Rush
Set in modern day Oxford, Mississippi, on the Ole Miss campus, bestselling author Lisa Patton’s RUSH is a story about women—from both ends of the social ladder—discovering their voices, courage and empowerment. When Lilith Whitmore, the well-heeled House Corp President of Alpha Delta Beta, one of the premiere sororities on campus, appoints recent empty-nester Wilda to the Rush Advisory Board, Wilda can hardly believe her luck. What’s more, Lilith suggests their daughters, both incoming freshman, room together. What Wilda doesn’t know is that it's all part of Lilith’s plan to ensure her own daughter receives an Alpha Delt bid—no matter what.Cali Watkins possesses all the qualities sororities are looking for in a potential new member. She’s kind and intelligent, makes friends easily, even plans to someday run for governor. But her resume lacks a vital ingredient. Pedigree. Without family money Cali's chances of sorority membership are already thin, but she has an even bigger problem. If anyone discovers the dark family secrets she's hiding, she’ll be dropped from Rush in an instant.For twenty-five years, Miss Pearl—as her “babies” like to call her—has been housekeeper and a second mother to the Alpha Delt girls, even though it reminds her of a painful part of her past she’ll never forget. When an opportunity for promotion arises, it seems a natural fit. But Lilith Whitmore slams her Prada heel down fast, crushing Miss Pearl’s hopes of a better future. When Wilda and the girls find out, they devise a plan destined to change Alpha Delta Beta—and maybe the entire Greek system—forever. Achingly poignant, yet laugh-out-loud funny, RUSH takes a sharp nuanced look at a centuries-old tradition while exploring the complex, intimate relationships between mothers and daughters and female friends. Brimming with heart and hope for a better tomorrow, RUSH is an uplifting novel universal to us all.

Rush Details

TitleRush
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 21st, 2018
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250020666
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

Rush Review

  • Berit☀️✨
    January 1, 1970
    5 Spectacularly Southern Stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟This was a buddy read with one of my book Besties Mackenzie... she started before I did and said the book was reminiscent of “The Help“ and I’d have to agree.... both books have a very similar vibe and this is very high praise because “The Help” is one of my all-time favorite books.... A lot of this book focuses on the Greek system at Ole Miss.... by Greek system I mean social sororities and fraternities and buy Ole Mis I mean University of Mississippi... I my 5 Spectacularly Southern Stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟This was a buddy read with one of my book Besties Mackenzie... she started before I did and said the book was reminiscent of “The Help“ and I’d have to agree.... both books have a very similar vibe and this is very high praise because “The Help” is one of my all-time favorite books.... A lot of this book focuses on the Greek system at Ole Miss.... by Greek system I mean social sororities and fraternities and buy Ole Mis I mean University of Mississippi... I myself was in a sorority when I was in college and both my older kids are currently in a Greek social organization at their universities.... I thought perhaps because of this tie in I liked the book more but my reading buddy Mackenzie Who is not Greek enjoyed it just as much as me! Because really whether you are Greek or not, southern or not, American or not, at its heart this book is about compassion, acceptance, change, family, and friendship....This book was told from three alternating points of view... Cali A college freshman with a less than stellar pedigree but a heart of gold... Wilda A helicopter mother of a girl who is a freshman as well and Cali’s New BFF... Pearl the cleaning lady and in house “psychologist“ at the ΑΔΒ sorority house....Pearl is very loved by all theΑΔ sisters... she is their mother away from home, and the girls probably tell her more than they would tell their actual mothers.... Pearl was a tremendously likable character, I seriously wanted a big hug from her and wish she had been part of my college experience.... this part of the story really focused on the change that is needed... and racial inequality as well as social inequality... it also was a very hopeful part of the story... I truly believe today’s youth are so much more accepting then previous generations and it gives me so much hope for our future.... The sorority girls actions in the story were a wonderful example of this....The other part of the book was about sorority recruitment at a huge SEC school where it is pretty cutthroat.... Cali is not a legacy none of her relatives have ever been Greek... and from what I understand this is a huge deal in the south... living in California sorority/fraternity recruitment/Rush is an entirely different animal than in the south where it is the end-all and be-all of who you are during your college days... A lot of this is because the south is so steeped in tradition... this book really showed the ugly side of sorority rush and how dirty it can be... what house you get into is so important and sometimes it is more important to these girl’s mothers then it is to the girls themselves.... now some of the shenanigans and outcomes in this book I’m not sure could actually happen, but this is fiction... and the author went to the University of Alabama so she’d know better than me! how competitive sorority recruitment has become was really demonstrated well in this book.... but I absolutely loved Cali’s attitude she wasn’t concerned with getting into a “top“ house she just wanted a sisterhood to belong to... Cali was such a wonderful character sweet, smart, humble, compassionate, just the kind of girl you’d want your daughter to be friends with and you’d want your son to date... I enjoyed this part of the book it brought back memories and my daughter just went through sorority recruitment a couple years ago.... I also liked how it painted a different picture of sororities then a lot of other books, it focus more on the sisterhood and their philanthropic activities, rather than partying.... and I really think this book painted the Greek system in a positive light more than anything else...This book really had so much heart, at its very core it was really about the bonds between females... young and old... rich and poor... sister or not... it was about growing and learning and changing and learning who you really are.... I fell in love with each and everyone of these characters and hated the book to end because I did not want to say goodbye to these characters... this book will leave you with a smile on your face and hope in your heart!Absolutely recommend when you are in the mood for an uplifting hopeful story filled with an amazing cast of characters you won’t soon forget!*** many thanks to St. Martin’s Press for my copy of this delightful book ***👑 thought I’d share that I am a ΖΤΑ and the mother of a ΚΚΓ and a ΒΘΠ
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  • Mackenzie - PhDiva Books
    January 1, 1970
