Black Bolt, Vol. 2
Black Bolt and his unlikely allies are finally free from their strange captivity, but their escape came at a high cost. Now, the Midnight King returns to Earth with a heavy heart and a new companion: the telepathic alien Blinky, a child with nowhere left to go! But the journey home is long and full of dangers - and a horde of space pirates is the least of them! And what awaits Black Bolt at his destination is judgment! In his absence, the Inhumans were rounded up and imprisoned - and now they struggle to maintain their fragile democracy. Someone must pay the price for the horrors they've endured. Will Black Bolt survive the wrath of his own people? COLLECTING: BLACK BOLT 7-12

Black Bolt, Vol. 2 Details

TitleBlack Bolt, Vol. 2
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 19th, 2018
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302907334
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel, Graphic Novels Comics

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Black Bolt, Vol. 2 Review

  • Dan Schwent
    January 1, 1970
    Black Bolt and Blinky return to earth and go to tell Titania that her husband, the Absorbing Man, is dead. The funeral is interrupted and Blinky is snatched away. Can Black Bolt and Titania save her?I liked Black Bolt, Vol. 1: Hard Time so this one was a no-brainer for me. Still, I didn't think he'd top the first half of this run. Top it, he did. This was easily the most emotional comic I've ever read.After the events of the last book, Black Bolt and Lockjaw have taken a beating. Black Bolt's vo Black Bolt and Blinky return to earth and go to tell Titania that her husband, the Absorbing Man, is dead. The funeral is interrupted and Blinky is snatched away. Can Black Bolt and Titania save her?I liked Black Bolt, Vol. 1: Hard Time so this one was a no-brainer for me. Still, I didn't think he'd top the first half of this run. Top it, he did. This was easily the most emotional comic I've ever read.After the events of the last book, Black Bolt and Lockjaw have taken a beating. Black Bolt's voice has left him. After overcoming some obstacles, Black Bolt and Blinky wind up back on earth and set out to settle things with Crusher Creel, the Absorbing Man's wife.Creel's funeral was touching with appearances from Captain America, the Wrecking Crew, and others. Remember when I said this was an emotional book? I shed a fucking tear for the fucking Absorbing Man!Anyway, Blinky gets abducted and Black Bolt and Titania go after here. The ensuing battle and exploration of Black Bolt's childhood left me worn out. FYI, another man-tear was shed after witnessing the horror of Black Bolt's upbringing.The end of the series was as satisfying as I could ever have hoped. The team of Saladin Ahmed, Christian Ward, and Frazier Irving have created once of those books that only comes along every once in a while and showed what a kick-ass creative team can do with a b-list character when given the opportunity. Five out of five of the easiest stars I've ever awarded.
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  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    When I initially witnessed the first issue's cover of this solo Black Bolt series, I did wonder how can one create a comic solely about a character who can destroy everything with the slightest whisper. However, writer Saladin Ahmed and artist Christian Ward found a way as the silent king of the Inhumans finds himself in a cosmic adventure where he was imprisoned whilst befriending some new companions such as the Absorbing Man and the telepathic alien child Blinky.Having escaped the clutches of When I initially witnessed the first issue's cover of this solo Black Bolt series, I did wonder how can one create a comic solely about a character who can destroy everything with the slightest whisper. However, writer Saladin Ahmed and artist Christian Ward found a way as the silent king of the Inhumans finds himself in a cosmic adventure where he was imprisoned whilst befriending some new companions such as the Absorbing Man and the telepathic alien child Blinky.Having escaped the clutches of the Jailer as well as the heroic sacrifice of Crusher Creel, Black Bolt, along with Blinky and his trusted teleporting dog Lockjaw, set on a long course through space to get back to Earth, where he must reconcile with his own people and must inform Titania about her husband Crusher's demise.The opening issue is very much the journey home, while Black Bolt took former inmate Monsteroso in a ship and dropped him off in his planet, where he reunited with his family. For much of this issue, the storytelling is fairly incidental as despite a chase involving space pirates and a funny moment involving Black Bolt about to get eaten by one of Monsteroso's parents, it's worth reading for Frazer Irving, an artist who I was never a big fan, but does his best work as his art is very painterly and abstract whilst honouring the cosmic grandeur of Jack Kirby.Once we arrive on Earth, the rest of the book is very much a redemptive arc of our eponymous hero as not only does he have to reconcile with his people following the recent Secret Empire event, but also his estranged son Ahura. Throughout this volume, there are tie-ins to recent events that involved the Inhumans , but Ahmed manages to maintain this title's standalone status by using the perspective of its small cast and when they arrive at The Bronx, where Titania lives, it does feel like the writer is interested in telling his own story that doesn't have worldwide consequences.Introduced in the original Secret Wars in the early eighties, Titania is a great addition to Black Bolt's pact as her first appearance here, she starts beating the crap out of the Midnight King and then the moment she hears the tragic news about her husband, she shows a heartbreaking tenderness. My favourite issue is #9, which is all about giving Creel the perfect send-off as the gang make a stop at the local bar, where everyone makes a toast for the former supervillain (except for Blinky who is given a ice cream), and then a funeral is given where the likes of the Wrecking Crew and Captain America. Everyone has some final words to say, all of which are touching.Based on what I've written above, you might think there's not much in the way of superhero action and yet Christian Ward's art delivers more than that. Whether it is the fantastical setting of New Attilan or the down-to-earth streets of The Bronx, Ward delivers some of the best visuals done in comics with his experimental use of panel layouts and multi-layered colouring. The action-packed climax involving multiple Inhumans and returning faces, is a psychedelic extravaganza that would give Inception a run for its money.As this series was only twelve issues, it proves that good things can't last forever. Some readers might see the final issue as a bit of a cop-out, but having enjoyed the company of these unlikely heroes who have grown to become a family, I couldn't think of a happier ending.
