The Dictator Pope
The Inside Story of the Francis PapacyCould Pope Francis be the most tyrannical and unprincipled pontiff in modern times? Yes, says Church historian Marcantonio Colonna, in his controversial yet judicious new book, The Dictator Pope.Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina was elected pope in 2013 as a liberal and a reformer. In fact, he was neither—except by coincidence. Though he was not well-known within the College of Cardinals that elected him, close observers in his native land already recognized him to be a manipulative politician, skilled at self-promotion, and a disciple of the populist dictator Juan Perón.Behind the mask of a genial man of the people is a pope who cares shockingly little about theology or the liturgy but is obsessed with his own power. Allying himself with the most corrupt elements in the Vatican, Francis rules by fear. He has obstructed or reversed the very reforms that were expected of him and attempted to alter Catholic teaching by subterfuge. In The Dictator Pope you will learn:Why the head of Francis’s own religious order thought he should not be made a bishopWhy Francis may have diverted Church funds to support Hillary Clinton’s failed presidential campaignHow true Church reformers have been punished by the Pope and his alliesHow Francis himself has mused that he might be the cause of a schism in the ChurchWhy clerics in the Vatican have gone from dismissing Francis as a “clown” to fearing him as a dictatorAbout the AuthorMarcantonio Colonna is the pen name of Henry Sire (H. J. A. Sire), an author and historian. Sire was born in 1949 in Barcelona to a family of French ancestry. He was educated in England at the Jesuits' centuries-old Stonyhurst College and at Exeter College, Oxford, where he gained an honors degree in Modern History. He is the author of six books on Catholic history and biography, including one on the famous English Jesuit, writer, and philosopher Father Martin D'Arcy, SJ. The Dictator Pope is the fruit of Henry Sire's four-year residence in Rome from 2013 to 2017. During that time he became personally acquainted with many figures in the Vatican, including Cardinals and Curial officials, together with journalists specializing in Vatican affairs.

The Dictator Pope Details

TitleThe Dictator Pope
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 4th, 2017
Rating
GenreReligion, Biography, Christianity, Catholic, Politics, Nonfiction, History

The Dictator Pope Review

  • Kevin Estabrook
    January 1, 1970
    I dismissed this book the first time I saw it, thinking it would be biased and slanderous. Reading Mark Lambert's article, titled "Far from Gossip, 'The Dictator Pope' is 'Absolutely Reliable'" changed my mind.Though this book contains one unfortunate fact after another, and though it brought me to my knees on several occasions, I am reminded that the Church has survived "challenging pontificates" in the past and will continue to do so until the Lord's glorious and triumphant return.
    more
  • Theresa Stiner
    January 1, 1970
    How can I say this is a 'good' book? It is a sad book. I believe it, for the most part, to be truthful. While reading it I thanked God for all the holy and saintly popes I have had in my lifetime of 63 years. I guess we were due for a more 'human' and political pope. With this it will be interesting to watch how the Holy Spirit watches over and protects the heart and truth of this one, holy, and apostolic church that the gates of hell will not prevail over it.
    more
  • Joyce Baker
    January 1, 1970
    On my God help us!Could Pope Francis be the Anti Christ! As a 74 old practicing Catholic I am sickened by what I head in in this book. And for the National Register and others not report what going on in the Vatican is a disservice to the church . Read and see what I am talking about. All had been verified by the author.
    more
  • Sean Lancaster
    January 1, 1970
    Disaster His modernist agenda has been exposed, this book puts it in black and white and is a must read for every concerned Catholic.
