You Let Me In
You Let Me In delivers a stunning tale from debut author Camilla Bruce, combining the sinister domestic atmosphere of Gillian Flynn's Sharp Objects with the otherwordly thrills of Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane.Cassandra Tipp is dead...or is she?After all, the notorious recluse and eccentric bestselling novelist has always been prone to flights of fancy--everyone in town remembers the shocking events leading up to Cassie's infamous trial (she may have been acquitted, but the insanity defense only stretches so far).Cassandra Tipp has left behind no body--just her massive fortune, and one final manuscript.Then again, there are enough bodies in her past--her husband Tommy Tipp, whose mysterious disembowelment has never been solved, and a few years later, the shocking murder-suicide of her father and brother.Cassandra Tipp will tell you a story--but it will come with a terrible price. What really happened, out there in the woods--and who has Cassie been protecting all along? Read on, if you dare...

You Let Me In Details

TitleYou Let Me In
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 21st, 2020
PublisherTor Books
Rating
GenreThriller, Mystery, Horror, Fiction, Fantasy, Mystery Thriller, Adult, Contemporary, Magical Realism, Paranormal

You Let Me In Review

  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    I'm out. I just can't get into this book. Some are really enjoying it, but I have decided to pass on this one. I'm not giving this book a rating as I did not finish.
  • Holly B
    January 1, 1970
    Not enjoying this one ... so I'm abandoning at 15%Bye bye Mr. Pepper-Man...
  • Joanne Harris
    January 1, 1970
    This book is an exquisite rarity: a faerie book that is at the same time marvellously visual and imaginative, but works equally well as a study of human trauma; a love story (of sorts); a family drama; a wholly engaging mystery. I found it in my ARCS-to-read pile (which this year has been sadly neglected) and started it with no great expectation, although by the end of the third page I was not only hooked, but beginning to think that this might be the best book I'd read all year. Anyone who This book is an exquisite rarity: a faerie book that is at the same time marvellously visual and imaginative, but works equally well as a study of human trauma; a love story (of sorts); a family drama; a wholly engaging mystery. I found it in my ARCS-to-read pile (which this year has been sadly neglected) and started it with no great expectation, although by the end of the third page I was not only hooked, but beginning to think that this might be the best book I'd read all year. Anyone who knows me knows how often I find myself disappointed by the payoff of a novel. This one maintained the tension right till the end - another rarity -never veering into over-exposition or self-indulgence. And the faeries are both nicely original and authentically folkloric: creepy, pagan, detailed, entrancing. I loved it, and I sense that I'll be following this author's future work with excitement and admiration. She's been places. She knows things. Follow her; you'll know them, too.
    more
  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    The title and cover for his novel didn't prepare me at all for what was inside and I'm still not sure exactly what I read. It's written as a letter from Cassandra Tipp, a 74 year old successful romance writer who has disappeared, addressed to her niece and nephew. She had a tumultuous life to say the least, accused of murdering her husband and later losing her father and brother in a murder-suicide. She also suffered from trauma as a child and underwent therapy for years, becoming the subject of The title and cover for his novel didn't prepare me at all for what was inside and I'm still not sure exactly what I read. It's written as a letter from Cassandra Tipp, a 74 year old successful romance writer who has disappeared, addressed to her niece and nephew. She had a tumultuous life to say the least, accused of murdering her husband and later losing her father and brother in a murder-suicide. She also suffered from trauma as a child and underwent therapy for years, becoming the subject of a bestselling book written by her therapist which resulted in estrangement from her family. In her letter to her niece and nephew she tells them about the influence of the faerie world on her life and the reader is left to decide if this is this real or if she has created an alternative history to explain her childhood trauma and subsequent mental illness. Norwegian author Camilla Bruce takes us into a dark and creepy fantasy world. The faerie world is fully realised and the relationship between Cassandra and her faerie lover is entrancing but disturbing. It took me a little while to engage with the book but the further I read, the more I wanted to know about Cassandra and her world. Many will love this tale and many won't, but however you feel it will keep you on the edge wondering what really happened to Cassandra Tipp. With thanks to Tor Books and Netgalley for a digital copy to read
    more
  • Blair
    January 1, 1970
    Recipe for You Let Me In: take the dark, folkloric themes of Pine or Lanny; mix with the lyrical, romantic style of The Summer That Melted Everything; add a relationship with the same disturbing overtones as those of My Dark Vanessa; combine with the weird atmosphere of two or three short stories by Kelly Link and Elizabeth Hand; and you have something unnerving, strange, yet rich and rather beautiful.It opens with an article describing the disappearance of Cassandra Tipp, a 74-year-old Recipe for You Let Me In: take the dark, folkloric themes of Pine or Lanny; mix with the lyrical, romantic style of The Summer That Melted Everything; add a relationship with the same disturbing overtones as those of My Dark Vanessa; combine with the weird atmosphere of two or three short stories by Kelly Link and Elizabeth Hand; and you have something unnerving, strange, yet rich and rather beautiful.It opens with an article describing the disappearance of Cassandra Tipp, a 74-year-old romance novelist. Cassie was reclusive, but somewhat notorious: she was accused (and cleared) of her husband Tommy's murder 40 years earlier; her therapist wrote a famous book about the case; her father and brother died in a suspected murder-suicide some years later. The narrative continues as a lengthy document Cassie has written for her named heirs, her niece and nephew Penelope and Janus. They must read this manuscript in order to obtain the password that will allow them to claim her estate.In the manuscript, Cassie spins a fantastic story – a literal fairytale. She claims that, since the age of five, she has been acquainted with a faerie community, and in particular a close companion whom she calls Pepper-Man. This creature has been a constant throughout her life, and according to Cassie, his influence explains her difficult childhood, Tommy's murder, the deaths in her family – everything. It's up to Penelope and Janus (and the reader) to decide whether this outlandish story could possibly be true, or whether Cassie has constructed an elaborate lie. Cassie's therapist believed the latter; that she invented these characters to make sense of childhood abuse, and was so deeply traumatised she was never able to let go of the fantasy. But, then, there are things about Tommy's death that make no logical sense. And Cassie certainly makes a persuasive case.You Let Me In weaves a brilliant, bewitching spell. At the very beginning, I found the style a little sugary; I wasn't convinced by the tone of the opening article; basically, I wasn't instantly sold. It was when Cassie began talking about the faeries that I found myself transfixed, and from then on, I didn't want to put the book down. The slightly florid prose really comes into its own when applied to tales of wood spirits flying through the night, enchanted stories delivered in jars, a man made from twigs and honey.Cassie's account of Pepper-Man is horrible and gorgeous, sickening and seductive. Theirs is a symbiotic relationship, yet one formed so early in Cassie's life that she has no hope of escaping. Here, again, it reminded me very much of My Dark Vanessa, its strength lying in how easy it is to be convinced by the narrator's version of the story. Do you hope Pepper-Man is real because you believe in their otherworldly bond, or because you desperately want Cassie not to have been abused? Or both; again, they are inextricable. This book is, I think, being undersold by its title (makes sense once you've read it, but at first glance seems more suited to a domestic thriller) and blurb (doesn't quite capture the richness of the story). The pre-release reviews on Goodreads are also a mess for the most part, which makes me think it's being promoted to the wrong audience. I hope it finds its perfect readers, as it found its way to me. It was thanks to Kirsty Logan's review that I did, and I have to echo her sentiment: when I'd finished it, I wanted to read it again. I received an advance review copy of You Let Me In from the publisher through NetGalley.TinyLetter