    Heart-warming, emotional, and thought-provoking…Rush is not what I expected—it is better! I’ve always been fascinated by the Greek system. My own undergraduate didn’t have a Greek system, so who knows if I would have Rushed a sorority myself, but I am intellectually and socially intrigued by the whole process. I started this book knowing I’d like it—who wouldn’t? Sorority rushing, an old southern legacy campus, teenage girls putting their hearts on the line for a welcome into a social system the Heart-warming, emotional, and thought-provoking…Rush is not what I expected—it is better! I’ve always been fascinated by the Greek system. My own undergraduate didn’t have a Greek system, so who knows if I would have Rushed a sorority myself, but I am intellectually and socially intrigued by the whole process. I started this book knowing I’d like it—who wouldn’t? Sorority rushing, an old southern legacy campus, teenage girls putting their hearts on the line for a welcome into a social system they’ll have their whole lives. Who wouldn’t love that? But Rush is very much more than a book about sororities. It is a book about race, class, family, sisterhood, and the search for respect and belonging. I encourage everyone to go out and read this book! You won’t regret it!About the BookA new rush season has settled in upon the Alpha Delta Beta house on the historic Ole Miss campus in Oxford, Mississippi. House Corp President Lilith Whitmore finds herself unable to be a rush advisor due to her position, and with a daughter set to begin sorority rush this fall. When Lilith appoints her old sorority sister Wilda Wilcox to the Rush Advisory Board, Wilda can’t say no. Her own daughter Ellie will be rushing at Ole Miss this fall as well, and Wilda finds herself on the precipice of an empty nest. She’ll do anything to stay involved with her only daughter’s life.Ellie Wilcox and Lilith’s daughter Annie Laurie are both legacies at Alpha Delta Beta, meaning their mothers were members. Lilith coordinates for them to room together, and Wilda thinks this may be the final push Ellie needs to get a bid from Alpha Delta Beta. But Ellie rooming with Annie Laurie has it’s own problems—Wilda begins to understand the true implications of wealth and status in the south, and she and Ellie may not be able to keep up.Cali Watkins lives in the dorm room next door to Ellie and Annie Laurie. Cali is smart, hard-working, and has a big heart—spending her time caring for those around her. She’s everything a sorority should want in a member. But she doesn’t have a pedigree. Cali’s family is full of secrets and scandal—the one thing that could prevent her from getting into a sorority. But all Cali wants is to find sisters of her own and belong, and she enters rush hoping no one finds out about her mother.Miss Pearl has been the housekeeper for Alpha Delta Beta for over twenty years, ever since she had to drop out of Ole Miss Herself at nineteen. Miss Pearl is black in a nearly all-white sorority. But Miss Pearl loves her job and her babies in the house. When an opportunity becomes available to be even more involved with Alpha Delta Beta, Miss Pearl knows that the color of her skin may prevent her one again from the life she’s earned.Can these powerful women change a social system that prioritizes status and skin color over substance of character??ReflectionAt the core of this book is a conversation about what it means to have respect and trust from others, and what it means to belong. I recently was reading a book about a person’s reputation being a form of social currency, and that reputation can give someone advantages that someone without that reputation may not be able to get. Some people, like the wealthy and high-society members of this book have a built in reputation from their status in life. But others that came in with nothing—Cali and Miss Pearl—were able to build that reputation by strength of character, kindness, and trustworthiness. I felt inspired seeing that reputation in this book looked superficial at the outside, but the book really ended up being about people caring more about who you are than where you come from.The book is told from three narrators, and what I loved about that was we had three different social subgroups of the larger Alpha Delta Beta social system. Wilda connects us to the legacy of ADB, and the previous generation of sisters. Wilda, though decades out of her time at the sorority, still feels insecure and desires to fit in with the perceived status members of the group. Though Wilda doesn’t really even like Lilith, she is desperate for Lilith to accept her. She wants to feel like she beautiful enough, wealthy enough, and classy enough to deserve Lilith’s friendship. But Wilda herself has something Lilith doesn’t—kindness and morals, and people who love her despite what she may or may not have.Then we have Miss Pearl. Oh, how I loved Miss Pearl! Miss Pearl is our portal into the primarily-black support staff of the house. The people who feel happy just to be a part of the system, even as the lowest ranking members. There was such a pureness to Miss Pearl. She didn’t begrudge others for having more than her, but she had the self-respect and confidence to stand up for what she wants as well. Through Miss Pearl, we see that despite all of the progress we think we have made for racial equality, there are still so many opportunities that aren’t equal or fair. I can’t imagine a reader on this planet who won’t love Miss Pearl, and cheer her on throughout this book.And finally we have Cali leading the charge as our window into the new generation of sorority rushees. It would be so easy for this book to be critical of sororities—portraying the girls as vapid or shallow. But what we see is that all of the shallowness of sororities exists only to outsiders. Every girl in this book struggled to belong to a sisterhood for the purpose of support and friendship, not for status. The generation of girls in Alpha Delta Beta were such wonderful characters. Cali herself has a strength and a vulnerability that is charming. As Cali befriends Ellie, we see that Ellie herself is more impressed by someone’s character than their status. Ellie, in fact, is the one that shows her mother Wilda how much Wilda’s own values were in the right place. How Wilda passed to Ellie a sense of kindness, not elitism, despite Wilda’s own insecurities.I read this with my friend Berit and one thing Berit said that resonated with me was that these were characters she would miss as soon as she stopped reading this book. I whole-heartedly agree with her! I feel completely in love with these women and I won’t soon forget them or the message of this book. I hope others enjoy it as much as I did!I won this in a Goodreads Giveaway :) See my blog post here!
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  • Brandice
    January 1, 1970
    Rush by Lisa Patton is a modern day story set at Ole Miss, where a new pledge class begins their journey into sorority life. The story encompasses many modern themes - the variation in class and background of students at college, particularly at big universities; the high standards including social and financial pressures often associated with traditional Greek life; and the unfortunate, still prevalent, racism in today’s society, especially in the deep south. The story is told from varying pers Rush by Lisa Patton is a modern day story set at Ole Miss, where a new pledge class begins their journey into sorority life. The story encompasses many modern themes - the variation in class and background of students at college, particularly at big universities; the high standards including social and financial pressures often associated with traditional Greek life; and the unfortunate, still prevalent, racism in today’s society, especially in the deep south. The story is told from varying perspectives of Miss Pearl, Alpha Delta’s housekeeper; Wilda, an Alpha legacy whose daughter, Ellie, is rushing this year; and Cali Watkins, an incoming freshman who is also rushing. I liked all three of these primary characters. Additional supporting characters include Mama Carla, the Alpha Delta sorority house manager; Aunt Fee, the chef; Haynes, Ellie’s Dad and Wilda’s husband; and Lilith Whitmore, another legacy and the House Corp President of the sorority, who is also the mother of a third pledge this year, Annie Laurie. I was not part of a sorority in college but attended many sorority events as a guest of a close friend who was part of one. I think there’s variation among different sororities regarding the demands of its members and the degree of their general attitudes and sometimes cutthroat tendencies, but I think Rush did a good job of incorporating realistic elements into the book. I was caught up in the story enough to read it in its entirety today. I did feel like there was a cheese factor at one point, but this didn’t last long as the story progressed. I also reminded myself that many of the characters are young and while smart, they were still just 18-22. At the same time, it was refreshing to read about young adults willing and ready to take action to make change. Even though this story is fictional, it was nice to see that everyone is not jaded or feeling defeated, and still willing and inspired to take action. Rush a timely read given the old school and morally unacceptable attitudes still held by many people who are happy to grasp at the desperate claim of “tradition” just to hide behind their pathetic, outdated views. I also chose to read it now because it was seasonally timely, with school, football season, and Fall upon us.
