Batman, Volume 6
Author Tom King pens the sixth volume of his critically acclaimed, best-selling Batman series in BATMAN VOL. 6!Don’t miss out on the newest installment of this best-selling, critically acclaimed graphic novel series written by breakout star Tom King, BATMAN and featuring art by Mike Janin!This Rebirth title continues to go places Batman has never seen. Batman is trying to prepare himself for a new life with a potential wedding to Catwoman. Will Batman continue on his new journey next to Selina…or will he return to the dark life of Gotham’s vigilante. Collects BATMAN #38-43.

Batman, Volume 6 Details

TitleBatman, Volume 6
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 31st, 2018
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401280277
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Graphic Novels, Batman

Batman, Volume 6 Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    When a Baaaaat loves a (Cat)woman… ! The wedding’s right around the corner but there’s more adventures to be had first! Batman, Volume 6: Bride or Burglar? collects four stories of differing length. And, as usual, Tom King’s done it again, producing yet another corking Batman book! The opening issue highlights how insane Bruce Wayne/Batman is, just in concept, when Bruce encounters a wealthy young boy, accompanied by his own butler, whose parents were also viciously murdered. But is this more th When a Baaaaat loves a (Cat)woman… ! The wedding’s right around the corner but there’s more adventures to be had first! Batman, Volume 6: Bride or Burglar? collects four stories of differing length. And, as usual, Tom King’s done it again, producing yet another corking Batman book! The opening issue highlights how insane Bruce Wayne/Batman is, just in concept, when Bruce encounters a wealthy young boy, accompanied by his own butler, whose parents were also viciously murdered. But is this more than coincidence… ? It’s not the first time someone’s shone a light on the strangeness of Batman’s origins and Bruce’s choices after his parents’ deaths but it’s a fine issue nonetheless. King continues the Superfriends story from the last book with Parts 3 and 4, this time featuring Wonder Woman. The Gentle Man is a warrior battling never-ending waves of monsters, forever, to keep our world safe. Wonder Woman and Batman do him a solid by giving him a day’s respite to visit his wife – except time doesn’t work the same way in the Gentle Man’s realm and Bruce’s faithfulness is about to be tested as he’s separated from Selina for 37 years… I loved seeing Joelle Jones return to draw this two-parter. Her art is delectable here, particularly with the characters’ body language like Catwoman laughing at Bruce in actual knight armour and Bruce and Diana talking about their pets over dinner (of course Wonder Woman has a kangaroo!). The Gentle Man may be a contrived character, made purely for this story to work, but he was surprisingly more developed than he should’ve been, another testament to King’s skill as a writer. I don’t get how Bruce doesn’t age 37 years though. I understand why Diana wouldn’t – she’s a god – but Bruce is just a man. Hmm… shenanigans! Everyone Loves Ivy is another callback from earlier in the series, this time to The War of Jokes and Riddles. A traumatised Ivy uses the Green to seize control of everyone’s will and it’s down to Batman and Catwoman to save the world. The concept felt derivative of Unity from Rick and Morty and the explanation behind Ivy’s actions meant little to me mostly as The War of Jokes and Riddles is the only book in King’s run that I haven’t been crazy about. Also, Catwoman – even on her best day – is NOT faster than The Flash, let alone 3! I guess Ivy controlling them must’ve slowed them down or something, right? But it was fun to see the Gotham City Sirens reunite, I love how King continues to feature Bat Burger in his stories (KGBLT and Killer Croque Monsieur - I wants them!) and I’m so enjoying seeing Batman and Catwoman working together – they’re quite the formidable team! Mikel Janin’s art is spectacular – he’s seriously becoming one of the best comics artists working today – and I loved June Chung’s gorgeous colours, blending Ivy into her plants so they become one. The book closes with Selina going shopping for her wedding dress – Catwoman-style (ie. breaking and entering)! There’s no real story but both Joelle Jones and Mikel Janin take turns drawing the comic so it looks amazing; Jones designs a helluva dress for Selina’s big day. I liked some stories less than others and had some nitpicks but I wasn’t bored by any of them either and I LOVED the art throughout. Batman, Volume 6: Bride or Burglar? is another reliably entertaining entry in Tom King’s run.