  • Eduardo
    January 1, 1970
    Where there's smoke there's fireThis is an important book for those Catholics, or not, that are surprised by a book with this title referring to none other then Pope Francis. How can this be? A Pope that has been portrait in the main stream media as noting but a great spiritual leader and reformer?If your trust in the track record of the traditional media ability to guive us unbious reports of people and events has not been shaken in the last while then this book is not for you, it will read as Where there's smoke there's fireThis is an important book for those Catholics, or not, that are surprised by a book with this title referring to none other then Pope Francis. How can this be? A Pope that has been portrait in the main stream media as noting but a great spiritual leader and reformer?If your trust in the track record of the traditional media ability to guive us unbious reports of people and events has not been shaken in the last while then this book is not for you, it will read as some crazy rant by someone set in doing a character assassination. For all others this will shed more light in the relegious and moral corruption that has taken hold of the Vatican for the last 60 years and that the last 4 years under Francis has done nothing to stop it and may even have taken it to the a breaking point.This book is very well researched and it will, at the least, give you reasons to pause and look at things in a different way. 
    more
  • Benedict
    January 1, 1970
    This is a far from perfect book, contains no groundbreaking information on the current Holy Father, and would seem to overreach on certain points, but it is a decent summary of many of the things about Papa Bergoglio that have given, and continue to give, many Catholics of all stripes some pause. UPDATE: I have much more esteem for this book now after reading the book on the Pope by Ross Douthat. Colonna, or rather H.J.A. Sire, has done a far job in describing, ideologically and psychologically, This is a far from perfect book, contains no groundbreaking information on the current Holy Father, and would seem to overreach on certain points, but it is a decent summary of many of the things about Papa Bergoglio that have given, and continue to give, many Catholics of all stripes some pause. UPDATE: I have much more esteem for this book now after reading the book on the Pope by Ross Douthat. Colonna, or rather H.J.A. Sire, has done a far job in describing, ideologically and psychologically, what makes the Holy Father tick. Douthat's book, on the other hand, makes zero reference to Peronism, which I am convinced is the key to understanding the mind of Jorge Bergoglio.
    more
  • Joseph Raborg
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great work for understanding some of the corruption surrounding the Vatican. It's very current and describes scandals extending into 2017. Essentially, Pope Francis places too much trust in the more liberal clergy, even though these same people are rather unsavory. Not all liberal clergy, mind you, but the ones with Pope Francis' ear.
    more
  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    My confusion about Pope Francis has cleared up after having reading this book.
  • Christopher Blosser
    January 1, 1970
    The author's name, "Marcantonio Colonna", is a pseudonym. Having finished the book, particularly the stunning accounts of Francis' vindictiveness and the fate of those who have crossed him -- it occurs to me that the author was wise to write under a pseudonym. (According to the LifeSite news exclusive interview, the real Marcantonio Colonna was born in 1535, an Italian aristocrat who served as a Viceroy of Sicily, best remembered for his service as admiral of the papal fleet in the Battle of Lep The author's name, "Marcantonio Colonna", is a pseudonym. Having finished the book, particularly the stunning accounts of Francis' vindictiveness and the fate of those who have crossed him -- it occurs to me that the author was wise to write under a pseudonym. (According to the LifeSite news exclusive interview, the real Marcantonio Colonna was born in 1535, an Italian aristocrat who served as a Viceroy of Sicily, best remembered for his service as admiral of the papal fleet in the Battle of Lepanto). The author writes with the stated intent of "[exposing] the myth of the supposedly liberal Pope who was elected in 2013 and to urge the cardinals at the next Conclave to avoid electing an unknown figure who turns out to be quite different from what he had been thought." Why the title? -- according to the author, who has researched Bergoglio's past, "Bergoglio is ... very much the product of the peculiar political culture of Argentina, formed by the populist dictator Juan Perón, of whom Bergoglio was a follower from his early years, and whom he very much resembles in his style of government." Cultivating (with the help of the media) an image of mercy, kindness and openness, Francis in private reveals himself to be rather the opposite:[Francis] had long been known in his native Argentina as a manipulative politician and a skilful self-presenter. Behind the mask of a genial man of the people, Pope Francis has consolidated his position as a dictator who rules by fear and has allied himself with the most corrupt elements in the Vatican to prevent and reverse the reforms that were expected