Eagle & Crane
Two young daredevil flyers confront ugly truths and family secrets during the U.S. internment of Japanese citizens during World War II, from the author of The Other Typist and Three-Martini Lunch.Louis Thorn and Haruto "Harry" Yamada -- Eagle and Crane -- are the star attractions of Earl Shaw's Flying Circus, a daredevil (and not exactly legal) flying act that traverses Depression-era California. The young men have a complicated relationship, thanks to the Thorn family's belief that the Yamadas -- Japanese immigrants -- stole land that should have stayed in the Thorn family. When Louis and Harry become aerial stuntmen, performing death-defying tricks high above audiences, they're both drawn to Shaw's smart and appealing stepdaughter, Ava Brooks. When the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor and one of Shaw's planes mysteriously crashes and two charred bodies are discovered in it, authorities conclude that the victims were Harry and his father, Kenichi, who had escaped from a Japanese internment camp they had been sent to by the federal government. To the local sheriff, the situation is open and shut. But to the lone FBI agent assigned to the case, the details don't add up.Thus begins an investigation into what really happened to cause the plane crash, who was in the plane when it fell from the sky, and why no one involved seems willing to tell the truth. By turns an absorbing mystery and a fascinating exploration of race, family and loyalty, Eagle and Crane is that rare novel that tells a gripping story as it explores a terrible era of American history.

Eagle & Crane Details

TitleEagle & Crane
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 3rd, 2018
PublisherG.P. Putnam's Sons
ISBN-139780399184291
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, War, World War II

Eagle & Crane Review

  • Dorie
    January 1, 1970
    This was really a 3.5 book for me but I bumped it up to 4 stars because I think there is some good writing and great character development here. We are introduced to a mystery right from the beginning of the novel. There is a police investigator looking into the plane crash of a private plane carrying a Japanese father and son who had escaped from an internment camp. The book is written in alternating perspectives by the main characters.Harry Yamada and Louis Thorn grew up side by side on land o This was really a 3.5 book for me but I bumped it up to 4 stars because I think there is some good writing and great character development here. We are introduced to a mystery right from the beginning of the novel. There is a police investigator looking into the plane crash of a private plane carrying a Japanese father and son who had escaped from an internment camp. The book is written in alternating perspectives by the main characters.Harry Yamada and Louis Thorn grew up side by side on land on the California coast, both families farming, one more successful than the other. Louis grew up always being told that the Yamada’s somehow had stolen land that belonged to the Thorn’s and they had the richer more fertile parcel. He is never really given a true explanation of what happened. Without going into the plot they eventually end up, boosted by Harry’s daredevil spirit, becoming wing walkers on an airplane for the sake of entertainment. They would travel to smaller towns where there wasn’t much in the way of excitement and gather as many people as they could, perform their show and then take people up for rides. Louis and Harry become comfortable with each other again, having to depend on each other for the show and the money that it enables them to send back “home”. We are able to see the effects of the depression on not only these families but those living in the small towns along the coast.There is a love triangle with Ava being the center of attention and both Harry and Louis love her. Ava and her mother Chloe were working with a shady “cure all tonic” salesman, Earl, and they become the set up people advertising the show, selling lemonade and tickets for ridesThere is a good story here and the characters are well developed. It does go back and forth in time but the story flows well. There is also the concurrent story of the investigator and how he gathers information and the conclusions he comes to. This book was a little slow going for me, there were definitely parts where it lagged but it was well worth the read and the ending is a good one.While it is definitely historical fiction, it doesn’t really go into much depth about the Japanese internment camps, but that was fine, I don’t think it set out to be a story about that. There are quite a few other books that I’ve read if one wants to read about the internment camps more in depth. This was the story of these young people dealing with a decades old family rivalry and how it affected them and how they lived their lives.The ending is a good one and I would recommend it for an easy day’s read. I will definitely look for more books by this talented author.I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Celia
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the book. Why, you ask?• It is historical fiction, lovingly and accurately researched, realistic. I found myself over and over, truly picturing the characters and the California setting. It evoked in me a vision and feeling that is hard to describe.• It is about aviation, a topic which became fascinating to me ever since reading 2 books about the Wright Brothers. Aviation history has taken on a new meaning for me and the story here about barnstorming pilots in a circus environment was en I loved the book. Why, you ask?• It is historical fiction, lovingly and accurately researched, realistic. I found myself over and over, truly picturing the characters and the California setting. It evoked in me a vision and feeling that is hard to describe.• It is about aviation, a topic which became fascinating to me ever since reading 2 books about the Wright Brothers. Aviation history has taken on a new meaning for me and the story here about barnstorming pilots in a circus environment was enthralling.• It is a mystery as well. The book starts with two deaths when a bi-plane crashes and the rest of the plot fleshes out the secrets and reasons behind this tragedy.• It addresses the plight of the Japanese American before and after Pearl Harbor.It is this last point that has affected me the most . Allow me to provide two quotes that really spoke to me: 1. Kenichi, Harry (Crane)'s father says:“I don’t know,” he said. “But we will not be harmed. This is America. America is made up of many things, including many Japanese. We are not alone in this country. America is part of us, and we are part of it now. The government’s leaders will not look at us as they do their enemy.” It sounded right to everybody: Kenichi, Shizue, Harry, Mae— even to Cleo and Ava. It sounded right, and yet it did not sound quite true. Kenichi was speaking of the America as America wanted to be, not as America was.2. How ironic, Ava thought, that the government had designated churches as the sites of so many pickup points. (to go to the Japanese detention camps)The plot tends to jump around, but when the locale or year changes, the chapter starts out with that information. I found that I easily followed the shifts and the presentation made sense to me in the order it was written.Well written, entertaining, and a book I strongly recommend. (What a book!!)