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  • Elyse Walters
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book I’ve read by Lisa Patton....a lifelong Southerner. I started this novel on the airplane back to California from Cancun, and immediately enjoyed the humor - and characters. I started laughing so hard - I couldn’t get the words out when I tried to share a scene with Paul. It was one of those contagious laughs.I told him - “College dorm culture seems to have changed since our daughters went”. He was curious of where I was going with this. Apparently there is such a thing as a This is the first book I’ve read by Lisa Patton....a lifelong Southerner. I started this novel on the airplane back to California from Cancun, and immediately enjoyed the humor - and characters. I started laughing so hard - I couldn’t get the words out when I tried to share a scene with Paul. It was one of those contagious laughs.I told him - “College dorm culture seems to have changed since our daughters went”. He was curious of where I was going with this. Apparently there is such a thing as a professional ‘dorm designer’. Already, Paul was laughing - “no way”....He was only making my sharing harder to continue. It costs a heavy penny, too, I tell him. He says, “what a couple hundred dollars?” Where has this guy been?MORE! I’m about to pee my pants - but I hold it and try to get the words out...$10,000 EACH girl - ( that’s 2 girls sharing a room - extra large suite to decorate for the two of them).. if that wasn’t funny enough - ( and by the way only 1 nutty ultra wealthy mom was behind this - while the other mom was sweating fear having agreed to the ridiculousness design and her portion of the fee creating problems for herself).....but.....the room wasn’t complete without a SAFE. OH....this book is hilarious.....It also has HEART.....with sparkling characters! .....WONDERFUL MESSAGES.........SURPRISES....that are very moving.....and yes.....it’s woman’s fiction...... The only time I felt my eyes start to water — was after finishing and enjoying this novel here at home in bed ( jet lag has me all screwy), about 20 minutes ago -4am- was reading THIS: ( in the author’s notes) “As a lifelong Southerner and a child of the 60s and 70s in Memphis, Tennessee, I grew up in a prejudiced environment. And shameful as it was for me to admit, I spent time in my younger years with the notion that I was somehow better because of my skin color, religion, and my socioeconomic status. When I look back on my thoughtlessness now, I am filled with sorrow and deep regret. Lisa Patton did some serious research before writing this book. She wanted to know if an African lady had ever been HOUSEMOTHER of a white sorority. Plenty of house keepers and cooks - but full time boss as house mother? From all her research- to the best of her knowledge, there are no House of Directors of National Panhellenic Sororities anywhere in the SEC. The rest of the author’s notes....( it’s longer than many ‘author’s notes’ in other novels)....was also so completely moving - I don’t want to share more - but it equally adds - and enhances the experience of reading her fiction story.
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  • Obsidian
    January 1, 1970
    Please note that I received this book via NetGalley. That did not impact my rating or review. First off, this book promised to be laugh out loud funny, it wasn't. I guess in 2018 I don't find racist white people (even if fictional) hilarious. It also talks about exploring the relationships between mothers and daughters and friends (sure, at a very superficial level). I do think that I was officially done though when we had a black character not only bash Obamacare and claiming it made poor peopl Please note that I received this book via NetGalley. That did not impact my rating or review. First off, this book promised to be laugh out loud funny, it wasn't. I guess in 2018 I don't find racist white people (even if fictional) hilarious. It also talks about exploring the relationships between mothers and daughters and friends (sure, at a very superficial level). I do think that I was officially done though when we had a black character not only bash Obamacare and claiming it made poor people poorer, but when that same character did a well both sides are at fault here when discussing racism in America. You just got the Beyonce "Boy Bye" middle finger wave from me here. "Rush" seemed like a funny send up of sorority life in America. Too bad it was not. "Rush" is mimicking "The Help". We get multiple POVs. We got a black character talking about taking care of her babies (she's only 44). We got a white character who is going to do what she can to make things better not only for the woman she has supposedly grown close to after speaking to her I think twice at this point in the book, but for all of the staff (the help) that work at the sorority. We also have another character who is foolish as the day as long. "Rush" starts off with Miss Pearl talking about her babies and taking care of the girls of Alpha Delta Beta for 25 years. Miss Pearl is going nowhere fast. She works at the sorority, but does not get paid during the summer when the school/sorority is closed, and is struggling to make ends meet. When a possible promotion arises to House Mother, Miss Pearl is encouraged by her aunt (who is also a cook at the sorority) and the current House Mother as well. The second POV comes from Wilda. She's nervous about her daughter going to Ole Miss since that means she is now officially an empty-nester. When an opportunity comes up that will allow her to keep an eye on her daughter and also volunteer for Alpha Delta Beta she jumps at the chance. Cali Watkins is struggling to fit in at Ole Miss. She has a secret she is hiding from not only her roommate (Jasmine) but also her new best friend Ellie (Wilda's mother). The three POVs did not work together very well at all.Miss Pearl's voice was way too subservient to me. Even when she was having problems with a fellow worker, she just seemed way too passive. There is even a scene where one of her "babies" touches her hair without permission and instead of telling her not to touch her hair, goes to herself, well some of these girls parents didn't teach them manners (eyeroll). I also really really hated this character talking about racism and giving one of the secondary characters (Lilith Whitmore) a free pass for her racism and outright hatred towards her at the end of this book. You can't be forgiven for something if I don't really think you even absorb what you did. The book fast forwards to two weeks later so I guess that's enough time for people to just not be racist anymore. I was bored by Cali's POV from beginning to end. Her supposed close relationship to Miss Pearl didn't even work since they don't meet until around the 60 percent mark. Cali saying she felt close to Miss Pearl on bid day just didn't ring true. You all talked for maybe 10 minutes. When Cali and Ellie decide to fight Lilith Whitmore the book just didn't ring true at all. I have not been part of a sorority. I was chased after during my undergraduate years to join, but I was not in the mood to be part of something where the majority of the sororities were predominantly white. Even girls who joined who were African American were very very light skinned. This was all back in 1997 by the way. So though I have not been part of the Greek life as they say, I have a hard time with the way the events in this book are portrayed. I don't want to spoil things for potential readers, but a few times I went, yeah sure that doesn't make any sense at all, but whatever. Wilda's POV should have been in a separate book. Frankly I was more interested in her POV. Dealing with two sons who are grown living their separate lives. She has her youngest daughter at Ole Miss. However, she gets caught up with keeping up with the Jones's and agrees to have her daughter room with Lilith Whitmore's daughter. That is the beginning of a disaster of her own making. When it comes up that the girls should split the cost of a dorm room decorator (yeah I was nonplussed myself) Wilda goes behind her husband's back to make sure he has no idea what she has done. Wilda has some backbone here and there. She actually calls out Lilith's racism to her face, but she still like all other characters in this book were so passive. The secondary characters were not developed very well. We have uber racist Lilith Whitmore who does remind me of so many white people I have met in my life. When she tries to explain later about why she is the way she is I rolled my eyes a thousand times. Go kick rocks.Wilda's daughter Ellie would have been a better POV or at least a better additional POV. I really didn't get much a sense from her besides she really liked Cali, and could not stand rooming with Lilith's daughter (Annie Laurie). Speaking of Annie Laurie, she was just nasty for nasty sake and once again got a redemption that was not deserved at all. I will say that Wilda's husband was interesting and they seemed like a pretty happy couple. I wish that we had seen more fall-out discussion between them after all the secrets Wilda was hiding comes out. The writing was okay. I can at least say you will definitely know the characters voices are separate. I just didn't care for all of the characters. I also thought the flow was up and down too much. We would have Cali talking to Miss Pearl and then the book would jump to the next chapter that was still Cali's POV. The POVs I don't think were evenly distributed. I can't tell in my ARC version very well, so will say that it seems that Wilda and Cali got more POVs than Miss Pearl did. This book takes place in 2016 and I love that the author does not only mention the Presidential election, but manages to get some digs at Obama in there. Taking place at Ole Miss, which is obviously in Mississippi just about killed me. I guess we are not going to talk about the atrocities that have occurred in that state. That state had the murder of James Craig Anderson in 2011 by a group of white teenagers. But you go ahead and tell me how black people need to let go of things that have happened in the "past" and move forward instead of blaming white people. The ending was more white savior nonsense. I just couldn't even get spun up about it at this point. Was glad to be done with this book.