Your Own Worst Enemy
Three candidates, three platforms, and a whirlwind of social media, gaffes, and protests makes for a ridiculous and hilarious political circus in Gordon Jack’s second highly satirical novel. Perfect for fans of Andrew Smith and Frank Portman.They say that with great power comes great responsibility. Unless you’re student body president at Lincoln High School. Then you get all the responsibility but none of the power. And the three candidates running for president know all about that.Stacey Wynn is the front-runner, but she didn’t count on Julia Romero entering this race. Julia is challenging Stacey for the title while also putting the moves on Stacey’s campaign adviser and only friend, Brian. And then there is Tony Guo, the way outsider. Tony is usually oblivious to the school’s political campaigning, as he’s oblivious to anything that isn’t about getting high and drinking all the Space Cow chocolate milk he can stomach. But when his favorite beverage is banned at school, a freshman political “mastermind” convinces Tony to become the voice of the little guy. But what kind of voice is that, really?If this were an ordinary high school election, the winner would be whichever candidate was the most popular. But this year, each candidate may have to sink to a new low to win an election that could change the course of...very little.

Your Own Worst Enemy Details

TitleYour Own Worst Enemy
Author
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction

Your Own Worst Enemy Review

  • Susan Kennedy
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't hate it, but I didn't love it. It probably wasn't the best time for me to be reading this book. Politics has gotten under my skin and I all the whining is really annoying. So, more of that in a book was just additional, annoying whining. However, I did love the diversity in the book and I did love a lot of the characters. Julia was probably my favorite character. Coming from Canada after making a huge mistake, she does come and really start over. I love that she accepts her faults and f I didn't hate it, but I didn't love it. It probably wasn't the best time for me to be reading this book. Politics has gotten under my skin and I all the whining is really annoying. So, more of that in a book was just additional, annoying whining. However, I did love the diversity in the book and I did love a lot of the characters. Julia was probably my favorite character. Coming from Canada after making a huge mistake, she does come and really start over. I love that she accepts her faults and faces up to them. She is a great character. Stacey was a bit of a good girl and overachiever, but she wasn't a bad character either. I loved that she befriended Brian when he was an overweight freshman. She is a bit pushy, but overall you just see she isn't a bad person. She has her faults, but she is another strong woman character. Then there is Brian; he is an amazing character that I would have loved to have befriended. He is kind and loyal; he stand by his best friend Stacey through everything. He falls for Julia and tries to keep that relationship going without hurting his best friend. He is just an all around great guy with a twit for a younger brother. Brian's younger brother is the tool of the book. Kyle is manipulative and seems to just want to make life for his older brother terrible. He is in therapy, which I'm not sure is working at all. He seems to manipulate the therapist too. Then there is Tony, he is the third person running for ABS President along with Stacey and Julia. Tony is just an idiot. He is always high and gets manipulated by everyone so easily. I feel sorry for him because of his home life and it makes you understand why he is the way he is. It is just a sad situation with him.This is mostly about the campaign going on for President. You see what each of their platforms are and how they are all playing the game during the running. You also see friendships bloom and the relationship between Brian and Julia grow. There are quite a few underlying stories going on during all of this and it definitely keeps you reading. I was a bit annoyed by some of the stabs taken at our current regime. I just think I'm annoyed at elections and politics as a whole. Everyone is really whiny and it really grates on my nerves that everyone is trying to bring everyone else down. I think I've just had enough, so I'm glad I'm finished with this one. With good character development, well written and easy to read, it was just okay for me.
    more
  • Lily ☁️
    January 1, 1970
    The feeling, when you get sent an email approval for an ARC from Edelweiss, without having requested the book. 😭💖Thank you to the publisher for providing an ARC via Edelweiss in exchange for a spot on the blog tour and promotion of the book.Blog | Bloglovin’ | Instagram | Tumblr | Twitter
    more
  • Kristi Housman Confessions of a YA Reader
    January 1, 1970
    RTC for blog tour.Thank you to the publisher for giving me a copy through Edelweiss for review.
