Ask a Manager

Ask a Manager Details

TitleAsk a Manager
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 1st, 2018
PublisherBallantine Books
ISBN-139780399181818
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Business, Leadership, Self Help

Ask a Manager Review

  • erforscherin
    January 1, 1970
    I first ran across the Ask a Manager blog years ago, during some dark times when I was struggling in a particularly awful workplace. Alison’s advice was calm, measured, and spot-on; her explanations helped me understand that my work environment was not normal, and most bosses didn’t behave like that, and it was well past time to find a new job. I will always be grateful for that, and for the kind community in the comments section.Ask a Manager is essentially all of that wisdom in the blog conden I first ran across the Ask a Manager blog years ago, during some dark times when I was struggling in a particularly awful workplace. Alison’s advice was calm, measured, and spot-on; her explanations helped me understand that my work environment was not normal, and most bosses didn’t behave like that, and it was well past time to find a new job. I will always be grateful for that, and for the kind community in the comments section.Ask a Manager is essentially all of that wisdom in the blog condensed into book form, and I so very much wish I’d had a guide like this when I was first entering the workforce. It can be a bit dry in parts, and sometimes the amount of information can feel overwhelming; this is definitely not a book to plow through in one sitting. But if you dip in and out of the sections that are relevant to your own workplace issues, you’re nearly guaranteed to find some good advice that you can take away to apply, whether it’s a carefully-worded script to use or just a new way of thinking about the problem.There are some sidebar question-and-answer “tales from the workplace” stories that are taken straight from the blog, and frankly I think it’s one of the book’s weaker parts; the advice is perfectly good on its own without the sensationalism. One of the things I’ve always admired most about Alison’s writing is that it’s very honest, but also very positive: every problem has a solution, and often it’s just a matter of communicating more clearly. Particularly as a woman in a male-dominated field, it can be difficult to be assertive without being seen as overly aggressive; her scripts and example language for certain scenarios have been very useful for me to understand how to approach problems more constructively.I would definitely recommend this book to any new graduates, but also to anyone who’s trying to navigate a tricky work environment (or just plain wanting to become a better co-worker). There are many gimmicky advice books out there, but this is one of the better offerings.-----[Disclaimer: This eARC was provided free by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.]
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Much like her website, the Ask A Manager book is full of no-nonsense, easily accessible workplace advice from an expert you can trust. In a field where managers often are promoted with zero managerial training, this book is a godsend.I received an advance copy from the publisher via Netgalley for review consideration.
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  • Margaret Sankey
    January 1, 1970
    I've read this blog for a long time, so this is a useful distillation of the most common problems and constructive ways to frame solutions--and Green includes the all time favorites, like the boss who insisted he was a Mayan Shaman--which serve as a reminder that you can work at a place which so twists your perception of reality that this seems like something you need to ask politely about.
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  • A. Elizabeth West
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Ballantine and Goodreads Giveaway, for this ARC of Alison Green's latest book. I first found Green's Ask a Manager blog while job hunting in 2012 and have been a loyal reader ever since. This book is like a printed version of that: a handy reference to situations you may encounter at work and how to address them. The book is divided into chapters--bosses; coworkers; if you're the boss; and finally, interviewers. Each section contains a ton of common dilemmas. For each one, she tells y Thank you, Ballantine and Goodreads Giveaway, for this ARC of Alison Green's latest book. I first found Green's Ask a Manager blog while job hunting in 2012 and have been a loyal reader ever since. This book is like a printed version of that: a handy reference to situations you may encounter at work and how to address them. The book is divided into chapters--bosses; coworkers; if you're the boss; and finally, interviewers. Each section contains a ton of common dilemmas. For each one, she tells you exactly what you can say and what to do if you hit a roadblock. Green has always advocated being both tactful and direct, and the language reflects that philosophy. It's like having an experienced and caring mentor helping you navigate your most tricky workplace situations. Featured text scattered throughout the book presents some of Ask a Manager readers' letters and Green's answers to them. Many of these are massively entertaining; even if they seem wacky (trust me, the blog has many of those!), you'll likely find a takeaway. A few features give the reader direct information such as turn-offs to avoid during an interview, or phrases you can use with your boss. I think an index would be helpful, though it's not too difficult to find what you're looking for. This is a book made for flipping, not necessarily a straight read-through, since it's so packed with information. I haven't found a better work advice columnist than Alison Green. If you want to learn to navigate your workplace with smarts and grace, get a copy of this book. It's a terrific addition to your professional library and would make a valuable gift for someone new to the workforce.