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Apparently being a sorority girl in New York is NOTHING like being a sorority girl down in Ole Miss! I loved this book, my first of Lisa Patton’s (I’ve already now bought all of her others!) which reminded me a bit of Kathryn Stockett’s The Help with a delightfully contemporary turn. Alpha Delta Beta sorority (430 members, 429 of them white) is surely an interesting place to be in 2016, especially for Miss Pearl, the housekeeper, who’s really like the unofficial therapist/second mother to these Apparently being a sorority girl in New York is NOTHING like being a sorority girl down in Ole Miss! I loved this book, my first of Lisa Patton’s (I’ve already now bought all of her others!) which reminded me a bit of Kathryn Stockett’s The Help with a delightfully contemporary turn. Alpha Delta Beta sorority (430 members, 429 of them white) is surely an interesting place to be in 2016, especially for Miss Pearl, the housekeeper, who’s really like the unofficial therapist/second mother to these girls. Told in alternating perspectives from Miss Pearl, Cali (the genius scholarship student who doesn’t come from the “pedigree” she was told is necessary), and Wilda Woodcock, Rush chair advisor and mother to Cali’s good friend, Ellie. I loved this look into sororities in the South and all the drama that comes with the rush of new pledge classes. This one is out in August and will be one you want to be sure to get your hands on!I received an advance copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    A thought-provoking story of fairness, empowerment and forgiveness. ⭐⭐⭐⭐SUMMARYIt’s the run up to Rush week at Ole Miss in Oxford Mississippi. This is the story about women from all rungs on the social ladder, discovering their voices, courage and empowerment.PearlFor 25 years, Miss Pearl has been housekeeper and a second mother to the Alpha Delta girls. She listens to their stories, holds their hands when they are sick, and celebrates with them when they get good news. When an opportunity for A thought-provoking story of fairness, empowerment and forgiveness. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️SUMMARYIt’s the run up to Rush week at Ole Miss in Oxford Mississippi. This is the story about women from all rungs on the social ladder, discovering their voices, courage and empowerment.PearlFor 25 years, Miss Pearl has been housekeeper and a second mother to the Alpha Delta girls. She listens to their stories, holds their hands when they are sick, and celebrates with them when they get good news. When an opportunity for promotion arises, it seems like a natural fit. But alum Lilith Whitmore puts her foot down fast, crushing Miss Pearls hopes of a better future. When the Alpha Delta girls find out, they devise a plan destined to change Alpha Delta and maybe the entire Greek system, foreverCaliCali Watkins possesses all the qualities sororities are looking for in a new potential member. She’s kind, intelligent, makes friends easily, and even plans to run for governor someday. Without family money and connections Cali’s chances of sorority membership are thin, but she has an even bigger problem. If anyone discovers the dark family secret she’s hiding she’ll be immediately dropped from consideration. WildaWhen Wilda Woodcock gets a call from old friend and Alpha Delta sorority alum Lilith Whitmore, appointing her to the Rush Advisory Board, she can hardly believe her luck. Wilda will now be able to keep an eye on her daughter, Ellie, while she is away at school. What’s more Lilith suggests that her daughter Annie Laurie and Ellie, both incoming freshmen room together. This decision will prove costly to Wilda, in more ways than one.REVIEWRUSH takes a thought-provoking look at the issues of fairness, diversity, empowerment and forgiveness. My favorite part of the book is how it is the newest members of the sorority who are the ones to step up and make a difference. I also loved Pearl’s attitude of not backing down and fighting for what she wants in a professional way. The writing is clear and succinct and despite having multiple points of view is very easy to follow. The characters were as dramatic and diverse as you would find in any sorority house. I particular loved the strength and outward thinking that Cali and Ellie exhibited. It’s a well-written story emanating from a Southern perspective, and while it may not appeal to everyone, I found it thoughtful and moving. The book was engaging: I laughed at parts, shook my head at parts and even had tears streaming down my face at parts. Anyone who has belonged to a sorority should definitely read this compassionate, compelling and enlightening book. From LISA PATTON’s personal note at the end of the book, you easily discern that this book was written from the heart despite many impediments put in her way. It is well beyond frustrating that these issues as real today as they were thirty and forty years ago, not just in the South and not just in sorority houses, but in small businesses everywhere. By writing this book it is apparent that Patton hopes to facilitate change. I hope that it will do just that. It’s time that young women like Cali and Ellie, our future leaders empower themselves; and find their courage and their voice to make things happen. Thanks to Netgalley for an advance reading copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Publisher St. Martin’s PressPublished August 21, 2018Review www.bluestockingreviews.com
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I was never in a sorority but Greek life has always fascinated me so when I read the description of Rush I was all in. It had the added bonus of being set in the South and I’m a sucker for southern fiction as well and this one was oozing good old fashioned southern charm with a side of, oh bless her heart sass. It was witty, fun and I felt like I got a secret look behind the scenes of sorority life.There are three points of view here, Miss Pearl the longtime housekeeper at Alpha Delt, Wilda who’ I was never in a sorority but Greek life has always fascinated me so when I read the description of Rush I was all in. It had the added bonus of being set in the South and I’m a sucker for southern fiction as well and this one was oozing good old fashioned southern charm with a side of, oh bless her heart sass. It was witty, fun and I felt like I got a secret look behind the scenes of sorority life.There are three points of view here, Miss Pearl the longtime housekeeper at Alpha Delt, Wilda who’s daughter Ellie is rushing for the first time as a freshman and then Cali another hopeful freshman who becomes fast friends with Ellie. My favorite of the three was easily Miss Pearl though everyone was enjoyable and fun to hear from. Pearl just stole the show for me with her heart that’s bigger than Mississippi and her love and affection for all of the Alpha Delt girls, she was a true gem.While this was a light and fun read it definitely still explored some important issues pertaining to race relations and old, outdated traditions that are really just a disguise for casual racism. The only people of color involved in the sorority are the staff with the exception of just one member and the antiquated rules are finally questioned and challenged. There was a quiet power to this book with some relevant themes that make you think and contemplate which I always appreciate, definitely some substance beside sweet southern charm.Rush in three words: Charming, Topical and Fun.
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  • Patti Henry
    January 1, 1970
    You love the south? Lordy, you're gonna love this!!!! RUSH transports us smack dab into the middle of the secret world of sorority rush, giving us a provocative peek into the world of the young coeds. We find ourselves behind the scenes with the sorority sisters and the beloved women who work inside the Houses. Lisa Patton has penned a powerful and relevant story infused with raw emotion and the beating heart of her sassy humor. I adored this unforgettable novel that will surprise you while capt You love the south? Lordy, you're gonna love this!!!! RUSH transports us smack dab into the middle of the secret world of sorority rush, giving us a provocative peek into the world of the young coeds. We find ourselves behind the scenes with the sorority sisters and the beloved women who work inside the Houses. Lisa Patton has penned a powerful and relevant story infused with raw emotion and the beating heart of her sassy humor. I adored this unforgettable novel that will surprise you while capturing your heart.