  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    This was what I was hoping it would be. Jack showed the highs and the lows of the political process, putting a hilarious spin on it all, while also including ideas of friendship, family, identity, and romance. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------I had featured this book as one of my Can't-Wait Wednesday picks. I had been expecting something along the lines of the movie Election, where the whole political process was depicted in a satirical way, and Gordon This was what I was hoping it would be. Jack showed the highs and the lows of the political process, putting a hilarious spin on it all, while also including ideas of friendship, family, identity, and romance. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------I had featured this book as one of my Can't-Wait Wednesday picks. I had been expecting something along the lines of the movie Election, where the whole political process was depicted in a satirical way, and Gordon Jack definitely delivered that in Your Own Worst Enemy.What seemed like a sure thing for Stacey turned into a cutthroat political race, which included false accusations, mud slinging, and even maligning by the media. Both Tony and Julia came out of nowhere to challenge Stacey, and to stop her rise to power.I must say, I really liked all three candidates, even Tony, who was pretty ridiculous and really hilarious. Jack did a great job creating these characters, because though they were each crafted in a way to represent a specific type of political voice, they were still very human. It was their flaws, which helped me empathize with them, even when they were running off the rails a little.It was easy to pick out all the current issues and ploys from the current state of American politics. However, because Jack was depicting all sides of just about every political hot button topic out there in an exaggerated manner, it didn't bother me. In fact, because he was showing all these things to the extreme, it showed how ridiculous we are about some things, while still shedding light on particular issues.One thing I can tell you is that I laughed, a lot. This book was really funny, even hilarious at times, but it was also kind of deep and thought provoking, in a good way. Some truths are easier to digest when served with humor, and I found Jack's examination of the the political process and the current issues facing Americans to be quite palatable.Overall: A hilarious and pretty honest look at American politics that left me laughing and thinking.*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
    more
  • Vicky Who Reads
    January 1, 1970
    really good! there were some things I thought could be done better, but overall this was funny and a unique read.
  • Stacy Fetters
    January 1, 1970
    "Here’s some change I can believe in.Make America baked again."I devoured this book in less than a day. I could not put this down. It was clever and witty that I found myself laughing so hard that tears formed. But it also contained some serious subjects that made you look at the real world and what we’re currently dealing with. This was still a really fun read. It makes you reminisce about the clown show we had to deal with with the last election. This was a lot more enjoyable since this was fi "Here’s some change I can believe in.Make America baked again."I devoured this book in less than a day. I could not put this down. It was clever and witty that I found myself laughing so hard that tears formed. But it also contained some serious subjects that made you look at the real world and what we’re currently dealing with. This was still a really fun read. It makes you reminisce about the clown show we had to deal with with the last election. This was a lot more enjoyable since this was fictitious. The banter between the opponents was hilarious and a tad bit out there. But they were all enjoyable in their own way. Tony has to be my favorite character. I mean, come on! I’ll never look at the bear-shaped honey bottle the same way ever again. Gordon Jack is a genius. To take something that is still a tough issue to discuss and brings this creative pieces into our lives is beyond astronomical. And to perfectly get Stacey’s attitude and personality onto paper was amazing. We are quite the special species and this book will fill you in more. With more boner jokes than you ever could imagine and a deep heartfelt look at unity, this book is definitely a must read. Maybe people will learn how to be beautiful human beings towards one another.