    more
  • Spencer Orey
    January 1, 1970
    If you're into scary fairies, mental health drama, and murder mysteries, this book is for you. I read it for the super scary fairies, and I was not disappointed. They are very scary.I was less interested overall in the mystery of "are the fairies real? did the fairies do it or did Cassie do it?" I think it's a more interesting book if the fairies are real, but I read a lot of fantasy. Maybe those lingering questions will give the book some crossover appeal.Even though I live in Denmark, I always If you're into scary fairies, mental health drama, and murder mysteries, this book is for you. I read it for the super scary fairies, and I was not disappointed. They are very scary.I was less interested overall in the mystery of "are the fairies real? did the fairies do it or did Cassie do it?" I think it's a more interesting book if the fairies are real, but I read a lot of fantasy. Maybe those lingering questions will give the book some crossover appeal.Even though I live in Denmark, I always forget the extreme family focus of a lot of Scandinavian lit. I found the family focus to be a little stifling for the story. I also wanted the scary fairies to be a little more up to no good on their own and to have more machinations beyond Cassie and her family drama.But this one really nails the horror show of what it's like if you see fairies but nobody believes you (while the fairies feed on your blood!! Ahh!!)
    more
  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsReview to come.*Many thanks to the publisher for providing my review copy.
  • Patricia
    January 1, 1970
    What a crazy and weird novel! I don't really know what to make of this, but I enjoyed every minute of this book. This book is about evil fairies and family drama. I dare you to try reading YOU LET ME IN; I hope you get sucked in as I did! Happy reading!
    more
  • Schizanthus Nerd
    January 1, 1970
    Fiction is sometimes better than reality, dont you think? Romance novelist Cassandra Tipp has been missing for a year and as per her Last Will and Testament, her considerable estate is to be shared by her niece and nephew. The only catch is, in order to make the claim, they need to go to Cassandras home and find the password hidden somewhere in the manuscript she left for them. Youre standing in my study, holding this story in your hands - the last one Ill ever tell. In doing so they will ‘Fiction is sometimes better than reality, don’t you think?’ Romance novelist Cassandra Tipp has been missing for a year and as per her Last Will and Testament, her considerable estate is to be shared by her niece and nephew. The only catch is, in order to make the claim, they need to go to Cassandra’s home and find the password hidden somewhere in the manuscript she left for them. You’re standing in my study, holding this story in your hands - the last one I’ll ever tell. In doing so they will learn about Cassandra’s life, from her early childhood onwards, and the versions of the truth that continue to haunt their family. ‘Maybe the past came back to haunt her. She has a history here’ The feedback on this book seems fairly divisive so far. You’ve got the ‘I loved this book!’ people on one side and the ‘What the hell did I just read?!’ people on the other. As I’ve come to expect, I’m a bit of an anomaly. My initial response to this book was ‘What the hell did I just read?! That was so good!’ It’s been over three weeks since I finished reading and I’ve spent plenty of time since then trying to figure out a way of talking about it without wandering into spoiler territory. I also haven’t been able to get Cassandra’s story out of my head. And things weren’t quite as they seemed. I’ve gone back and forth countless times, trying to decide one way or another what I truly believe and while that would usually frustrate me, here it has only added to my appreciation of the story. You could see it purely as the ramblings of an elderly woman with a history of unresolved trauma and inadequately treated mental illness. That’s what Dr. Martin, Cassandra’s psychiatrist, would say. And he did. In fact, he wrote an entire book about her.Or you could believe in Pepper-Man’s existence and know in your heart that what Cassandra says is true.I’m still not entirely sure exactly which parts of the story I attribute to mental illness and/or trauma and which I believe Pepper-Man is responsible for, but because this is a story I think I can get away with what I still consider cheating. I believe both to be true. How on earth can I hold that position?I think there were certain traumatic events in Cassandra’s childhood that contributed to genuine mental illness. Whether she would have been mentally ill without these experiences, I cannot say for sure but I suspect she would have been, to a certain extent. I believe that these traumatic experiences caused her to need coping mechanisms and one of these was the creation of Pepper-Man. Now, this is where reality and book world diverge a little: in my heart I want to believe that Pepper-Man truly existed, that somehow this young girl’s trauma physically manifested a protector. An unconventional protector, sure, but a protector nonetheless. ‘Can’t both stories be true?’ I asked. ‘Why is it that only because one thing is true, the other thing is not? Why do we always have to decide?’ I’m definitely interested in learning what other readers believe and if the author ever answers this question in an interview and you don’t think I know of its existence, please, please send me the link. I wanted someone to know, you see. To know my truth, now that I am gone.How everything and none of it happened. I’m not usually a ‘Have you considered adding more pink?’ kind of person but definitely feel like an opportunity was missed when the covers were designed for this book. Cassandra, the main character, is an author whose books all feature pink covers so it would have been perfect if this book’s cover had been a creepy Pepper-Man design in various shades of pink. Usually when I buy a book I make sure I choose my favourite cover image, even if it costs more. Unfortunately I don’t have a favourite here. ‘She would have us believe she’s off with the faeries’ While you probably need to know upfront that this is a strange story and it may not be for you, I don’t want you to not attempt it at all. If you’re intrigued and want a sneak peek, you can currently download a digital preview of the first 34 pages here.Content warnings include mention of (view spoiler)[abortion, alcoholism, bullying, child abuse, death by suicide, mental illness, murder, self harm and sexual assault (hide spoiler)].Thank you so much to NetGalley and Bantam Press, an imprint of Transworld Publishers, Penguin Random House UK, for the opportunity to read this book.