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  • Christopher Shawn
    January 1, 1970
    Pulled from a popular blog of the same name, Ask a Manager is exactly what you'd think it is.Quick, to the point answers and advice for all those sticky situations that pop up in the workplace.Typical things like loud chewers, stinky co-workers and the like are covered as well as some outrageous cases that were sent in the to author by her fans.How do you deal with a co-worker in a sub/dom relationship who insists on calling her SO "master" 24/7, including work events?How do you tell your boss y Pulled from a popular blog of the same name, Ask a Manager is exactly what you'd think it is.Quick, to the point answers and advice for all those sticky situations that pop up in the workplace.Typical things like loud chewers, stinky co-workers and the like are covered as well as some outrageous cases that were sent in the to author by her fans.How do you deal with a co-worker in a sub/dom relationship who insists on calling her SO "master" 24/7, including work events?How do you tell your boss you can hear his NC-17 conversations with his wife when he has the office door open?This book is full or practical (and entertaining advice) and its listicle-like nature make it a quick, breezy read.
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  • Anne Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    For all of those people who have wanted advice about any number of potentially awkward workplace discussions, without reading dry tomes on how to be a better person, Alison Green's Ask A Manager is the answer! Green approaches workplace issues with both experience and humor, and the realization that people are only human- and need to be treated as such. Ask A Manager is broken down into 4 sections: you are the manager, you have a manager, you work with others, you're interviewing for a job. Even For all of those people who have wanted advice about any number of potentially awkward workplace discussions, without reading dry tomes on how to be a better person, Alison Green's Ask A Manager is the answer! Green approaches workplace issues with both experience and humor, and the realization that people are only human- and need to be treated as such. Ask A Manager is broken down into 4 sections: you are the manager, you have a manager, you work with others, you're interviewing for a job. Even if you don't necessarily fall into all those categories (maybe you aren't a manager yet) the entire book is well worth reading. You get excellent advice about real world situations- and I, for one, always find it helpful to read as many other views as possible. I felt better about some of my own work experiences after reading this and discovering I wasn't the only one who had ever had to deal with X, Y, or Z. Since Green is an advice columnist, each section is short and to the point. She mixes the more general situations ('how do I ask for a raise') to the still common but awkward ('I totally got drunk at the office party) to the (hopefully) less common ('my boss always steals my lunch out of my desk'). Even those situations you haven't dealt with yourself are good opportunities to think about what you would do in a similar situation.What I really enjoyed about Ask A Manager was the light, humorous, and down-to-earth style of writing Green uses. You can easily imagine you're having a quick phone conversation with a friend who's giving you the support you need to handle any situation. Humor and kindness are Green's recipe for handling many of the awkward interactions humans have with each other and I found myself wishing everyone would read this book and follow its advice. A fast, fun read that will help give you confidence as you maneuver not just your professional life- this book is full of advice that should certainly be applied to daily life in all aspects! Not your regular book on how to manage others, but one that makes you reflect on your interactions in a whole new way. A must read for everyone who has to deal with people.I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    I follow Alison Green on Twitter and am usually glad to see anything she writes, so I was excited to receive an ARC of this book from a Goodreads Giveaway.I am lucky in that I don't have a ton of professional problems, but this year at my job has been a bit tumultuous - particularly with regard to leadership. This book, though it's intended for business professionals and not academics, turned out to be tremendously helpful and allowed me to identify a couple of specific frustrations I'd had trou I follow Alison Green on Twitter and am usually glad to see anything she writes, so I was excited to receive an ARC of this book from a Goodreads Giveaway.I am lucky in that I don't have a ton of professional problems, but this year at my job has been a bit tumultuous - particularly with regard to leadership. This book, though it's intended for business professionals and not academics, turned out to be tremendously helpful and allowed me to identify a couple of specific frustrations I'd had trouble pinning down and gave me good, concrete steps to address them. It's been about a week and a half since I read it and I still find myself thinking about some of the advice within, which doesn't often happen for me - so I'd definitely recommend this to anyone looking to improve their life at work!