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  • Malum
    January 1, 1970
    A HUGE improvement over the last volume. Even the art is starting grow on me. The funeral part was touching but lost a lot of its impact because you know nobody stays dead in comic book world for long, especially when "no body was recovered". But, hey, that's the nature of comic books.
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  • Frédéric
    January 1, 1970
    Quite the same qualities and defaults than book one: - Decent plot with a cool twist in the middle, good interactions between characters, one very well done issue (Creel's funeral) and some frightful revelations on Black Bolt's past but... too many explaining captions all over the place. Saladin Ahmed must learn to let go of his novelist's habits.- Mixed art; not so great pencils imo but amazing colors and psychedelic stuff that compensate.If you liked vol.1 it would really be a shame not to rea Quite the same qualities and defaults than book one: - Decent plot with a cool twist in the middle, good interactions between characters, one very well done issue (Creel's funeral) and some frightful revelations on Black Bolt's past but... too many explaining captions all over the place. Saladin Ahmed must learn to let go of his novelist's habits.- Mixed art; not so great pencils imo but amazing colors and psychedelic stuff that compensate.If you liked vol.1 it would really be a shame not to read this conclusion of the series.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    The Midnight King has escaped from the Jailer, and now rockets back towards home with Blinky in tow. His first job is to break the bad news about the death of Crusher Creel to Creel’s wife, Titania, and hell hath no fury like a supervillain grieving. And then, when the old enemies of Attilan catch up with him, Black Bolt finds himself assaulted on all sides, and only his estranged family can save him.Considering this is Saladin Ahmed’s first comics work, you’d never know. This book is extremely The Midnight King has escaped from the Jailer, and now rockets back towards home with Blinky in tow. His first job is to break the bad news about the death of Crusher Creel to Creel’s wife, Titania, and hell hath no fury like a supervillain grieving. And then, when the old enemies of Attilan catch up with him, Black Bolt finds himself assaulted on all sides, and only his estranged family can save him.Considering this is Saladin Ahmed’s first comics work, you’d never know. This book is extremely well presented, and the journey that the characters, especially Black Bolt of course but the supporting characters as well, go through is realised exceptionally. He also manages to tie together continuity across this series, Royals, and previous events in Inhuman and Uncanny Inhumans as well, so it’s a great debut for him. He’s written novels before, but I can attest that writing novels and comic scripts are entirely different undertakings.I’m not sure when Ahmed was told that this would only be a 12 issue series, because he manages to wrap things up neatly by the end, resolving all of the dangling plot threads and giving satisfying endings for everyone involved, even the ultimate villain of the piece.And that’s saying nothing about Christian Ward, whose psychedelic imagery manages to tone itself back at the appropriate moments to really humanize the characters before going over-the-top insane during the fight scenes to give some real punch to the proceedings. The ever-reliable Frazer Irving steps in for an issue seamlessly, while Stephanie Hans’ crossover art beautifully captures the plight of Black Bolt & Medusa when they temporarily reunite. Black Bolt, at it’s heart, especially in this volume, is a story about family. Found family, estranged family, reunited family, it’s all in here somewhere. Saladin Ahmed and Christian Ward (and friends) do a superb job with this second and final volume of really hammering home what Black Bolt has learned from his experiences in space, and manage to make the Inhuman former king…human.
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  • charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    i will literally fight marvel to the death for cancelling this
  • ion
    January 1, 1970
    If only all comics could be this gorgeous.