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    Some books you read and you know they come from the heart. RUSH is one of those books – it is so brimming with compassion even as it looks at and points out the subtle ways racism still thrives even in places of luxury like multimillion-dollar sorority houses. It’s a difficult subject to point out, especially with the people you love, and RUSH handles those moments of hard decision unflinchingly: do you call out your peers for their microaggressions, or do you just stay silent so you don’t distu Some books you read and you know they come from the heart. RUSH is one of those books – it is so brimming with compassion even as it looks at and points out the subtle ways racism still thrives even in places of luxury like multimillion-dollar sorority houses. It’s a difficult subject to point out, especially with the people you love, and RUSH handles those moments of hard decision unflinchingly: do you call out your peers for their microaggressions, or do you just stay silent so you don’t disturb the dinner party? It’s not easy to juggle all of that, and sorority recruitment, and partying, and decorating dorm rooms, while still hanging on to a sense of humor, but RUSH manages it with grace.
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  • ABookwormWithWine
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐💫 / 5 rounded up BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN THE WORLD. This is how Rush by Lisa Patton made me feel. It is a beautiful book that touches on race, and was reminiscent of a Jodi Picoult novel.What it's about: Miss Pearl has been working at the sorority of Alpha Delt at Ole Miss for the past 25 years as a housekeeper and virtual mother to the girls, but when she tells the new House Corp President Lilith Whitmore that she would like to apply for a new promotion in the house, Lilith has a l ⭐⭐⭐⭐💫 / 5 rounded up BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN THE WORLD. This is how Rush by Lisa Patton made me feel. It is a beautiful book that touches on race, and was reminiscent of a Jodi Picoult novel.What it's about: Miss Pearl has been working at the sorority of Alpha Delt at Ole Miss for the past 25 years as a housekeeper and virtual mother to the girls, but when she tells the new House Corp President Lilith Whitmore that she would like to apply for a new promotion in the house, Lilith has a lot to say about it... and you can bet it's because Miss Pearl is black. Cali Watkins is a freshman at Ole Miss and wants nothing more than to join a sorority, but will her past and lack of a pedigree or family money mean she can't? Wilda Woodcock has just been appointed to the Rush Advisory Board and her daughter Ellie is rooming with Lilith's daughter Annie Laurie, but what lengths will Lilith go to for her daughter to get a Rush bid? And what will Wilda do about Lilith? The story is told from multiple viewpoints which I really enjoyed overall. We get in the minds of Wilda, Miss Pearl and Cali; and the only time I didn't like this was when certain things were described from 2 different character's POVs. For instance, I could have done without the description of Ellie and Annie Laurie's room from both Cali and Wilda. Everything else about it was great though and I liked seeing the world through each of these characters. Patton uses a lot of description in Rush, and I felt like I could see the Ole Miss campus while reading it. I loved the setting of Oxford, Mississippi for this novel and learning all about the process of rush. I was never in a sorority myself so the process is nothing like I have ever heard of and it was so interesting to read about. I also fell in love with the majority of the characters in the novel. Lilith was the character you love to hate, but besides her and her daughter most of the characters were very sweet and very relatable. I especially loved Wilda and Miss Pearl, but this book is full of amazing characters with lots of depth. The truly beautiful thing Patton does in this novel, is the way she takes the subject of racism and infuses love, hope and laughter into it while still treating it with the seriousness it needs. Rush says you CAN change your attitude and make a difference in the world. I cried tears of both happiness and sadness while reading it, but the overall feel of the story was very heartwarming and uplifting. Besides racism, it touches on all kinds of relationships and how people can change for the better. Final Thought: I really did love this book, and would recommend it to people who are fans of Jodi Picoult for the topic, and lovers of Southern fiction for the style in which it was written. It is a fairly long book at over 400 pages if you read the author's note, but it was well worth all those pages and they turn very quickly. Rush is set in 2016, but is still more than relevant to 2018 which is sad but true. This country has come a long way, but it still has a long way to go. The bright side is that there is hope and we can make changes to the world we live in if we come together and fight for what's right.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Bestselling author Lisa Patton digs deep into exciting new territory with RUSH, a story about mothers and daughters, sisterhood, tradition, and doing the right thing.When Lilith Whitmore, the well-heeled House Corp President of Alpha Delta Beta—the premiere sorority at Ole Miss—appoints recent empty-nester Wilda to the Rush Advisory Board, Wilda can hardly believe her lu I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Bestselling author Lisa Patton digs deep into exciting new territory with RUSH, a story about mothers and daughters, sisterhood, tradition, and doing the right thing.When Lilith Whitmore, the well-heeled House Corp President of Alpha Delta Beta—the premiere sorority at Ole Miss—appoints recent empty-nester Wilda to the Rush Advisory Board, Wilda can hardly believe her luck. What’s more, Lilith suggests their daughters, both incoming freshman, room together! What Wilda doesn’t know is that it's all part of Lilith’s plan to ensure her own daughter receives an Alpha Delt bid—no matter what.Smart, sweet Cali Watkins is the perfect potential new sorority member…except for one thing. She’s missing a very important ingredient—pedigree. Without family money, Cali's chances of membership are already razor thin, but she's got an even bigger problem. If anyone discovers the dark family secrets she's hiding, Cali will be dropped from Rush faster than she can say, Hotty Toddy.For twenty-five years, Miss Pearl—as her “babies” like to call her—has been the housekeeper and a second mother to the Alpha Delta girls, even though it reminds her of a painful part of her past she’ll never forget. When an opportunity for promotion arises, it seems a natural fit. But Lilith Whitmore slams her Prada heel down fast, crushing Miss Pearl’s hopes for a better future. When Wilda and the girls find out, they devise a plan destined to change Alpha Delta Beta—and maybe the entire Greek system—forever.Lisa Patton’s RUSH is a sharp, nuanced look at a centuries-old tradition with a harvest of heart, humor, and honor mixed in between.Having gone to a (horrible) under-grad university that did not have a Greek system (it's not a big thing in Canada like it is in the USA) this book was strangely calling my name to see what the big deal was about as all I know of the Greek System are the movies "Animal House" and "The House Bunny"! I had problems at first keeping track of who the girls were as they all had so many secrets but that is a Southern Gothic novel for you. The book kept me engrossed from page one as my chin dragged on the floor at the mere description (and unmitigated gall) of the $20,000+ dorm room design (with a safe for valuables???) which gracefully led to much laughter over the "Jimmy Choos are shoes" section. I was sad when this book ended --- those girls are loveable and fierce and just the kind of girls you would want to have your back. Great job, Lisa Patton... please write more books!!
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  • J.T.
    January 1, 1970
    This book epitomizes the phrase “be the solution.”Bravo!