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  • Tom Donaghey
    January 1, 1970
    ASK A MANAGER by Alison Green is a handy guide to dealing with “Situations” at work. They happen to all or us. Our co-workers do irritating things, our bosses are jerks, the people around you seem to be doing everything in their power to make sure you are not successful in your work. Most of these are minor things, but they do tend to accumulate, making your workplace a site you tend not to like. Alison Green has been writing her “Ask A Manager” blog for over ten years now and in that time she ASK A MANAGER by Alison Green is a handy guide to dealing with “Situations” at work. They happen to all or us. Our co-workers do irritating things, our bosses are jerks, the people around you seem to be doing everything in their power to make sure you are not successful in your work. Most of these are minor things, but they do tend to accumulate, making your workplace a site you tend not to like. Alison Green has been writing her “Ask A Manager” blog for over ten years now and in that time she has read about many situations which appear to be common frustrations for so many of us. While she addresses many of the situations that arise in offices, her general rule is to talk about the problem. The greatest piece of wisdom is her presentation of the language and method of delivering the words needed to alleviate, or at least ease, the problem. This is a guide book that says to talk about the situations in a calm manner, leaving any aggression you might be feeling behind. There is also a lengthy section on dealing with these self same problems when you are the boss. More supervisors should read that part, because I’ve worked with so many that didn’t have a clue about dealing with their people except for the “My way or the Highway” approach. I won this book through Goodreads.
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  • Jai
    January 1, 1970
    as expected - insightful & entertaining.
  • Fran
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the audiobook of this. I love Ask A Manager and I find both Alison's voice and her advice very soothing.One thing that really ticks me off though is her advice on apologising for things like lateness, or resumé typos, which tends to be along the lines of, "I'm neurotic about punctuality so I'm mortified" or "I'm a neurotic proofreader." Neurosis is a mental disorder, not a character trait, and I find Alison's use of it in these contexts incredibly aggravating.
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    I won a copy of this book from goodreads. I had heard of Ask a Manager and have read a handful of posts over the years, but am not an avid blog reader. I am still working on reading this because its more of a reference book than a book you could read straight through. Alison has numerous wording suggestions for different situations which I had a hard time differentiating when I read many in a row without taking a break. As a speech-language pathologist, I am considering how I could use the examp I won a copy of this book from goodreads. I had heard of Ask a Manager and have read a handful of posts over the years, but am not an avid blog reader. I am still working on reading this because its more of a reference book than a book you could read straight through. Alison has numerous wording suggestions for different situations which I had a hard time differentiating when I read many in a row without taking a break. As a speech-language pathologist, I am considering how I could use the examples to help teach hidden social rules to my students.