    more
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    the fuck did i just readfor realwtfif you're a fan of traditionally written fairies, you might enjoy this more than i didit was just... so weirdi feel confused and uncomfortableidk man
  • Amy Imogene Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Super weird, definitely meant to disturb, and not afraid of killing any expectations you had about faeries. Welcome to You Let Me In.Concept: ★★★★ 1/2Writing style: ★★★★Pacing: ★★★★★Content warnings: Yes, a lot of them, please see end of review.You Let Me In comes out on April 21.First off, I'd like to make a disclaimer that I'm about to praise this novel, but it in no way means that I am praising the subject matter. There are dark themes in this, and if you are concerned about warnings please Super weird, definitely meant to disturb, and not afraid of killing any expectations you had about faeries. Welcome to You Let Me In.Concept: ★★★★ 1/2Writing style: ★★★★Pacing: ★★★★★Content warnings: Yes, a lot of them, please see end of review.You Let Me In comes out on April 21.First off, I'd like to make a disclaimer that I'm about to praise this novel, but it in no way means that I am praising the subject matter. There are dark themes in this, and if you are concerned about warnings please see the end of this review. You Let Me In follows the story (or stories?) of Cassandra Tipp's life. Tipp was a reclusive writer with a troubled upbringing and a tragic life, and it's time for her to tell her story. She's ready to share her truth...but you might not be able to believe it. It's literally so hard to decide what to share and what not to share about this novel. I went in with very little—just what's in the description. I think in order to enjoy this for what it is, you should go in with little information. One of the main themes at play in You Let Me In is the concept of memory and trauma. Did these events happen as Cassandra said they did? Is it possible for two conflicting stories to both exist? What is the "real" story? Is there a "real" story?Now, you might be wondering, this was published by TOR...the fantasy publisher. Memory and trauma don't sound fantastical. What's up with that? According to Cassandra, the "Pepper Man" is her closest companion. A "faerie," the Pepper Man lives next to Cassandra, lives off of Cassandra, and ultimately entwines her life with his and takes her on adventures under the mound. Faeries in this are not handsome, not romantic, and NOT something mysterious in the woods. These faeries are the undead/unmade. I don't know if I agree with the designation of "faerie" in this, but it IS very otherworldly. (In a way, I think readers who enjoyed Never Contented Things will like this too. Similar executions on unsettling faeries meant to horrify.)My favorite aspect of this novel was its extremely masterful pacing and sense of truth. Novels often claim that they "leave the truth up to the reader." In my experience, they rarely deliver. There's always a more fleshed out "truth" to believe. In You Let Me In, this debut actually delivers on a double-edged sword of truth. What really happened? It's up to you. I know what belief I took out of this, but you and I might disagree. It speaks to the author's skill that we can have such opposing takeaways.One of the main sticking points (as I see it, anyway) for You Let Me In revolves around its placement in the discussion of speculative fiction at this point in time. It's getting harder and harder for speculative dark fiction to deliver on an engaging, well-crafted, and memorable narratives. On the one hand, it seems like we're just getting more twisted and triggering narratives to deliver on this promise. On the other, some of the recent entries into the genre are dark and yet amazing (see Follow Me to Ground, which I also loved.) While this one's themes are dark and its content very upsetting to people with different expectations, I found it extremely singular and one-of-a-kind. Does it fall on the side of "too much" because of that? I don't know. I struggled with my opinions. I definitely loved what it was doing in realm of writing and story development, but I really struggled to enjoy the content due to its extremely dark themes. Bottom line: read this if you like the genre, but definitely go in with eyes wide open regarding warnings and expectations.Thank you to TOR for an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.Content warnings: (view spoiler)[Potential rape (depending on the versions of the story), potential familial abuse (same as previous), consent issues throughout, bad family treatment of main character's mental health, childhood trauma, abortion discussed, death of a child (discussed, version of truth issue again), murder, mind games, problematic mental health professional, etc. (hide spoiler)]Blog | Instagram
    more
  • Julie (JuJu)
    January 1, 1970
    DNF - this is my first DNF in a long time! This book cover was so eerie looking! And the description was just as alluring. But this book wasnt my cup of tea...I dont care for Fantasy. As soon as the author started discussing faeries, I was done. Thank you to Edelweiss, Tor Books and Camilla Bruce for this digital ARC, although I wasnt able to read and review! DNF - this is my first DNF in a long time! This book cover was so eerie looking! And the description was just as alluring. But this book wasn’t my cup of tea...I don’t care for Fantasy. As soon as the author started discussing faeries, I was done. Thank you to Edelweiss, Tor Books and Camilla Bruce for this digital ARC, although I wasn’t able to read and review!