    more
  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    I knew after the last volume it would be hard to top it. This isn't as good but honestly? That's okay. So this has three parts. Super Friends part 3-4 (Now it's Bruce and Diana's turn to be besties) as they fight for over 20+ years together against a endless horde of monsters while Selina tries to free them. Then we have a Poison Ivy story, which I'm going to be honest here, has never been one of my favorite characters. I get WHY people Love her, but not me. Anyhow she takes over the world and e I knew after the last volume it would be hard to top it. This isn't as good but honestly? That's okay. So this has three parts. Super Friends part 3-4 (Now it's Bruce and Diana's turn to be besties) as they fight for over 20+ years together against a endless horde of monsters while Selina tries to free them. Then we have a Poison Ivy story, which I'm going to be honest here, has never been one of my favorite characters. I get WHY people Love her, but not me. Anyhow she takes over the world and everyone in it except for Selina and Bruce since they had the cure. Last but not least is two one shots, one with the Origin of BRUCE WAYNE. No, not the hero, but a kid who is twisted and turns into a little killing machine. Then the last volume is Selina going over her past interactions with the Batman while trying on a wedding dress...or two...or three. Good: I love Selina and Bruce together. It works. Maybe it's because of King's writing but they feel like they belong together. I really enjoyed Super Friends part 3 and 4 as well. Diana and Bruce always had a respectable relationship and nothing changes here. Very well done. I also enjoyed the hell out of Selina past interactions with Bruce and of course her trying on the wedding dresses. Bad: The origins story of Bruce Wayne was kind of flat. It had a cool idea but went nowhere. I think it'll be interesting to see what becomes of him though. Also the poison Ivy story, while not bad, didn't really stick the landing for me. So nothing terrible here. This is still a very solid collection for me. While I didn't love it like War/Engagement, I thought it was up there with I am Bane at a 3.5. I'll hit a 4 on here because I smiled a lot, and that's a good sign.
    more
  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    I knew after the last volume it would be hard to top it. This isn't as good but honestly? That's okay.So this has three parts. Super Friends part 3-4 (Now it's Bruce and Diana's turn to be besties) as they fight for over 20+ years together against a endless horde of monsters while Selina tries to free them. Then we have a Poison Ivy story, which I'm going to be honest here, has never been one of my favorite characters. I get WHY people Love her, but not me. Anyhow she takes over the world and ev I knew after the last volume it would be hard to top it. This isn't as good but honestly? That's okay.So this has three parts. Super Friends part 3-4 (Now it's Bruce and Diana's turn to be besties) as they fight for over 20+ years together against a endless horde of monsters while Selina tries to free them. Then we have a Poison Ivy story, which I'm going to be honest here, has never been one of my favorite characters. I get WHY people Love her, but not me. Anyhow she takes over the world and everyone in it except for Selina and Bruce since they had the cure. Last but not least is two one shots, one with the Origin of BRUCE WAYNE. No, not the hero, but a kid who is twisted and turns into a little killing machine. Then the last volume is Selina going over her past interactions with the Batman while trying on a wedding dress...or two...or three.Good: I love Selina and Bruce together. It works. Maybe it's because of King's writing but they feel like they belong together. I really enjoyed Super Friends part 3 and 4 as well. Diana and Bruce always had a respectable relationship and nothing changes here. Very well done. I also enjoyed the hell out of Selina past interactions with Bruce and of course her trying on the wedding dresses.Bad: The origins story of Bruce Wayne was kind of flat. It had a cool idea but went nowhere. I think it'll be interesting to see what becomes of him though. Also the poison Ivy story, while not bad, didn't really stick the landing for me.So nothing terrible here. This is still a very solid collection for me. While I didn't love it like War/Engagement, I thought it was up there with I am Bane at a 3.5. I'll hit a 4 on here because I smiled a lot, and that's a good sign.
    more
  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    I received this from Edelweiss and DC Comics in exchange for an honest review.Another good volume in Tom King's Batman run. I'm really enjoying how we are seeing deep into the psyche of not only Batman, but into the people around him, villains and heroes alike. I'm not going to say any more, because I don't want to spoil anything, but I've also enjoyed the ties back to previous storylines and obscure plot points.