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  • Martie Nees Record
    January 1, 1970
    Genre: Historical FictionPublisher: PENGUIN GROUP PutnamPub. Date: July 3, 2018On the first page of this historical fiction is an old black and white picture of a handsome young man with laughter in his eyes and a cocky grin on his face. He is standing in front of a biplane – a small plane for two, with an open cockpit. Over the picture, it reads, “In memory of my grandfather, Norbert.” The image and words left me with a feeling that I would enjoy this novel, which I did.The characters include t Genre: Historical FictionPublisher: PENGUIN GROUP PutnamPub. Date: July 3, 2018On the first page of this historical fiction is an old black and white picture of a handsome young man with laughter in his eyes and a cocky grin on his face. He is standing in front of a biplane – a small plane for two, with an open cockpit. Over the picture, it reads, “In memory of my grandfather, Norbert.” The image and words left me with a feeling that I would enjoy this novel, which I did.The characters include two friendly but highly competitive male teens living on their farms in California during the 1930s to the 1940s. Both are the sons of farmers who have been feuding for years. One of the boys is shy despite a handsome, all American face. The other boy is also handsome. His face displays his Japanese American features. This teen’s nature is much more outgoing than his friend’s, but because we are in the years prior to and during WWII, he hides his true personality, emulating humility to stay out of harm’s way. We also meet a young teenage girl, her mother, and her con artist stepfather who makes a living by selling snake oil. He usually gambles away what little money they have. But, one time he is lucky and wins two biplanes. Eventually, they all meet, and so begins the story of their traveling flying circus, known as barnstorming. The conman gathers the crowds with their act, which consists of two biplanes, two stunt pilots, and two wing walkers. They make their money by selling tickets to the crowds for biplane rides. This is all illegal, but lots of fun. In case you haven’t guessed, the boys are the wing walkers and they both fall for the girl.The young love triangle is written sweetly. The description of farming during the depression and life during WWII is spot-on. But, what I really enjoyed is learning how the early Japanese found their way into the United States. This book didn’t concentrate on the Japanese railroad workers but rather on the Japanese farm workers. I was completely ignorant that in the 1880s Japanese immigrants first came to the Pacific Northwest to farm. They traveled throughout the States buying land. Many became very successful farmers. Sadly, these farmers lost everything when the war led to the internment of Japanese Americans. Not a proud moment in our history. I found this beautiful sad poem that I encourage you to read. “Japanese-American Farmhouse, California, 1942” by Sharon Olds: https://www.poemhunter.com/best-poems.... There is also a mystery in this story, which I didn’t think enhanced the novel at all. Rather, the extra plot detracts from it, causing the tale to be too long. In 1943, an FBI agent comes looking for the Japanese teen and his family. (Eerily similar to today’s unfair treatment of immigrants coming to the US.) While there, he witnesses a biplane crash. The passengers are burned to death and not recognizable. The pilot and the passenger are assumed to be the Japanese father and son. Now, the agent’s job is to investigate the crash. I felt as though this added plot is to ensure a bestseller. The author would have been better off deciding to write one or the other, a mystery or a historical fiction. But it wasn't enough to stop me from enjoying the novel overall.I received this Advance Review Copy (ARC) novel from the publisher at no cost in exchange for an honest review.Find all my book reviews at: Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list...Leave Me Alone I am Reading & Reviewing: https://books6259.wordpress.com/Twitter: Martie's Book Reviews: https://twitter.com/NeesRecord
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  • ♥ Sandi ❣
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars Thanks to Penguin's First-to-Read and G.P. Putnam's and Sons for the chance to read and review this ARC. Publishes July 3, 2018This book came at a really good time for me. It has an author that I like, one who is able to pen characters that speak to you, who sets you in a story that is comfortable and likable, allowing you to become part of their world. This novel brings in the historic past of the bi-plane, when it was in its glory. It delves into the profession of the barnstorming circ 5 stars Thanks to Penguin's First-to-Read and G.P. Putnam's and Sons for the chance to read and review this ARC. Publishes July 3, 2018This book came at a really good time for me. It has an author that I like, one who is able to pen characters that speak to you, who sets you in a story that is comfortable and likable, allowing you to become part of their world. This novel brings in the historic past of the bi-plane, when it was in its glory. It delves into the profession of the barnstorming circuit and the people who ran the circus-like atmosphere. There are elements of the life of a Japanese American and the heartbreaking internment of all Japanese just after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. It is a love story, a story of adventure, and a murder mystery told in both the past and the present. If you have never read Rindell, this is a good novel to begin your adventure with her.
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    There are many WW2 historical fiction books out there but yet most of them do not explore the subject of Japanese internment camps. So I am thankful the author and publisher decided to make that a focus of the novel.Louis Thorn and Haruto "Harry" Yamada, aka Eagle and Crane, are part of a daredevil aviation act in the 1930s and 40s. Ava Brooks is the stepdaughter of the owner of the Flying Circus and both young men find her appealing. But everything changes after the Pearl Harbor attack. While a There are many WW2 historical fiction books out there but yet most of them do not explore the subject of Japanese internment camps. So I am thankful the author and publisher decided to make that a focus of the novel.Louis Thorn and Haruto "Harry" Yamada, aka Eagle and Crane, are part of a daredevil aviation act in the 1930s and 40s. Ava Brooks is the stepdaughter of the owner of the Flying Circus and both young men find her appealing. But everything changes after the Pearl Harbor attack. While authorities conclude Harry and his father, Kenichi, died in a plane crash after escaping from an internment camp, a lone FBI agent thinks this isn't an open and shut case. This is a story about family, loyalty, and an ugly part of American history.I've always been fascinated with this period of aviation where airplanes were becoming a more common thing but yet there was still a bit of wonder and excitement. I definitely enjoyed the Flying Circus bits of the story and the complicated relationship the men had with one another and with Ava. I thought the backstory of each family really set the stage for what was to come later on in the story.My only complaint about the book is at times I thought the author fell into the trap of telling how bad internment camps were rather than just letting the story unfold naturally. It felt like I was hearing the voice of the author rather than the characters, if that makes any sense. Overall, this was a good read that held my interest throughout. Definitely recommend if you enjoy WW2 historical fiction.Thank you to First to Read for the advance digital copy! I was under no obligation to post a review and all views expressed are my honest opinion.
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  • ☮Karen
    January 1, 1970
    I love this author and this book was a fantastic read. I'll read anything she writes after The Other Typist, which had me bewitched but also bewildered. Eagle and Crane fortunately skips the bewilderment and goes straight to endearment and heartbreak.Two boys, one a Japanese American, the other white, grow up on the same section of farmland in pre - World War II California. Their common age and venue make friends out of them despite their families' histories. Eventually they join a flying circus I love this author and this book was a fantastic read. I'll read anything she writes after The Other Typist, which had me bewitched but also bewildered. Eagle and Crane fortunately skips the bewilderment and goes straight to endearment and heartbreak.Two boys, one a Japanese American, the other white, grow up on the same section of farmland in pre - World War II California. Their common age and venue make friends out of them despite their families' histories. Eventually they join a flying circus together and spend some time away from home learning to be stunt men and pilots. Their friendship hits some bumps but nothing like when the Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor and the war and internment camps are in their backyard. Oh, and there is also a young woman involved.To avoid spoilers I'll simply say that the ending has some nice twists, one you might see coming or not, which is always a good thing. The characters and the story, adventures and history galore, will stay with me for a long time to come.Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher.