    more
  • Lady H
    January 1, 1970
    I have been procrastinating writing this review because I'm uncertain how to articulate the experience of reading this strange book. Reading it felt somewhat like wading through a humid, foggy forest; there was beauty and a sense of timelessness, and yet the story weighed heavily on me too, as I constantly questioned whether I was reading about a supernatural experience or trauma-induced mental instability. Ever since she was a young girl, Cassandra could see fairies; one in particular, whom she I have been procrastinating writing this review because I'm uncertain how to articulate the experience of reading this strange book. Reading it felt somewhat like wading through a humid, foggy forest; there was beauty and a sense of timelessness, and yet the story weighed heavily on me too, as I constantly questioned whether I was reading about a supernatural experience or trauma-induced mental instability. Ever since she was a young girl, Cassandra could see fairies; one in particular, whom she has christened "Pepper-Man" due to his distinctive pepper smell, has been with Cassandra for as long as she can remember, and he has been feeding off her. Literally, mind you; this is not some metaphorical life energy situation; Pepper-Man literally sinks his teeth into Cassandra's flesh and consumes her blood. As he does so, he slowly grows more human, as fairies in this world take on the characteristics of whatever it is they're feeding off of, whether that be humans, trees, or animals. The adults in Cassandra's life believe she has a particularly badly behaved imaginary friend, but this gets harder to reconcile as Cassandra gets older and continues to see Pepper-Man. Most choose to believe that Cassandra is mentally ill, and in fact the psychologist her parents send her to strongly believes that Cassandra is having delusions as a reaction to severe childhood trauma and abuse. What is the truth? Is Cassandra mentally ill or are fairies real? Well, the story posits that perhaps both options are true, or that one truth does not necessarily negate the other. Perhaps Cassandra was abused, but that doesn't mean fairies aren't real. The narrative constantly teases the reader with hints of what the truth may be, but stops just short of confirming one way or another, leading you to inhabit a nebulous, liminal space in which perhaps both truths are somehow a reality. It makes you question the meaning of reality itself; if Cassandra truly believes fairies are real, if they have continued to affect her life in such a significant way, what does it matter that others can't see them? What does it even mean for them to be "real"? They are real to her, and whether they are a manifestation of mental illness or not doesn't really matter anymore. This sense of being unmoored is greatly increased by the ambiguous setting; there are so few clues that indicate when or where this story is taking place. Cassandra never seems to concerned with digging into her past to look for potential trauma that may be causing her to have delusions; she is perfectly content with her fairy friends, her only friends, who have also gifted her with the stories she publishes, brewed in fairy "tea." Incidentally, this is my favorite depiction of fairies that I've ever read. They are incredibly sinister. They are also not necessarily otherworldly creatures; here, they are humans who have died and come back to life in weird, twisted ways, and they long for a taste of humanity. Not to trivialize the toxic nature of Cassandra's parasitic (symbiotic?) relationship with Pepper-Man, but if you like villain romances, this is it. Pepper-Man is such an intriguingly ambiguous character; he needs Cassandra to exist, he feeds off her to the point where she is constantly sickly and deficient in vitamins, and even the book argues that he has groomed her since she was a child, but he...loves her? Maybe? Things become even stranger and more compelling when their relationship turns sexual, and it is never quite clear precisely when that happens, though the book hints that it starts when Cassandra is fourteen. Though Pepper-Man is seductive, he's also very bizarre and creepy, and the book knows this, even as it refrains from taking a clear side. The book's lovely prose complements the bewitching tale of sinister fairies and amorphous realities. When I first started reading I was a bit hesitant at the second-person perspective, since Cassandra is speaking directly to her niece and nephew, but as she began to weave her tale of fairies, I was hooked, and from there I couldn't put the book down. I was drawn in to this strange, morbid fairy tale with its languid prose; there were so many scenes where I had to pause and re-read just to take in the scene and the words. There is so much richness in the way this book is written; it makes for a heady, captivating experience; by the end one feels almost like a mosquito gorged on blood: satisfied yet slightly nauseated.
    more
  • Nenia ❤️️ I hate everything you love ❤️️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Heather told me this was a creepy mystery about evil faeries and that was all I needed to finagle myself an ARC.I CAN'T BLOODY WAIT TO BEGIN THIS LITTLE SHINDIG
  • Jennifer Novotney
    January 1, 1970
    About the book:You Let Me In by Camila Bruce is a thriller from Tor Books in the vein of Shirley Jackson, Carmen Maria Machado, and Tana French. It is due out in April 2020.The book is written in first-person from the perspective of Cassandra Tipp, who has mysteriously gone missing at 74 years old. Did she die? Did she disappear? No one knows. Cassandra, a best selling novelist, has left a manuscript behind for her niece and nephew in the case of her disappearance with a few stipulations. Only About the book:You Let Me In by Camila Bruce is a thriller from Tor Books in the vein of Shirley Jackson, Carmen Maria Machado, and Tana French. It is due out in April 2020.The book is written in first-person from the perspective of Cassandra Tipp, who has mysteriously gone missing at 74 years old. Did she die? Did she disappear? No one knows. Cassandra, a best selling novelist, has left a manuscript behind for her niece and nephew in the case of her disappearance with a few stipulations. Only her niece or nephew can claim her estate and they must read her manuscript to find a password to claim it. In her manuscript, she takes the reader through her life story from the time she was a little girl with mind bending twists and turns to figure out how she turned into a suspected murderer.In her story, Cassandra has an unusual mythical friend named Pepper-Man, who sinks his teeth into her throat at night and influences her to think and do bad things. When Cassandra meets more faeries like Pepper-Man in the woods, her world changes forever. Bruce flips modern fairy tales upside down and creates a creepy, dark story remniscient of the brothers Grimm.But the reader is soon confronted by the idea of reality creeping in to Cassandra's world in the form of Dr. Martin. He has written a book of his own about her called "Away with the fairies: A study in trauma induced psychosis." We are left questioning whether the fairies are real or a sort of coping mechanism Cassandra has cooked up to deal with her dysfunctional family.After her husband, father, and brother die, things get even more mysterious. Was the faerie world something Cassandra just created to deal with her trauma or is that where she ultimately ended up? To find out, as the back of the book says, you must "read on, if you dare..."What you will love 😍: The fast pace and fantasy element.What you will hate 😠: The ambiguity. What did happen to Cassandra!?What you will appreciate 😌: Camilla Bruce's strong writing skills and imaginative story. How did she think of these dark and disturbing faerie characters?
