Lord Winthrop as a distant cousin. He is suddenly landed and titled and is now a good prospect for all the young ladies seeking husbands in the season. But the one woman who he loves still, after three years, stole his heart and ran away. That lady is Catherine Winthrop.Catherine was rejected by the new Lord Winthrop and she cannot, despite many efforts to, forget him . Can these two broken hearts make it past all their painful pasts and now the bitter present? Will they allow forgiveness in their hearts and forge a new path on which to trod? I was completely captivated by this novel. Miller has created characters so powerfully that I found my heart breaking with theirs at each painful turn of events. I confess I did shed some tears. I love discovering new authors and I am so glad indeed that I took a chance with Carolyn Miller's deft hand at a Christian Regency. Highly recommended.*I thank the publisher for this copy. The opinions stated here are entirely my own.
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  • Suzie
    January 1, 1970
    Before I finished Carolyn Miller’s book and read the author’s note, I saw echoes of Jane Austen in Winning Miss Winthrop—especially Persuasion in the first three quarters and a little Pride & Prejudice in the final pages.Yet Miller’s story is original and engaging (and maybe a little sad—at first). I couldn’t help but feel bath for Catherine as trial after trail invades her life. She is forced to leave the only home she’s known to live with her unhappy mother. The man she once loved is now t Before I finished Carolyn Miller’s book and read the author’s note, I saw echoes of Jane Austen in Winning Miss Winthrop—especially Persuasion in the first three quarters and a little Pride & Prejudice in the final pages.Yet Miller’s story is original and engaging (and maybe a little sad—at first). I couldn’t help but feel bath for Catherine as trial after trail invades her life. She is forced to leave the only home she’s known to live with her unhappy mother. The man she once loved is now the master of her family’s home and land.The new master of Winthrop Manor has the burden of fixing the crumbling home, paying the outstanding debts of the previous Lord Winthrop, providing for a family that has had little to do with him in the past, and dealing with the machinations of a marriage-minded mother.Jon’s mother was actually the character who surprised me the most. I never could exactly read Lady Harkness’s motives.Readers of Miller’s previous series will enjoy the cameos from a few people but don’t worry, this book stands just fine on its own. And there’s no shortage of drama.Miller’s portrayal of the aristocracy in Bath is filled with pictures of diversions such as concerts and balls as well as the assembly that are fresh and descriptively colorful. And though I wanted to yell at Catherine and Jon to just talk to each other already, it’s the journey they take that makes the ending worth the wait.Disclosure statement:I receive complimentary books from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including NetGalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.
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  • Carrie Turansky
    January 1, 1970
    Carolyn Miller never fails to stir my heart with her engaging Regency novels, and she has done it again with Winning Miss Winthrop. This delightful story has just right blend of family drama, faith, romance, and redemption. Separated by a heartbreaking misunderstanding in the past, Catherine and Jon’s journey will keep you turning pages and longing for them to learn the truth. Readers who are looking for an English historical romance reminiscent of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer will be delight Carolyn Miller never fails to stir my heart with her engaging Regency novels, and she has done it again with Winning Miss Winthrop. This delightful story has just right blend of family drama, faith, romance, and redemption. Separated by a heartbreaking misunderstanding in the past, Catherine and Jon’s journey will keep you turning pages and longing for them to learn the truth. Readers who are looking for an English historical romance reminiscent of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer will be delighted with Winning Miss Winthrop!
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  • Clara
    January 1, 1970
    Since reading Ms. Miller's first book, what has struck me as refreshing is her characters' integrity. They are never portrayed as perfect or unapproachable, but there is a noble air to them which is very much appreciated. It also, many times, sets the pace of the plot as the characters try to remain steadfast through a time period stained by unruly tongues and a judgemental society.I saw this integrity portrayed once again in Jonathan Carlew as he sought to wisely fulfill an unexpected inherited Since reading Ms. Miller's first book, what has struck me as refreshing is her characters' integrity. They are never portrayed as perfect or unapproachable, but there is a noble air to them which is very much appreciated. It also, many times, sets the pace of the plot as the characters try to remain steadfast through a time period stained by unruly tongues and a judgemental society.I saw this integrity portrayed once again in Jonathan Carlew as he sought to wisely fulfill an unexpected inherited role, through his interactions with his family and close friends, and his patience to not let society's prejudice make him doubt his good influence. And then there's his... bullheadedness. Yep, he's pretty much as stubborn as they get. I confess this caught me by surprise, not in a bad way for I knew this promised for a good character growth. Morality is a fine line to walk on. Though righteous character may be grown, there's always the chance of developing pride in one's self and forgetting that a noble persona walks alongside gentleness and meekness. Can Jonathan find this out in time to repair severed ties? Specially one in regards to the young lady who never stopped having a place in his heart.Catherine Winthrop has suffered enough heartache in recent times to make her sick to her bones. And to be in constant association with the man she once gave her heart to hasn't been helping her healing. She can't forget how he coldly and unceremonious broke their understanding. Still, here in there she sees the kindhearted man she once knew. How to associate these two sides? Who is the true Jonathan Carlew?Full of the captivating Regency world, with the bonus of a masquerade ball (!!!), this book sure kept me interested as page-to-page I was challenged to not judge a character by first impressions, as they can be misguided, as well as to believe hope is always unwavering, no matter the situation. I'm very much looking forward to Serena's book.**many thanks to the publisher for providing an ARC. This is my honest review.