    more
  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. World: The art is fantastic. King is an artist's writer, he let's the art tell the story and allows this mediums strengths to support the tale. The quiet moments with no dialog, the beautiful panels, the emotions the nods are all so beautiful. The world building is also solid, using the pieces that he's been building since Rebirth and also the history of the relationship between Bat and Cat it's perfect. The 2 issue arc with Diana is also wonderful, pulling that part of the world and also t Wow. World: The art is fantastic. King is an artist's writer, he let's the art tell the story and allows this mediums strengths to support the tale. The quiet moments with no dialog, the beautiful panels, the emotions the nods are all so beautiful. The world building is also solid, using the pieces that he's been building since Rebirth and also the history of the relationship between Bat and Cat it's perfect. The 2 issue arc with Diana is also wonderful, pulling that part of the world and also the Animated Series feeling that the book hints at is wonderful. Story: 3 incredible stories. The first is a contusion of 'Super Friends' where we see the relationship of Diana ans Bruce and how it effects his relationship with Cat. It'd beautiful, it's small and quiet and heartwarming, it hits all the feels. Then we have the 3 issue arc with Ivy which is beautiful and the art is stunning and I'm rambling cause it's so good. This is a Batman story that would not be possible it out Selina and the changes we've seen the DCU go through over the years. The beautiful ideas of redemption and change is beautifully realized with Ivy and the relationship of another DC pair is solidified. Then we have the single issue of Selina and her dress, just read it, enjoy the art and love it. Characters: King understands these characters so intimately it's amazing. It's beautiful how well Bat and Cat work and also how scary the prospect of a future is for them. It's beautiful what King has done with Selina, not clipping her claws (yes I went there) but making her such a strong and independent character. Ivy and Harley are done so well and the depth of emotional growth in this book is amazing. I love King, he's up there with Snyder now for one of the best to write Bats. Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*
    more
  • Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful collection of story arcs that focuses heavily on the relationship between Batman and Catwoman. I loved how it was explored with so much depth and so indirectly. As complicated as these two have had it between each other throughout their whole legacy, it is amazing how Tom King finally glues the pieces together to make it all work, and to make it all come true for fans. And Mikel Janin's artwork is really addictive nowadays. Really nice to see it back in action in this volume, even if A wonderful collection of story arcs that focuses heavily on the relationship between Batman and Catwoman. I loved how it was explored with so much depth and so indirectly. As complicated as these two have had it between each other throughout their whole legacy, it is amazing how Tom King finally glues the pieces together to make it all work, and to make it all come true for fans. And Mikel Janin's artwork is really addictive nowadays. Really nice to see it back in action in this volume, even if it's not for every issue. Some full two-page scenes are truly stunning, and really deliver the mood too.I look forward to the next big volume, especially issue #50!P.S. Full review to come.Yours truly,Lashaan | Blogger and Book ReviewerOfficial blog: http://bookidote.wordpress.com
    more
  • ✨Tamara
    January 1, 1970
    Stunning artwork.Sleek and sexy with a little gore and heartbreak... the best type of Batman comic. The epic saga of Batman 💘 Catwoman continues. I thoroughly enjoyed this graphic novel. It was a little difficult to follow in some parts but eventually I got the story out of it. A little less straightforward than some. Still very good none the less. I need to get my hands on the rest of the series for my library.
    more
  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues](For the purposes of this review I’m assuming that this actually collects #38-44 and not #38-43, since the trade cover is from #44, the issue title from #44 is the same as the trade title, and volume 7 apparently collects #45-50, so otherwise it’d be missing)“Will you marry me?” – Those four words upended Selina Kyle’s life; and then she went and said yes! But before she can get hitched to the Batman of her dreams, she’s got to meet the other half of the Trinity, battle be [Read as single issues](For the purposes of this review I’m assuming that this actually collects #38-44 and not #38-43, since the trade cover is from #44, the issue title from #44 is the same as the trade title, and volume 7 apparently collects #45-50, so otherwise it’d be missing)“Will you marry me?” – Those four words upended Selina Kyle’s life; and then she went and said yes! But before she can get hitched to the Batman of her dreams, she’s got to meet the other half of the Trinity, battle best frenemy Poison Ivy, and, most important of all, pick a wedding dress! But first, a creepy aside about a child who wants to be a pseudo-Hush figure. The opening issue for this volume is just plain weird; it’s kind of a dark mirror of what Bruce Wayne’s childhood could have been if he wasn’t exactly the person he is today. It’s not really ground we haven’t covered before (see again: Hush), but it’s King’s usual twisted mind at work so there’s something extra going on behind the scenes. Travis Moore’s on art for this one, and it’s just as dark and twisted as the story.After that brief interlude, we’re back for the second half of the Super Friends story that started in the previous volume. This one’s not quite as good, as Batman and Wonder Woman are trapped in an alternate dimension and Catwoman’s interactions