of him.Bad papist that I am, I admit to having not kept up with the latest news of Francis' pontificate over the past several years -- between the frequent denunciations of the "trads" and the repetitive -- or should I say interpretive -- apologetics of the pro-Francis contingent (ex. "he may have said X, but what he REALLY meant was X"), following along got so tiring after a while. That being said, The Dictator Pope offers a remarkable opportunity for everybody who has kept their head in the sand to acquaint themselves with all the major issues and scandals that has rocked the pontificate. Philip Lawler -- whose journalistic work I'm familiar with -- attests to the accuracy of the author's reporting, "he clearly knows his way around the Vatican, and has excellent sources inside the Roman Curia"; likewise Robert Royal acknowledges in his review: "It sometimes stretches evidence, but the sheer amount of evidence it provides is stunning. About 90 percent of it is simply incontrovertible, and cannot help but clarify who Francis is and what he’s about." Even if you exclude from consideration the author's conspiratorial portrayal of the "St. Gallen Group" -- a conspiracy of bishops who identified and lobbied for Bergoglio as candidate to push reforms in opposition to the pontificate of Ratzinger -- or the shocking (but as yet undocumented) claim that "Peter's Pence" were diverted to fund Hillary Clinton's electoral campaign, there are enough publically known and footnoted points of concern here that would alarm all but the most furvent Francis-apologists.Beyond the accounts of financial corruption at the highest levels; the papal manipulations of the Bishop's Synod and tolerance (even promotion) of permissive interpretations of Amoris Laetitita; the liberalized "reform" of the John Paul II Institute on Marriage and the Family; the papal repression of a Franciscan religious order after it expressed its wish to celebrate mass under the old rite (or "Extraordinary Form") -- I would have to say the most disappointing, upsetting subject was Francis' deficient response to the crisis of sexual abuse within the Catholic church.According to the author, the CDF under Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger was the first to take the crisis seriously, adopting a hardline response and imposing a policy of "zero tolerance":"According to data presented by the CDF to the UN Human Rights Commission in January 2014, Benedict XVI had defrocked or suspended more than 800 priests for past sexual abuse between 2009 and 2012. In 2011, the CDF sent a letter to the world’s bishops’ conferences, asking them to adopt stringent guidelines on how to respond to allegations that were to include assistance to victims, protection of minors, education of future priests and religious, and collaboration with civil authorities. The guidelines required bishops to forward all new cases to civil authorities and to the CDF. In a March 2010 pastoral letter to Ireland’s Catholics, Benedict criticised the lax application of the Church’s laws by bishops, whose failures had “seriously undermined your credibility and effectiveness.” He noted a “misguided tendency” against applying canonical punishments that he said was due to “misinterpretations of the Second Vatican Council.”(On this topic, see also: Pope Benedict XVI and the Sexual Abuse Crisis: Working for Reform and Renewal Our Sunday Visitor, 2010).Appallingly, Benedict's "this reform of accountability appears to have evaporated with Benedict’s resignation":... in the name of his favourite theme, “mercy,” Francis decisively broke with the Ratzinger/Benedict programme of reform, reducing the penalty for priest abusers to “a lifetime of prayer” and restrictions on celebrating Mass. In February 2017 it was revealed that Francis had “quietly reduced sanctions against a handful of paedophile priests, applying his vision of a merciful church even to its worst offenders.The author cites Associated Press’s Nicole Winfield's article, "Pope quietly trims sanctions for sex abusers seeking mercy", noting that Francis has "surrounded himself with cardinal advisers who botched handling abuse cases in their archdioceses." Moreover, ... Francis scrapped the [sexual abuse advisory] commission’s proposed tribunal for bishops who botch abuse cases following legal objections from the congregation. The commission’s other major initiative — a guideline template to help dioceses develop policies to fight abuse and safeguard children — is gathering dust. The Vatican never sent the template to bishops’ conferences, as the commission had sought, or even linked it to its main abuse-resource website.(It's also worth noting that, post-publication of The Dictator Pope, this topic has resurfaced this past week with yet another instance of Francis' inattention and disregard to the gravity of the issue, failing to either read or act on an eight page letter from a victim detailing his abuse and a diocese' inaction).Returning to the general topic of the Francis pontificate, I found this book a rewarding, disturbing-if-not-particularly-surprising, read. Two other critical books are slated to come out this year, Phillip Lawler's Lost Shepherd: How Pope Francis is Misleading His Flock (February 2018) and Ross Douthat's To Change the Church: Pope Francis and the Future of Catholicism (March 2018). I'll be curious to see how this measures up to them.