    more
  • Namera [The Literary Invertebrate]
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure if a DNF is actually the appropriate shelf, because I did read the ending.It's just that I skipped about 30 chapters to get there. It wasn't a bad book, but I got bored - as my friends can attest, I get bored very easily, and I usually require at least some romance to keep me interested. [Blog] - [Bookstagram]
    more
  • Lyn
    January 1, 1970
    We all need a good laugh right now, and thank goodness someone's delivering. Gordon Jack's newest book brings the hilarious and ridiculous sides of politics to light in a novel about high school elections. If you loved the movie Election, this book will be 100% your cup of tea.What Jack so brilliantly mocks is a system that brings out the worst in us. Human nature, whether you're 17 or 77, finds all kinds of new ways to scheme and lie and cheat. Stacey, Tony, and Julia are three candidates for s We all need a good laugh right now, and thank goodness someone's delivering. Gordon Jack's newest book brings the hilarious and ridiculous sides of politics to light in a novel about high school elections. If you loved the movie Election, this book will be 100% your cup of tea.What Jack so brilliantly mocks is a system that brings out the worst in us. Human nature, whether you're 17 or 77, finds all kinds of new ways to scheme and lie and cheat. Stacey, Tony, and Julia are three candidates for student body president who forget their better angels while vying for the highest office in the land. Instead of their bad behavior leaving you worried about the fate of the free world, you're more likely to crack up and release some cathartic sighs in the realization human nature has always had this problem. We're not exactly breaking new ground with today's headlines, much as it might seem that way. The characters show us every kind of motivation for declaring candidacy--self-righteous altruism, manipulative curiosity, vaulting ambition, and a desperate need for chocolate milk. Jack also takes on the fraught politics of multicultural school communities, exploring aspects of identity that so readily get politicized in the wrong kinds of ways--not because identity and political action are problematic, but because human nature loves to box people in, permanently ("colonize," in Julia's words). Jack deftly tackles white privilege and complex racial and ethnic dynamics in a school where power is shifting every second. This is a place where we seriously need a laugh somedays, partially because racial politics in this country are so bad, and partially because The Young People Will Win, as David Hogg likes to say. They'll win with their fresh perspective, their humor, and their open-mindedness. They think outside the boxes adults would keep them in. And they are breaking new ground with their activism. But they are fortunately the stuff of our nonfiction, today, and too good to skewer. What we need to mock is our worst devils and how elections seem to find all those gremlins, stat. I can't think of a more perfect book to arrive in time for our insane midterms. Read it, America. Because you seriously need to chill.
    more
  • Susana Herrera
    January 1, 1970
    I gobbled up Jack’s Your Own Worst Enemy in the same way I devoured The Boomerang Effect, in just a few sittings, forcing myself to slow down enough to savor the last few morsels of the surprise delicacies found in the form of a hilarious climax. Jack is a master at building tension with humor and wit. He expertly develops each of his diverse high school students, giving voice to characters we don’t ordinarily see in dystopian novels. I found myself rooting for each candidate against my own will I gobbled up Jack’s Your Own Worst Enemy in the same way I devoured The Boomerang Effect, in just a few sittings, forcing myself to slow down enough to savor the last few morsels of the surprise delicacies found in the form of a hilarious climax. Jack is a master at building tension with humor and wit. He expertly develops each of his diverse high school students, giving voice to characters we don’t ordinarily see in dystopian novels. I found myself rooting for each candidate against my own will, which is part of the point, exactly...This YA novel is a salty satire on America’s politics; Jack asks each of us why we vote the way we do: Is it race, class, resistance to a previous group in power or is it simply the right words at the right time to the right people who are actually motivated to go out there and vote? In this case, we examine the student government teens and then we must examine ourselves. What happened in 2016? Well, here’s one way to look at it that will actually make you laugh. And we laugh because it is true.
    more
  • April
    January 1, 1970
    Another winner from Gordon Jack, high school librarian by day, master novelist by night! The characters in this book are so engaging and endearing, even when they're making bad choices. They're in competition with each other, but you can't help rooting for them all. The author's perceptiveness about human nature, and teenager nature in particular, makes the story realistic and touching, even in the madcap moments. I laughed out loud and didn't want it to end. Writer another one, Gordon Jack! I'm Another winner from Gordon Jack, high school librarian by day, master novelist by night! The characters in this book are so engaging and endearing, even when they're making bad choices. They're in competition with each other, but you can't help rooting for them all. The author's perceptiveness about human nature, and teenager nature in particular, makes the story realistic and touching, even in the madcap moments. I laughed out loud and didn't want it to end. Writer another one, Gordon Jack! I'm waiting!