with the hero they’re replacing is the only way to get them back. It feels like King is trying to establish a certain tone for Wonder Woman, but it doesn’t gel with how her character has been presented before (or even is currently) so it comes off as odd. Joelle Jones’s art can’t be faulted though, because that’s as beautiful as ever.Speaking of beautiful art, the next three issues featuring Poison Ivy taking over the world are jaw-dropping. Mikel Janin has turned out some cracking visuals during his Batman tenure, and these issues have some of the most lifelike pages I’ve ever seen. The story itself is a fun Bat/Cat team-up with an unexpected Gotham City Sirens-esque ending, but I expect it’ll get overriden by the fandom rage induced by Catwoman beating two Flashes at once despite there being a perfectly good reason why she can do that. Ignore that and enjoy the pretty story, fandom.And then finally, the elusive issue 44. Set almost entirely from Catwoman’s point of view, this her cold feet issue as you attempts to reason if she should marry Batman or not, and if she’ll lose her identity as a result. I’m sure all the press about Batman #50 has told people that she does decide to go through with it, but it’s a very introspective little issue which is what King does so well. Joelle Jones on art doesn’t hurt either, especially since she’s launching the new Catwoman series, so it’s a taste of things to come.This volume of Batman is an eclectic one. The opening issue and the Super Friends two-parter probably some of the weaker issues of King’s run so far, but that’s easily off-set by the fantastic Everybody Loves Ivy story and the Catwoman spotlight issue. The art as varied as the stories, but always manages to be top notch.
    more
  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    We’re a few issues away from the big wedding with Batman #50, but there are still obstacles that are set to challenge the romance between the Bat and the Cat — whether it’s one man’s faithfulness to his one true love or the search for that perfect wedding dress, they’re explored in this latest volume of Tom King’s phenomenal Bat-run. Please click here for my full review.
    more
  • Eli Seibert
    January 1, 1970
    “You're not Bruce Wayne! You're a sick kid with dead parents.”“Well, yes… but… but what else is Bruce Wayne?”Wow, there hasn’t been a Tom King batbook I haven’t thoroughly enjoyed yet, and this volume is not the exception. Bruce Wayne fanatics, never ending monster hordes, Wonder Woman, more BatCat, and a story line that not only does not portray Ivy as a villain (FINALLY), but furthers her relationship with Harley? What more could my tiny nerd heart ask for?The art was fantastic; the stories we “You're not Bruce Wayne! You're a sick kid with dead parents.”“Well, yes… but… but what else is Bruce Wayne?”Wow, there hasn’t been a Tom King batbook I haven’t thoroughly enjoyed yet, and this volume is not the exception. Bruce Wayne fanatics, never ending monster hordes, Wonder Woman, more BatCat, and a story line that not only does not portray Ivy as a villain (FINALLY), but furthers her relationship with Harley? What more could my tiny nerd heart ask for?The art was fantastic; the stories were great, and I am more pumped than ever for the comic book wedding of the century!
    more
  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    3.5
  • Ken Moten
    January 1, 1970
    The big day is just around the corner and we got some more insanity to encounter before we get there. This volume collects three stories. The first story is one of those insanity thrillers you either come to love or hate from King (I personally love it). The second story is an interesting team-up of Wonder Woman and Batman that I did not see coming. The main story though involves a very devastating attack by Poison Ivy, which ties back to Batman, Volume 4: The War of Jokes and Riddles in a very The big day is just around the corner and we got some more insanity to encounter before we get there. This volume collects three stories. The first story is one of those insanity thrillers you either come to love or hate from King (I personally love it). The second story is an interesting team-up of Wonder Woman and Batman that I did not see coming. The main story though involves a very devastating attack by Poison Ivy, which ties back to Batman, Volume 4: The War of Jokes and Riddles in a very surprising way. All-in-all this was a decent prelude to the wedding story (which I have no confidence will be carried-out).
    more
  • Craig
    January 1, 1970
    I'm still a sucker for the whole Batman-Catwoman wedding thing, which takes up part of this volume. Other elements are quite as strong, particularly a rather rushed story about Poison Ivy taking over the world, except for Bruce and Selina, who are immune to whatever plant-based trickery she's come up with (Ivy controls the entire Justice League, including Superman). Much better is the two-issue story about Batman and Wonder Woman giving the Gentle Man a respite from his never-ending battle again I'm still a sucker for the whole Batman-Catwoman wedding thing, which takes up part of this volume. Other elements are quite as strong, particularly a rather rushed story about Poison Ivy taking over the world, except for Bruce and Selina, who are immune to whatever plant-based trickery she's come up with (Ivy controls the entire Justice League, including Superman). Much better is the two-issue story about Batman and Wonder Woman giving the Gentle Man a respite from his never-ending battle against demon hordes. I also like the story about Selina Kyle breaking into a wedding gown store to try on gowns in the middle of the night, interspersed with vignettes from the Batman-Catwoman relationship through the years. Some great artwork throughout this volume as well--I'm not sure who I like better, Mikel Janin or Joelle Jones. Another winner, though the wheels do seem to be spinning a bit here in regard to the impending nuptials.