    more
  • Nigel
    January 1, 1970
    In brief - I really am not sure whether it was quite good or quite bad... Three star I think though maybe only just. A marmite book perhaps.In fullI enjoyed the start of this book. We have (or rather don't have!) Cassie Trip, an eccentric and ageing author who has not been seen for a year. Her nephew and niece are carrying out her final instructions by visiting her house. They find a manuscript from Cassie with instructions that they are to read it to claim their inheritance. It is Cassie's life In brief - I really am not sure whether it was quite good or quite bad... Three star I think though maybe only just. A marmite book perhaps.In fullI enjoyed the start of this book. We have (or rather don't have!) Cassie Trip, an eccentric and ageing author who has not been seen for a year. Her nephew and niece are carrying out her final instructions by visiting her house. They find a manuscript from Cassie with instructions that they are to read it to claim their inheritance. It is Cassie's life story and her executors read this as we do. I thought it had a good feel to it.While a number of people appear in the book there really are only two characters of any real importance. Cassie herself and Pepper Man so named because there is apparently a slight smell of pepper when he is around. Is this a matter of "strange/imaginary childhood friends" or something much darker?... I'm guessing her nephew and niece did not expect the story that we are given. I certainly did not. We do know that Cassie had problems and fell out with her family for various reasons - what is her explanation of this.The blurb for this book says more than once that it is an "extraordinary" book. It also states that it is dark and disturbing. I agree with these words. However, looking a little deeper, I found this simply didn't gel together into the powerful story that I was expecting from this synopsis. The book certainly shows a very vivid imagination though. As I said earlier the start got my attention and I was looking forward to the journey. It was quite an interesting read however it was never compelling for me.The supernatural aspect is there with tones of legend and faerie stories. However I found it hard to escape the feeling that this was simply to do with a youngster who blamed bad things on their imaginary friend who was real honestly... It is hard not to give things away at this point and I really would prefer people to discover what happens for themselves. However I do think this is a book that will divide people. Without question some will find it great but I think it may be that a proportion of people for whom it does not work. Maybe I simply never "got it" as far as this book is concerned however I can't honestly say it worked for me.Note - I received an advance digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair reviewhttps://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
    more
  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    A glorious, pitch-black fairy tale of a book. Lush, strange and defiant. As soon as I finished it, I went straight back to the start and read it again.
  • K.S. Marsden
    January 1, 1970
    Throughout her life, Cassie is the only witness to the dark faeries' deeds. She has to survive her family and a murder trial.I received a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.This book is weird.It is not a murder mystery, or thriller. It will not give you any answers.Instead, it follows Cassie and her interactions with the faeries - these are not Disney Tinkerbells, they are real, dark, not-dead things that leech life.For as long as she can remember, Pepper-Man has been Throughout her life, Cassie is the only witness to the dark faeries' deeds. She has to survive her family and a murder trial.I received a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.This book is weird.It is not a murder mystery, or thriller. It will not give you any answers.Instead, it follows Cassie and her interactions with the faeries - these are not Disney Tinkerbells, they are real, dark, not-dead things that leech life.For as long as she can remember, Pepper-Man has been there, drinking her blood and leeching her life, every night. He was a dark creature, who did horrible things towards all people. As a young girl, Cassie works hard to be worse than her Pepper-Man to scare people off, to keep them at a safe distance.It seems that only Cassie can see the faeries, as her parents and others from town dismiss her silly 'stories', replacing her truth with something they can digest.The book follows Cassie as she grows up, gets married, and eventually gets charged with the murder of her husband. This leads to her childhood psychiatrist writing an in-depth book (with Cassie's permission) about his dealings with his young subject, who is completely given over to her illusions.Now everyone knows that she is crazy, and guilty of murder.Cassie is not a reliable narrator, but in her words, just because one thing is the truth, doesn't make another thing untrue.She has survived the emotional abuse inflicted by her mother, and she has come to terms with her whole family hating her. She is quiet, but strong. She accepts what she cannot change, and lives each day with simple joy.There is always a question over what is real. Are faeries real? Is there some abuse in Cassie's early years that catapulted her into a lifetime of fantasies.It is beautifully written, carefully balancing on the edge of both, to constantly keep you guessing, and making either a possibility. It hints at something disturbing, but still keeps you invested in Cassie and Pepper-Man's story.This was a fascinating, but surreal story.
    more
  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Um...Okay.Im sorry what?What did I just read?I was very interested in this book based on the description but the story is just so confusing? I dont even know what to say.Reclusive novelist Cassandra Tipp disappeared exactly one year ago. Now her niece and nephew are sent to her home to retrieve a password which they will give to her lawyer to inherit her estate.What they find is one final story from their eccentric aunther life storywhich they may choose to believe or not.What the book Um...Okay.I’m sorry… what?What did I just read?I was very interested in this book based on the description but the story is just so… confusing? I don’t even know what to say.Reclusive novelist Cassandra Tipp disappeared exactly one year ago. Now her niece and nephew are sent to her home to retrieve a password which they will give to her lawyer to inherit her estate.What they find is one final story from their eccentric aunt—her life story—which they may choose to believe… or not.What the book description failed to mention is that Cassandra has been (or believes she has been) tormented since childhood by a blood-sucking fairy who impregnates her as a teen and then casts a spell to take on human form and marry her. A trail of bodies follows with Cassandra as a suspect each time.I mean, how much more do I say without this being too spoiler-y?I love ambiguous stories but this one just didn’t do it for me. I didn’t feel like I got to know any of the characters and even though Cassandra is narrating, her true beliefs/emotions remained frustratingly concealed from readers. Really it comes down to this: Was she abused as a child? Did she create the elaborate story to cope or repress the trauma? Or is it possible that her fantastical tale is the truth?The problem is that I honestly don’t care. No relationship is developed between any characters, I never gained any necessary insight into Cassandra’s thoughts or actions, and I cannot take an evil fairy named Pepper Man seriously.Thanks to Tor Books and Edelweiss for providing me with a DRC in exchange for my honest review. You Let Me In is scheduled for release on April 21, 2020.For more reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
    more
  • Bandit
    January 1, 1970
    I honestly didnt know what to expect from this book. Or, to be more accurate, I had an idea of what it might be and then it went and blew my expectations right out of the water. Because the initial appearance screams thriller, doesnt it. One of those ever so popular female driven female authored thrillers dominating the genre these days. You have a womens face on the cover, theres that title that makes you gowell, Let Me In and Let The Right One in were taken and there are only so many titles to I honestly didn’t know what to expect from this book. Or, to be more accurate, I had an idea of what it might be and then it went and blew my expectations right out of the water. Because the initial appearance screams thriller, doesn’t it. One of those ever so popular female driven female authored thrillers dominating the genre these days. You have a women’s face on the cover, there’s that title that makes you go…well, Let Me In and Let The Right One in were taken and there are only so many titles to go around. There are the inevitable (and in this case widely inaccurate) descriptions comparisons. And the official plot summary itself presupposes a suspense thriller with some murders thrown in for good measure. But, giant Kardashian butt of a but, this isn’t that sort of thing. Surprise, surprise. The author boldly goes and does something completely different. And, frankly, pretty awesome. I mean, yeah, sure, major kudos just for defying the genre stereotypes and clichés, but also props for delivering a genuinely good story. And not just that…a genuinely good story about fairies. Yeah, fairies. Not that cute whimsical beings of ephemeral charm, but something infinitely darker and creepier dwells in the forest here. Cassandra Tipp is befriended