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  • Taylor (shihtzus.and.book.reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    Many, many thanks to Putnam Books for my free copy in exchange for my honest review. It is a pleasure to share my thoughts!When I first saw this book on Goodreads, I didn’t even read the blurb because the cover was so gorgeous, I knew the inside had to be just as beautiful. I was immediately intrigued (helloooo, historical fiction + Taylor) and pulled into a world I knew NOTHING about. Barnstorming?? Who knew such a thing existed?! The story is split into two times, early 1940’s, moving forward Many, many thanks to Putnam Books for my free copy in exchange for my honest review. It is a pleasure to share my thoughts!When I first saw this book on Goodreads, I didn’t even read the blurb because the cover was so gorgeous, I knew the inside had to be just as beautiful. I was immediately intrigued (helloooo, historical fiction + Taylor) and pulled into a world I knew NOTHING about. Barnstorming?? Who knew such a thing existed?! The story is split into two times, early 1940’s, moving forward and then separately in 1943. Basically, these two storylines could not be any more different.In 1943, Agent Bonner from the FBI has come to Newcastle, California to investigate two missing Japanese men from the Tule Lake Relocation Center, where they are being held by the federal government after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. While questioning Louis Thorn, they watch as a biplane falls from the sky and erupts in a ball of fire. You could say this complicates things…In the early 40’s, we meet Earl Shaw and his Flying Circus. As they make their way through small towns in Depression-era California, they are careful to keep under the radar as much as they can, while still making a profit. (Side note: you’re going to LOATH Earl Shaw.) When they reach Newcastle, two young men with a competitive relationship take their plane ride to the next level and decide to wing-walk while in the air. This launches a Flying Circus with daredevils and all Earl can see are dollar signs. Thus we have, Eagle & Crane.I would say that the first 60% of the book focuses more on the traveling circus and the bonds and relationships formed between Eagle & Crane (Louis and Harry) and Earl’s stepdaughter, Ava. The fact that Harry is Japanese-American is brought up many times, illustrating the presence of racism, but more so after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The last half of the book was a bit harder to read, as the author describes the internment camps the Yamada family and the rest of the Japanese-Americans were forced into. I’m sure I learned about this in school but I didn’t remember any of it. I was shocked to read about the conditions these people were forced to live in. Most people know about Concentration Camps but you don’t really hear talk about the Internment Camps the Japanese-Americans were forced into—because Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. In the US Governments mind, it was safer to evacuate and detain ALL Japanese-Americans, rather than take the chance they might miss someone who was disloyal to the US. I found myself shocked..and infuriated..my blood was boiling as I read.“I don’t know,” he said. “But we will not be harmed. This is America. America is made up of many things, including many Japanese. We are not alone in this country. America is part of us, and w are part of it now. The governments leaders will not look at us as they do their enemy.”It sounded right to everybody: Kenichi, Shizue, Harry and Mae-even to Cleo and Ava. It sounded right, and yet it did not sound quite true. Kenichi was speaking of the America as America wanted to be, not as America was.The middle of the book is a bit slower, as Agent Bonner is floundering in his investigation and Eagle & Crane and flying around having a good old time, but there are important nuggets thrown in that help to tie everything together. Stick with it and you’ll love this ending!That ending. Never saw it coming.The writing is superb and there’s excellent character development. I loved seeing the transformation illustrated. Well done, Suzanne Rindell!
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  • Linda Zagon
    January 1, 1970
    My Review of "Eagle & Crane" by Suzanne RindellKudos to Suzanne Rindell Author of "Eagle & Crane" for writing such an inspiring, intense, captivating, intense, emotional and intriguing novel. The Genres for this novel are Historical Fiction and Fiction. The timeline for this novel is around the Great Depression and the Bombing of Pearl Harbor, and World War Two. The location of the story is in California.The author describes her characters as complicated, complex, and torn by both events My Review of "Eagle & Crane" by Suzanne RindellKudos to Suzanne Rindell Author of "Eagle & Crane" for writing such an inspiring, intense, captivating, intense, emotional and intriguing novel. The Genres for this novel are Historical Fiction and Fiction. The timeline for this novel is around the Great Depression and the Bombing of Pearl Harbor, and World War Two. The location of the story is in California.The author describes her characters as complicated, complex, and torn by both events and family expectations. Louis Thorne and " Harry Yamada" were friends for a short time when they were little boys. Harry loved magic, and Louis loved comic book heroes.  The Thorne family believed that the "Yamada" family had stolen their land, and from that become a great hatred.Louis meets a young girl, Ava, who is selling tickets for a flying show. Louis comes back with money and reunites with Harry. Somehow the two young men become aerial stuntman doing life-threatening and dangerous acts. The two work together as a team. Despite set backs and major problems, the two become known as "Eagle" and "Crane", nick names assigned to them with a racial intonation.When the tragedy  of the  Pearl Harbor bombing occurs, the United State government puts all of the Japanese people in internment camps.  Many are Japanese Americans, both citizens and American born. This is a terrible time that is not always revealed  in history books. The homes, land, possessions were supposed to be temporarily taken away from these people. There was inadequate medical care, cramped quarters, and poor living conditions. I appreciate the research and the resources the author used to provide the information. It is both thought-provoking and very emotionally charged. . Do we learn from history?Somehow, both Harry and his father escape the camps, but there is an airplane found with two charred bodies. The local government finds it an open and close case. One FBI agent with a personal agenda suspects foul play, and starts to investigate.  Will the deep secrets between the two families be revealed?  I highly recommend this amazing novel to readers that appreciate Historical Fiction.