    more
  • Megan Farve
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Batman, Volume 6: Bride or Burglar from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.I am a huge batman fan and try to read any story line of his that I can. So far, I have thoroughly enjoyed this Batman series, especially I Am Bane and The War of Jokes and Riddles. That being said, I could not wait to get my hands on the sixth volume in the series, Bride or Burglar. However, I found myself not as satisfied with this volume as I was with others in the collection.I wil I received a copy of Batman, Volume 6: Bride or Burglar from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.I am a huge batman fan and try to read any story line of his that I can. So far, I have thoroughly enjoyed this Batman series, especially I Am Bane and The War of Jokes and Riddles. That being said, I could not wait to get my hands on the sixth volume in the series, Bride or Burglar. However, I found myself not as satisfied with this volume as I was with others in the collection.I will say that I found the story line between Batman, Wonder Woman, and The Gentle Man to be intriguing as they battled the hordes of Gehenna. I enjoyed getting a glimpse of who the The Gentle Man was before his battles. It humanized him and made his sacrifice mean that much more.(view spoiler)[What I also enjoyed about this story was that it was nice to see Batman and Catwoman’s love challenged not by a villain, but by time itself. To me it showed that what Bruce feels for Selina is real and that he is trying to be the best man that he can for her, as we have previously seen in Rules of Engagement. The same can be said of Selina, as she ensures that The Gentle Man returns to his duties as soon as possible to release Bruce and Diana. (hide spoiler)]As for the Ivy story line, I enjoyed seeing Batman and Catwoman against the world; together. It seems that as we venture further into this graphic novel series, they are learning to work with one another more easily. While they still have their differences, as Selina will always be a cat burglar at heart, it works.(view spoiler)[I was also excited to see Ivy in the aftermath of The War of Jokes and Riddles. In Volume 4, all the villains had to choose sides in the war, and Ivy chose to side with the Riddler. This story line lets us glimpse how she handled her choice, or rather, is still handling her choice. We see her slightly broken from what she believes she has done and she is trying to make up for her mistakes, albeit incorrectly. By bringing Ivy into this story, we see how even villains can be hurt and humanized, much as we have seen with Selina Kyle in this series. (hide spoiler)]As stated before, I did not like this volume as much as its predecessors, but it was still a good addition to the storyline, allowing readers to test Batman and Catwoman’s relationship as well as view some of the aftermath from The War of Jokes and Riddles. I highly recommend this series to any Batman fan. I cannot wait to see what Tom King has in store for fans next!
    more
  • Tom McDonald
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.I was initially hesitant to pursue this narrative yet eager to form my own opinion, as it has received quite a bit of social backlog. There’s too much a sense of nostalgia, not enough plausible “action” apparently, too many references to DC’s Silver Age.But even if the feeling tone may not necessarily coincide with collectively adored depictions of Batman, a series which is constantly fluctuating in terms of Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.I was initially hesitant to pursue this narrative yet eager to form my own opinion, as it has received quite a bit of social backlog. There’s too much a sense of nostalgia, not enough plausible “action” apparently, too many references to DC’s Silver Age.But even if the feeling tone may not necessarily coincide with collectively adored depictions of Batman, a series which is constantly fluctuating in terms of presentation and mood, what I think Tom King has mastered directly is the sense of true calm that comes over Bruce when he has a trusted significant other. That’s the most striking element of reading this entire volume — the usual grim frustration and dogged futility that fuels Batman’s journey is curiously absent. For King, it’s because Bruce has Selina. Batman has Catwoman. Batman has solid love in his life that he can trust. King’s narrative emphasizes how truly interpersonal and sensitive the Dark Knight actually is as a character, and how everything else for him falls into place when he has a passionate connection to someone else. Love is everywhere in this story. It’s what maintains Bruce’s integrity when he’s trapped in another dimension with the mythically attractive Diana of Themyscira; knowledge of love helps Batman stop Poison Ivy from holding the world her psychic hostage. As a Catwoman fan, I was deeply pleased with all the flashbacks of Selina and Bruce over the years. And I was smitten with seeing Selina sneaking out at night to find her wedding dress. While I am not the biggest fan to all of Mikel Janin’s character designs, I appreciate their aesthetic cleanliness, the brightness of the colors. And because this is Batman, I would be remiss to not mention the obvious — hopefully all hell doesn’t break lose and Bruce ends up losing everything. Bruce’s life has a nasty habit of being tragic.But maybe all those fanboys out there who dislike this King run just aren’t romantic.