    more
  • Avid Reader and Geek Girl
    January 1, 1970
    FTC DISCLAIMER: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Harper Teen through Edelweiss+. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.4 starsI really enjoyed this satire of the election process. It had a great diverse list of characters, LGBT-wise and racially diverse. We had:Stacey-long time politician, I didn't really like Stacey until almost the end of the book, she's a perfectionist who can be a bit mean and self-centered at times, but she finally comes around to a better FTC DISCLAIMER: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Harper Teen through Edelweiss+. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.4 starsI really enjoyed this satire of the election process. It had a great diverse list of characters, LGBT-wise and racially diverse. We had:Stacey-long time politician, I didn't really like Stacey until almost the end of the book, she's a perfectionist who can be a bit mean and self-centered at times, but she finally comes around to a better personality at the end of the book.Julia- the new girl with some big secrets, including her unknown heritage, trying to atone for her sins, she was one of my favorite characters of the book.Tony- the Asian stoner and obvious Trump of the book, who really isn't fit for office.Brian- the sweet guy stuck between his new love and his best friend.Kyle- Brian's little brother, who seems like a misogynist to me, and who hates the corrupt system. Lance- the tabloid-like reporter and creep. But for all of them they wanted parental approval and the acceptance of their peers. It showed the large differences but the underlying commonalities of them all. Stacey and Julia had the most character development, I was happy to see Stacey realize she wanted to be like her dad not her mom, who was just evil and self-centered. The rotating POV really worked well for this story, if it had only been told by one of the MCs you wouldn't have liked anyone probably. The characters were perfectly flawed, which I really loved. It didn't pull me in until near the end, that and a few too many unusual words is why I rated it down a star.
    more
  • Mary Taugher
    January 1, 1970
    At a time when we all need a respite from ugly national politics along comes Your Own Worst Enemy, a hilarious satire about a high school election. I adored this book and could not put it down. Gordon Jack is one of the funniest and talented YA writers out there. The characters vying for class president include Stacey, the frontrunner and traditionalist; Julia, the newcomer with a secret who throws Stacey off what was assumed to be a clear path to victory; and Tony, a stoner who just wants choco At a time when we all need a respite from ugly national politics along comes Your Own Worst Enemy, a hilarious satire about a high school election. I adored this book and could not put it down. Gordon Jack is one of the funniest and talented YA writers out there. The characters vying for class president include Stacey, the frontrunner and traditionalist; Julia, the newcomer with a secret who throws Stacey off what was assumed to be a clear path to victory; and Tony, a stoner who just wants chocolate milk in the cafeteria. The hijinks start right away with a vandalized campaign banner, and as in real life we read that this might be a false flag ploy by the candidate whose banner was defaced. The chapters are told in alternating points of view, which I found fascinating as we got multiple perspectives on the same event. I also appreciated the structure of this book; its sections were labeled with titles like Endorsements, Opposition Research and Attack Ads, giving us a behind-the-scene look at what it takes to run a political campaign in high school — and it’s not just cupcakes and banners. One of the most endearing characters was Brian, Stacey’s closest friends and her campaign manager. Brian is torn between his long friendship with Stacey and his budding romance with Julia, and his situation only gets more fraught when his younger brother, an avid Tony supporter, stoops to espionage. Aside from dirty politics, the books deals with important issues such as racial and sexual identity as well as socioeconomic differences and white privilege in what seems to be a fairly affluent public high school. The outcome of the election is a mystery until the very end, and I won’t spoil it. But I have to say that thanks to many laugh-out-loud moments and clever plot twists, Your Own Worst Enemy leaves you feeling lightened and hopeful. If teenagers can find a way to navigate a bitter election and come out stronger, more engaged and more tolerant than before its start, then maybe there’s hope for some sort of renewed civil discourse in these divisive times.