  • Marialyce
    January 1, 1970
    4 the times they are a changing starsMy reviews can be seen here: https://yayareadslotsofbooks.wordpres..."Sisterhood is the essence of all the wisdom of the ages, distilled into a single word. You cannot see sisterhood, neither can you hear it nor taste it. But you can feel it a hundred times a day. It is a pat on the back, a smile of encouragement. It's someone to share with, to celebrate your achievements." Finding sisterhood is fully explored in this commendable book called RushCollege days 4 the times they are a changing starsMy reviews can be seen here: https://yayareadslotsofbooks.wordpres..."Sisterhood is the essence of all the wisdom of the ages, distilled into a single word. You cannot see sisterhood, neither can you hear it nor taste it. But you can feel it a hundred times a day. It is a pat on the back, a smile of encouragement. It's someone to share with, to celebrate your achievements." Finding sisterhood is fully explored in this commendable book called RushCollege days who can forget them? The thrill of being on one's own, the fun of decorating your dorm room, the anticipation of becoming an adult with a sense of belonging and meaning. Oh, I so remember.....In this book, we meet young women ready to embark on this new adventure, looking so forward to the fun, the independence, the joy of growing up. The girls decide to pledge a sorority since most of their mothers were a part of a prestigious sorority, that is the one they all want. They are a mixed crew of girls, some of them are the haves with their share of overly pretentious parents, and others are the have nots having to struggle with the costs of college and rushing a sorority. As fate would have it, one of the have nots is destined to room with one of the have nots. Their dorm room is decorated to the tune of then thousand dollars a piece and then the story starts to take on the aura of intrigue and scheming.Also present in this tale is a lovely housekeeper of the sorority house. She is a warm compassionate lady who comes to love all the girls and becomes over time their confidant. She is a black woman and although most of the girls and their mothers have moved beyond looking at color, some still stick to the old disguising tradition of race.This was not a delicate read, one of the frivolity and pure fun. This book had lots to say about the problems faced by some who are not considered to be equal to others. The story has the intense marking of what was formerly a Southern tradition, as wrong as it was, but gratefully the author shows how we are moving away from the prejudice and bias that has come to us through hundreds of years.Recommended for those who like a well composed story that presents us with views that show us the system is changing and equality is not just a word anymore but a lifestyle.Thank you to my local library whose services I seem to partake on a daily basis!
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  • Sarah Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book so much! Each character felt real and well-developed, the setting was easy to immerse yourself in, and the realities of Greek life were presented in a true and nuanced way. I enjoyed the perspective of reading about events from a couple different characters points of view, and my heart fell in love with this story.I am a sorority woman, though not an SEC school. My parents and siblings were members of Greek organizations. My in-laws and sister-in-law were members of Greek organ I loved this book so much! Each character felt real and well-developed, the setting was easy to immerse yourself in, and the realities of Greek life were presented in a true and nuanced way. I enjoyed the perspective of reading about events from a couple different characters points of view, and my heart fell in love with this story.I am a sorority woman, though not an SEC school. My parents and siblings were members of Greek organizations. My in-laws and sister-in-law were members of Greek organizations in the SEC. I have served as an advisor after graduation, recruitment chair while an active, and as a rho gamma (our recruitment counselors), so I am intimately aware of the recruitment process and could deeply relate to so much of that component of the book.I love that this book addresses the inadvertent racism that is still very much a reality in this country, and shows strong characters willing to fight against it, and stand up for what is right and just. This book addresses some hard conversations occuring in our country in a respectful and nuanced way that was relatable and engaging and has stayed with me after finishing the book, challenging me to use my voice in a louder and more active way.I truly enjoyed this book and recommend reading it. I think it would be great for a book club, and I look forward to reading other works by this author.I received a digital ARC of this book from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for my review.
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  • Sherri Thacker
    January 1, 1970
    Rush was just ok for me. Since I was never in a sorority, I felt lost throughout this book and just couldn’t connect to anything these girls went through. I know I’m in the minority with my 2 star rating but I’m disappointed overall. Oh well. Just wasn’t for me and that’s ok.
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  • Amy (TheSouthernGirlReads)
    January 1, 1970
    “The power of women gathering is immeasurable “Unknown.Y’all I have been fortunate to read some amazing Southern Fiction this Summer and this one, my goodness. It did not disappoint..Set in modern day Mississippi, told from three point of views. A student and potential Sorority sister, Cali...a mom and an alumni, Wilda...and a beloved staff member at the sorority house, Pearl. Rush immediately reminded me of a cross between Legally Blonde and The Help. I was completely invested in the story and “The power of women gathering is immeasurable “Unknown.Y’all I have been fortunate to read some amazing Southern Fiction this Summer and this one, my goodness. It did not disappoint..Set in modern day Mississippi, told from three point of views. A student and potential Sorority sister, Cali...a mom and an alumni, Wilda...and a beloved staff member at the sorority house, Pearl. Rush immediately reminded me of a cross between Legally Blonde and The Help. I was completely invested in the story and the characters..I laughed. I cheered. I loved. .I loved that Patton enabled these characters, representing the new generation, to stand for something they believe in. I think those of us not of the “newest” generation are rather hard on this newer generation...just as the generation before us (whatever it may be) was hard on their children 🤦🏻‍♀️. These girls made a difference and I appreciate Lisa creating the characters to do so. .I cheered that they stood up for what’s right and wrong. I felt proud as I closed this book. Behind the walls of a Sorority house timely issues were presented in this novel. Lisa did not shy away from the hard stuff. I could not appreciate her more for that..If you want a smart, humorous novel that speaks on prevalent topics based in the South...this is the book for you. I hope you love it as much as I did!
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  • Roshni
    January 1, 1970
    it is a simple, heartfelt story. what makes this novel different from others is the subtle way it teaches you all it takes is a small action to make a difference, either it is a hug for a sick person, simply listening or standing up to your mother.This book is about Cali Watkins, Wilda Woodcock, Lilith Whitmore, Miss Pearl and many other girls who believe in sisterhood, friendships, honour and doing the right thing whatever it takes. Miss Pearl is like a second mother to all the girls in the Alp it is a simple, heartfelt story. what makes this novel different from others is the subtle way it teaches you all it takes is a small action to make a difference, either it is a hug for a sick person, simply listening or standing up to your mother.This book is about Cali Watkins, Wilda Woodcock, Lilith Whitmore, Miss Pearl and many other girls who believe in sisterhood, friendships, honour and doing the right thing whatever it takes. Miss Pearl is like a second mother to all the girls in the Alpha Delt. she has been working there from past 2 decades and knows the functioning, management of the place by hand. but she is black. Should that define her and make her any less entitled to promotions, success and self respect.Cali, a simple, smart small town girl with the help of her friends Ellie, Jasmine and Mrs Woodcock brings change in not one person but in many lives.the author has handled beautifully the feeling of motherhood, be it of miss Pearl with her aunt Fee or of Ellie and mrs Woodcock and even Annie Laurie and her mother.all in all this book is a treasure, the way it handles racism, friendship. it was my perfect cozy winter read. I was with the characters all the way, weeping with them, laughing and even plotting!