    more
  • Norman Cook
    January 1, 1970
    "The Origin of Bruce Wayne" from issue #38, with art by Travis Moore, is the best story by far in this collection. Batman encounters a boy who is the mirror image of Bruce Wayne, albeit a dark mirror image. We see how Bruce Wayne could have turned out by the death of his parents, how probably most people would have reacted. This once again shows why Batman is such a powerful character; he overcomes the utmost tragedy to become a beacon of hope."Super Friends, Parts 3 and 4" from issues #39-40, w "The Origin of Bruce Wayne" from issue #38, with art by Travis Moore, is the best story by far in this collection. Batman encounters a boy who is the mirror image of Bruce Wayne, albeit a dark mirror image. We see how Bruce Wayne could have turned out by the death of his parents, how probably most people would have reacted. This once again shows why Batman is such a powerful character; he overcomes the utmost tragedy to become a beacon of hope."Super Friends, Parts 3 and 4" from issues #39-40, with art by Joëlle Jones, is one of those preposterous stories only comics can even begin to handle. Batman and Wonder Woman are trapped in an alternate dimension where time moves much faster, so they end up spending decades there fighting demons while Catwoman has less than a day to figure out how to get them back. I think the point was to show how strong Batman's love for Catwoman (and his dog!) is, but it didn't ring true that he could survive that length of time isolated with one of the most beautiful women and not crack. Not to mention he seemed to be the same age when he got back as when he left."Everyone Loves Ivy" from issues #41-43, with art by Mikel Janín, begins with Poison Ivy taking mind control over every person on Earth, with no real explanation other than she put something in the vegetation that people eat. Of course, Batman comes up with an antidote for himself and Catwoman, but then has to outmaneuver the psychologically fragile Ivy to get her to relinquish control. How one person could control billions is sort of just glossed over, and the repercussions from something like that would be mind boggling."Bride or Burglar" from issue #44, with art by Mikel Janín and Joëlle Jones, alternates between Catwoman's search for the perfect wedding dress and various scenes from the "courtship" of Batman and Catwoman. I loved the way each of their costumes changed to show the various points in time. A fun little story that provides more insight into the relationship between these two characters.
    more
  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    You will have noticed that the subtitle of this book is not exactly Batman, but actually, in reducing the man's presence and importance on these pages, the result is perhaps better than it might have been. We start with a one-shot that doesn't do what it promises, for one, before a two-issue piece where Selina learns some lessons before the will-they-won't-they wedding that was supposed to be such a showcase for DC in 2018. Yes, Selina is the subject, Batman the distant warrior, and an eternal b You will have noticed that the subtitle of this book is not exactly Batman, but actually, in reducing the man's presence and importance on these pages, the result is perhaps better than it might have been. We start with a one-shot that doesn't do what it promises, for one, before a two-issue piece where Selina learns some lessons before the will-they-won't-they wedding that was supposed to be such a showcase for DC in 2018. Yes, Selina is the subject, Batman the distant warrior, and an eternal battle to right wrongs is the provider of the moral for our Cat. Someone else then takes their turn to be a baddie, and we get the disconcerting view of Bruce waking up with Selina (more than once) on his way to try and solve things. You'll notice the villain has lost all sex appeal she once had, for this is the book that is supposed to warm us up for the marriage, and the last one-shot goes through iterations of the Cat from the past, while everyone – including Selina – gets ready.Now one-shots and compilations of them in trades are never really the best comic titles, but here we get a pretty good book. You can fault the ending of the three-parter, the slightly incoherent emotional lead-in to the wedding, and more, but actually these shorts aren't too bad. And compared to the recent DC output, they're actually pretty bloody good. Flaws exist, sure, but I liked this book – it took a different approach to the whole build-up than I expected, and was actually worth the read, even while it bore an initial sheen of the disposable. Don't come here for the usual Batman action, but come for something that downplays certain aspects of the character without making us fear for the change the wedding might instil. Any changes on these pages are worth embracing – although why Bruce is suddenly left-handed I'll never know.