    more
  • Sheila Grau
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Your Own Worst Enemy. I came for the 2016 election spoof, but this book was so much more than that. It was genuinely funny, but also insightful and honest. The author didn’t take the easy route of creating caricatures to make fun of, or stoop to school election clichés. Jack has created three very real characters vying for the position of student body president. Stacey represents the old guard – work ethic and tradition. Julia offers a voice to the previously overlooked members of the s I loved Your Own Worst Enemy. I came for the 2016 election spoof, but this book was so much more than that. It was genuinely funny, but also insightful and honest. The author didn’t take the easy route of creating caricatures to make fun of, or stoop to school election clichés. Jack has created three very real characters vying for the position of student body president. Stacey represents the old guard – work ethic and tradition. Julia offers a voice to the previously overlooked members of the student body, questioning those very traditions. And then there’s Tony. Tony just wants the cafeteria to bring back his chocolate milk. The story is fast-paced, alternating between these different points-of-view as we learn about what motivates these characters and what’s at stake for them. I flew through the book, thanks to Jack's hilarious narration and the hints of mystery surrounding the candidates.
    more
  • Robie
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Gordon Jack's Boomerang Effect and am thrilled to report that Your Own Worst Enemy shares the uniquely hilarious and honest take that made the first book stand out from other YA novels. He goes deeper in Your Own Worst Enemy making it an even more satisfying read. Stacey, Julia and Tony are delicious characters whose raw, funny and painful moments kept me turning pages, ignoring the clock well into the evening. Jack's clever parallels to the last election are also terrific. The book's ho I loved Gordon Jack's Boomerang Effect and am thrilled to report that Your Own Worst Enemy shares the uniquely hilarious and honest take that made the first book stand out from other YA novels. He goes deeper in Your Own Worst Enemy making it an even more satisfying read. Stacey, Julia and Tony are delicious characters whose raw, funny and painful moments kept me turning pages, ignoring the clock well into the evening. Jack's clever parallels to the last election are also terrific. The book's honesty and creative genius touched me and also had me laughing and smiling ear to ear. Five stars! Now the long wait until book three. Ugh.
    more
  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Your Own Worst Enemy. From the beginning to the end, the characters made me laugh out loud, which I rarely do. Three very different candidates equally ridiculous in their motives and platforms vie for ASB president. The election rings true by bringing out the worst in human interaction. The nice thing is, that despite the egos involved, there is a thread of inner good bringing hope to us all. It turns out that we are not beyond redemption.
    more
  • Rachel Lu
    January 1, 1970
    Since the first 2 reviews start with "I loved Your Own Worst Enemy," I'll stick with the status quo and say I loved "Your Own Worst Enemy" too. Hilarious, I found myself chuckling throughout — yet the story also explored deeper issues, tackling diversity, people's voices and of course, a light parody on the 2016 election. However, unlike the election, this book ends with hope, with people from different backgrounds working together solve problems and issues.
    more
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Do you love swag and snail mail? Gordon has tons of fun swag just for signing up for his newsletter (no purchase required but you should definitely preorder YOUR OWN WORST ENEMY). Check it out here.