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  • Lynda Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    When I first discovered Jane Austen, I was a young lady just beginning life. I adored Pride and Prejudice and longed for the day when my very own Darcy would appear. But as I have matured, and yes, found my own Darcy, I have learned to appreciate and sigh for those who need a second chance to find happiness with the one they love. Persuasion is one such example, and Winning Miss Winthrop is another, an enjoyable novel of lost love regained after much heartache. This is the first book in the seco When I first discovered Jane Austen, I was a young lady just beginning life. I adored Pride and Prejudice and longed for the day when my very own Darcy would appear. But as I have matured, and yes, found my own Darcy, I have learned to appreciate and sigh for those who need a second chance to find happiness with the one they love. Persuasion is one such example, and Winning Miss Winthrop is another, an enjoyable novel of lost love regained after much heartache. This is the first book in the second series by Carolyn Miller, and I believe she just gets better with each novel. This one is significantly longer than any of the books in her previous trilogy, and the plot is more complex, the character development allowed to go a bit deeper, letting us appreciate their strengths and weaknesses more as we know what has led them to this point in their lives. Faith plays an important role in understanding suffering, whether it be from misunderstanding or deliberate maliciousness. Anyone who has ever asked how much more growth they might need before God considers the trial at an end will find a kindred heart in Catherine, who tries to patiently endure her own situations with grace but struggles with weariness at it all. As with her earlier novels, the Regency period is well-researched and I learned several things about it that I didn't know before, such as the history of White's. But even though the characters must choose to remain within society's strictures, or not, I love that it does not make them somehow "less." Women do have fewer choices at that time, but as a wiser character reminded another, they can choose to live, no matter how difficult circumstances may be. With nods to Austen but still a work all her own, Miller's latest novel is a shining example of what's best in the Regency genre with great characters, difficult situations, and a fantastic romance in a much more regimented time and place. I highly recommend it to those who enjoy Austen and are looking for a newer author to read, but those who appreciate historical fiction, in general, will also find a great story here! I received a review copy from the publisher and author but was under no obligation to post a positive review. The opinions expressed are both honest and my own.
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  • Abby Breuklander
    January 1, 1970
    Love love and love!! This is one of those stories where you feel that it was written just for you, I felt everything that Catherine felt, from anger to sadness to hope. What a wonderful reminder that sometimes the very circumstances that we think are going to break us can actually be the very path to get us right where we're supposed to be. There is always hope.
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  • Kellyn Roth
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted on Reveries Reviews.Title: Winning Miss WinthropAuthor: Carolyn MillerSeries: Regency Brides: Promise of Hope, #1Genre: Christian Historical RomanceEra: RegencySetting: English countryside, BathPublisher: Kregel PublicationsSource: from NetGalley (in exchange for honest review)Overall Rating: 3.5/5I have no idea what to think of this book! I’ll unashamedly admit it. I loved it … and yet there were a couple problems that detracted from my enjoyment of the story.PLOT: 3/5… eh?Oka Originally posted on Reveries Reviews.Title: Winning Miss WinthropAuthor: Carolyn MillerSeries: Regency Brides: Promise of Hope, #1Genre: Christian Historical RomanceEra: RegencySetting: English countryside, BathPublisher: Kregel PublicationsSource: from NetGalley (in exchange for honest review)Overall Rating: 3.5/5I have no idea what to think of this book! I’ll unashamedly admit it. I loved it … and yet there were a couple problems that detracted from my enjoyment of the story.PLOT: 3/5… eh?Okay, so, I have no idea what to think of this plot! On one hand, it definitely kept my attention and was interesting and intriguing. On the other hand … it felt like the first draft plot got mixed up with the final draft plot.This book needs some alpha readers. ;) Even though I know it’s traditional, so it must have gone through multiple rounds of edits. Go figure.I felt that the time that needed to be dedicated to Catherine and Jon’s backstory just … wasn’t? I didn’t really get a good sense of what kept them apart, et cetera. It was perhaps just a little cliche as well. (TALK, GUYS. BUT IN PERSON. NOT OVER LETTER. BECAUSE THAT IS NOT WORKING FOR YOU.)The place where the plot of this book really shone was in the theme. The Christian content was sooo amazing. It’s been a while since I’ve read a story that put so much emphasis on God in the characters’ lives without being overly preachy.CHARACTERS: 4/5The characters were fairly well-developed. As I said before, at times I was a little bit confused by the reasons behind Jon’s actions in the past – and even Catherine’s. I felt like that whole part could be been developed further. However, overall, they were well done.I found myself almost liking the side characters more than the hero and heroine. Catherine’s aunt, (eventually) Jon’s mother, Jon’s friends, Lavinia (who has a book about her I should really read), Lavinia’s husband (oh, my word, this man …), and multiple other characters.I liked Jon okay, but he didn’t stand out to me in a big way. Catherine was a decent character – and there were some things about her that I really liked, such as her stutter. It was really cute. 😛The characters’ interactions reminded me of Kristi Ann Hunter. This is very, very good thing in my book!The biggest thing about these characters … they were never exactly proper? And I know, being rich and in family circles (which they weren’t always, but I digress), they might have acted like that … but I think not? It just pulled me out of the story. Felt like modern-day people got dumped in a Regency setting.However, it was hilarious. Their interactions and little comments and everything really made the book flow. So I can’t be too harsh.SETTING: 4/5Aside from what I mentioned in the character section about the characters being not exactly proper, the setting was very well done. I felt a strong influence of Persuasion in this story (BATH!!!), so that was fantastic. There was also a kind of Mansfield Park or lowkey Sense and Sensibility feeling. It was just all very Jane Austen-y. Two thumbs up!WRITING: 4/5Overall, the writing was very good. A consistent, flowing style. There were a couple times where I felt it needed a good editing, but I had an eARC so I will presume that these errors and weird sentences and such will be ironed out by publication day.CONTENT: 2/5Language: n/aViolence: n/aSexual: people gossip that Catherine is in an improper relationship with an older gentleman who views her as a father. Mentions of Jon’s friends being improper/rogues/etc. Semi-detailed kissing and remembering kissing (as in, Catherine is super worried that kissing Jon when they first met drove him off) (no, that is not how men work, sweetie).Other: n/a (unless you count mentions of pregnancy, etc.)I can’t remember anything that put up major flags for me. It was a clean Regency romance. A few conversations resulting from untrue gossip leads me to say 13+ with parental guidance.OVERALL: 3.5/5I probably would have rated it a bit lower just based on the quality of the story, but … I enjoyed it so very much! From the message to the characters to the writing, it was deeply enjoyable.And … if that doesn’t count for something to a reviewer, I don’t know what should! If you love Regency romance and don’t mind looking over some minor flaws in a plot, by all means, dig into this story!Review by Kellyn Roth of Reveries Reviews