    more
  • Eoghan Rua
    January 1, 1970
    The intrigues of the Bergoglio Papacy are laid out quite well here in this book by English historian Henry Sire and what is revealed behind the public mask of humility is the quite thuggish behind closed doors reality of Jorge Mario Bergoglio. Sire writes from a conservative Catholic view and that should be kept in mind.Sire's claim that Bergoglio is a Papal equivelent of Juan Perón, is, I think, a little unfair to Perón who was by any measure a very skilled and successful political operator and The intrigues of the Bergoglio Papacy are laid out quite well here in this book by English historian Henry Sire and what is revealed behind the public mask of humility is the quite thuggish behind closed doors reality of Jorge Mario Bergoglio. Sire writes from a conservative Catholic view and that should be kept in mind.Sire's claim that Bergoglio is a Papal equivelent of Juan Perón, is, I think, a little unfair to Perón who was by any measure a very skilled and successful political operator and this claim may reflect an English conservative bias. Unlike Perón who was able to bring together his Argentine compatriots from different political fields behind him during the Cold War, Bergoglio is the most hated Pope by Catholics of modern times (though loved by liberals). Perón was a uniter, Bergoglio a divider.Bergoglio can only be understood for what he is; a rather low intelligence former bouncer from Buenos Aires, who came to power almost by accident as the front man for far more cunning and intelligent Western European (Germanic) liberal clerics who had been pushing their agenda for some time, namely: Cardinal Danneels and Cardinal Kasper. This coupled with a slick "liberal" Jesuit PR campaign is the Bergoglio Papacy.For those of us who are not religious (or at least have woken up to Christianity) but like to keep an eye on what the Vatican is doing, there are a few things missing here. Bergoglio's coup against the Sovereign Military Order of Malta is mentioned and the controversy over his German proxies supporting contraception is discussed. However, it doesn't mention that the Bergoglian-controlled Knights are now implicated in bringing thousands of Africans and Muslims into Europe in "rescue operations" in the Med via the Malteser International. Just like the Jesuit Refugee Service.As if aiding and abetting clerical sex abuse of children wasn't bad enough, giving away their birth right is just the icing on the cake. Sire should perhaps cover this in future editions. For those of us who have come to reject Christianity in total, Bergoglio's reign may just be the thing that brings down or permanently discredits the Church. The association of priest and treason couldeven awaken the ghost of Giuseppe Mazzini.
    more
  • Vincent
    January 1, 1970
    Based on this book, it looks like the problems which the Vatican are facing right now will continue into the foreseeable future. In that sense, this book helped me temper my expectations. We know there's a lot of moving parts in the Vatican. But in the book, it is very tough keeping track of everyone. A lot of names that you'll hear once, and never again. The author traces the absolutely extraordinary sequence of events that had to transpire in order for Bergoglio to become bishop, then cardinal Based on this book, it looks like the problems which the Vatican are facing right now will continue into the foreseeable future. In that sense, this book helped me temper my expectations. We know there's a lot of moving parts in the Vatican. But in the book, it is very tough keeping track of everyone. A lot of names that you'll hear once, and never again. The author traces the absolutely extraordinary sequence of events that had to transpire in order for Bergoglio to become bishop, then cardinal, then Pope. From my perspective, this had to be Divine Providence and God's plan.I read this book because I wanted a true insider look from a journalist with integrity. We live in an age where a journalist has yet to ask the pope a simple question like "Are you going to answer the Dubia?" I believe this author was very courageous to pen this book, and reveal his actual name (Henry Sire). It's a tough book to read in a sense, because it's exposing realities which aren't pleasant to think about. Ignorance may be bliss, but the truth will set you free. If you're interested in the truth about what's going on in the Vatican, read this book.