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    4 ☆ Rush takes place in the (present day) picturesque Southern town of Oxford, Mississippi at Ole Miss where a new pledge class is put through the ringer to join a sorority. Inside the Alpha Delta house is where you’ll find the sweet and personable Miss Pearl who’s not only the sorority home’s housekeeper but goes beyond her paid duties by taking special care of the Alpha Delt girls - or as she refers to them.. “all her babies”. You just can’t help but adore her!During pledge things go amuck pro 4 ☆ Rush takes place in the (present day) picturesque Southern town of Oxford, Mississippi at Ole Miss where a new pledge class is put through the ringer to join a sorority. Inside the Alpha Delta house is where you’ll find the sweet and personable Miss Pearl who’s not only the sorority home’s housekeeper but goes beyond her paid duties by taking special care of the Alpha Delt girls - or as she refers to them.. “all her babies”. You just can’t help but adore her!During pledge things go amuck promptly pushing the girls to get motivated in standing up for what they believe in. They devise a plan to bring change to their sorority; the old beliefs of the past and unconscionable traditions will soon be history if the girls have anything to say about it. And they hope if they’re successful it will encourage the entire Greek system to follow suit. Rush is about keeping future Lilith Whitmore’s with their elitism, racial and social inequality out.. yes.. but it’s also about the bigger picture. Rush is humorous, warm-hearted and tender, and all about.. working hard for what you believe in, patience, understanding + kindness. The message in this from the author is a positive one — BE THE CHANGE you want to see in the world. I highly recommend reading this book! It’s wonderful!
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  • Cindi Marshall
    January 1, 1970
    Lisa Patton is using her God given gift of writing to make a difference. Someone else said it in their review and I echo that this is a true depiction of being the change you want to see in this world. This book is very entertaining and kept my attention to the very end. It is a fun read while subtly tackling very heavy issues, racism being the main one. This book is much bigger than a story about sorority rush and is very pertinent to all ages. I would recommend it to my teenage daughter as wel Lisa Patton is using her God given gift of writing to make a difference. Someone else said it in their review and I echo that this is a true depiction of being the change you want to see in this world. This book is very entertaining and kept my attention to the very end. It is a fun read while subtly tackling very heavy issues, racism being the main one. This book is much bigger than a story about sorority rush and is very pertinent to all ages. I would recommend it to my teenage daughter as well as my peers (I am 62). Wonderful book with a heartfelt message everyone should hear. Especially pertinent for the times we are living in today.Bravo and congratulations to Lisa for a job well done!
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  • Sharlene
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it and will give it a 5 star. This was a different review for me to write though. My daughter lived this book. I know people in real life that could be the characters in the book. Some of them very nice and some not so nice ones that you will meet if you read the book, which I highly recommend. As to the subject of racism that is covered in the book. Does it exist, sadly yes. Is everyone from the South, Ole Miss or any SEC school racist, ABSOLUTELY NOT. Does racism exist only in the Sout I loved it and will give it a 5 star. This was a different review for me to write though. My daughter lived this book. I know people in real life that could be the characters in the book. Some of them very nice and some not so nice ones that you will meet if you read the book, which I highly recommend. As to the subject of racism that is covered in the book. Does it exist, sadly yes. Is everyone from the South, Ole Miss or any SEC school racist, ABSOLUTELY NOT. Does racism exist only in the South, of course not. This book does a great job of showing that most people in the South are many things but racist is not one of them. They are kind, caring, helpful people. That everyone gets along very well on a daily basis. Sadly the national media and many others that do not live in the South don't seem to understand that. As Oprah once said, "you are your zip code" if you don't live there you don't have any idea. I hope all my friends will read this book, I especially hope all my Ole Miss friends and SEC friends will read this book and I really hope all Moms with daughters that went through sorority RUSH/recruitment or will some day will read it. It should be required reading for all parents, and students that are considering a sorority or fraternity. I hope everyone that just enjoys a great book will read it, as it truly is a great one.
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  • Maya
    January 1, 1970
    This book caught me by surprise., When I first started reading it, I was not into it and felt like it was going to similar to the Help but in a university setting. Boy was I wrong! I got totally engrossed in the story the further along I got into the book. This is a book about mother/daughter relationships and the relationships depicted in the book are complex and true to life. I got attached to the characters especially Callie and Ellie especially as the book went on. It is hard not to root for This book caught me by surprise., When I first started reading it, I was not into it and felt like it was going to similar to the Help but in a university setting. Boy was I wrong! I got totally engrossed in the story the further along I got into the book. This is a book about mother/daughter relationships and the relationships depicted in the book are complex and true to life. I got attached to the characters especially Callie and Ellie especially as the book went on. It is hard not to root for them! Even the unlikable characters were well developed and interesting. While this books seems a little fluffy, it actually had a lot of interesting substance to it. It made me think about mother/daughter relationships and racial biases more than I thought it would. I haven't read any books by this author before so I am not sure if this true of all of her books but it did make me want to read more of her work.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I've written this review for Really Into ThisCheck out all of our reviews at https://reallyintothis.comHappy Reading, friends!RUSH BY LISA PATTON BOOK REVIEWSorority life in the Deep South with a huge helping of generational racism, a myriad of traditions, female friendships & a generous finish of feminism & human rights. That’s a lot for a book, right? Somehow Lisa Patton pulls it off in Rush.SEC FOOTBALL DAYSFirst, Lisa Patton NAILS SEC Gameday! I’ve had the chance to venture to many a I've written this review for Really Into ThisCheck out all of our reviews at https://reallyintothis.comHappy Reading, friends!RUSH BY LISA PATTON BOOK REVIEWSorority life in the Deep South with a huge helping of generational racism, a myriad of traditions, female friendships & a generous finish of feminism & human rights. That’s a lot for a book, right? Somehow Lisa Patton pulls it off in Rush.SEC FOOTBALL DAYSFirst, Lisa Patton NAILS SEC Gameday! I’ve had the chance to venture to many an SEC game, one even featured at Ole Miss Campus aka TSUN. To this, I say, GTHOM & HAIL STATE! Okay, back to the book review!To say SEC Gameday is an event is the understatement of the century. For many, it truly is a rite of passage that I didn’t recognize until I experienced it firsthand. I love the role college football plays in this book because it rings true for an SEC school. Oxford, Mississippi IS a football town & there’s no getting around it.Alas, it’s true. Many a young lady paints her face for Gameday despite it being 100 degrees. Of course, you want to wear your school’s colors featured on a fancy dress. Extra points if the dress contains lace or embroidery. Never forget, flatiron the hell out of your hair!MISS PEARLOh, Miss Pearl. I love this lady as much as the sisters of Alpha Delta Beta. Miss Pearl is the housekeeper, confidant, second mother & friend to all. Where would these girls be without her? She keeps a watchful eye, makes emergency trips to the store for them & truly cares about all her “babies”.Miss Pearl is one of those women you want to meet & are lucky to know. Honestly, Miss Pearl faces a lot in her life, but it doesn’t sour her. Her heart is wide, kind & she is generous as the day is long. Miss Pearl also shares my love for all things Usher Raymond! Readers instantly fall in love with Miss Pearl. Lisa Patton knows this & when Lilith Whitmore enters the story & treats Miss Pearl badly, the narrative becomes all too real.READ THE AUTHOR’S NOTEOften, I read the author’s notes in books. I find it gives me greater insight into the story & allows me to focus on the writer’s intent. Let me clearly state, read Lisa Patton’s author’s note in the back of this book. She speaks about her inspiration to write Rush after learning of the many hardships facing the individuals who work tirelessly to support the Greek “way of life” on many college campuses.GENERATIONAL RACISMCourageously, Rush does face the issue of racism and, more specifically, generational racism head-on. Truthfully, there’s no better place for this than Ole Miss Campus. In case you need a refresher on racism in the South, check out this information about James Meredith. Mr. Meredith is the first black student admitted to Ole Miss & the town blew up. Federal troops descended upon Oxford, riots ensued & 2 people we ultimately killed in the uprising.The truth is, Ole Miss has roots in racism. There’s the playing of Dixie, Confederate flags waving at games, Colonel Rebel & more. To their credit, the school has tried to alter traditions, change the mascot & discourage Confederate flags. But as Lisa Patton explains further in Rush, traditions in the South don’t go down without a hell of a fight.THE VERDICTI am Really Into This book! I believe Rush is ripe for the picking for a movie or TV series with Reese Witherspoon. The story is beautiful. I cried, laughed, got angry, my heart was broken & healed in one 400 page novel. I expected a fun sorority romp in the Deep South, but was given a gorgeous tale of friendship, love, forgiveness & healing.If you’re looking for another read to stir up your emotions, check out Not Her Daughter by Rea Frey.Special thanks to Lisa Patton, St. Martin’s Press & NetGalley for providing my copy in exchange for an honest & fair review.