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  • Iola
    January 1, 1970
    Persuasion is not my favourite Jane Austen novel. I find it frustrating, because the problems faced by the hero and heroine could be solved by one simple conversation. Unfortunately, Jane Austen lived in a society where men and women were unable to speak plainly to each other. That meant Persuasion's hero and heroine spent most of the book at odds, even though they had mutual feelings towards each other. Winning Miss Winthrop is loosely based on Persuasion, and has the same central trope. Two ye Persuasion is not my favourite Jane Austen novel. I find it frustrating, because the problems faced by the hero and heroine could be solved by one simple conversation. Unfortunately, Jane Austen lived in a society where men and women were unable to speak plainly to each other. That meant Persuasion's hero and heroine spent most of the book at odds, even though they had mutual feelings towards each other. Winning Miss Winthrop is loosely based on Persuasion, and has the same central trope. Two years ago, Miss Catherine Winthrop fell in love with her third cousin once removed, Jonathan Carlew. She thought the feeling was mutual, but he abandoned her. Now she is twenty-five years old, at home, and on the shelf. But things are about to get complicated.Her father dies, and instead of the estate going to the expected heir, it goes to Jonathan Carlew. Catherine and her mother are forced to leave their home and move into the Dower House, with a much-reduced income. What follows is a frustrating yet engaging read as Catherine and Jonathan have to face up to being in the company of the other, both believing the other to have been at fault in the demise of their earlier relationship. Matters are not helped by Catherine‘s mother, the Dowager Lady Winthrop, who makes Elizabeth Bennett’s mother appear intelligent and self sacrificing.There is lots of great writing, much of which centres around Catherine's frustration over her situation. There are also some welcome cameos from characters in her earlier series.As usual, Carolyn Miller's is writing is spot on for the period and location. Her locations come alive, and she captures the manners of the Regency period perfectly, while introducing a rare spiritual depth. Miller's writing is full of the wit and subtext present in other Regency novelists such as Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. And now I'm anxiously awaiting Miss Serena's Secret, the second book in the series.Recommended for all Regency romance lovers.Thanks to Kregel and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.
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  • Paula Shreckhise
    January 1, 1970
    Winning Miss Winthrop by Carolyn Miller With flowing prose true to the Regency time period, Carolyn Miller pens a tome in the vein of Jane Austen. Set in Gloucestershire and Bath, England in 1816, this novel is reminiscent of Persuasion with it’s estranged hero and heroine. A secret romance, meddling parents, hurt feelings! Will their love die before it has a real chance to grow? Catherine Winthrop’s papa has died leaving a distant cousin, Jonathan Carlew, as the new Baron. Though he is an honor Winning Miss Winthrop by Carolyn Miller With flowing prose true to the Regency time period, Carolyn Miller pens a tome in the vein of Jane Austen. Set in Gloucestershire and Bath, England in 1816, this novel is reminiscent of Persuasion with it’s estranged hero and heroine. A secret romance, meddling parents, hurt feelings! Will their love die before it has a real chance to grow? Catherine Winthrop’s papa has died leaving a distant cousin, Jonathan Carlew, as the new Baron. Though he is an honorable man, the history between Jon and Catherine puts his character in a questionable light. Is Jon truly doing what is best for the family or just exercising his authority over them? Whose perspective is the correct one? Catherine is trying to put the scriptures into practice by honoring her mother and forgiving the ones she perceives as having wronged her. Likewise, Jonathan’s faith is strong and he is determined to rescue his relatives from a reversal of circumstances brought on by Catherine’s father’s unwise lifestyle. Jon takes his responsibilities as Baron seriously and wants to preserve the family’s legacy. After all, he is an astute businessman. Will society’s expectations prove to be an obstacle? Will Jon and Catherine be able to clear up the past misconceptions and realize, in time, that they were meant to be together? Is there a spark of love still there? Carolyn Miller writes her characters and their situations vey realistically. They are charming, albeit having foibles and strong personalities. I enjoyed this tale of Regency England immensely and am glad to see Catherine’s sister, Serena, is the subject of the next book in the series. * I received a complimentary copy of this book on behalf of the author by the publisher. I was not requested to give a favorable review. All opinions are my own. *
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  • Kristin Davison
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars I would like to thank netgalley and Kregel Publications for the opportunity to read this book. Catherine's father dies leaving her and her mother to move out of their comfortable home and into a small cottage to make room for Tue new Lord Winthrop. Jonathan inherits the tittle unexpectedly and has to come to terms with living close by to the women who broke his heart two years ago. I really enjoyed the story and the religious tones weren't too over the top. The novel is definitely insp 3.5 stars I would like to thank netgalley and Kregel Publications for the opportunity to read this book. Catherine's father dies leaving her and her mother to move out of their comfortable home and into a small cottage to make room for Tue new Lord Winthrop. Jonathan inherits the tittle unexpectedly and has to come to terms with living close by to the women who broke his heart two years ago. I really enjoyed the story and the religious tones weren't too over the top. The novel is definitely inspired by Austen, especially Persuasion.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    It was a great story, I just wish there was more interaction between the 2 MC's.