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  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    I guess it all comes down to the style of writing and I see that this author has a lot of dedicated readers. But I am not one of them. The prose is very simple for me, for example “No need to knock; their boots make a good deal of noise on the wooden planks.” This is not an engaging prose for me. Also the book starts with bombardment of dialogue. That is not an engaging start for me. Start with a story woven with vivid imagery instead of load of [email protected]: Best Historical Fiction
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 3/5Suzanne Rindell combines historical fiction, mystery, romance and family drama in her third novel Eagle and Crane.A plane crash and two dead bodies, one too badly burned to even identify, opens up the story immediately bringing to the fore the mystery that readers will have to puzzle out throughout the whole book. At the center of it all are three characters – Haruto “Harry” Yamada, Louis Thorn and Ava Brooks. FBI Agent Bonner adds up tension to the story, playing the role of a connec Rating: 3/5Suzanne Rindell combines historical fiction, mystery, romance and family drama in her third novel Eagle and Crane.A plane crash and two dead bodies, one too badly burned to even identify, opens up the story immediately bringing to the fore the mystery that readers will have to puzzle out throughout the whole book. At the center of it all are three characters – Haruto “Harry” Yamada, Louis Thorn and Ava Brooks. FBI Agent Bonner adds up tension to the story, playing the role of a connector stitching together the pieces of the story. The narrative toggles back and forth detailing the family feud between the Yamadas and the Thorns, the beginning of Harry and Louis’ daredevil act, and the internment of Japanese immigrants in the U.S. during World War II.This was a slow starter for me. Rindell’s story took time to unfold, her prose stilted at times and meandering even at some points. Eagle and Crane is not the type of book you just pick up and read in one go. This sometimes counts against the book for me, but somehow I just couldn’t put this one down and let it go unfinished.Meticulously researched and carefully detailed, Eagle and Crane is an immersive work that will transport readers to a time when America let fear rule over her.I’ve read quite a few historical novels set during WWII but not one of them included anything about Japanese internment camps, so this was both a revelation and an informative bit of history for me. I didn’t know that this happened and I just can’t help thinking how it somehow mirrors what is currently happening in U.S. right now.But more than the strong historical foundations of this story, it was the characters that made me stick through finishing this book.All three of the main characters – Ava, Harry and Louis- were well-developed and complex. Their trio is Eagle and Crane’s heart and soul. Harry and Louis' complicated friendship, Ava's love for both boys, Louis' conflicted loyalties - these fuel most of the book, and it were these parts I loved most. I think it brought out the human factor I’m looking for in every historical fiction and allowed me to connect more to the story. Though I must say, Agent Bonner's parts often felt pat and contrived to me.Overall, Eagle and Crane was a satisfying read. If you're one for historical fiction, then I definitely recommend this one to you. Digital ARC graciously provided by publisher via Edelweiss. This review was first published on In Between Book Pages.
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  • Janelle
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come
  • bookwonderful
    January 1, 1970
    This book starts with a mystery. Two men have escaped from a Japanese internment camp during WW2 - Harry Yamada and his father, Kenichi. As the police and FBI go to investigate, a plan crashes containing what seems to be the bodies of the escapees. An open and shut suicide case to some. But for agent Bonner, something seems off. As he dives deeper in an attempt to find the truth behind the crash, he uncovers a sweeping story behind a generational feud between the Yamadas and the Thorns. We follo This book starts with a mystery. Two men have escaped from a Japanese internment camp during WW2 - Harry Yamada and his father, Kenichi. As the police and FBI go to investigate, a plan crashes containing what seems to be the bodies of the escapees. An open and shut suicide case to some. But for agent Bonner, something seems off. As he dives deeper in an attempt to find the truth behind the crash, he uncovers a sweeping story behind a generational feud between the Yamadas and the Thorns. We follow Harry Yamada and Louis Thorn - raised to hate the others family due to their grandfathers’ feud over farming land. They form an unlikely barnstorming duo brought together by chance by Ava Books and her traveling family. We follow them as they travel around depression era Northern California trying to become a successful stunt act while navigating the tense relationship between Harry and Luis. When Pearl Harbor is bombed the Yamadas are at risk and thus begins the unraveling of how the plane crashed with the bodies of Harry and Kenichi.Told with stunning descriptions of Northern California and amazing detail around Japanese interment this story is one of loyalty, friendship, family and loss.
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  • Atom Sharp
    January 1, 1970
    I expected a lot from this book and got a whole lot more. A transportive tome that gives you the feeling of being right there with the fully-realized characters, this mystery had me trying to put together what I thought was going to happen, second-guessing myself, and ultimately being surprised and (spoiler-free hidden emotion) at the end. There are little vignettes, mini folk tales within that were just so interesting, they could have even been their own little spin-off books based around their I expected a lot from this book and got a whole lot more. A transportive tome that gives you the feeling of being right there with the fully-realized characters, this mystery had me trying to put together what I thought was going to happen, second-guessing myself, and ultimately being surprised and (spoiler-free hidden emotion) at the end. There are little vignettes, mini folk tales within that were just so interesting, they could have even been their own little spin-off books based around their own main characters, and the events they set in motion were very engrossing. I found I was really invested in what was going to happen, and there was so much intrigue there was always a reason I couldn't put it down. Overall, if you are looking for something to keep you guessing and take you away to another time and place full of interesting people mired in all the love and tragedy life has to offer, this book is for you. I'll be giving it another read to walk back through the mystery with my post-read perspective.
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  • Reeca Elliott
    January 1, 1970
    Louis and Harry are friends but yet enemies. To say their relationship is complicated is an understatement. Harry and Louis attend a flying circus. Harry decides he wants to WALK THE WING of the plane. Well! Louis is not to be outdone. They both do it and do it splendidly! They decide to join this flying circus and be stuntmen. This is just the beginning of their tale.Harry is Japanese at a time in our country’s history when it is not too popular to be Japanese. His family is ridiculed and event Louis and Harry are friends but yet enemies. To say their relationship is complicated is an understatement. Harry and Louis attend a flying circus. Harry decides he wants to WALK THE WING of the plane. Well! Louis is not to be outdone. They both do it and do it splendidly! They decide to join this flying circus and be stuntmen. This is just the beginning of their tale.Harry is Japanese at a time in our country’s history when it is not too popular to be Japanese. His family is ridiculed and eventually placed in an internment camp due to Executive Order 9066. He and his father escape and this puts the FBI on their trail. Then they are both killed in a plane crash…so what happened?This is just one of the great storylines in this read. The camps, the flying circus, the mystery of the plane crash kept me glued to this book. I read it in two days!The author did a fabulous job with the historical research. And there is a lot of history in this read and it ties the whole story together. How the flying circus survived, how awful the camps were, how terrible it was to be Japanese are just a few fascinating facts floating throughout this tale.The story is a little long and has a large amount of description. But, it is unique in many ways. With the flying circus, WWII, Japanese Camps and the mystery, I was hooked.
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  • Brendan Jones
    January 1, 1970
    A page-turning historical mystery that tells an astonishingly contemporary story of an unexpected friendship that leads to the ends of a bi-planes wings. If this were a movie the trailer would have so many cool takes you wouldn't believe it was all from the same film. You can taste California in all its beginnings as a state, its hope and its richness and its beauty, and eventual sadness. Rindell does a great job telling the haunting story of WWII-era Japanese internment camps, and the psycholog A page-turning historical mystery that tells an astonishingly contemporary story of an unexpected friendship that leads to the ends of a bi-planes wings. If this were a movie the trailer would have so many cool takes you wouldn't believe it was all from the same film. You can taste California in all its beginnings as a state, its hope and its richness and its beauty, and eventual sadness. Rindell does a great job telling the haunting story of WWII-era Japanese internment camps, and the psychological effects it had on families of the era. But mostly this is just a very good, deeply imagined story, with a classic Rindellian twist at the end! Haruto "Harry" Yamada is a character I won't ever forget.