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  • Leanne
    January 1, 1970
    I loved every word of this book. It was such a timely, refreshingly poignant story and everything I love about southern fiction. The setting and the characters were wonderful and won't be easily forgotten.
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Oh dear...as an Ole Miss sorority alum I feel like 2 stars is a betrayal. I picked this up at Square Books in Oxford while on a girls reunion trip for goodness sakes. There were moments I thought it was a fun read, but honestly only due to all the references I happen to get.Perhaps this just isn’t my kind of writing style, and that’s okay. There were countless, repetitive phrases that made me physically cringe (“mosey” is actually not needed every other paragraph. “Chocolate sister”? I CANT.)The Oh dear...as an Ole Miss sorority alum I feel like 2 stars is a betrayal. I picked this up at Square Books in Oxford while on a girls reunion trip for goodness sakes. There were moments I thought it was a fun read, but honestly only due to all the references I happen to get.Perhaps this just isn’t my kind of writing style, and that’s okay. There were countless, repetitive phrases that made me physically cringe (“mosey” is actually not needed every other paragraph. “Chocolate sister”? I CANT.)The author was simultaneously trying too hard and not trying hard enough. Obviously she gets the white side of southern sorority-ness, but the black characters came off woefully under researched and shallow. The subject matter is noble! If the issue is extreme racial inequity, why would anyone want to read endlessly about the white sorority girls feelings, emotional upheaval, and ultimate come to Jesus moments? MUCH more depth into the black characters backgrounds and perspectives was needed. “Some of these babies don’t even look at me and that’s okay. That’s just how they was raised.” Please. Give me all the books on what it’s like to work as a black person in a white sorority house at Ole Miss; THAT would be compelling!The ending was so cheesy it was physically painful. The author gives approximately 2 paragraphs on generational racism, then wraps this up with an ‘all is forgiven’ silly conversation at the end. That’s not how this works.
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  • Tara - Running 'n' Reading
    January 1, 1970
    WOW! I enjoyed this novel so much more than I'd expected! Lisa Patton is a new-to-me author and now I'd love to read her previous novels.On the recommendation of a friend, I requested a copy of RUSH from my local library; while I have not personally experienced sorority life (I was not interested during my college years), I have many friends who were members of university sororities and remember their experiences during our time together. I love novels with a university setting, especially in th WOW! I enjoyed this novel so much more than I'd expected! Lisa Patton is a new-to-me author and now I'd love to read her previous novels.On the recommendation of a friend, I requested a copy of RUSH from my local library; while I have not personally experienced sorority life (I was not interested during my college years), I have many friends who were members of university sororities and remember their experiences during our time together. I love novels with a university setting, especially in the south, and this story is fantastic. There's just enough "sorority drama," without being over the top; most important, Patton tackles some tough issues, especially within southern culture, brilliantly and I love the addition of the information in her author's note and how she came to use her curiosity about this challenging theme to build a narrative for these characters. Highly recommend for those who enjoy southern fiction and/or university settings; a very entertaining and thought-provoking read.
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  • Paula Pugh
    January 1, 1970
    I found this novel to be so engaging and thought provoking. The narrative covers the world of racial injustice and inequality at a university in Mississippi in current day. Young sorority women take action against the injustice while bucking against a woman who values money as power and keeping the status quo. She uses her power to manipulate situations to her advantage, often hurting and alienating others with no regard.Seeing life from a black woman’s perspective is enlightening and painful. S I found this novel to be so engaging and thought provoking. The narrative covers the world of racial injustice and inequality at a university in Mississippi in current day. Young sorority women take action against the injustice while bucking against a woman who values money as power and keeping the status quo. She uses her power to manipulate situations to her advantage, often hurting and alienating others with no regard.Seeing life from a black woman’s perspective is enlightening and painful. She sees her lot in life as set by age old traditions but fights to right the wrongs with the help of the young women. I read every chapter hoping the mean, spiteful antagonist would get her just rewards!
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  • Lori Boyd
    January 1, 1970
    Story delves into the Sorority Rush process at a prominent Southern University (Ole Miss) ... the legacies, racism and the nerves girls go thru to get a bid. This books reminds me of a modern day ‘The Help’. The book shows different points of view from a parent caught up in it, the help that work at the Soriety House, and the girls pledging. The author does a good job of showing the good, bad and ugly, and makes no excuses for any of it. The story is interesting, characters are both likeable and Story delves into the Sorority Rush process at a prominent Southern University (Ole Miss) ... the legacies, racism and the nerves girls go thru to get a bid. This books reminds me of a modern day ‘The Help’. The book shows different points of view from a parent caught up in it, the help that work at the Soriety House, and the girls pledging. The author does a good job of showing the good, bad and ugly, and makes no excuses for any of it. The story is interesting, characters are both likeable and despised, writing is clear and to-the-point. Thoroughly enjoyable read. Couldn’t put it down.I received this ARC for review.
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  • Linda Hutchinson
    January 1, 1970
    This book was cringeworthy with almost every character a total cliche. The ending was painfully cheesy and contrived. I could say a lot more but I personally feel the author didn’t develop her characters and if anything, it’s an indictment of the elitist sorority system. I’m done. 🎤
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  • aya
    January 1, 1970
    as a college student, i know it can be difficult to be aware of our institutional impact on communities, but RUSH took that concept and expressed it really well without being pushy or overwhelming and was also super funny at the same time. loved it!
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