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  • Heather F
    January 1, 1970
    I first found Ask a Manager while googling "quit new job" on my phone in the bathroom at said new job seven years ago. Her blog is a daily visit for me. I'd hoped this book would be an expansion on that, but frankly it's a recap-something that might make a nice gift for the college grad in your life, but fans will have already read most of the stories and concepts. Also, there are infantile doodles throughout the book which are off-putting. 3.5/5 startsThank you to NetGalley for this ARC.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I've been reading the Ask a Manager blog for a number of years now and recommend it to just about everyone who works. While the blog is in a Q&A advice column format, this book summarizes the most common types of questions through four categories: conversations with your boss, conversations with your coworkers, conversations when you're the boss, and conversations with your job interviewer. If you're a long-time blog reader there probably won't be much here that's new or surprising, but I st I've been reading the Ask a Manager blog for a number of years now and recommend it to just about everyone who works. While the blog is in a Q&A advice column format, this book summarizes the most common types of questions through four categories: conversations with your boss, conversations with your coworkers, conversations when you're the boss, and conversations with your job interviewer. If you're a long-time blog reader there probably won't be much here that's new or surprising, but I still found it useful; while Green's responses to letter writers often provide scripts specific to their situations, this book is a compilation of more general scripts you can use for most difficult situations you might encounter at work. I specifically found a script for something I'd been struggling with how to navigate ("I can definitely do that, but I do want to flag X for you.") And if you aren't already a regular reader of her blog, I think you'll find her calm, straightforward approach to be refreshing and valuable.Because there are general themes behind much of the advice (which she explicitly lists at the end of the book), some of the phrasing can get a bit repetitive; e.g., "You'll want to address this head on." I don't know that that's necessarily a problem, since this can definitely be used as a reference book where you're just looking up a specific situation and not reading the whole thing straight through. It didn't bother me too much. But her phrases could have been edited a bit more for variety. Sprinkled throughout the book are some "best of" highlights of the most bizarre letters that have been sent in to Ask a Manager. Just like her blog, these balance out the more typical work situations with an element of humor, shock, or just "at least my job isn't that bad." I was disappointed, though, that she didn't include a brief note with the update to the Mayan shaman letter, which was my favorite update of all time.Green recently launched an Ask a Manager podcast in anticipation of the book's release, and one of the things she said she'd been looking forward to about doing a podcast was the ability to demonstrate tone. She often talks about the right tone to take when having specific conversations, and it's helpful to actually hear her examples. This was one reason I picked up the audiobook over the print version, as she narrates it herself and you can get those same examples of the right tone to take in various conversations.I honestly wish there was a non-offensive way I could suggest that everyone I work with read this book, but alas, I don't think that's possible. I will recommend it to everyone else, though!
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  • Orla
    January 1, 1970
    Alison Green's Ask a Manager blog is a daily must-read for me, so buying this book was a given. Whether you read it all at once, or piece by piece like I did, you'll be a wiser person by the time you hit the last page. It's all based around conversations you might need to have at work, whether they're with a co-worker, someone you manage, your boss, or an interviewer. These conversations are wide-ranging and include suggested wording and advice on tone. Sprinkled with real examples from people w Alison Green's Ask a Manager blog is a daily must-read for me, so buying this book was a given. Whether you read it all at once, or piece by piece like I did, you'll be a wiser person by the time you hit the last page. It's all based around conversations you might need to have at work, whether they're with a co-worker, someone you manage, your boss, or an interviewer. These conversations are wide-ranging and include suggested wording and advice on tone. Sprinkled with real examples from people who wrote to Ask a Manager, it's both a practical business book and an entertaining read.A lot of business books deal in hypotheticals, make assumptions about the reader's job role and ambition level, or are trying to sell the author's opinion on how people should work. Green comes at it from a different angle, she understands the importance of interpersonal dynamics, and how continued small annoyances can have an outsized effect on your productivity and your happiness at work. Fixing these is often as simple as having one slightly awkward conversation, and while that makes sense, it can be hard to know what to say in that conversation. That's where this book comes in - filled with workplace problems and ways to talk through them. You may not have a coworker who is placing curses on employees, but you can probably relate to someone who is being driven slowly demented by a coworker who keeps doing/saying something irritating but has never said anything to them about it because they don't want to sound petty. Yes, you can ask someone not to wear the strong perfume that triggers your migraines. Yes, you can ask someone to be more mindful of their personal hygiene if your eyes water when they come by your desk. Yes, you can tell someone to hit the mute button if they tend to snack during conference calls. And you probably should ask them, because you're probably not the only person affected by whatever they're doing, and if that awkward conversation resolves the problem everyone will be happier for it. I point people towards Ask a Manager all the time for sensible work advice, and it's wonderful to have so much of that collected in this book. Assuming that you work with other people, it's probably the best business book you could ever read since harmonious work relationships are more important than most of us realize.