    more
  • Kyle Berk
    January 1, 1970
    Batman vol 6 continues to be interesting. I’ve been keeping up with the series issue to issue but reread the trade before putting it on here. And I’ll tell you this reads much better in a trade then a single issue.Batman and Catwoman are getting married and Catwoman gets to see Bats do his thing before the nuptials. He fights alongside Wonder Woman as he did Superman last time, though I think Superman’s was more interesting. He helps another kid who’s parents are murdered. And he fights Poison I Batman vol 6 continues to be interesting. I’ve been keeping up with the series issue to issue but reread the trade before putting it on here. And I’ll tell you this reads much better in a trade then a single issue.Batman and Catwoman are getting married and Catwoman gets to see Bats do his thing before the nuptials. He fights alongside Wonder Woman as he did Superman last time, though I think Superman’s was more interesting. He helps another kid who’s parents are murdered. And he fights Poison Ivy who’s taken over the world. We also get a really great issue of Selma picking her dress.All of this is good stuff. I think it’s well handled besides the poison ivy story being contrived. The art is gorgeous jumping between Mikel Janin and Joelle Jones, both of whom bring there own flavor the works with Kings writing.This is another good volume in Kong’s run. If you haven’t liked his Batman before I don’t think this is going to change your mind but if you did this one is solid too.4 stars.
    more
  • Kenneth Roman
    January 1, 1970
    The road to the altar is turning out to be very difficult for Batman and Catwoman. In this collection of comics, Batman #38-44, Batman and Catwoman must team up with friends and even enemies to defeat old and new villains. From hordes of sin created monsters to Poison Ivy. Bat and Cat also struggle to define their relationship and what it will mean for both of them when they say "I do". I am really enjoying the lead up to the wedding. The creators are looking into the psyche of both Batman and C The road to the altar is turning out to be very difficult for Batman and Catwoman. In this collection of comics, Batman #38-44, Batman and Catwoman must team up with friends and even enemies to defeat old and new villains. From hordes of sin created monsters to Poison Ivy. Bat and Cat also struggle to define their relationship and what it will mean for both of them when they say "I do". I am really enjoying the lead up to the wedding. The creators are looking into the psyche of both Batman and Catwoman to show what a marriage between these characters will look like and what it will mean for the future of the comic. The collection wraps with a entertaining issue where we see Selina Kyle reminiscing on her past with Bruce Wayne, while she reverts back to her burglar ways to obtain one last thing for the wedding.
    more
  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Batman, Vol. 6: Bride or BurglarWell, with one arc, Tom King has wiped out nearly all the good he’s done with The Batman title since Rebirth started. The final book in the arc, where the name comes from, was good in that we got to see the evolution of Bruce/Batman and Selina/Cat Woman in both costume and relationship but it felt flat. The Ivy story was good but too truncated. I’m tired of storylines that basically affect the entire world then are resolved in three issue like nothing ever happene Batman, Vol. 6: Bride or BurglarWell, with one arc, Tom King has wiped out nearly all the good he’s done with The Batman title since Rebirth started. The final book in the arc, where the name comes from, was good in that we got to see the evolution of Bruce/Batman and Selina/Cat Woman in both costume and relationship but it felt flat. The Ivy story was good but too truncated. I’m tired of storylines that basically affect the entire world then are resolved in three issue like nothing ever happened. The Gentle Man story was meh and the less said about The Origin of Bruce Wayne, the better. Please don’t tell me this run peaked at issue 37 and annual 2. 2.5⭐️’s rounded up.
    more
  • Phillip Raynor
    January 1, 1970
    I'm generally a Batman fan but Tom King isn't my favorite scribe for the Dark Knight. He is a little too cerebral, exploring the psychological side of Bruce Wayne. I can't imagine the creative struggle King must go through to come up with new material. However, this book felt a little like filler to me. This trade covers Batman #38-44 and it's a part of the buildup to the biggest event in modern comics (possibly). One of the better parts was the "historical" issue, covering a partial timeline of I'm generally a Batman fan but Tom King isn't my favorite scribe for the Dark Knight. He is a little too cerebral, exploring the psychological side of Bruce Wayne. I can't imagine the creative struggle King must go through to come up with new material. However, this book felt a little like filler to me. This trade covers Batman #38-44 and it's a part of the buildup to the biggest event in modern comics (possibly). One of the better parts was the "historical" issue, covering a partial timeline of their relationship. Everything else came across to me like loose ends being tied up, minor ones at that.All in all, 3.5 stars.