  • Ruthsic
    January 1, 1970
    Warnings: racism, substance abuse, fatphobia, will probably make you relive 2016 all overIn a parody of the 2016 American presidential election, Your Own Worst Enemy explores the devolution of human nature when it comes to politics. Stacey thinks she is running unopposed for student body president, until Julia, a newcomer, and Tony, the school's stoner, both enter the race. As the candidates and their campaign managers figure out ways to one up each other, and defeat the other candidates, we see Warnings: racism, substance abuse, fatphobia, will probably make you relive 2016 all overIn a parody of the 2016 American presidential election, Your Own Worst Enemy explores the devolution of human nature when it comes to politics. Stacey thinks she is running unopposed for student body president, until Julia, a newcomer, and Tony, the school's stoner, both enter the race. As the candidates and their campaign managers figure out ways to one up each other, and defeat the other candidates, we see a slightly exaggerated portrayal of how identity politics can be misused and the original message lost in the mess. In a revolving multi-person POV of Julia, Stacey, Tony, Kyle and Brian, we see the countdown towards the student body elections from all angles. Each of the people in it had their own reasons for getting involved, be it misguided altruism, an effort to seem mature, just the hankering for chocolate milk in cafeteria, or a sense of feeling power. I feel the most character development was done in the case of Julia's arc so I'll start with that first. Her arc is the most important issue in this story: her ethnicity and race paint a target on her back and is used to launch an opening volley into this battle. Julia herself doesn't know what race she belongs to, thanks to a close-lipped mother but due to her surname, everybody assumes she is Latina and the Latinx majority in the school flock to support her. Her message is probably naive in the start, but by the end she realizes she has a chance to make actual change, and the ideas on how to make the school year more inclusive. Stacey, on the other hand, is an experienced student politician with a good sense of social issues and has worked hard to get to this position, but her desire to do good things is often overshadowed by her cold political sense to the point that it sometimes seems she only is an ally for political benefit, and her personal troubles often leak into her good judgement. She also has a take-charge nature, which means she has been taking care of her father when her mother dumped them both, but that very nature is seen as distancing by her peers (remind you of someone?). Brian, who has been her best friend and campaign manager is stuck between his friendship and his feelings (and frequent boners) for Julia. Tony - well, he is only a Trump in that he doesn't care about public service and doesn't have what it takes for the job - is being manipulated by Kyle into blowing up what could have been a good election race and essentially bring down the whole level. Kyle, a nihilistic little brat who embodies chaotic evil at just 14 years of age, should have been watched more carefully because he seems the type to be being radicalized by some alt-right peeps. The story also goes into what good politics could like, if people stopped to listen to diverse opinions, acknowledged privileges and knew when to be an ally instead of drowning out voices. It takes a realistic approach to the situation, and present the characters as all flawed in their own way, but still being able to do good if they acted together. It talks about how sensationalization, unfair methods, manipulation, all in the context of the small pool of a student body, but also embodies the general spirit of how politics is in this current age. It also mentions the current social issues, and how they have impacted the discussion and voter engagement. And the multiple POV worked so well for this story, specifically because it kept the story from dragging in any particular parts, and by switching characters keeps your interest going. Perhaps the only parts I did not really like were how the ending itself was rushed into, and the way Brian's and Stacey's dynamic was changed a bit towards the end to justify her anger towards him. In my opinion, there didn't need to be a romantic angle involved at all? Stacey particularly didn't seem like she would worry about that, so it seemed a bit out of character for her there. Overall, a good satirical look at American political issues. Is it diverse? It has a multiracial main character (Julia) who is suggested to be bi, and an Asian-American main character (Tony); another main character is questioning (Brian). Among the secondary characters, there is a gay black kid (James), a couple of Latina girls. Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review from Viz Media, via Edelweiss.