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  • Leslie Rose
    January 1, 1970
    "Eagle and Crane" is about family, friendship, love, and the dark and tragic outcomes of the bigotry and racism towards the American Japanese that pervaded our nation during the years from the 1930's to 40's. Rindell's descriptions of the California landscapes, from the foothills to the Central Valley to the coast, provide a rich backdrop for the murder mystery that drives this story. The unexpected twists and turns the story takes at its end, as the past and present collide, lead to a satisfyin "Eagle and Crane" is about family, friendship, love, and the dark and tragic outcomes of the bigotry and racism towards the American Japanese that pervaded our nation during the years from the 1930's to 40's. Rindell's descriptions of the California landscapes, from the foothills to the Central Valley to the coast, provide a rich backdrop for the murder mystery that drives this story. The unexpected twists and turns the story takes at its end, as the past and present collide, lead to a satisfying conclusion.
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  • Sharlene
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars for Suzanne Rindell's Eagle and Crane. Truly a beautiful story. It was: Riveting, Moving, a page turner, did not see the mystery ending coming at all, amazing characters and locale. Enjoyed this book greatly.
  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you First To Read and Penguin Random House for the ARC of Eagle and Crane. What a great read. This novel gives you an inside look at the “flying circus” days. I’m not sure how you ever become brave enough or stupid enough to walk on the wings of a biplane. It was fun to read and learn about this time in entertainment history. Although I’ve read a few books about WWII, they seem to mainly skim over the subject of the Japanese Internment Camps. This novel gives us some insight on what they w Thank you First To Read and Penguin Random House for the ARC of Eagle and Crane. What a great read. This novel gives you an inside look at the “flying circus” days. I’m not sure how you ever become brave enough or stupid enough to walk on the wings of a biplane. It was fun to read and learn about this time in entertainment history. Although I’ve read a few books about WWII, they seem to mainly skim over the subject of the Japanese Internment Camps. This novel gives us some insight on what they were like. I bet you’re wondering how these two subjects mesh together. Well all you have to do is do a fly by of Eagle and Crane to find out!!
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  • Erika Wolffersdorff
    January 1, 1970
    So I won this book through a Goodreads giveway. I thought the cover was beautiful, so I threw my name in the hat. What a beautiful and captivating story! This one had me hooked from the very first page. I loved the characters and their backstories. It was beautifully written and had me guessing until the end! So happy I won it! A must read for historical fiction fans!
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  • nikkia neil
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks Edelweiss for this ARC.Loved the tension, historical detail, and diplomatic way Rindell handles race issues. This book is more than a life lesson though. It's exciting, moving, and moving to read.
  • Jordan Finch
    January 1, 1970
    The cover of this book is gorgeous, but also quite deceptive. The girl on the cover makes it seem like there's going to be a lot of romance and sort of implies that there will be a lot of relationship drama, but Eagle & Crane is so much more than that. It's a story about family and trust and chasing adventure and the ugliness of war, and if you don't want to both smile and cry a little bit by the end, you're reading this book wrong.Eagle & Crane is the story of Louis Thorn and Haruto "Ha The cover of this book is gorgeous, but also quite deceptive. The girl on the cover makes it seem like there's going to be a lot of romance and sort of implies that there will be a lot of relationship drama, but Eagle & Crane is so much more than that. It's a story about family and trust and chasing adventure and the ugliness of war, and if you don't want to both smile and cry a little bit by the end, you're reading this book wrong.Eagle & Crane is the story of Louis Thorn and Haruto "Harry" Yamada; in the 'current' time (1943), Harry and his father have just escaped from a Japanese internment camp, and the FBI's first stop is their old homestead, entrusted to sometimes friend-sometimes adversary Louis Thorn. A plane crash and two burned bodies quickly turns a manhunt into a murder mystery, with Louis as the main suspect. Did the man murder his former friend to keep the property that had once belonged to the Thorn family, or is something more nefarious at work? So begins the story, which then jumps back and forth between the investigation and Louis and Harry's tangled past. Having the story told as FBI Agent Bonner works through the case allows the story to unfold slowly and with rich detail while also keeping an air of 'whodunit?' over everything. As the history of Louis and Harry and their families unfolds, you can't help but continue to wonder if Louis was responsible for the Yamadas' deaths. Frankly, I wasn't sure until the very end; sometimes I'd think there was no way he could've done it, but other times I wasn't so sure. Rindell does a wonderful job of describing and then playing up the bad blood between the Thorns and the Yamadas until you just can't be sure of who did what and what actually happened and whether or not Louis has blood on his hands.Aside from the mystery, there's a strong sense of adventure--and, to a good degree, recklessness--in the story. Earl Shaw's Flying Circus is so much fun to read about, and while Earl himself is quite a slimy character, I love the other members of the circus and their adventures. Of course, Louis and Harry are the stars of the show with their daredevil antics, and their stunts and tricks are so vividly described that I couldn't help but be nervous at times! The whole air of the show changes once the two boys join, and it's good to see Ava's character begin to change as her world expands and she has true friends...and maybe something a little more. The romance in the group is a little tricky, but it's not the love triangle and girl drama that I was expecting, and really, while the romance is an important part of the story near the end, the adventure and freedom and excitement of the daredevil show along with all the related complications are much more important to the plot. The history of aviation during this time and the stories of barnstormers are very interesting, and the side tidbits of information add an extra layer of authenticity to the story. Likewise, the realistic looks at immigration and farming in California and California in general during the 1930s and 1940s really bring the story to life and create this realistic picture of places and people and everyday life in America. Of course, that normal life is shattered with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the resulting interment of Japanese-Americans. The relocation of the Yamadas is so sad, and their time in the camp is filled with heartbreak after heartbreak. After seeing how sweet the whole family is, it's just awful to experience their loss and their tragedy all for just being from the wrong country. WWII was a dark period for much of the world, but it had to have been especially dark for the Japanese Americans wrongly forced into the internment camps. They came to America believing in