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Exquisite! Carolyn Miller's beautiful prose conveys her readers to the world of Regency England filled with rich historical detail and charm. As a fan of all things pertaining to Jane Austen, I was thrilled when I read Miller's debut novel. Oh, to have beautiful stories in the grand tradition of one of my favorite authors, yet to include a strong faith element as well immediately brought Ms. Miller to my favorites list. In Winning Miss Winthrop, Miller brings us two characters who need to leave Exquisite! Carolyn Miller's beautiful prose conveys her readers to the world of Regency England filled with rich historical detail and charm. As a fan of all things pertaining to Jane Austen, I was thrilled when I read Miller's debut novel. Oh, to have beautiful stories in the grand tradition of one of my favorite authors, yet to include a strong faith element as well immediately brought Ms. Miller to my favorites list. In Winning Miss Winthrop, Miller brings us two characters who need to leave the shadow of past hurts and broken hearts behind. Catherine and Jonathan's story will leave the reader wondering if there can be a happy ending until the very end. At times I was very frustrated, other times I felt compassion for Catherine and Jonathan. This story kept me laughing at the witty dialogue I have come to expect. The faith thread of forgiveness is woven seamlessly into this sweet romance.I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book from the author/publisher. I was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Seema Khan
    January 1, 1970
    “You have always, and will always, live within my heart”: ... My thoughts in a word? #Beautiful <3Winning Miss Winthrop is Carolyn Miller 's fourth Regency and first in the new series "Regency Brides: A Promise of Hope".Those who have read Carolyn's earlier books, will concur that this too is a trademark Carolyn Miller book with exceptional writing (with a close eye on details), a beautiful heartfelt story, believable characters, interesting plot and overall a book carving a place in you a “You have always, and will always, live within my heart”: ... My thoughts in a word? #Beautiful <3Winning Miss Winthrop is Carolyn Miller 's fourth Regency and first in the new series "Regency Brides: A Promise of Hope".Those who have read Carolyn's earlier books, will concur that this too is a trademark Carolyn Miller book with exceptional writing (with a close eye on details), a beautiful heartfelt story, believable characters, interesting plot and overall a book carving a place in you and your heart for a long time. Before anything else, my praise goes to the author. Her stories have a very Jane Austen-y feel to them, with a distinct Carolyn Miller mark on them. One gets engrossed in the story, unmindful of the small hours of morning flowing to bring the rising sun and chirping birds ;p (Carolyn you will soon start owing me and everyone a good supply of dark circle removal creams!!) When I started the book, it was all Persuasion reloaded for me. But as you move ahead in the story there are some very different aspects to it. I won't give away the spoilers, but you ‘have’ to read it to believe and experience it. It is a story of love found, lost and regained. Many reviewers have commented that they should have communicated with each other to have saved themselves from the heartbreak and pain of the past three years. But in my opinion, what happened to them was God's plan for them. Had they gotten together in the very beginning itself, Jonathan would always have been on the receiving end of things for one. And also, there would have been problems along the way for them. What happens in their lives only strengthens their personalities, Faith and love for each other. Which would not have happened had they even eloped and married three years ago. It would somehow have let to resentments and unhappiness. So, it is fine that they did not communicate. It only helped them. “She is a treasure not easily won.” The story is interesting and quite touching at places. You really feel for the characters. Especially for Catherine. With a constantly irritable mother and falling status and circumstances, the poor girl surely has a lot on her plate to deal with. My heart goes out to her. Catherine as a character is very real. She feels jealousy, envy, happiness, heartache and still strives through all of them. She suffers certain pangs of self pity but recovers soon. But she is also accomplished and polished. Understanding, patient and caring. She decides to be the heroine of her story.And yes of course my heart went out for Jonathan too. The ‘cit'. The outsider. The unacknowledged family son. You feel his humiliation and are amazed at his perseverance. A strong character. His stubbornness and quick judgement are his biggest faults and cause not just Catherine but even him a great deal of agony. But I loved his role as a hero, as a son, a brother and the newly appointed head of the family. Very responsible and caring. The most surprising character is that of Lady Harkness. The feeling she gives you at the beginning and towards the end are very different and I loved her. To be honest, I had gauged and expected this when I started the book and was happy it turned out to be that way! Dowager Winthrop was a very well written character. I really felt like getting inside the book and shaking some sense into her. I pitied Catherine for having to literally bear with her. Aunt Drusilla and General Whitby add a lot of positivity to the book. Julia, Lord Carmichael and Major Hale also add to the flavour of the book. Like Jane Austen, a subplot the secondary characters running along also influences the story of the main characters.And to be sure, we a have a revisit from the author’s favourite characters Lavinia and Nicholas Hawkesbury. We get the update on how their lives have progressed which is very interesting. I also loved the setting. First Gloucestershire and then Bath. The author has described the places in such a way that I truly felt being there and moving along with the characters.I would have loved to go into further details but I do not want to risk giving away crucial spoilers. There is only one thing to it, BUY A COPY AND READ IT.I can't wait for Serena's story!
