There Are No Grown-ups
The best-selling author of Bringing Up Bebe investigates life in her forties, and wonders whether her mind will ever catch up with her face.When Pamela Druckerman turns 40, waiters start calling her "Madame," and she detects a disturbing new message in mens' gazes: I would sleep with her, but only if doing so required no effort whatsoever.Yet forty isn't even technically middle-aged anymore. And after a lifetime of being clueless, Druckerman can finally grasp the subtext of conversations, maintain (somewhat) healthy relationships and spot narcissists before they ruin her life.What are the modern forties, and what do we know once we reach them? What makes someone a "grown-up" anyway? And why didn't anyone warn us that we'd get cellulite on our arms? Part frank memoir, part hilarious investigation of daily life, There Are No Grown-Ups diagnoses the in-between decade when...- Everyone you meet looks a little bit familiar. - You're matter-of-fact about chin hair. - You can no longer wear anything ironically.- There's at least one sport your doctor forbids you to play. - You become impatient while scrolling down to your year of birth. - Your parents have stopped trying to change you.- You don't want to be with the cool people anymore; you want to be with your people. - You realize that everyone is winging it, some just do it more confidently. - You know that it's ok if you don't like jazz.Internationally best-selling author and New York Times contributor Pamela Druckerman leads us on a quest for wisdom, self-knowledge and the right pair of pants. A witty dispatch from the front lines of the forties, There Are No Grown-ups is a (midlife) coming-of-age story, and a book for anyone trying to find their place in the world.

There Are No Grown-ups Details

TitleThere Are No Grown-ups
Author
ReleaseMay 29th, 2018
PublisherPenguin Press
ISBN-139781594206375
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Humor

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There Are No Grown-ups Review

  • Cristy Jimenez-Shawcroft
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't put this book down. Entertaining, quick read. I like how the author writes; she is completely honest and very reflective, telling about everything from ménage à trois she planned for her husband's 40th birthday to her bout with cancer to how she became a journalist to figure out what is going on (she had felt clueless about aspects of the world around her previously, in part due to her parents sugar-coating everything when she was growing up). It reads like various short stories to cr I couldn't put this book down. Entertaining, quick read. I like how the author writes; she is completely honest and very reflective, telling about everything from ménage à trois she planned for her husband's 40th birthday to her bout with cancer to how she became a journalist to figure out what is going on (she had felt clueless about aspects of the world around her previously, in part due to her parents sugar-coating everything when she was growing up). It reads like various short stories to create a memoir that has a lot of insights and universal truths for everyone. I definitely recommend it.
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  • Merry Miller moon
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Goodreads for the free ARC of this book. The author is giving advice/life lessons on how to deal with life when you reach your forties, which is so appropriate for me, since I am a forty something. In one chapter, she describes how she made her husband's fantasy come true for this birthday-having a threesome, with another woman. Kudos to you, Pamela Druckerman! for not only doing this, but writing about it so bluntly. Pretty amazing since her previous book was a 'how to parenting' b Thank you to Goodreads for the free ARC of this book. The author is giving advice/life lessons on how to deal with life when you reach your forties, which is so appropriate for me, since I am a forty something. In one chapter, she describes how she made her husband's fantasy come true for this birthday-having a threesome, with another woman. Kudos to you, Pamela Druckerman! for not only doing this, but writing about it so bluntly. Pretty amazing since her previous book was a 'how to parenting' book about the differences between raising children in the United States and France, where the author lives with her British born husband and their children. The very next chapter is more somber, she describes getting diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. WOW! I cannot even imagine! You are one strong woman, Pamela! I'm so glad that you have pulled through and continue to thrive. Each chapter is wrapped up with a 'You know you are in your forties when....'-and they are so relateable that they are funny! I learned the following by reading this book, 'Nunchi', which means eye measure in Korean, is the ability to pick up on things well. She says that we have no similar word for this in English. Apparently all other nationalities of people pick up on things far better than we do as Americans. Very interesting. Good book.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Penguin for providing an advance reading copy, won via a GoodReads giveaway. (Thanks also to GoodReads!) Druckerman has a great voice, which makes for an easy read - conversational, though she mixes in facts and quotations. I was predisposed to like this book, as the premise hit a note with me. (I've come to believe no one knows what they're doing.) It was enjoyable, and I particularly liked some parts, but it felt sort of surface-level... I wanted the author to delve a bit deeper t Thank you to Penguin for providing an advance reading copy, won via a GoodReads giveaway. (Thanks also to GoodReads!) Druckerman has a great voice, which makes for an easy read - conversational, though she mixes in facts and quotations. I was predisposed to like this book, as the premise hit a note with me. (I've come to believe no one knows what they're doing.) It was enjoyable, and I particularly liked some parts, but it felt sort of surface-level... I wanted the author to delve a bit deeper throughout. (Incidentally, the focus on the 40s felt sort of contrived to me - seemed like so many of the themes related to being a well-adjusted, mature adult more so than being 40something.)I'd recommend this as a beach read or perhaps a good plane book. Not going to change your life, but entertaining enough to be worth a couple hours of your time.
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  • Marla
    January 1, 1970
    There are funny points in this book and times I could relate. Interesting book about what it's like when you hit your 40s.
  • Alexa Kozlov
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book at a Goodreads giveaway. I'm in my 20s but I really enjoyed this book. I loved the writing. The humorous portions actually made me laugh out loud. Other portions were really heartfelt. I recommend it. It is an easy and interesting read. I can already think of a few girlfriends who would love to read this next.
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  • Andrienne
    January 1, 1970
    Really has plenty of insight for the nearing forty and for the forty plus. I liked her stories about sexuality, owning up faults, and of course the cultural differences that still mention her life living in France. I especially enjoyed the idea of cultivating perception and the stories around it.Access to review copy provided by the publisher.
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    A great read! Enjoyed the book...cover to cover!
  • Meredith
    January 1, 1970
    Not at all what I expected. More interesting, more wisdom, more sanity.
  • Joana Faria
    January 1, 1970
    A bit flat really. Just finished it and already forgot most of it.
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