a great nation and built their lives, only to have their land, their belongings, their families ripped away, and the toll it took on those men and women are clearly displayed in Harry and Kenichi's demeanors after their escape.Although the end is quite bittersweet, some wrongs are righted and some people get what they're due. It's not a happy ending for all, but as Agent Bonner wraps up his case, he helps others fit all the pieces together so that there are at least chances for reconciliation for those who need it. Bonner is a strange character, and while he doesn't really add much to the story except to give the reader a way into the lives of Louis, Harry, and Ava, his heart is in the right place, and his motives are good ones, so I didn't really mind him.Eagle & Crane is a tale of loss and betrayal and danger and friendship, and those themes are relatable for people of all ages across all times. Louis, Harry, and Ava are incredibly interesting main characters, and the barnstorming show makes for incredibly interesting and exciting reading. While most WWII books are set in Europe or the Pacific or anywhere where there was fighting, Rindell's choice to set her story in America really allows readers to see what life was like for those back home and shows the interment camps for the horrible tragedy that they were. Between the mystery and the daredevil stunts, Eagle & Crane will have you hooked until the very last page.*Thanks to Penguin's First to Read for the advance copy of this book.* (less)
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  • Kyra Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you so much to Putnam Books for my copy of EAGLE & CRANE. All opinions are my own.Last year, I read The Other Typist by Suzanne Rindell and it became one of my favorite reads of the year. Rindell kept me captivated during the entire story and I was blown away by how her writing was so incredibly fluid. Needless to say, I was beyond thrilled when Putnam Books reached out and asked if I wanted to review a copy of Eagle & Crane. Historical Fiction is one of my favorite genre's so I de Thank you so much to Putnam Books for my copy of EAGLE & CRANE. All opinions are my own.Last year, I read The Other Typist by Suzanne Rindell and it became one of my favorite reads of the year. Rindell kept me captivated during the entire story and I was blown away by how her writing was so incredibly fluid. Needless to say, I was beyond thrilled when Putnam Books reached out and asked if I wanted to review a copy of Eagle & Crane. Historical Fiction is one of my favorite genre's so I devoured this book in no time. Eagle & Crane is a historical fiction/mystery novel which takes place during World War II. The story is based in California and spans over a handful of years. The plot revolves around a duo of daredevils, Haruto "Harry" Yamada and Louis Thorn, who are aerial stuntmen in "Earl Shaw's Flying Circus." It explores the complex relationship and history between the two neighboring farmer families, one American and one Japanese. To make matters even more complicated, both young men are drawn to their boss's step-daughter, Ava. This novel sets itself apart from other historical fiction novels by examining how the lives of Japanese immigrants and their families were affected before and after the attack on Pearl Harbor.Right off the bat, I became intrigued by the mystery: Haruto "Harry" Yamada and his father Kenichi Yamada escaped from a Japanese internment camp in California. Before the Yamada's were taken to the internment camp, they signed their property and biplane over to their neighbor, Louis Thorn. While the authorities are questioning Louis, who currently lives on their farm, they all are shocked when the biplane comes crashing down on the property. It is presumed that the two bodies found dead and badly charred inside the plane are Harry and Kenichi Yamada. The authorities consider the case closed, however, the lone FBI agent on the case has his doubts. The rest of the story addresses the secrets and history between everyone involved and the events that led up to the crash.The chapters alternate between the past and present stories of the main characters, which sets the stage for what's to come and makes for a compulsive read. It is very clear that Rindell did her research and she does an excellent job at bringing these characters to life. Each have endured their own unique hardships which makes it easy to sympathize with them. The Yamada's were such a kind-hearted and grateful family. I was rooting for them the entire time. It disgusts me to think of the blatant racism and inhumane treatment they endured. It was disheartening to learn that most Asian families lost their possessions, businesses and homes during their internment. The friendship and loyalty between the main characters was heartwarming. The story flowed beautifully and it was easy to read. This is an entertaining book about family, friendship and loss. This is a must-read for historical fiction fans!My Rating: 5 of 5 stars!
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  • Susie | Novel Visits
    January 1, 1970
    {My Thoughts}What Worked For MeThe Flying Circus – The parts of Eagle & Crane that revolved around the barnstorming daredevil flying acts of the 1930’s and 1940’s were truly amazing. When the act came to their small California town, both young men were drawn to the allure of flying and everything that went along with it. Through a series of dares and one-up-manships they made themselves indispensible as wing walkers and flying stuntmen. What made it so incredible was that the two did their s {My Thoughts}What Worked For MeThe Flying Circus – The parts of Eagle & Crane that revolved around the barnstorming daredevil flying acts of the 1930’s and 1940’s were truly amazing. When the act came to their small California town, both young men were drawn to the allure of flying and everything that went along with it. Through a series of dares and one-up-manships they made themselves indispensible as wing walkers and flying stuntmen. What made it so incredible was that the two did their stunts without in any way being tethered to the plane itself and with absolutely no formal training! Can you imagine? It was almost too much to believe, but a little research shows that was exactly how it worked back then.Strong on History – Besides getting the Flying Circus right, Suzanne Rindell did a terrific job with the other historical aspects of her third novel. She set her book in California’s Central Valley, where my grandparents owned a ranch, and though I didn’t know the area that far back, everything about the setting felt accurate. The storyline around Harry and his family and the suspicion they came under after the bombing of Pearl Harbor was a reminder of just how wrong we’ve been in the past. Harry and his sister were born in California and his parents had lived there for many, many years contributing to the community.