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  • Charlotte Dance
    January 1, 1970
    Every book by this author hits just the right note. They fit so nicely into the Regency time period without ever feeling that they are modern characters placed into a historical setting. In fact, the basis of the story wouldn't have happened in current times. I am not generally a fan of plots using mistaken ideas to keep people apart, but it did work well in this case. Both Catherine Winthrop and Jonathan Carlew are humble, sweet characters that handle grief and disappointment in totally differe Every book by this author hits just the right note. They fit so nicely into the Regency time period without ever feeling that they are modern characters placed into a historical setting. In fact, the basis of the story wouldn't have happened in current times. I am not generally a fan of plots using mistaken ideas to keep people apart, but it did work well in this case. Both Catherine Winthrop and Jonathan Carlew are humble, sweet characters that handle grief and disappointment in totally different ways. You connect with them separately and desire that they will see the truth. Pride and deceit keep them apart, but it is the pride that others held. Forgiveness is often a theme in novels and it is well done in this novel. However, I think the theme of humility is even stronger. It isn't really valued in life or in fiction until you run into someone who is severely lacking it. You will love Catherine and her sweet manner in this story. You will not love her mother, who is a perfect foil to set off Catherine's character. This book stands well completely on its own. It is a very satisfying book to read. Carolyn Miller's previous books introduce some of the characters, but it is not necessary to read them to get full enjoyment of this book. I have enjoyed each of these books and look forward to more to come.
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  • Beth Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Full review on Faithfully BookishIn a delightful Downton Abbey meets Pride and Prejudice mashup, Miller weaves a story with everything we love about Lizzie Bennet and Mr. Darcy in a Matthew and Mary Crawley-esque drama with rich layers and depth!Catherine Winthrop is a simply enchanting heroine. She is compassionate and kind, loyal, devoted, and long-suffering. Jonathan Carlew is an upright man of faith and integrity. His compassion for everyone in his care is admirable.Although lovers’ spats ba Full review on Faithfully BookishIn a delightful Downton Abbey meets Pride and Prejudice mashup, Miller weaves a story with everything we love about Lizzie Bennet and Mr. Darcy in a Matthew and Mary Crawley-esque drama with rich layers and depth!Catherine Winthrop is a simply enchanting heroine. She is compassionate and kind, loyal, devoted, and long-suffering. Jonathan Carlew is an upright man of faith and integrity. His compassion for everyone in his care is admirable.Although lovers’ spats based almost solely on miscommunication tend to rub me the wrong way, the strict etiquette of the Regency era and the unexpected demise of the responsible party in this instance earn this charming story a pass. Winning Miss Winthrop raises the bar for Regency romance with depth and intrigue to spare and I highly recommend it!I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher and was under no obligation to post a review. The opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Jenny Glazebrook
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved all of Carolyn Miller’s books and this one was no exception. I was captivated from the very start. My heart was carried along with Catherine’s as she struggled to let go of the past, find peace in God, and accept all He had for her. I loved that the hero, Jonathan, was so realistic. I appreciated that he was a man of character who tried to live up to God’s standards, but that he also came to realise that on his own he simply couldn’t do it and needed God to intervene and rescue him I have loved all of Carolyn Miller’s books and this one was no exception. I was captivated from the very start. My heart was carried along with Catherine’s as she struggled to let go of the past, find peace in God, and accept all He had for her. I loved that the hero, Jonathan, was so realistic. I appreciated that he was a man of character who tried to live up to God’s standards, but that he also came to realise that on his own he simply couldn’t do it and needed God to intervene and rescue him from his own past misunderstandings and mistakes. I was reminded throughout that God goes behind and before us, using even our mistakes to deepen our relationship with him and our understanding of him, just as he did for Catherine and Jonathan in this story. I was also reminded of the value of perseverance as we wait upon the Lord and trust Him even when everything seems to be going wrong. And then, what a beautiful, triumphant ending!As always with Carolyn Miller’s books, the dialogue was witty, the descriptions full of life, the language very fitting for the regency period, the setting vivid and the spiritual walks of the characters inspiring. Another amazing story from this author.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    Travel back in time to the Regency Era where Miss Winthrop’s Story is brought to life by the skilled penmanship of Carolyn Miller. Visit Gloucestershire and Bath where the sights and sounds are brought to life and you can envision the Balls. This is a page turner that has you identifying with Catherine and Jonathan and hoping a long ago misunderstanding can be made to rights. I love how Catherine holds to her integrity and faith throughout the difficulties she encounters. This is a difficult tim Travel back in time to the Regency Era where Miss Winthrop’s Story is brought to life by the skilled penmanship of Carolyn Miller. Visit Gloucestershire and Bath where the sights and sounds are brought to life and you can envision the Balls. This is a page turner that has you identifying with Catherine and Jonathan and hoping a long ago misunderstanding can be made to rights. I love how Catherine holds to her integrity and faith throughout the difficulties she encounters. This is a difficult time to live when women have no means to support themselves and rumors and innuendos run rampant. I found this novel to be engaging and left me wanting to read the next one in this series ASAP. I received a complimentary copy from the author/publisher. The honest review and opinions are my own and were not required.