    more
  • Scott Waldie
    January 1, 1970
    Though this wasn't my favorite in the King run so far, there are some really nice stories, like the tale of how Bats and Wonder Woman replace the Gentle Man in Gehenna for a day, which for them turns out to be decades, and they have to confront their past feelings for one another with the shadow of Bats' marriage to Selina hovering over them. Good stuff, and some of the other single stories were good. As for the Poison Ivy three-party, it felt a bit too surreal, but the art was so damned good th Though this wasn't my favorite in the King run so far, there are some really nice stories, like the tale of how Bats and Wonder Woman replace the Gentle Man in Gehenna for a day, which for them turns out to be decades, and they have to confront their past feelings for one another with the shadow of Bats' marriage to Selina hovering over them. Good stuff, and some of the other single stories were good. As for the Poison Ivy three-party, it felt a bit too surreal, but the art was so damned good that it helped compensate. So, still a good volume to have, but there have been better.
    more
  • Luis Reséndiz
    January 1, 1970
    qué lástima que ya me enteré que todo este arco va a terminar con una babosada. qué coraje, porque tom king parecía --y, en cierta forma, fue, al menos en war of jokes and riddles-- un guionista capaz de subvertir el status quo de batman. el tipo dice que hay que darle chance al resto de su estancia en el título, sin embargo, y esto ha estado tan bien escrito que me siento inclinado a darle el beneficio de la duda.
    more
  • Aftin Combs
    January 1, 1970
    The big ceremony is just around the corner and the issues are still great. In this volume you get a bestie adventure between Batman and Wonder Woman, a great Poison Ivy arch, and grieving kid that worships Bruce Wayne. Each story brings something new to the table. Each one has its own vibe while all clearly belonging together in the world of Gotham. Plus they are all told with art work that is sleek and beautiful.
    more
  • Yaritza
    January 1, 1970
    Will we finally see a wedding between Batman and Catwomen? To be continued. Love the illustrations throughout the comic. The romance between Batman and Catwoman is romantic. Love how Superman is always fighting with Batman. Poisob Ivy illustrations are great. Her character grows through each scene. Comic has romance, fights, death and flashes of the future. Will love catch the bats heart or will he turn to the dark?
    more
  • Arlo Wiley
    January 1, 1970
    Tom King's Batman run continues to be one of the most exciting things ever to happen to the Dark Knight. Even when the stories are global in scale, they are small and intimate affairs. Before Batman and Catwoman tie the knot, these are stories of self-reflection, as Bruce and Selina must decide who they are as individuals; and of bonding, as Batman shares a kind of camaraderie with Wonder Woman and Catwoman helps Poison Ivy to see who she really is.
    more
  • Alí Flores
    January 1, 1970
    El origen de Bruce Wayne:? Superamigos: Diana recluta a Bruce para apoyarle en una pelea de 20 años, Selina es la única que puede salvarlos de ese cicloTodos aman a Ivy: Ivy toma el control de todo el mundo, Selina y Bruce son los únicos que tienen la cura para esta situación ¿Novia o ladrona?: Selina recapitula su historia con Bruce a través del tiempo, esto lo hace a la par de buscar su vestido de boda.
    more
  • Luís Fernandes
    January 1, 1970
    Once again, King keeps giving us a more emotinal take on the Bat. The way he manages the balance of the dark and gritty vigilante stories with the more personal side of Bruce, the one trying to be happy is fantastic. There were great moments throughout the entire book, but the Poison Ivy arc tying in to The War of Jokes and Riddles was definitely the best. Please keep this coming Mr. King, I anxiously await the big day!
    more
  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Basic plot: Several short stories leading Bat and Cat closer to their wedding.Nothing could top the previous arc in my mind, but King is still on his game. Theae shorts highlight the partnership between Bat and Car, and what they go through in their crazy life. Some of this felt a bit rushed, as is the nature of shorter stories sometimes. The art was always great, though. There were some particularly beautiful panels in the Ivy storyline.
    more
  • John Funderburg
    January 1, 1970
    It's Tom King. It's Batman. What more is there to say? King's run has far overshadowed Snyder's New 52 outing - the emotional depth of the characters is truly awesome, and the unique stories that King comes up with leave me smiling ear to ear. Let's hope King stays on Batman for a very long time.
    more
Write a review