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    A concise and neatly-organized snapshot of the topics covered in her blog of the same title. The book is broken into chapters based on the work relationship involved: conversations with your boss, with your coworkers, with your employees, and with your interviewer. Each chapter starts with a sort of overview before proceeding into a numbered list of situations. The explanations/suggestions are typically under a page in length, and often only a paragraph long, making this a speedy read. I will sa A concise and neatly-organized snapshot of the topics covered in her blog of the same title. The book is broken into chapters based on the work relationship involved: conversations with your boss, with your coworkers, with your employees, and with your interviewer. Each chapter starts with a sort of overview before proceeding into a numbered list of situations. The explanations/suggestions are typically under a page in length, and often only a paragraph long, making this a speedy read. I will say that if you're even an occasional visitor to her blog, you're probably well familiar with the recommendations in this book (and you'll also probably recognize the choice, juicy anecdotes scattered within, e.g. "My boss thinks he's a Mayan shaman"). If you want to show your support for years of advice, by all means buy the book. If you don't know Green's blog, by all means check it out (and then decide if you'd like it condensed into book form). I will add that this book lacks an index, which would have made it much handier as a reference. There is a table of contents that I nearly overlooked which at least shows you where each chapter begins, but you will have to skim/re-read to get back to specific points. An e-copy would not have this issue, of course, but I won a print copy in a Goodreads giveaway, so can't complain too much. On the plus side, this paper copy will be easier to loan out around the office! Ultimately, I absolutely recommend this for anyone new or new-ish to workplace environments, and even those who've been working for a while but find themselves stymied by awkward situations. This book provides a bite-sized introduction covering key/common issues, at least some of which everyone will encounter at some point. Blog-fanatics, otoh, won't find anything new or revelatory however, and as I said, unless you just want to push money her way, you could skip this.
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  • MariLee
    January 1, 1970
    Ask a Manager is a practical, helpful guide for navigating sometimes tricky interactions with bosses, coworkers, employees, and interviewers. (Some examples: how to tell your boss your work load is too heavy, how to ask for feedback, when another co-worker takes credit for your idea/work, employees missing too much work, an interviewer asks an inappropriate question, etc.) Alison Green has sound advice and suggestions for how to frame these conversations and what to say to get the desired result Ask a Manager is a practical, helpful guide for navigating sometimes tricky interactions with bosses, coworkers, employees, and interviewers. (Some examples: how to tell your boss your work load is too heavy, how to ask for feedback, when another co-worker takes credit for your idea/work, employees missing too much work, an interviewer asks an inappropriate question, etc.) Alison Green has sound advice and suggestions for how to frame these conversations and what to say to get the desired results. The book is broken up into sections: Conversations with Your Boss, Conversations with Your Co-workers, Conversations When You're the Boss, and Conversations with Your Job Interviewer. She also includes a introduction and conclusion which offer some good general advice, including when and why to speak up (and when not to) and how to apply these principles to other aspects of your life.Each section is well organized into a question and answer format with the questions in bold which makes it easy to scan and find the concern you need some help addressing.This was an enjoyable and helpful book which I would recommend to anyone, especially those who may be just starting out in the workforce such as recent graduates (especially college), or those who may be uncomfortable or unsure how to best communicate with others in a professional setting.Green is the former chief-of-staff of a successful nonprofit organization who now runs a blog entitled, "Ask a Manager", and writes for New York Magazine, U.S. News & World Report, and other prominent publications. She has a lot of experience fielding common questions and concerns from people, as well as how to handle some not-so-common situations she has been asked to address by readers.Thanks to Ballantine Books/Random House and Goodreads Giveaways for an advance copy.