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  • Sonnetta
    January 1, 1970
    Catherine and Jonathan are a perfect example of what happens when we do not communicate and make assumptions. It was great reconnecting with previous characters and viewing them with the new relationships. One of the things I love about Carolyn's stories is that the relationships are not superficial. She showcase people speaking the truth in love according to the scriptures. These are stories that any reader can learn from and hopeful take away from it how much God is active in our lives.I recei Catherine and Jonathan are a perfect example of what happens when we do not communicate and make assumptions. It was great reconnecting with previous characters and viewing them with the new relationships. One of the things I love about Carolyn's stories is that the relationships are not superficial. She showcase people speaking the truth in love according to the scriptures. These are stories that any reader can learn from and hopeful take away from it how much God is active in our lives.I received this book from the author and the opinions expressed are entirely me own. There are some authors that you will continually read because you know that their stories will make you want to know about God and how to grow closer to Him.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    "Winning Miss Winthrop" is a Christian romance set in 1816 England. I prefer romances where the main characters are better people for having met each other, and this author's previous books have had this. However, I can only describe these main characters as becoming worse people from having known each other.The hero started out as kind and thoughtful of others, even those that he felt had offended him. However, he became harsh and controlling. His main fault was that he refused to listen to peo "Winning Miss Winthrop" is a Christian romance set in 1816 England. I prefer romances where the main characters are better people for having met each other, and this author's previous books have had this. However, I can only describe these main characters as becoming worse people from having known each other.The hero started out as kind and thoughtful of others, even those that he felt had offended him. However, he became harsh and controlling. His main fault was that he refused to listen to people and instead jumped to conclusions that made him miserable. He made poor decisions because he felt rejected and hurt. Also, inexplicably, he did nothing to correct things when friends and family started telling others that he's engaged to a young woman when it's not true.I had a hard time liking the heroine, and many of her actions didn't make sense. She started out thinking of others, but she became rude and guided by her emotions. She justified her behavior by feeling she was just saying the truth or that society's rules weren't fair. She behaved inappropriately then dealt with the resulting gossip in ways that just made it worse. For example, she tells people that she is engaged to a nice man hoping that will stop gossip. Only she fully intends to later break that engagement, which will only ruin her reputation more, which she doesn't seem to consider. Also, she frequently jumped to wrong conclusions about the hero's actions.Despite only having known each other for a short period several years in the past, both the hero and heroine feel that they could not love any other despite the ever-increasing hurtful actions of the other. They seem to feel that a romantic moment in time indicates a true and lasting love. The misunderstandings between the two continued all the way up to the last scenes, and there's no reason to believe that their communication will be any better after they marry. Frankly, I'm disappointed that a Christian book is promoting this relationship as a romantic ideal.The Christian element was a few prayers to God when they got themselves in trouble. There was no sex or bad language.I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through Netgalley.
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  • Dana Michael
    January 1, 1970
    I have become a huge fan of Miller's. This was another winner! This book reminded me somewhat of Persuasion by Jane Austen. Miss Winthrop, the heroine has lost her father, her home, and her love. The new occupant of her home, is the man she fell in love with over two years ago. This is a sweet and clean romance that kept me turning the pages. I really do love her writing style and I look forward to the next book in the series. #winningmisswinthrop #netgalley
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    Being a Persuasion fan, a "Persuasion"-like premise + regency period made this book enticing even before I started it. Miller's story-telling is so good that the book hit the right spot of being like "Persuasion" and not being like "Persuasion".
  • Kristi
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading this book during my work week and had a bit of trouble really getting into it. I'm going to blame that on both life and the book itself. Life kept interfering with my reading time and the author writes for this time period so well that it took me a bit to settle in and get used to the word choices she used. Ah, but when the weekend arrived there was no stopping me. Once I had a chance for some uninterrupted reading that's exactly what I did. Read almost the entire book in one s I started reading this book during my work week and had a bit of trouble really getting into it. I'm going to blame that on both life and the book itself. Life kept interfering with my reading time and the author writes for this time period so well that it took me a bit to settle in and get used to the word choices she used. Ah, but when the weekend arrived there was no stopping me. Once I had a chance for some uninterrupted reading that's exactly what I did. Read almost the entire book in one sitting.I liked both the main characters in this book. Catherine, while not a young debutante, seemed to have more on her shoulders than a woman of her station should. When Catherine and her mother face a major life-changing event Catherine almost seems like the parent while her mother takes on an almost childlike attitude. It was easy to feel sorry for Catherine because her mother grated on my nerves. Jon was also easy to like as he was put in a situation that was not only awkward but one I don't feel like he really wanted. There is a history between Jon and Catherine and I loved how the author slowly revealed all the details. It seemed like it took forever to find out even the slightest detail but this just added to the story for me. It definitely kept me interested.In addition to the main characters, I also liked Drusilla and General Whitby. These two lightened up the story a bit with their personalities. I also liked Julia, Jon's sister. And while I didn't care for his mother, Lady Harkness, at first by the end of the book I had changed my mind about her. I love when an author can change my mind about a character. What a sign of great writing and character development! It was also nice to see Lavinia and the Earl of Hawkesbury again. These two are favorites of mine and I'm always glad to see them.As to the story itself, I loved it! While the pace was a bit slow at the beginning once it picked up it was wonderful. There was just the right build-up to the climax and the ending was perfect. The author does a great job of writing for the time period with word choice and descriptions that will soon have readers picturing themselves at Winthrop Manor, The Dower Cottage, or all the locations in Bath. And I was so happy that there wasn't the obligatory kidnapping of the heroine. I find this overused in many Regency books.For me, Carolyn Miller had a lot to live up to with this book. I had rated all of the books in her Regency Brides: A Legacy of Grace series 5 stars and had high expectations for this series. I am happy that this book exceeded my expectations, and I can't wait to read the next book in the series.I received a free copy of this book from the publisher and was under no obligation to write a review. All opinions are mine.
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  • Brittany Searfoss
    January 1, 1970
    This first book in a new series by Carolyn Miller brings back beloved characters from the first series and also introduces some new characters that have their own appeal. Catherine Winthrop knows what it is like to have loved and lost a good man. She thought he loved her too, but one day he broke off their relationship without any explanation. Several years later, a tragedy has befallen her family, and Jonathan Carlew comes back into her life because he has inherited the Winthrop family estate t This first book in a new series by Carolyn Miller brings back beloved characters from the first series and also introduces some new characters that have their own appeal. Catherine Winthrop knows what it is like to have loved and lost a good man. She thought he loved her too, but one day he broke off their relationship without any explanation. Several years later, a tragedy has befallen her family, and Jonathan Carlew comes back into her life because he has inherited the Winthrop family estate through a distant family tie. Old misunderstandings arise, Catherine's mother becomes unbearable, and the old lovers clash every time they meet. Soon circumstances begin to spiral out of control, and Jonathan and Catherine must make difficult decisions that affect their future. Can they ever reconcile and move on, or will the past continue to haunt them?I cannot begin to express how much I enjoy Carolyn Miller's books. Every one seems to get better and better. I love how she is able to write about so many different characters who have various problems and perspectives and make each one authentic and believable. Personally, I enjoy books more when authors write from the heart about real life situations and struggles. No one is perfect, and everyone fights their own battle in life. Sometimes relationships do bring out the worst in people. The question is, what will people do with the lessons they learn? Will they change for the better, or use their circumstances as an excuse to continue bad behavior? Carolyn's use of biblical principles and her unique grasp of the inner workings of various relationships continue to keep me coming back eagerly for each new book she writes. If you enjoy Jane Austen, Georgette Heyer, or genuine stories with good life lessons, you will definitely enjoy this book!I received a copy of this book from the author and publisher with no requirement of a positive review. The opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.