    more
  • Halina Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    This book is just fantastic. As soon as I picked it up I couldn't put it down. It deals with so many social issues in our country that millions of teenagers face everyday. In particular this novel tackles the idea of human identity and how we define ourselves. Each of the characters spend most of the novel holding on so close to small factors that contribute so little to their large and broad identity. They focus their energies on their accomplishments, involvements, sexual preferences, race, pa This book is just fantastic. As soon as I picked it up I couldn't put it down. It deals with so many social issues in our country that millions of teenagers face everyday. In particular this novel tackles the idea of human identity and how we define ourselves. Each of the characters spend most of the novel holding on so close to small factors that contribute so little to their large and broad identity. They focus their energies on their accomplishments, involvements, sexual preferences, race, past, parents, etc. They get caught up in what defines them instead which hinders them from making connections with others and being themselves. Finding your identity is something every teenager goes through and this book goes through this process in a very real way. This book is no fairy tale, it is extremely realistic and unpredictable. My favorite part of the book is the author's voice of the characters. Although the book is written in the third person, the narration is so strong that I would often feel that it was the character speaking and I was inside their head. This book is great for teenagers and adults alike. Although it is funny and lighthearted it is a book that should be taken seriously. Our nation is currently so divided by all of our differences and we live in such in a politically tense climate. We need to focus less on how our identities make us different but how they make us stronger and more connected. There is no better example of this practice than the plot of this book.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Stacey Wynn is the model high school student, set to take student council president at Lincoln High. With her best friend Brian as campaign advisor and sassy nemesis James as her vice president, things seem to be right on track for Stacey’s senior year. But Stacey’s plans take a sudden nosedive as the new girl, Julia, and the high school stoner, Tony, enter the race. Three very different platforms, each with their own unique appeal, go head-to-head amidst some classic high school drama. Gordon J Stacey Wynn is the model high school student, set to take student council president at Lincoln High. With her best friend Brian as campaign advisor and sassy nemesis James as her vice president, things seem to be right on track for Stacey’s senior year. But Stacey’s plans take a sudden nosedive as the new girl, Julia, and the high school stoner, Tony, enter the race. Three very different platforms, each with their own unique appeal, go head-to-head amidst some classic high school drama. Gordon Jack tells the story of this exciting political race, replete with high school drama and hilarious mishaps. Your Own Worst Enemy is a great book for anybody looking for a funny read, mixed with some sentiment and a powerful truth.
    more
  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    A good read that kept me interested until the end. Full RTC!****************Full review: https://mindofabookdragon.wordpress.c...I really enjoyed this book, and I really enjoyed all the different voices represented in this novel. The cast of characters were engaging and dynamic, and they had their own motives for acting the way they did in the novel.The very beginning was really good, and it hooked me until the end. The more I read, the more I wanted to know more about them. I didn’t really like A good read that kept me interested until the end. Full RTC!****************Full review: https://mindofabookdragon.wordpress.c...I really enjoyed this book, and I really enjoyed all the different voices represented in this novel. The cast of characters were engaging and dynamic, and they had their own motives for acting the way they did in the novel.The very beginning was really good, and it hooked me until the end. The more I read, the more I wanted to know more about them. I didn’t really like Stacey and Tony, but I think they were still dynamic characters. They had a lot to grow from. I didn’t really connect to them on a personal level.I think Julia was one of the most relatable characters. Her feelings of not fitting in because of her culture and the way she looks was something I feel many people can understand. I think it’s important to note that she resisted a lot of the racialization that people did of her.The premise of the student government was really well done. I really enjoyed reading about the different strategies used by each candidate. I think they really represented different approaches used by politicians today.Overall, this was a fun read. I wish I had had more time to read it at a time!
    more
  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    A hilariously satirical novel about a high school election. You can read my full review and enter a giveaway for a copy of the book here!Diversity Rep: mixed-race main character; Asian-American main character; POC and LGBTQ+ side charactersWarnings: microaggressions; some comments that are racist/fatphobic; vandalism of a poster with an anti-immigrant slur; teenage drinking & drug use (Please let me know if I missed any!)Thank you to Fantastic Flying Book Club for including me on the blog to A hilariously satirical novel about a high school election. You can read my full review and enter a giveaway for a copy of the book here!Diversity Rep: mixed-race main character; Asian-American main character; POC and LGBTQ+ side charactersWarnings: microaggressions; some comments that are racist/fatphobic; vandalism of a poster with an anti-immigrant slur; teenage drinking & drug use (Please let me know if I missed any!)Thank you to Fantastic Flying Book Club for including me on the blog tour and for providing me with a review copy! This did not affect my opinion of the book in any way.