“I don’t know.” He said. “But we will not be harmed. This is America. America is made up of many things, including many Japanese. We are not alone in this country. America is part of us, and we are part of it now. The government’s leaders will not look at us as they do their enemy.”And yet, they were stripped of all they owned and essentially sent to prison. Very real, very sad, and frighteningly current.A Love Triangle – Both Louis and Harry were drawn to Ave Brooks, stepdaughter of the act’s owner. All three were very young and inexperienced, not knowing quite what to do with their feelings. Add to that the facts that Harry was Japanese and that there was much bad blood between the two young men’s families, and you have a perfect set up for tension, young love, and heartache.What Didn’tThe Mystery – While I thoroughly enjoyed the historical side of Eagle & Crane, I had a harder time with the mystery side of it. In the opening pages a small plane crashed in the field below Louis’s home. In the charred wreckage were the bodies of Harry and his father, who had recently escaped the internment camp. Tied into the rest of the book was the mystery of what happened to them and why this crash occurred. Sadly, many of the elements of the mystery and the investigation surrounding it felt forced to me. Like pieces of a puzzle that don’t quite fit together, but are crammed into place anyway.Believability – Some of the key elements of the story surrounded Earl Shaw, owner of the flying circus. I found his character to be a little too much of a heavy-drinking, gambling, dishonest charicature. But, even moreso, I found it almost impossible to believe that the others in the troupe (including two older, more experieinced pilots) kept falling for his schemes over and over again. Elements of Loius’s story also felt like a stretch to me. I’d thought he’d grown, but then he’d revert back to the black and white views of the rest of his family. He frustrated me.Roosevelt’s Declaration of War – The text of Roosevelt’s speech declaring war on Japan was included Eagle & Crane. I’m not sure why. Perhaps it was to give context to the anti-Japanese feelings of the era, but it wasn’t needed. I pretty much skipped it, as I suspect other readers will do.{The Final Assessment}As a historical fiction novel Eagle & Crane checked all the boxes for me. It took a meaningful time in American history and inserted the flying circus angle to give it a twist. I learned a little more about the era and a lot more about early daredevil flyers. I’d have been happy to have that side played up even more and the mystery side to have been played down. In fact, had Rindell eliminated the storyline around the FBI agent investigating this case, the entire book would have been more to my liking. If you’re a fan of mysteries, especially those set in the past, then Eagle & Crane will make a perfect read for you. Grade: B-Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher, G.P. Putnam’s Sons, and Edelweiss in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Viviane Crystal
    January 1, 1970
    Haruto (Harry) Yamada and Louis Thorn grew up side by side on California farmlands. At one time their lands had been joined and owned by the Thorn family. But to Louis’ father and brothers’ lifelong chagrin, the father had gambled too much in a drunken stupor one night and lost the most valuable west side of his property to the Yamada family. Not a good loser, he bore a grudge against the Yamadas that grew with the telling into fantastic hate and determination to get back at them for “tricking” Haruto (Harry) Yamada and Louis Thorn grew up side by side on California farmlands. At one time their lands had been joined and owned by the Thorn family. But to Louis’ father and brothers’ lifelong chagrin, the father had gambled too much in a drunken stupor one night and lost the most valuable west side of his property to the Yamada family. Not a good loser, he bore a grudge against the Yamadas that grew with the telling into fantastic hate and determination to get back at them for “tricking” the Thorn family out of their property.When we meet Harry and Louis, they have spent years apart and are now barely on speaking terms, sad because they had been childhood companions and friends for a long time, until Louis heard enough of the conflict to turn him against the “Jap” Harry. Now they are to slowly become united as they are snagged into flying “barnstorming” and daredevil deed exhibitions planned by Earl, a con man who originally sold a “cure all tonic.” Ava and her mother Chloe work for Earl and Ava becomes a new source of contention between Harry and Louis. Later on, that romantic triangle becomes the focus of a mystery.WWII arrives with the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and the flight business (which is vividly described quite enjoyably) collapses as all Japanese and Japanese-Americans are interned in camps for the duration of the war. The mystery begins when Harry and someone else in his family escape the camp and supposedly take up one of the bi-planes and crash it spectacularly with no seeming effort to save themselves. Murder? Suicide? It’s up to the local sheriff and FBI Agent Bonner to figure that one out! The plot and character presentations are intriguing and keep a perfect pace and pitch for any reader to follow. Uncertainty is the prevalent motif of this romance/mystery novel so that the reader feels like he or she is the investigator and/or chronicler of this work of historical fiction. This is a unique perspective of the way WWII changed the lives and attitudes of Americans toward foreigners forever! Something to reflect on in these trying days of similar conflicts!
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  • Energy
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely love Historical Fiction and I appreciate that the author chose to talk about what happened to Japanese citizens during the War because it is a dark spot in our history that isn't often discussed. Told from alternating perspectives of the investigator who is looking into a plane crash of a Japanese father and son, who the local sheriff just doesn't want to deal with, and from a young girl Ava, who really is the heart of the story. Louis Thorn grew up hearing how his families neighbor I absolutely love Historical Fiction and I appreciate that the author chose to talk about what happened to Japanese citizens during the War because it is a dark spot in our history that isn't often discussed. Told from alternating perspectives of the investigator who is looking into a plane crash of a Japanese father and son, who the local sheriff just doesn't want to deal with, and from a young girl Ava, who really is the heart of the story. Louis Thorn grew up hearing how his families neighbors, the Yamada's, had cheated his family out of the western side of their land. He was supposed to hate them as ferociously as their father and his eldest brother, Guy. But as a young boy, he befriends Harry. But as happens, they go their separate ways in life until both are drawn to planes that are doing maneuvers out in the field. After taking their scenic flights, they are hooked and become a part of the traveling Flying Circus that is Ava's step-father Earl's creation. While they aren't best friends, they slowly slide into a comfortable sort of friendship with both Ava and each other. Harry performing more daring stunts, and Louis, anxious to keep up, follows his lead, while the show just seems to keep getting bigger, drawing in more customers. But as with all good things, Earl is a sham, Ava knew it from the day they met him selling magic Tonic. But her mother Chloe saw him as their way out, and so they're stuck with him. As with all shams, they eventually show their true colors, and that is exactly what happens. But the fall out is more than any of them could anticipate. While the story was a bit slow to start for me, once it got going, I was hooked. Eagle & Crane is not a fast read by any means, and I think that is why I appreciated it even more. Rindell is very careful in her explanations of characters, settings, and importantly, the tension that surrounds them during these hard times of war. I loved how the opposing chapters between the investigator and the main characters weaved themselves together for a more complete story. This is a story that needed to be told and it was very well done.