by one as a child, The Pepper Man (a peculiar sort of deviant who speaks in contraction free riddles, but is in his own way loving and devoted), and thus a disturbing abusive lifelong loving friendship begins. The fairies are vampirical by nature, long dead or undead creatures that require regular feedings of blood in order to function. In return they offer company, gifts and strange forest delights. And whether you believe in them or not will define how you read this book. Because the book is in fact a last will and testament manuscript companion provided by Cassandra Tipp, a reclusive author who disappears leaving behind a fortune accumulated by writing romance novels, addressed to her niece and nephew. If they read the story, they’ll know how to claim the money. So they read. And so do we. And what a strange story it is. Not the first to represent the creatures of the forest and dark and scary, there’s Keith Donohue for one (apparently not famous enough for an official description comparison but much more accurate all the same), but still well done. The best thing about this being the ambiguity of it all. The cleverest thing of all is that this book can be read as two completely different stories that’ll give you completely different versions of events. While it isn’t a classic suspense thriller, there’s plenty of a sort of slow boiling suspense, it is plenty thrilling and there are murders to solve. It’s just that you’re never quite sure of the nature of reality in the narrative. Casssandra, Cassie, isn’t quite the prototypical unreliable narrator, but she’s something like that. If she is living in a delusion, it’s an all encompassing profound reality shaping one. If she isn’t…well, then there’s one more thing to fear in the woods. Either way she is a victim and her life is undeniably tragic, but you’re just never quite sure as to why. I absolutely love the way the author leaves that up to her audience to decide, her commitment to straddling both planes of existence complete until the very end and what a whammy of an ending it is. Natural or supernatural, this was a very entertaining atmospheric read. All in all very nicely done, not to mention most auspicious for a debut. It’s such a pleasure for a seasoned thriller reader to be genuinely surprised by a book. So many thanks for that to the publishers, who have previously rejected all my Netgalley requests with frustrating consistency. And, of course, thanks to Netgalley. Recommended.
    more
  • Isabel • The Crime Bookshelf
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 STARS. Thank you so much to Tor Books for the gifted ARC of YOU LET ME IN! This has to be one of the most unique books Ive ever read 😱 I wasnt sure what to expect going into this book and WOW was I pleasantly surprised!What I enjoyed most about this book was how different it was compared to the books I typically read. This book has VERY strong otherworldly and fantastical elements, which made it feel so unique and unlike anything else Ive ever read 👌 I also enjoyed how compelling it was 3.5 STARS. ⁣Thank you so much to Tor Books for the gifted ARC of YOU LET ME IN! This has to be one of the most unique books I’ve ever read 😱 I wasn’t sure what to expect going into this book and WOW was I pleasantly surprised!⁣⁣What I enjoyed most about this book was how different it was compared to the books I typically read. This book has VERY strong otherworldly and fantastical elements, which made it feel so unique and unlike anything else I’ve ever read 👌🏼 I also enjoyed how compelling it was right from the beginning. While I am not used to reading about otherworldly beings, I was so intrigued from the moment I started reading. This book was all out weird at times, but I really enjoyed the change of pace 🙌🏼 I also loved how beautiful the writing was, which made the book that much better.⁣⁣One of the main issues I had with this book was that I couldn’t fully connect to it. I never completely understood this book, which made me feel very disconnected from the story and characters. I also didn’t really love how ambiguous it was because I never really knew what was real or not. I had SO many unanswered questions at the end of the book, which made the ending feel very unsatisfying. ⁣⁣TRIGGERS: Suicide, Abuse⁣⁣Overall, I would recommend this one to you guys! It’s definitely not your typical thriller by any means, but it’s always fun to try something different 🤓 YOU LET ME IN is out APRIL 21st so make sure to keep an eye out!⁣
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    DNF @ 14%While this was absolutely not my cup of tea (not sure how to describe the writing/plot without sounding condescending...) I thought I might persevere to see if it improved. But the plot wasnt going anywhere and then a fairy showed up, so it was definitely time to bail. DNF @ 14%While this was absolutely not my cup of tea (not sure how to describe the writing/plot without sounding condescending...) I thought I might persevere to see if it improved. But the plot wasn’t going anywhere and then a fairy showed up, so it was definitely time to bail.
    more
  • Lukasz
    January 1, 1970
    This book will divide readers - some will love its unsettling atmosphere and weirdness, others will DNF it after the first chapter. You Let Me In is weird and confusing. It doesnt offer straight answers. It doesnt have an unambiguous ending. It deliberately misleads the reader. I found it dark and compelling. Will I recommend it to everyone willing to listen to me? No way. You have to know what you're getting into.You can approach it as a study of human trauma, a supernatural thriller, or a This book will divide readers - some will love its unsettling atmosphere and weirdness, others will DNF it after the first chapter. You Let Me In is weird and confusing. It doesn’t offer straight answers. It doesn’t have an unambiguous ending. It deliberately misleads the reader. I found it dark and compelling. Will I recommend it to everyone willing to listen to me? No way. You have to know what you're getting into.You can approach it as a study of human trauma, a supernatural thriller, or a family drama with a horror undercurrent. Cassandra Tipp, an infamous and eccentric novelist, has vanished. She has left a letter. Her heirs need to read it to discover a password to her testament. Hopefully, they'll be able to claim her estate.The letter recounts two disturbing stories - one of an abused little girl coping with trauma, second of magical gifts and husbands made from twigs and leaves and sticks and stones. Both stories might be true. Both end in murder. Both show the same events but in a different light. The boundaries between reality (as we know it) and the supernatural blur and shift as we follow the story.Cassandra has a faerie friend she calls a Pepper-Man. He feeds on her blood and influences her behavior and thoughts. With his help and in his company, she explores the unsettling and dark faerie world inhabited by twisted and broken beings caught in between the worlds.Just when the reader starts to immerse in the supernatural, the story introduces another perspective on the events. Cassandra's therapist Dr. Martin has written a book about her case called “Away with the fairies: A study in trauma-induced psychosis.” What if the faeries are only a sort of coping mechanism that allowed Cassandra to survive in a dysfunctional family?I admit I loved the ambiguity and lack of clear answers. It made me question both storylines and wonder which told the truth. Whichever you choose to believe, don't expect a happy ending. Both are disturbing and devastating. An impressive debut.ARC through NetGalley
    more
  • Heather *Undercover Goth Queen*
    January 1, 1970
    It's hard to describe this book without going into too much detail and giving things away. As a girl, Cassandra Tipp met a faerie she named Pepper-Man. Her family life was horrible. She had no friends. And Pepper-Man never went away. Now she's dead, and her niece and nephew have come to her house in the woods to read her final manuscript in order to get the password to access her fortune.I didn't know exactly what I was requesting when I saw this on NetGalley. In my mind it was a thriller barely It's hard to describe this book without going into too much detail and giving things away. As a girl, Cassandra Tipp met a faerie she named Pepper-Man. Her family life was horrible. She had no friends. And Pepper-Man never went away. Now she's dead, and her niece and nephew have come to her house in the woods to read her final manuscript in order to get the password to access her fortune.I didn't know exactly what I was requesting when I saw this on NetGalley. In my mind it was a thriller barely removed from Sharp Objects, which the synopsis compares it to. But when Pepper-Man arrived on the pages, I knew I was dealing with something else altogether.I almost DNFed in the beginning. The book opened with a jarring second-person narration that I didn't feel flowed quite well. I didn't read this for a few days, and then I came back to it, and before too long the second-person dropped off, cropping up only once in a while after that beginning. Mostly the story is told from Cassandra's perspective, and she isn't a likable narrator. Nor is she reliable. But her story is heartbreaking and compelling, no matter which version of this story you believe is the real one.This book is quite disturbing and devastating, but also really good. It kept me reading well into the night, and I only put it down when I couldn't keep my eyes open. The next day I woke up before my alarm and finished it. I'm sure I'll be thinking about it for some time. I'd recommend it for fans of dark (very dark) faerie stories and dysfunctional families.