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  • Lisa Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Title: Winning Miss WinthropAuthor: Carolyn MillerPages: 320Year: 2018Publisher: Kregel PublicationsMy rating is 4 out of 5 stars.Catherine Winthrop is in for a change of circumstances. She has lived in the manor house all her life, but with the recent death of her father and no male heir, the manor passes to a cousin. Catherine and her mother will be moved to the ill-kempt dower house. With the reading of the will, Catherine discovers how ill-prepared her father left her, her younger sister and Title: Winning Miss WinthropAuthor: Carolyn MillerPages: 320Year: 2018Publisher: Kregel PublicationsMy rating is 4 out of 5 stars.Catherine Winthrop is in for a change of circumstances. She has lived in the manor house all her life, but with the recent death of her father and no male heir, the manor passes to a cousin. Catherine and her mother will be moved to the ill-kempt dower house. With the reading of the will, Catherine discovers how ill-prepared her father left her, her younger sister and their mother. They are poor. Her mother refused to ask for anything from the new Lord Winthrop and won’t let Catherine do so either. The new master of the manor just happens to be the one person Catherine never wants to see again. The man who broke her heart two years ago. She had thought he returned her feelings of love and they would marry, but instead she received a note from him ending their relationship. How could he treat her so cruelly?Jonathan Carlew, or Lord Winthrop now, had no idea he would inherit his title. He is a businessman and his profession has most in the aristocracy looking down on him. With his new title, however, people are treating him somewhat differently. He thankfully has lots of money as he will need it to pay off the former Lord Winthrop, Catherine’s father’s, gambling debts and many repairs around the estate. He has no wish to have contact with Catherine, the woman who broke his heart, claiming he was beneath her station per her comments relayed to him by her father. Two years and he still feels something for her, whether it still be love or some darker emotion he doesn’t care to examine. He will just avoid her as much as possible while living on the same grounds. However, they do come across each other’s paths occasionally, sometimes arguing and sometimes longing for each other. How could she treat him so cruelly?Carolyn Miller has written another regency romance that readers will enjoy! I read her first trilogy and loved each book! I was excited to get started on this second trilogy and I was not disappointed. The subtle wit and dry sarcasm was done with a deft touch and worked into conversations seamlessly. Catherine’s reliance on God in difficult situations, especially ones with her overbearing and critical mother, were encouraging to read and a great reminder He never leaves us alone in any circumstance. Aunt Drusilla was a card! She wasn’t afraid to tell it like it is and had no qualms about stating her opinion about anything. Serena’s story is next in the series and she has already set off sparks with her frank comments to Lord Carmichael. Could a romance between these two be in the works?
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  • Connie Saunders
    January 1, 1970
    Author Carolyn Miller has once again written a wonderful Regency drama that is full of intriguing characters, thought-provoking situations, and the underlying theme of grace and forgiveness. 'Winning Miss Winthrop' is set around Bath and Gloucestershire in 1816 during the time when social classes were prominent and the rules that separated them were very clearly defined. Great wealth and aristocracy were revered, people in the working class were often looked down upon and crossing these social c Author Carolyn Miller has once again written a wonderful Regency drama that is full of intriguing characters, thought-provoking situations, and the underlying theme of grace and forgiveness. 'Winning Miss Winthrop' is set around Bath and Gloucestershire in 1816 during the time when social classes were prominent and the rules that separated them were very clearly defined. Great wealth and aristocracy were revered, people in the working class were often looked down upon and crossing these social class lines was strongly discouraged!Catherine Winthrop and Jonathan Carlew met and fell in love almost three years ago but they both mistakenly thought that they had been rejected by the other. Now Catherine's father has just died and she is faced with the loss of the privileged lifestyle she has always known. She is thrust into the position of caregiver for both her overbearing mother and her younger sister and her life becomes even more complicated when the man who broke her heart becomes the new owner of the family estate. Suddenly Jonathan finds himself with a title and tremendous wealth but he doesn't enjoy being the person that causes so much change in Catherine's life. I enjoyed the description of the elegant balls, the lavish estates and the beautiful gardens and I loved the two main characters. Catherine managed to keep her sweet nature and her deep faith through all of her troubles and Jonathan's humility remained long after his status had changed. I truly liked both of them and I longed for their misunderstandings to be settled and their hearts to be mended. I also liked that Catherine's friendship with Lavinia (from 'The Elusive Miss Ellison') continued in this story and that many of the characters possessed a faith in God. Reading their Bibles and talking to God was a frequent occurrence!I recommend 'Winning Miss Winthrop' to anyone who likes Christian fiction and stories set during the Regency era.I received this book from the author and publisher but I voluntarily chose to write a review. These opinions are my own.