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    Eagle & Crane by Suzanne Rindell (Release Date: July 3rd, 2018) is a historical fiction novel, set during WWII. The book follows Louis Thorn, Haruto “Harry” Yamada, and Ava Brooks. Louis and Harry join Ava’s stepfather’s Flying Circus, a barnstorming act in the years following the depression. Though they are neighbors, a feud between their two families prevents them from being friends. But soon they become “Eagle & Crane,” a popular stuntman duo. As Japanese-Americans, Harry and his fami Eagle & Crane by Suzanne Rindell (Release Date: July 3rd, 2018) is a historical fiction novel, set during WWII. The book follows Louis Thorn, Haruto “Harry” Yamada, and Ava Brooks. Louis and Harry join Ava’s stepfather’s Flying Circus, a barnstorming act in the years following the depression. Though they are neighbors, a feud between their two families prevents them from being friends. But soon they become “Eagle & Crane,” a popular stuntman duo. As Japanese-Americans, Harry and his family already dealt with racism and discrimination on a daily basis but, lived a comfortable life on an orchard farm. Once Japan attacks Pearl Harbor the Yamada’s are sent to live at a Japanese internment camp. When Harry and his father flee the camp, an FBI agent comes to investigate. While Agent Bonner is interviewing Louis, the Yamada’s plane mysteriously crashes with two bodies inside, assumed to be Harry and his father. The Agent Bonner now has many more questions than answers. There is an infinite amount of historical fiction books in this era; most are set in France or Germany. Eagle & Crane has a fresh take on this time period. It takes place in California during WWII and goes in detail of the terrible internment of Japanese citizens after Pear Harbor by the United States government. This is a perspective of WWII I have never really learned about in great detail. The author does a wonderful job of describing this era (1930s and 1940s). You can really imagine everything, the smell, the color, the feel. The only critique I have about this book, which is more of a personal preference, is that I thought it the story dragged a little and I was impatient to find out what was going to happen next. Other than that, I really enjoyed Eagle & Crane! *I received an ARC from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Naina
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to First to Read for my free ARC copy of this book -- I really enjoyed reading it. A mix of historical fiction, romance, and mystery that was very well-written and kept me hooked from the very first page. The book starts with an FBI agent showing up to investigate the escape of two Japanese-American men from from an internment camp during WWII. As he's questioning, Louis Thorn, one of the two leading men in the book, a plane comes crashing down and it's presumed to contain the bodies o Thank you to First to Read for my free ARC copy of this book -- I really enjoyed reading it. A mix of historical fiction, romance, and mystery that was very well-written and kept me hooked from the very first page. The book starts with an FBI agent showing up to investigate the escape of two Japanese-American men from from an internment camp during WWII. As he's questioning, Louis Thorn, one of the two leading men in the book, a plane comes crashing down and it's presumed to contain the bodies of Kenichi Yamada and Harry Yamada, Kenichi's son and Louis's best friend. Thus starts the mystery into the deaths of these two men -- was it an accident, a suicide, or a murder?The chapters then alternate timelines, flashing back to tell us more about the history of the Thorn family, the Yamada family, and about the barnstorming act that Harry and Louis get caught up in as young teenagers and travel with throughout California and the west. We learn about Earl Shaw, the proprietor of the act, his wife, Cleo, and her daughter, Ava Brooks. Despite the alternating timelines, the book was very easy to follow and I thought each and every flashback added something to the story. The book ends with the resolution of the murder mystery and FBI investigation and throws in one little additional twist. The murder storyline was captivating and wrapped up nicely too, something that I was particularly pleased about. The resolution wasn't completely obvious, but also not completely mind-boggling and a wild twist. I learned so much from this book, about aviation and that time period, and believe this book gives a critical voice to show how brutally Japanese American individuals and citizens were treated at that time.
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  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    I received Eagle & Crane as part of a Goodreads giveaway.In World War II-era California, a plane crashes to the ground, containing what authorities presume to be the bodies of Kenichi and Haruto "Harry" Yamata, a father and son recently escaped from the a Japanese internment camp. As investigators seek to puzzle out the truth amidst confusing evidence, the story flashes back to Depression-era California, where "Harry" Yamada and Louis Thorn--friends in childhood torn apart by a decades-old f I received Eagle & Crane as part of a Goodreads giveaway.In World War II-era California, a plane crashes to the ground, containing what authorities presume to be the bodies of Kenichi and Haruto "Harry" Yamata, a father and son recently escaped from the a Japanese internment camp. As investigators seek to puzzle out the truth amidst confusing evidence, the story flashes back to Depression-era California, where "Harry" Yamada and Louis Thorn--friends in childhood torn apart by a decades-old feud between their families--reunite under the unlikeliest of circumstances--as stuntmen for Earl Shaw's Flying Circus. The struggling arial show that quickly finds success due to the antics of the two daredevils, whose chilly relationship begins to thaw. At stake, however, is the heart of Ava Brooks, Shaw's bright, pretty stepdaughter, who finds herself torn between the two dashing, dedicated, and often dueling young men. As personal dramas play out, political ones also take their toll, as World War II breaks out, and the friends must reckon with the loss of freedom and liberty, the forces of prejudice, and crises of conscience as the book races toward its tragic conclusion.This was a really enjoyable read. The setting is an interesting one, and one that doesn't turn up terribly often in historical fiction. Rindell does a great job of placemaking--you really feel as if you're traveling the arid landscape of California in the early 1940s. There were some plots twists I saw coming fairly early on, though the big finale remained a well-guarded surprise. The end left me hanging a bit and seemed to end somewhat suddenly, but on the whole, I found myself riveted.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Very good historical fiction. This had a little mystery, some adventure, and plenty of heartache. It alternates between two time periods that eventually catch up to each other to reveal the mystery. I liked this way of storytelling - it gave good background to the story and it kept you vested in how it was going to unfold.The heart of this story is about Japanese-American relations during World War II and how poorly these families were treated. We get to know young men from two families on neigh Very good historical fiction. This had a little mystery, some adventure, and plenty of heartache. It alternates between two time periods that eventually catch up to each other to reveal the mystery. I liked this way of storytelling - it gave good background to the story and it kept you vested in how it was going to unfold.The heart of this story is about Japanese-American relations during World War II and how poorly these families were treated. We get to know young men from two families on neighboring farms - one caucasian and one Japanese. There is a long standing feud between the two families and the boys aren't allowed to be friends growing up. Because of a traveling air show, they wind up working together and getting to know each other. This part of the story was great fun and was quite unique as far as subject matter. I enjoyed their getting to know one another and their daredevil antics. Then Peal Harbor happened and the Japanese family was forced into an internment camp. They have to place their trust in the uneasy friendship the two young men have built. Without giving anything away, this is where the mystery of the story comes in - can they trust their neighbor despite the bad blood? Also adding to the depth of the story is a love triangle and an FBI investigation. All these elements make for an interesting and relevant story that I thoroughly enjoyed. It made me think and it made me care for these characters. The ending wasn't necessarily a surprise, but it was very satisfying. A very good read that I would highly recommend.Thank you to the First to Read program for the advance readers copy of this book.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    This was my third book by Suzanne Rindell. And, this one did not disappoint at all. Actually, I have loved all three of her books. (I'm still waiting to see "The Typist" on film - it was picked up years ago!!)This one dealt with barnstorming and airplane rides. These people were crazy enough to climb onto the wings of these airplanes and do all sorts of tricks while up in the sky. Totally crazy!!!The book also dealt with the Japanese camps that were all over the U.S. during World War II. I had h This was my third book by Suzanne Rindell. And, this one did not disappoint at all. Actually, I have loved all three of her books. (I'm still waiting to see "The Typist" on film - it was picked up years ago!!)This one dealt with barnstorming and airplane rides. These people were crazy enough to climb onto the wings of these airplanes and do all sorts of tricks while up in the sky. Totally crazy!!!The book also dealt with the Japanese camps that were all over the U.S. during World War II. I had heard of this, but hadn't really heard the full extent as to what was going on with this phenomenon. When one of the characters in this book unfortunately gets involved in this, you learn a lot about it. However, it wasn't the brunt of the book and it touched on it, but not a whole lot.For me, the book was a fun loving, high flying, excellent read that I just tore through. Excellent characters and an excellent story!Thanks to Penguin Group Putnam and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
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