    more
  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Dark and magical, You Let Me In surprised me in every way possible and is one of the best books Ive read this year. Faeries are no fit company for the living; touching them taints you like a disease. I grew like a pale fruit in the shadows, small and bitter, never getting enough sunbut I grew. I didnt shrivel up and die; I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Dark and magical, You Let Me In surprised me in every way possible and is one of the best books I’ve read this year. Faeries are no fit company for the living; touching them taints you like a disease. I grew like a pale fruit in the shadows, small and bitter, never getting enough sun—but I grew. I didn’t shrivel up and die; didn’t fall from the branch and crash to the ground. I was a white apple, a moon-colored pear, a toxic green plum the size of a coin. Grew strange and crooked, but there was life, flushing my veins with rich red blood, enough to sustain more than one. Sometimes a book comes out of nowhere and hits you right between the eyes. You Let Me In was one such book for me. The blurb on the back of the cover was vague enough that I thought this was going to be a mystery of some kind. What I didn’t expect was a dark and irresistible tale about faeries, family drama, murder and one girl’s incredible life story. This is Camilla Bruce’s debut, and I can hardly believe it. Her writing is simply gorgeous without a wasted word anywhere, and the pacing couldn’t be any better. I was hooked from the first page and finished this in a mere two days, which for me is quite a feat! If you love the dark faerie stories of Holly Black, then you might just be the perfect reader for this book.The story is told by the 74-year-old reclusive romance novelist Cassandra Tipp, who has been missing for over a year when the story begins. Cassandra has left strict instructions regarding her estate, should she die or go missing, and now her niece and nephew, her sole heirs, have come to Cassie’s old house in the woods to discover the secrets of her will. In Cassie’s study, they find a manuscript that, upon reading, will reveal a secret password that will allow them to claim Cassie’s estate. This book is that manuscript, and as Janus and Penelope begin to read, a wild tale unfolds about Cassie’s life-long friendship with a faerie called Pepper-Man and his part in the deaths of Cassie’s husband Tommy, her father, and her brother Ferdinand. Cassie, you see, was accused of murder, and now she intends to set the record straight.As Cassie reveals more and more details about her strange childhood, we learn about the family who treats her as an outcast: a mother who verbally abuses her and excludes her from family events, a father who is too timid to help her, and a perfect sister who she will never be able to emulate. Cassie eventually grows up and falls in love, but true happiness is never quite within her grasp. Her lifeline, though, is Pepper-Man: always at her side throughout the years, showing her the magical secrets of another world, one her family will never be able to enter.And here is where I must stop talking about the plot, because to reveal too much would be a shame. I think one reason this story resonated so much with me is that I saw myself in Cassie. No, I didn’t have a faerie companion (although I wouldn’t have said no to one!), but I did feel like an outsider for much of my childhood, I did believe in magic and faeries and more when I was young, and I was sorely disappointed when these things never materialized. Cassie has written forty-two romance novels over her lifetime, and I know when you discover the catalyst for these stories, you will be as delighted as I was. (I really want to talk about Bruce’s vision of where stories come from, but I’m trying to avoid spoilers—it’s so hard!) Cassie was a wonderful creation, a girl with a terribly horrid childhood who finds her escape in the hidden world of faeries. Bruce’s faeries are strange creatures made from bits of nature. They resemble humans, sort of, but also animals and birds. They feed off humans, which makes them terrifying. In fact, Pepper-Man drinks blood from Cassie like a vampire, and the fact that she has allowed this for so many years will make you wonder if she is indeed being abused. Their relationship is creepy and loving and odd and often hard to understand, but I think that’s why I loved it so much. The title of the book has special meaning in regards to that relationship, and I got chills when I read that part. Readers who must have firm answers at the end of their stories may be frustrated, but the ambiguity is one of the things I loved best about this book. Cassie’s tale is fairly linear, although she does inject brief asides about people she hasn’t really told you about yet. I ran into the name “Mara” early on with no explanation of who she is (don’t worry, you WILL find out about Mara later in the story!) There are plenty of cryptic comments about events that haven’t happened yet in her story, which could be frustrating to some readers. But for me, those passages were like catnip. They only made me want to read faster so I could catch up.We also meet a psychologist who spends years studying Cassie and her “traumas,” as he calls them. Dr. Martin is convinced that Cassie is a victim of abuse, and she’s hiding the truth behind made-up stories about faeries, but because we see the entire story from Cassie’s point of view—the unreliable narrator—the truth is shrouded in mystery. Are the faeries real? Or is Cassie so traumatized that she can’t separate reality from fiction? It’s a question that you might still be asking yourself at the end of the story.I will drop some trigger warnings at the end of this review, because be warned, this is a very dark story, despite some of the lighter, magical elements. First of all, not all readers are going to like the relationship between Cassie and Pepper-Man. There’s a creepy and unnatural vibe to it at times, but if you can get past Cassie’s childhood years, which are really quite innocent for the most part, I found their relationship to change and grow into something quite like love. I felt so bad for Cassie, who is shunned by her family for being so odd (they can’t see Pepper-Man, and even though Cassie tries to tell them about him, of course they don’t believe her) and accused of horrible things that she didn’t do. Pepper-Man offers her unconditional love and acceptance, and he’s really the only person in her life that does.As Janus and Penelope finally get to the end of Cassie’s story, the reader is right there with them, and here is where Camilla Bruce pulls her last trick, an unexpected twist that made me love the story even more. I cannot recommend You Let Me In highly enough, especially to readers who appreciate the darker side of fantasy. This is one book I won’t soon forget.Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy. Above quote was taken from an uncorrected proof and may differ in the final version of the book. Trigger warnings: Verbal abuse, implied sexual abuse, murder, suicide, implied abortionThis review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy
    more
  • Lukasz
    January 1, 1970
    This book will divide readers - some will love its unsettling atmosphere and weirdness, others will DNF it after the first chapter. You Let Me In is weird and confusing. It doesnt offer straight answers. It doesnt have an unambiguous ending. It deliberately misleads the reader. I found it dark and compelling. Will I recommend it to everyone willing to listen to me? No way. You have to know what you're getting into.You can approach it as a study of human trauma, a supernatural thriller, or a This book will divide readers - some will love its unsettling atmosphere and weirdness, others will DNF it after the first chapter. You Let Me In is weird and confusing. It doesn’t offer straight answers. It doesn’t have an unambiguous ending. It deliberately misleads the reader. I found it dark and compelling. Will I recommend it to everyone willing to listen to me? No way. You have to know what you're getting into.You can approach it as a study of human trauma, a supernatural thriller, or a family drama with a horror undercurrent. Cassandra Tipp, an infamous and eccentric novelist, has vanished. She has left a letter. Her heirs need to read it to discover a password to her testament. Hopefully, they'll be able to claim her estate.The letter recounts two disturbing stories - one of an abused little girl coping with trauma, second of magical gifts and husbands made from twigs and leaves and sticks and stones. Both stories might be true. Both end in murder. Both show the same events but in a different light. The boundaries between reality (as we know it) and the supernatural blur and shift as we follow the story.Cassandra has a faerie friend she calls a Pepper-Man. He feeds on her blood and influences her behavior and thoughts. With his help and in his company, she explores the unsettling and dark faerie world inhabited by twisted and broken beings caught in between the worlds.Just when the reader starts to immerse in the supernatural, the story introduces another perspective on the events. Cassandra's therapist Dr. Martin has written a book about her case called “Away with the fairies: A study in trauma-induced psychosis.” What if the faeries are only a sort of coping mechanism that allowed Cassandra to survive in a dysfunctional family?I admit I loved the ambiguity and lack of clear answers. It made me question both storylines and wonder which told the truth. Whichever you choose to believe, don't expect a happy ending. Both are disturbing and devastating. An impressive debut.
    more
  • Menna van Praag
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very intriguing book. I read it in one sitting - it's gloriously short - which in itself is a commendation. And I found myself thinking about it for several days afterwards. It's a strange story & unexpected and I'm not entirely sure how to classify it but all in all a very good read. I adore the cover!
    more
  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    What happened to Cassandra Tipp? Cassandra is an elderly writer known as much for her reclusiveness as for her romance novels. She vanished leaving everyone to wonder if she had been murdered, committed suicide, or just decided to leave everything behind, and start over. Cassandra has not lead an uneventful life. As a child, she was the black sheep of her family, living in her own world, one filled with fairies and delusions. Her husband was brutally killed; a crime that saw Cassandra on trial What happened to Cassandra Tipp? Cassandra is an elderly writer known as much for her reclusiveness as for her romance novels. She vanished leaving everyone to wonder if she had been murdered, committed suicide, or just decided to leave everything behind, and start over. Cassandra has not lead an uneventful life. As a child, she was the black sheep of her family, living in her own world, one filled with fairies and delusions. Her husband was brutally killed; a crime that saw Cassandra on trial for the heinous act. Her father and brother died under mysterious circumstances and Cassandra found herself under suspicion yet again.Cassandra has left her will, naming her niece and nephew as her sole heirs. There are some stipulations though, they must go to her home and read a manuscript she left on her desk. As the story of Cassandra's life unfolds, I was shocked, horrified, and heartbroken. Are these words the truth, the words of a deranged mind, or some version of both? I cannot say more for fear of spoiling this page-flipping tale, however, some readers might be bothered by some of the subject matter, with childhood abuse playing a role in Cassandra's story. You will want to prepare yourself for a story that you won't soon forget, and expect your opinions to change.......over and over. It's been several days since I finished You Let Me In, and I am still not sure what happened to Cassandra. Honestly, this one just let me stunned.I received a DRC from Tor Books through Edelweiss +.
    more
  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    You Let Me In is a very disturbing, devastating, and weird book, but its also extremely good. It was such a pleasure to be genuinely surprised by this book. Its a story of tragedy, illusion and conjuring, family secrets and death. Nothing is as it seems. I recommend this one to fans of very dark stories and dysfunctional families. I loved the story and the way it was told. Camilla Bruce writes beautifully. She succeeds exceedingly well confusing at you and at the same time hooking you into the You Let Me In is a very disturbing, devastating, and weird book, but it’s also extremely good. It was such a pleasure to be genuinely surprised by this book. It’s a story of tragedy, illusion and conjuring, family secrets and death. Nothing is as it seems. I recommend this one to fans of very dark stories and dysfunctional families. I loved the story and the way it was told. Camilla Bruce writes beautifully. She succeeds exceedingly well confusing at you and at the same time hooking you into the story. It kept me reading well into the night. Great story and interesting family dynamics. I loved it. I highly recommend it. My copy of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks to the the author, the publisher, and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review it.
    more
  • Natassja
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this! Curious to see how the final version may change.
Write a review