    more
  • Denise Spicer
    January 1, 1970
    Lots of inside info and facts about the current Pope, his supporters, his background in Argentina, his election, his pontifical style. This book delves into an account about this very divisive and politically manipulative pope with surprising, sometimes shocking, details. For someone who emphasized his transparency and mercy, there are lots of secrets with this pope and his inner circle. The book goes into the confusion and chaos created and encouraged under Pope Francis, the scandals (financial Lots of inside info and facts about the current Pope, his supporters, his background in Argentina, his election, his pontifical style. This book delves into an account about this very divisive and politically manipulative pope with surprising, sometimes shocking, details. For someone who emphasized his transparency and mercy, there are lots of secrets with this pope and his inner circle. The book goes into the confusion and chaos created and encouraged under Pope Francis, the scandals (financial and homosexual) and his harsh treatment of critics. A fascinating read.
    more
  • peter brock
    January 1, 1970
    I highly recommend this book, especially to my fellow Catholics. It exposes the utter corruption of the Vatican hierarchy and a feckless dangerous Pope and his questionable progress from ordination to the present. It demonstrates the epitome of Gresham’s Law regarding morals and money of the charlatans in the Vatican who disgrace the Catholic Church. This is compounded by the hierarchy around the world who can not be ignorant of the situation in Rome and do not raise an outcry against it. Partic I highly recommend this book, especially to my fellow Catholics. It exposes the utter corruption of the Vatican hierarchy and a feckless dangerous Pope and his questionable progress from ordination to the present. It demonstrates the epitome of Gresham’s Law regarding morals and money of the charlatans in the Vatican who disgrace the Catholic Church. This is compounded by the hierarchy around the world who can not be ignorant of the situation in Rome and do not raise an outcry against it. Particularly guilty are the Cardinals who elected this travesty to the Papacy. How far into the universal church does this corruption descend? A good question to those Catholics petitioned to Peter’s Pence donations that are not accounted for. This expose also raises the question of the need for the Papacy and the beaurocracy of the Vatican other than as an historical museum of artwork and antiquities. What is the job description of the Pope? It should be limited to the preservation of Christian, Catholic doctrine. The Pope is not a qualified “ruler” of the monolithic Catholic universe. Most Popes are not even qualified managers as demonstrated by the current poser. As an 85 year old catholic, my sympathy goes out to the many religious around the world who labor selflessly day in and day out practicing their religion while the Vatican reeks. It is way past time for an assessment of the Catholic Church. Who will begin?
    more
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    A particularly damning book from a conservative Roman Catholic scholar (Henry Sire under the pen name Marcantonio Colonna).Pope Francis is depicted as, behind closed doors, a dictator more interested in power than religion and quite prepared to use it 'to do down' those perceived as his enemies. A man not interested in tackling the moral and financial problems of the Vatican and Roman Catholic church: one for whom'zero tolerance' is a slogan to appease critics rather than a policy to be enforced A particularly damning book from a conservative Roman Catholic scholar (Henry Sire under the pen name Marcantonio Colonna).Pope Francis is depicted as, behind closed doors, a dictator more interested in power than religion and quite prepared to use it 'to do down' those perceived as his enemies. A man not interested in tackling the moral and financial problems of the Vatican and Roman Catholic church: one for whom'zero tolerance' is a slogan to appease critics rather than a policy to be enforced.Pope Benedict XVI comes out as someone who tried to tackle the mess but was just too old to prosecute the struggle.It's worth reading at 232 pages. One will better understand the convulsions presently under way in the Roman Catholic Church in the United States and, probably, other countries in the future.If this book is even half right I think future historians of the Church of Rome will say summarize the main problem of the last 3 papal reigns as: John Paul II reigned too long, Benedict XVI reigned too short and Francis reigned at all.Quite an indictment, indeed.
    more
  • rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    eye-opening.
  • Julie Kos
    January 1, 1970
    Really need to know this!If only that this information will inspire you to pray more for Holy Mother Church and her priests, bishops and pope,you need to read this book. Things are beginning to change and you need to understand why.