  • Joana Veríssimo
    January 1, 1970
    This volume was a GOOD as the first :) Beautiful art and a beautiful story :)The art is exquisite, the simple traces of the pencil and once again, the use of vibrants colors, giving the story this scifi and dream sequence feel. And I really just want that last page/last issue cover blown up into a huge posterThen the story is so well develop - heartbreaking and heartwarming :) Black Bolt's relationship with Blinky, and then Ahura is so well done - you see how deep and complicated they are. Titan This volume was a GOOD as the first :) Beautiful art and a beautiful story :)The art is exquisite, the simple traces of the pencil and once again, the use of vibrants colors, giving the story this scifi and dream sequence feel. And I really just want that last page/last issue cover blown up into a huge posterThen the story is so well develop - heartbreaking and heartwarming :) Black Bolt's relationship with Blinky, and then Ahura is so well done - you see how deep and complicated they are. Titania was such a great addition, the scene at the funeral was so beautiful and to see all these peope come to it, from all these different lives, they came and spokeI still feel this comic is okay for people who are casual Marvel readers, but there are more outside things that left me confused and curious about all that happened outside this story. But really the questions don't stop your enjoyment, it very much still works, and I would definitely recommend it!!! :D
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    The second half of Ahmed's Black Bolt run isn't as strong as the first. Issue 7 is sad and sweet with a great guest artist. But starting with issue 8, the book runs headlong into complicated Inhumans backstory that it had so skillfully skirted in the first volume. The funeral for Creel is great, but he comes back to life a few issues later which makes his death feel like even more of a cheat than is usually for a comic book death. There's great dialogue scattered throughout and Ahmed really writ The second half of Ahmed's Black Bolt run isn't as strong as the first. Issue 7 is sad and sweet with a great guest artist. But starting with issue 8, the book runs headlong into complicated Inhumans backstory that it had so skillfully skirted in the first volume. The funeral for Creel is great, but he comes back to life a few issues later which makes his death feel like even more of a cheat than is usually for a comic book death. There's great dialogue scattered throughout and Ahmed really writes a great Titania. The final defeat of the Jailer doesn't quite land, but it has some really great art.
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  • Blindzider
    January 1, 1970
    Ehhhh, I'm going to only give it two stars. I got bored with this volume, realizing that Black Bolt wasn't really in it that much, focusing more on the supporting characters. The novelty and uniqueness (which is still there) wore off, and the art was at times difficult to follow. While I was excited about the ending, I think it was just because there was some action and was losing interest before the climax. Looking back on this series, you didn't really leave knowing BB anymore than when you st Ehhhh, I'm going to only give it two stars. I got bored with this volume, realizing that Black Bolt wasn't really in it that much, focusing more on the supporting characters. The novelty and uniqueness (which is still there) wore off, and the art was at times difficult to follow. While I was excited about the ending, I think it was just because there was some action and was losing interest before the climax. Looking back on this series, you didn't really leave knowing BB anymore than when you started.
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  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    An ill-fitting conclusion for a book that started out with epicness and vulnerability. Not even an issue of Frazer Irving's nightmarish art helps seal the deal, all because the plot just doesn't cut it. Especially since a whole issue (and an emotional arc from earlier) is negated by a later "twist". This is precisely why superhero comics are giving people fatigue.
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  • Bryce Perry
    January 1, 1970
    Solid ending to a fantastic series. I cried at the absorbing man's funeral. Saladin Ahmed and Frazer Irving were able to give Crusher Creel enough humanity and character to evoke actual tears. Amazing.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted so badly to love this as much as Volume 1, but I found a lot of the dialogue to be a bit cringy and I didn't feel the need to fully devour this book in one sitting like I did with Volume 1. I do wish it could have continued on though, I'd like to see where it could have gone.
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  • Ash
    January 1, 1970
    You know, I've mostly enjoyed this series (Crusher! Titania! The phenomenal art!), but I'm certainly never going anywhere near the inhumans ever again. Even a good writer (which Ahmed is) can't get them past their core lameness.
  • Marisa Carpico
    January 1, 1970
    First off, this is really a 4.5. What a glorious end to a very layered and emotionally complex story. Perhaps the greatest compliment I can give the creative team here is that they made me care deeply about a character and history about which I had no prior experience. Ward deserves a lot of the credit for why this crazy story and the unconventional storytelling works. Marvel and or disinterested readers were fucking crazy to let this end.
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  • Michal Vámoš
    January 1, 1970
    Kouzelný. Kresba, vyprávění, postavy, vše úžasný. Jen ke konci docela wtf mindfuck, který si myslím, že nebyl úplně nutný. Jinak super. Hrozná škoda, že to zrušili.
  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    Still carries the emotional heft of the first book, but without quite as compact a storyline.
  • vibraniums
    January 1, 1970
    me, annoyed that marvel cancelled this ??? more likely than YOU think
  • Sebastian Song
    January 1, 1970
    A simple tale told so well.
  • Gabriel Pinto
    January 1, 1970
    Aunque la historia pierde algo de fuerza y emocionalidad en este volumen (con la excepción del funeral de Creel y el viaje de Ahura y Blinky a la conciencia de Blackagar), el arte sigue siendo un punto fuerte. No es el cierre perfecto de una serie tan humana como esta, pero los humanos no son perfectos. Así que supongo que está bien.
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