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  • Dee/ bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    #WinningMissWinthrop #NetGalleypublisher synopsis: Catherine Winthrop has cried out to God too many times to count. Years ago, the man who stole her heart rejected her--and she's never recovered. Now tragedy has brought him back into her life. This time it isn't her heart he's taking, it's her home and her family's good name--and she has no one to share her grief.Jonathan Carlew's life may look enviable from the outside--wealthy, handsome, landed--but the mystery surrounding his birth has shadow #WinningMissWinthrop #NetGalleypublisher synopsis: Catherine Winthrop has cried out to God too many times to count. Years ago, the man who stole her heart rejected her--and she's never recovered. Now tragedy has brought him back into her life. This time it isn't her heart he's taking, it's her home and her family's good name--and she has no one to share her grief.Jonathan Carlew's life may look enviable from the outside--wealthy, handsome, landed--but the mystery surrounding his birth has shadowed his entire life. Now as he ascends to the barony, fresh challenges await, including a scheming mama who wants him to embrace power, even at the cost of losing love. How can he remain the kind, honorable man he strives to be and still meet the demands of his new society responsibilities?These two broken hearts must decide whether their painful past and bitter present will be all they can share, or if forgiveness can provide a path to freedom for the future.Set in the sumptuous salons of Bath, Regency England's royal breeding ground for gossip, Winning Miss Winthrop is the first volume in Carolyn Miller's new series. Fans of the wholesome and richly drawn first series won’t want to miss this new set of characters.This book started out slow for me, but bit by bit it enamored me to where it was so hard to put down!! I believe this is the first in this series of books, but there is, perhaps, crossover from a previous series to these new character stories, so it might be advantageous to read the other series as well!I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Fiction Aficionado
    January 1, 1970
    Books like Winning Miss Winthrop remind me why Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer have been long-time favourite authors of mine. There’s something about Regency manners (and manors) that appeals to me on a visceral level, but while many modern-day authors are able to dress their stories in an admirable reproduction, few are able to recreate the tone and essence of the era with the kind of authenticity Carolyn Miller displays.Picking up this book was a bit of a gear shift at first. After inviting me Books like Winning Miss Winthrop remind me why Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer have been long-time favourite authors of mine. There’s something about Regency manners (and manors) that appeals to me on a visceral level, but while many modern-day authors are able to dress their stories in an admirable reproduction, few are able to recreate the tone and essence of the era with the kind of authenticity Carolyn Miller displays.Picking up this book was a bit of a gear shift at first. After inviting me into the characters’ lives through the drama of Catherine’s father’s passing and the ignobility of seeing their beloved home pass into the hands of the man who broke her heart, the story seemed to plateau out a little. There wasn’t a lot of direct contact between Miss Winthrop and Mr Carlew—now the new Lord Winthrop—for the first half of the novel, and it seemed as though the characters were at an impasse. But the story’s web continued to spin, and I found myself settling in to these characters’ lives, enjoying becoming better acquainted with them, and rediscovering that this kind of total immersion in everyday Regency life is exactly what I love so much about Austen and Heyer.Neither Catherine nor Jonathan are particularly charismatic characters, but the more I got to know them, the more I appreciated the nuances of their characters: Catherine’s generosity and wry wit, and Jonathan’s honourability and steadiness of character. But they have their faults, too, and I loved that a large part of this story focuses on their maturation as individuals—not to mention coming to a point where they could see that those qualities they first loved in each other have been there all along.Carolyn Miller has a deft touch with secondary characters as well—both the obnoxious and the witty. General Whitby had me laughing out loud on occasion, particularly with some well-placed and typically British set-downs aimed at the overbearing Lady Milton. If you’re a fan of Persuasion, or any Regency novel of a more literary nature, be sure to check this author out.I received a copy of this novel from the publisher. This has not influenced the content of my review, which is my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know if Carolyn Miller is becoming a better writer or if I'm just becoming more appreciative of her writing style. (I suspect it's a mix of the two.) Whatever is happening, though, I find that I love each of Miller's novels more than the last, and Winning Miss Winthrop, the first in her new "A Promise of Hope" series, is one of the best books I've read so far this year!Fans of Jane Austen's novels will love this latest regency novel from Carolyn Miller. Winning Miss Winthrop has shades o I don't know if Carolyn Miller is becoming a better writer or if I'm just becoming more appreciative of her writing style. (I suspect it's a mix of the two.) Whatever is happening, though, I find that I love each of Miller's novels more than the last, and Winning Miss Winthrop, the first in her new "A Promise of Hope" series, is one of the best books I've read so far this year!Fans of Jane Austen's novels will love this latest regency novel from Carolyn Miller. Winning Miss Winthrop has shades of Persuasion and Sense and Sensibility, coupled with a mother who feels ripped from the pages of Pride and Prejudice. (Seriously, every time I read Catherine's mother's lines, I heard Mrs. Bennet, the 1995 miniseries version, in my head.) The story doesn't feel like a copy of Austen, though—instead, it feels like it fits right into Austen's world.After Catherine Winthrop's father dies with no heir, the estate is entailed to Jonathan Carlew ... the man who broke Catherine's heart. Or did she break his? Misunderstandings abound throughout the novel, leaving me dying for Catherine and Jon to talk about what went wrong in their relationship. The problem? They both thought they knew exactly what had happened, but each only had half the story.As the novel progresses, the (seemingly) unrequited love hums beneath the surface, making the final resolution all the sweeter. The story beyond the romance is also intriguing, as Catherine adjusts to her new life (and takes on Bath, a common setting in Austen's novels) and Jon struggles with his new responsibilities as Lord Winthrop. Also, Lavinia and Nicholas from The Elusive Miss Ellison make several appearances in the novel, tying this book to Miller's previous series.From beginning to end, I was completely enthralled with this novel (and I read it all in just over a day, as I simply couldn't put it down). While I loved Miller's previous novels, Winning Miss Winthrop is special. Fans of regency romance will love it! Disclosure of material connection: I received this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review, and the opinions expressed are my own.
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