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  • Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    You may have heard of the "Ask a Manager" blog, run by author Alison Green that answers questions of all sorts about jobs and job hunting. How do deal with someone who steals your work lunch? What if the thief is your BOSS? How do you navigate salary negotiations? What do you do when someone is going through a very tough personal time but it's affecting their productivity? What is the reasoning for certain rules regarding the workplace? And so forth.This is a condensed version of that blog that You may have heard of the "Ask a Manager" blog, run by author Alison Green that answers questions of all sorts about jobs and job hunting. How do deal with someone who steals your work lunch? What if the thief is your BOSS? How do you navigate salary negotiations? What do you do when someone is going through a very tough personal time but it's affecting their productivity? What is the reasoning for certain rules regarding the workplace? And so forth.This is a condensed version of that blog that deals with the most common of those questions. This question and answer format pretty much takes you through all of those (and even more common ones like how to approach your boss to ask for a raise, for example). These are pretty cookie cutter in the sense that these are not the really outrageous stories you sometimes hear about in the news or on Green's blog.That's pretty much it. As others say, this is probably more useful for someone who is just entering the workforce (a new grad, for example) than someone who has been in the working force for awhile. You might find some things that are useful (I liked the interview section) but honestly her blog is better. The entries on her blog are more interesting and unique and this book is more about reaching a general audience.I bought it to support the author and her work but in retrospect I wish my library had already picked it up/hope they do add it to their collection. However, it would make a good gift for a new grad, someone who perhaps hasn't had to work outside the home before, is re-entering the workforce after an extensive absence, etc. Would also recommend her blog as a supplement to this and for general entertainment. :)
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  • Alex Can Read
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a long-time fan of Alison Green’s Ask A Manager blog, where she dishes out practical advice for workplace questions all week long. The letters she answers range from the mundane to the absolutely absurd and hard-to-believe. I am so excited about her new book, where she distills years worth of advice into a handy workplace manual that will be useful for new grads and seasoned professionals alike.The great thing about Alison’s advice is that she empowers readers by giving them scripts, I have been a long-time fan of Alison Green’s Ask A Manager blog, where she dishes out practical advice for workplace questions all week long. The letters she answers range from the mundane to the absolutely absurd and hard-to-believe. I am so excited about her new book, where she distills years worth of advice into a handy workplace manual that will be useful for new grads and seasoned professionals alike.The great thing about Alison’s advice is that she empowers readers by giving them scripts, and suggestions on how to approach scary conversations about raises, promotions and asking your manager to step in when your coworker is cutting you out of important conversations.The scenarios Alison addresses in her book are real scenarios, sent in by letter writers asking for advice on how to handle specific challenges they are facing in the workplace. Dedicated readers of the blog might recognize a story or two, and a lot of the advice will feel familiar, but many of the letters included are new content, never seen on the AAM blog. Alison has distilled years of her best advice into an easy to access guide.I can personally attest to drawing confidence from Alison’s posts on how to ask for a promotion. Her scripts and framing were so crucial to my approach, which was successful.Alison’s advice is useful for anyone with a reasonable boss. As Alison herself notes – an unreasonable person won’t be reasoned with. The scripts and advice Alison shared aren’t magic bullets, but they are wonderful tools for anyone in a workplace to have at hand.You can be sure I am purchasing a copy to gift to my about-to-graduate-from-college little sister.I received an eARC from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Lena
    January 1, 1970
    I've been reading the Ask a Manager blog for a few years, and it's been really useful for various things -- for know which things are reasonable and what a healthy work environment looks like (something probably particularly helpful for grad students), and also frequently for amusement at some of the strange situations. And for someone like me, who can have a tough time figuring out how to communicate, the scripts Alison gives are really nice.Now as for this book... I was hoping it would be more I've been reading the Ask a Manager blog for a few years, and it's been really useful for various things -- for know which things are reasonable and what a healthy work environment looks like (something probably particularly helpful for grad students), and also frequently for amusement at some of the strange situations. And for someone like me, who can have a tough time figuring out how to communicate, the scripts Alison gives are really nice.Now as for this book... I was hoping it would be more letters, but instead it's a list of common situations of various