  • Nathan Albright
    January 1, 1970
    It took a while for this book to get to me, and it was one I was eagerly waiting for.  For odd reasons I do not entirely understand, I frequently engage in social media conversations with traditionalist Catholics whose political and moral worldview is very similar to my own, and within that community this book is a vitally important one as it demonstrates the disconnect between the contemporary Catholic hierarchy and the ordinary and decent body of Catholics that exists in the United States and It took a while for this book to get to me, and it was one I was eagerly waiting for.  For odd reasons I do not entirely understand, I frequently engage in social media conversations with traditionalist Catholics whose political and moral worldview is very similar to my own, and within that community this book is a vitally important one as it demonstrates the disconnect between the contemporary Catholic hierarchy and the ordinary and decent body of Catholics that exists in the United States and other places.  And, as someone who reads and comments on matters relating to Catholicism as part of my general religious beat as a writer, this book is obviously one of considerable personal importance to review [1].  A reader should know going into this, though, that this book is one of those pieces of political literature that leaves a lot of people looking very bad and that probably encourages even more cynicism than would already exist concerning the structural and leadership problems of the contemporary Papacy going back to the "reforms" of Pope Paul in the aftermath of Vatican II.At about two hundred pages before its endnotes, this book is a quick but powerful read as the author is clearly well-informed about the background of Pope Francis and the Peronist roots of his protean political worldview and dictatorial behavior.  The book consists of six chapters that detail the context as well as the behavior of the current papacy, beginning with a look at the justly maligned St. Gallen Mafia (1) of leftist European bishops who were influential in politicking for Francis in the aftermath of the resignation of Pope Benedict over his inability to enforce clerical and moral discipline on the wayward curia.  The second chapter looks at the context of Francis' own rise through first the Jesuit and then the regular hierarchy and the various enemies he made along the way (2).  The third chapter looks at the absence of reform from Francis' papacy given the expectations that were raised about this at the beginning of his reign (3).  The author then turns to the crookedness of the path that Francis has taken and his generally deceptive and secretive ways (4).  The author then discusses the abuse of mercy in refusing to seriously punish abusive and grossly immoral and corrupt priests and bishops who happen to be potential political allies (5) before closing with a discussion of the Pope's desire to control the curia through living close to them rather than being isolated in the Vatican (6).What are the takeaways from this book?   For one, understanding Francis' dictatorial ways requires a look at his own personal context as a Peronist, as well as his lifelong tendency to surround himself with mediocre talent whose moral failings make them possible to blackmail and coerce into following his will.  In reading a book like this, one can see the great disconnect that exists between pious (or impious) ordinary Catholics and an unwieldy and immensely corrupt Catholic hierarchy under a great deal of pressure to tolerate gross corruption and immorality, including the attempt to use Catholic tithes and offerings to sway politics in favor of "progressive" candidates in elections.  Whether one is an insider to the Catholic world or an outsider, one can have a great deal of empathy for Catholics while maintaining a great deal of hostility towards the contemporary papacy, and it is probably wise to do so at present.  The author does not whitewash Benedict or John Paul II, but does indicate that they are to be praised for at least trying to fight against the corruption within the bishops and archbishops and cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church, however difficult and unsuccessful that struggle to toe moral and doctrinal lines has turned out to be.[1] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2018...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2018...