    more
  • Donna Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    The best way to sum up why I liked this book is to quote my daughter who said "he writes like a girl...and I mean that as a compliment!" This book was so enjoyable because the dialog and the emotions of the characters were so believable. The author does a fantastic job of mastering the voice of multiple teenagers, regardless of their age, gender, interests or background. I found the plot truly engaging and enjoyed it even more given the relevancy to the election. The characters feel real and the The best way to sum up why I liked this book is to quote my daughter who said "he writes like a girl...and I mean that as a compliment!" This book was so enjoyable because the dialog and the emotions of the characters were so believable. The author does a fantastic job of mastering the voice of multiple teenagers, regardless of their age, gender, interests or background. I found the plot truly engaging and enjoyed it even more given the relevancy to the election. The characters feel real and the issues they are facing are real and the author does an excellent job introducing the issues and making you want to care. Also illuminates the often hidden paths of need for approval vs desire to stand up for a cause that teenagers have to navigate every day in high school. Witty, deep, relevant. Definitely recommend this book!
    more
  • hpboy13
    January 1, 1970
    Your Own Worst Enemy was a delight to read, the kind of book I breezed through quickly, and was left sad that it ended. It takes a look at a cutthroat student election, and Gordon Jack does a perfect job of capturing the duality of how much it matters (it’s life and death to the kids running) and how little it matters (student government has almost no power).It’s tricky to capture today’s teens in writing. If you ignore how much they all concern themselves with questions of identity politics, it Your Own Worst Enemy was a delight to read, the kind of book I breezed through quickly, and was left sad that it ended. It takes a look at a cutthroat student election, and Gordon Jack does a perfect job of capturing the duality of how much it matters (it’s life and death to the kids running) and how little it matters (student government has almost no power).It’s tricky to capture today’s teens in writing. If you ignore how much they all concern themselves with questions of identity politics, it’s not realistic; if you dive into those identity politics headfirst, it’s unreadable. Gordon Jack found a perfect balance between the two, where the identity politics inform the narrative, but not so much the narration.The characters are wonderful – many sympathetic, many familiar, and a few absolutely terrifying. The one commonality is a messed up home life that, though unresolved at book’s end, helps develop the characters and make them real. I found myself rooting for Julia, Brian, and Stacey to all get what they want. There were characters who angered me (Lance is the worst) or scared me (Kyle, precisely because he’s so believable).Obviously, though a humorous book that had me laughing aloud, this book is also meant as a riff on the 2016 election. Gordon Jack treads a very fine line – there are moments in the book that obviously parallel the election, but because it isn’t a 1-to-1 parallel, the 2016 parallels don’t overwhelm the book.So, it’s a book full of humor, politics, romance, familial dysfunction, and awesome characters – there’s not much more you could ask for!
    more
  • ItsOwlRight
    January 1, 1970
    1 high school student council president election. 3 very different candidates. That doesn’t seem above average--until you throw in the politics, schemes, drama, protests, humor, satire, and a lot of “Wait, what?!” moments, all at one (very diverse) high school. I also loved that pretty much any political/social issues you can think of, mostly race and gender, were dealt with a lot in both serious and humorous ways. I’d recommend this for everyone and anyone just looking to read something fun.
    more
  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so clever and funny. Every line is seeped with sarcasm and humor. I was reading most of it on the plane and I had trouble not laughing out loud to it. If you liked the movie Election with Reese Witherspoon, you will love this book.
  • elly
    January 1, 1970
    This is a comedic YA novel about the complications and paranoia of politics! I enjoyed reading! I gave it three stars because at times I felt the diversity wasn't portrayed naturally, there was a slight stiffness to it. But other than that I liked it!
    more
Write a review