types (interacting with your manager, interacting with peers, interacting with reports, interacting with interviewers) and scripts and advice for handling them. I think it's a good reference if you're running into any of the problems there, and also for getting a general idea of how to react or raise things and so on. But it's not nearly as entertaining a read as the blog, because it's focused on broadly applicable advice rather than on dealing with rare situations that are mostly entertaining because they are odd (e.g., "How do I tell my employee she is unprofessional and inexperienced when she seems upset that we celebrate every person's birthday except for hers, because she was born on leap day and therefore does not have a birthday"). Also, because of the format, the book didn't ever help me understand situations from another point of view, which the blog has been helpful for.So yeah, still pretty useful, but not as much new content as I was hoping for, and no new weird letters.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Like some other early reviewers of this book, I'm a longtime reader of the author's blog. Her book is a distillation of her approach into insights and scripts for a litany of situations, like "coworker steals my ideas" and "employee won't take no for an answer." The format is a lot drier than the blog, which is often very colorful but still useful, because the advice she provides is always grounded in a way of looking at work which you can eventually internalize and evince yourself. Unlike the b Like some other early reviewers of this book, I'm a longtime reader of the author's blog. Her book is a distillation of her approach into insights and scripts for a litany of situations, like "coworker steals my ideas" and "employee won't take no for an answer." The format is a lot drier than the blog, which is often very colorful but still useful, because the advice she provides is always grounded in a way of looking at work which you can eventually internalize and evince yourself. Unlike the blog, the book contains easy-to-find advice about common scenarios.This would be an essential read for someone new to office work, returning to the workforce, or becoming a manager for the first time. It's not really necessary for longtime fans, although if you start reading her work you'll probably become one!Review copy received from Edelweiss.
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  • Joy
    January 1, 1970
    I won an advanced copy of Ask a Manager in a Goodreads giveaway.I was glad to win this book as at work I had to do a development goal and I didn’t have to go buy a book for work.I found the situations varied and the responses to adapt useful. There are co-worker to co-worker situations and dealing with managers, or those who have to be managed. Also an interview section that covered most of the sticky points that can come up. The questions and situations from reader made my workplace pretty seem I won an advanced copy of Ask a Manager in a Goodreads giveaway.I was glad to win this book as at work I had to do a development goal and I didn’t have to go buy a book for work.I found the situations varied and the responses to adapt useful. There are co-worker to co-worker situations and dealing with managers, or those who have to be managed. Also an interview section that covered most of the sticky points that can come up. The questions and situations from reader made my workplace pretty seem tame.I have personally found it frustrating in my own work place that my manager makes a face when I refer to any experience I have had in a former job. Since I have not had much training in my current job I rely a lot on what I have learned before. So after the face one day and I had thought about it, I went to her office the other morning and asked “Do you really want me to depend upon only what I have learned since I have been here?” Put that way she realized that no, that is not what she wanted. She also came to understand that just because I was relying on previous knowledge didn’t mean I thought it was done better somewhere else. So I think the book helped me in my own work enviroment, which is what is was meant to do.Thank you.
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  • Jessi
    January 1, 1970
    I read the Ask a Manager blog pretty religiously. Like, every new post, going back and reading old posts, following comments. I was really excited to get this book. And it really is a good book with practical details for everyday working life (more geared toward office work.) There are sections based on your role in the office (boss, employee, etc.) and they include bullets of practical advice, scripts for difficult situations, and stories taken right from Green's blog. It is a little dry in poi I read the Ask a Manager blog pretty religiously. Like, every new post, going back and reading old posts, following comments. I was really excited to get this book. And it really is a good book with practical details for everyday working life (more geared toward office work.) There are sections based on your role in the office (boss, employee, etc.) and they include bullets of practical advice, scripts for difficult situations, and stories taken right from Green's blog. It is a little dry in points but it's a nonfiction advice book. I liked the stories pulled right from the blog, they injected some life into the book. If you are already an Ask a Manager reader, it's all the advice you've read but organized into neat lists. Nothing new really so longtime (years) readers probably won't gain much. For people just entering the workplace, just becoming mangers, or conducting interviews, this would be an invaluable book.