    more
  • Brian Murphy
    January 1, 1970
    When I first saw this book I was absolutely opposed to reading it. I figured it was some "rad trad" conspiracy theory. I'm sure there's plenty of people that probably think it is. Part of me hopes that it still is...I wouldn't have called myself a fan of Pope Francis, but I generally liked him and figured he was at least a good man. I tried to read everything he did and said charitably in light of the Church's tradition. However, as time as gone on and I've seen the changes he's made and the peo When I first saw this book I was absolutely opposed to reading it. I figured it was some "rad trad" conspiracy theory. I'm sure there's plenty of people that probably think it is. Part of me hopes that it still is...I wouldn't have called myself a fan of Pope Francis, but I generally liked him and figured he was at least a good man. I tried to read everything he did and said charitably in light of the Church's tradition. However, as time as gone on and I've seen the changes he's made and the people and teachings he seems to implicitly but not explicitly promote, this has been harder to do. Its made me wonder if he's just foolish. I don't think he is a fool though, he seems pretty intelligent, which must mean that he intends these things. The unnecessary change to the catechism on the death penalty and his response to the McCarrick abuse crisis and Vigano letter really have made me think twice. He strikes me as a man who lives in ambiguity and with a lack of accountability. I've seen this type of behavior in people that have been close to me in my own life; they project a persona of innocence and expertise, but in reality lack both. This is the picture that is drawn in The Dictator Pope: someone I would, in my non-expert opinion, classify as a narcissist, who thinks the world should bend to their plans and visions; anyone who gets in the way of this is the enemy and quickly becomes a casualty; anyone who supports this is nothing more than a pawn.I pray that this is completely false. But the people that Pope Francis has removed from positions of influence and the people he has replaced them with has defied all logic. What happened to the Order of Malta and the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate is a travesty. Yes, he is the Pope, but he wields his power like an authoritarian father. He won't answer questions for clarification but instead responds by making anyone who asks a question look like the enemy, even a child of Satan. There is nothing healthy about this. His comments in response to Vigano's letter clearly show who he is; He is a politician that will "not say a word", but instead will let other people do the dirty work of tearing down his imagined enemies all the while employ veiled attacks in the context of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. I hope to God that this is all mistaken depiction of him. And if so I will gladly repent and seek forgiveness. However, I don't see how this is possible when he hides in silence and ambiguity.I give this book 3 stars mainly because I still hope that it is wrong. But if it is true then it deserves 5 stars for the courage it took to write it.
    more
  • Linda Edmonds cerullo
    January 1, 1970
    This Pope is a fraud. While I'm not a Catholic, I married into a Catholic family. I always found it curious how intelligent people could look to a fallible man for direction. While the RCC claims it is "One, True and Holy" it is anything but. It changes constantly. God does not change, nor do his laws. As the world seemed to rejoice that a new Jesuit, liberal pope was selected, I was skeptical. I'm not sure why anyone would think that if an institution claimed to be the one true church of Christ This Pope is a fraud. While I'm not a Catholic, I married into a Catholic family. I always found it curious how intelligent people could look to a fallible man for direction. While the RCC claims it is "One, True and Holy" it is anything but. It changes constantly. God does not change, nor do his laws. As the world seemed to rejoice that a new Jesuit, liberal pope was selected, I was skeptical. I'm not sure why anyone would think that if an institution claimed to be the one true church of Christ, there could be any change (as God is the same yesterday, today and forever). Francis is a throwback to the worst of the popes in history. He is cunning, scheming, irreverent and a liberal puppet. He has little respect for cardinals who are conservative, has overlooked the behavior of priests/bishops/cardinals who were a part of this massive sexual abuse conspiracy and really should be tried in International Court for crimes against humanity. He was in league with Obama and Hillary Clinton and was incensed when he found out Trump won the election as it meant his "plan" to make changes in the church (and the world) was now out of reach. He is a scam artist and a deceitful person. Why anyone remains in the Catholic Church has always been a mystery to me, but never more so than after reading this book. His desire to find out who wrote the book and the using of his "minions" to locate the person is just another example of how power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely as Lord Acton so eloquently stated. I'm reminded of a verse in the Bible that says "Come out of her, come out of her my people" (Revelation 18:4). If you are a true believer, you could never stay in a church this evil. Highly recommend and pray for the safety of the author.
    more
  • Erick
    January 1, 1970
    After reading the book I could tell that it would tried to explain the leadership of the pope in the light of the journalism and the news, according to the author the actual papacy has been very supportive on liberal views and very punishing on conservative and traditional views.The books reflects on various "hot" topics of the catholic church, one of them is the Synod of the Family where the catholic teaching was supposedly attack by the pope actions where he was supporting those cardinals who After reading the book I could tell that it would tried to explain the leadership of the pope in the light of the journalism and the news, according to the author the actual papacy has been very supportive on liberal views and very punishing on conservative and traditional views.The books reflects on various "hot" topics of the catholic church, one of them is the Synod of the Family where the catholic teaching was supposedly attack by the pope actions where he was supporting those cardinals who agreed with his views and taking out of his consideration those who don't. The synod is quite important since promotes a moral teaching to give holy comunion to the divorce contrary to the catholich teachings and it lead to the exhortation "Amoris laetitia" As well it touches the topics ot the vatican intervention in the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate and the Order of Malta, where the pope uses methods very harsh and without consideration of the people suffering.The author is a member (was) from the order of Malta and currently is been suspended for writing this book.It does provides a little glimpse inside the Vatican challenges. Although very political and from the journalist point of view.