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  • Denise St Pierre
    January 1, 1970
    A great, quick read for anyone in the workforce, entering the workforce, or leading the workforce. It has the signature wit of Alison's blog and even some of the more questionable stories from readers, but all the advice is framed in a way that's useful, accessible, and adjustable, depending on your position and industry. I know this book would have given me a lot more confidence back when I was approaching my boss about a raise, and would have reassured me that asking wasn't an imposition, but A great, quick read for anyone in the workforce, entering the workforce, or leading the workforce. It has the signature wit of Alison's blog and even some of the more questionable stories from readers, but all the advice is framed in a way that's useful, accessible, and adjustable, depending on your position and industry. I know this book would have given me a lot more confidence back when I was approaching my boss about a raise, and would have reassured me that asking wasn't an imposition, but a natural aspect of my working life. This book takes those conversations that we turn inward and turn into anxiety spirals, and shows that they are really just a part of having a job...we are far from the only ones who fret about the impression we make, about engaging with our coworkers, or about having hard conversations with our bosses. I'll be recommending this one far and wide!
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  • Ginae B.
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, how we wish that this sort of book were around when we were ensconced in the workforce. It can be brutal out there. So many issues can arise when one is working. The biggest challenge of all can come from learning some modicum of diplomacy while dealing with those above us.Allison Green tells it exactly how it is. There's no floofy fluff or garbage. What began as an advice site has evolved into something more tangible. If you have a single inquiry, you might just want to Google that inquiry. Oh, how we wish that this sort of book were around when we were ensconced in the workforce. It can be brutal out there. So many issues can arise when one is working. The biggest challenge of all can come from learning some modicum of diplomacy while dealing with those above us.Allison Green tells it exactly how it is. There's no floofy fluff or garbage. What began as an advice site has evolved into something more tangible. If you have a single inquiry, you might just want to Google that inquiry. However, if you find that you have a lot of questions or just want to ensure that you are following the norms of corporate life, this is the book for you.
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  • Cagne
    January 1, 1970
    Fast paced as an audiobook, which I guess is a good summary on what after will be a good reference book in the text form.Regarding its value outside of the workplace, I found the guidelines on handling an employee's mistake somewhat relevant regarding meeting with people who turn out to have a flexible concept of time and appointments; so far it always was weird to approach in a way which kept the relationship ongoing, but turning into a "what do you do and can we fix it" situation was insightfu Fast paced as an audiobook, which I guess is a good summary on what after will be a good reference book in the text form.Regarding its value outside of the workplace, I found the guidelines on handling an employee's mistake somewhat relevant regarding meeting with people who turn out to have a flexible concept of time and appointments; so far it always was weird to approach in a way which kept the relationship ongoing, but turning into a "what do you do and can we fix it" situation was insightful.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    SUPER useful book on how to navigate tough or uncomfortable discussions and situations at work. While tact and diplomacy may seem like common sense, it can be hard to find the right words to convey what you want to say, and this book not only gives useful tips for specific situations but also examples.*Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Melody
    January 1, 1970
    I love this blog but I wish this book had gone into a little more depth, or had a few more anecdotes, at times. There is good overview information, but it can sometimes feel beginner. Still, it is nice to have it in one place. Structurally, I don’t understand having the content about interviewing at the end of the book instead of the beginning. After all, that’s the beginning of the process.
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  • Gabrielle Simmons
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoy the Ask a Manager website, so when I saw she had written a book, I immediately entered the giveaway. Thankfully, just like her website this book was extremely enjoyable, informative and had lots of interesting questions. This is a great reference book, as she has literally touched on everything and I will refer back to it many times I'm sure!
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  • Gyan Yankovich
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the perfect beginner’s guide to being a good manager, employee, and co-worker, but Alison’s lessons in communication and assertiveness could really transcend the workplace to any area of your life. Whether you’re a regular reader of Ask A Manager or not, this book is a fantastic resource for anyone who has a job and wants to do it well.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    A nice, straightforward guide to dealing with bosses, coworkers, and employees, with just a dash of the weirder stories from the Ask a Manager website. I was honestly hoping for more of the crazypants stories and less of the perfectly reasonable work advice, but, you know, that stuff's useful too, I guess. :)
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