    more
  • John Ray Catingub
    January 1, 1970
    Relatively short in scope because His Holiness' papacy is still ongoing, "The Dictator Pope" lays out and elaborates on a number of criticisms that many who do not align with him already know. The depth at which that Henry Sire reports these issues is thorough and does well to frame each matter better, with more insider information than a news story might have. Despite such a title, Sire's book refrains from defaming or libelling Pope Francis but, instead, use fact and history to present the bac Relatively short in scope because His Holiness' papacy is still ongoing, "The Dictator Pope" lays out and elaborates on a number of criticisms that many who do not align with him already know. The depth at which that Henry Sire reports these issues is thorough and does well to frame each matter better, with more insider information than a news story might have. Despite such a title, Sire's book refrains from defaming or libelling Pope Francis but, instead, use fact and history to present the background, reality, and fallout of papal missteps and interventions. Though I wish it was longer, this book is a necessary read for one who truly wonders who Pope Francis might be.
    more
  • Michael Shurtleff
    January 1, 1970
    This book is far from a screeching character assassination. It is also not good bedtime reading, unless George Orwell relaxes you and you fall asleep listening to the soothing tones of a high speed train wreck. But you will close this book with a better understanding of Pope Francis than when you opened it. Many of the things that have left me scratching my head in recent months make perfect, clear sense now. I saw the McCarrick Scandal foreshadowed in practically every chapter. Very sobering an This book is far from a screeching character assassination. It is also not good bedtime reading, unless George Orwell relaxes you and you fall asleep listening to the soothing tones of a high speed train wreck. But you will close this book with a better understanding of Pope Francis than when you opened it. Many of the things that have left me scratching my head in recent months make perfect, clear sense now. I saw the McCarrick Scandal foreshadowed in practically every chapter. Very sobering and nicely documented.
    more
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    A good summary of the past five years in Francis' papacy. The reason for my three-star rating is two-fold: primarily because it's a journalistic book and I don't think it is a good idea to compare it to towering works of literature or philosophical masterpieces; secondarily because I think it was a bit too much of a summary in certain areas. It felt like it presumed knowledge where perhaps it shouldn't have.
    more
  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    From those innocent days when the worst scandal in the Vatican was the possibility that it might have funneled money to Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign. One of a very few books about the Catholic Church that retains its relevance in the post-McCarrick era.
    more
  • Avery Reich-Norris
    January 1, 1970
    A book that mostly allows the facts to speak for themselves. There are some conclusions drawn, but mostly the author gives just the facts. The author also acknowledges some points where he lacks in knowledge and where he himself is biased.
  • Ron
    January 1, 1970
    Tough read. All politics is dirty, and we can only pray that he will tonight for for purposes of good, but this is conspiracy attack dog to an extreme degree. Informative on some level, but not all balanced and quite depressing.
  • Joshua
    January 1, 1970
    A little time has really vindicated and confirmed what Henry Sire (the author's real name) has written here. The contents of the book are by and large a presentation of facts, not simply rhetoric. Highly recommended.
  • Maurisa Mayerle
    January 1, 1970
    Very quick and eye opening read. Over the years my opinion of Pope Francis has soured. I’ve heard of many of the issues addressed in this book but when one reads it all in one place it is truly shocking.
  • satu
    January 1, 1970
    The truth can set one free ,if he knows it's the truth! Each ,time I read more i was offering prayer for mercy and conversion .For courage fortitude ,for the white martyrs of persrcution..
  • Kristen Sloan
    January 1, 1970
    If half of what he wrote is true, I am deeply concerned. But the gates of Hell will not prevail against His Church.
Write a review