Find You In The Dark
A chilling debut thriller in the vein of Dexter and The Talented Mr Ripley.Martin Reese has a hobby: he digs up murder victims. He buys stolen police files on serial killers, and uses them to find and dig up missing bodies. Calls in the results anonymously, taunting the police for their failure to do their job.Detective Sandra Whittal takes that a little personally. She’s suspicious of the mysterious caller, who she names the Finder. Maybe he’s the one leaving the bodies behind. If not, who’s to say he won’t start soon?As Whittal begins to zero in on the Finder, Martin makes a shocking discovery. It seems someone—someone lethal—is very unhappy about the bodies he’s been digging up.Hunted by a cop, hunted by a killer. To escape and keep his family safe, Martin may have to go deeper into the world of murder than he ever imagined.

Find You In The Dark Details

TitleFind You In The Dark
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 2nd, 2018
PublisherText Publishing
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Fiction, Adult Fiction

Find You In The Dark Review

  • Selene
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book’s synopsis and had such high hopes for loving these characters!Moving along . . .Martin sold his tech company and retired early. He’s wealthy and his wife, Ellen, is a loan officer turned shopkeeper. Their teenage daughter, Kylie, is a high school student with a love for swimming. Ellen’s sister, Tinsley, has been missing for twenty years and Martin has been spending all of his free time searching for her remains. Along the way, he uncovers the bodies of other murdered women an I loved this book’s synopsis and had such high hopes for loving these characters!Moving along . . .Martin sold his tech company and retired early. He’s wealthy and his wife, Ellen, is a loan officer turned shopkeeper. Their teenage daughter, Kylie, is a high school student with a love for swimming. Ellen’s sister, Tinsley, has been missing for twenty years and Martin has been spending all of his free time searching for her remains. Along the way, he uncovers the bodies of other murdered women and anonymously reports the findings to the police. Ellen doesn’t have any clue about how Martin spends his “camping” time, but his daughter soon finds out some interesting details when he becomes sloppy. At first it seems as though Martin’s secretive search for his sister-in-law is a genuine one. He cares for his wife but her sister’s disappearance/assumed murder is a very touchy subject. It’s also one that keeps bouncing to the forefront of their family life because their daughter wants to be more independent and Ellen is increasingly paranoid that some terrible misfortune will befall her. But does Martin have another motive for finding these buried women? What’s his true agenda?Issues?This story was very underwhelming for the first half and the pace was frustratingly slow. Martin visited these burial sites regularly, dug up human remains in various stages of decay and returned home sometimes a smelly mess, and his wife NEVER suspected something was a bit odd? Okay, so he mostly showered and cleaned up at hotels, but he did this solo “camping” activity for many years and if camping were a sport, then Martin was an Olympian! He lied to his daughter and wife about his whereabouts all the time and he still managed (somehow) to be a bore! His inner monologue for the majority of this book was dull, despite the nature of his exracurricular activities. Other issues? The two detectives assigned to investigate the finder of these uncovered bodies were one dimensional. Detective Chris Gabriel felt inferior to his partner, Sandra Whittal, and she was about as likable as a migraine. Their dialogue together was only slightly interesting at the very end. The gist of this story?(view spoiler)[There was a one-sided bromance between murderers and Martin inadvertently inserted himself into that equation. (hide spoiler)]Favorite lines spoken by Kylie?“You smell like unwashed old man, Dad.”▣ The author’s writing style was okay, but the pulse of this book was at flatline status for almost the entire story! There were occasional blips of life and some clever bits, yes. But these characters really skipped from gray to ultra high definition after the sixty-two percent mark. The last twenty-four percent of this book? That’s when Martin really came to life! That’s when he possessed some personality! Finally!*NetGalley ARC provided by Atria Books in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Zoe
    January 1, 1970
    Dark, menacing, and gritty!Find You In The Dark is an engrossing, creepy thriller that delves into the sadistic and disturbing thoughts, motivations, and actions of serial killers and immerses you in all the manipulation, violence, murder, depravity, and pure evil they're capable of.The prose is chilling and tight. The characterization is well done with a whole slew of characters that are flawed, vulnerable, and persistent. And the plot, told from multiple perspectives, is an exceptionally suspe Dark, menacing, and gritty!Find You In The Dark is an engrossing, creepy thriller that delves into the sadistic and disturbing thoughts, motivations, and actions of serial killers and immerses you in all the manipulation, violence, murder, depravity, and pure evil they're capable of.The prose is chilling and tight. The characterization is well done with a whole slew of characters that are flawed, vulnerable, and persistent. And the plot, told from multiple perspectives, is an exceptionally suspenseful, twisty, violent, tension-filled thrill ride that keeps you on the edge of your seat from the very first page.Overall, Find You In The Dark is a fast-paced, unique, ominous tale that reminds you that if you continually dance with the devil eventually you might get burned.Thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.All my reviews can be found on my blog at https://whatsbetterthanbooks.com
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I find it impressive how vile and tormented someone could be, how a sick mind can operate... This book give you an inside view on how a serial killer thinks, and that is something. Ok, I'll say it, it's disgusting. This book was good, but I found it difficult to read. I received an advanced copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Selena
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-copy of Find you In The Dark by Nathan Ripley from NetGalley for my honest review. This book is Nathan Ripley‘s debut thriller. This book is about a wealthy retired man, Martin, who has a family of his own. He is bored and is obsessed with serial killers. He secretly researches and digs up missing victims of serial killers. He feels like he is doing people a favor by helping solve mysteries secretly and doing thing that the police don't do. Martin's most recent dig is the bod I received a free e-copy of Find you In The Dark by Nathan Ripley from NetGalley for my honest review. This book is Nathan Ripley‘s debut thriller. This book is about a wealthy retired man, Martin, who has a family of his own. He is bored and is obsessed with serial killers. He secretly researches and digs up missing victims of serial killers. He feels like he is doing people a favor by helping solve mysteries secretly and doing thing that the police don't do. Martin's most recent dig is the body of Tinsley, who is his wife's sister who has been missing for 20 years. When he arrives at the burial site to dig up his victim, he discovers something extra that sets him in a tailspin of events. Now he is on someone's radar and he is being chased by someone who isn't happy that Martin is digging up his work. Mystery, suspense, serial killers and crooked cops. Need I say more . . . .
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    Before I started reading this I’d heard mixed reports which is always intriguing – turns out I adored it and it was just the kind of story I love to get my head into. Not sure what that says about me…ANYWAY, Martin spends his spare time looking through the cracks of various police investigations and very successfully digging up lost victims of serial killers. Sandra is a detective who is not as enamoured of this idea as some of her colleagues – rather than seeing him as a hero, she wonders about Before I started reading this I’d heard mixed reports which is always intriguing – turns out I adored it and it was just the kind of story I love to get my head into. Not sure what that says about me…ANYWAY, Martin spends his spare time looking through the cracks of various police investigations and very successfully digging up lost victims of serial killers. Sandra is a detective who is not as enamoured of this idea as some of her colleagues – rather than seeing him as a hero, she wonders about the psyche of a man who would do this sort of thing. Martin calls in his finds anonymously, but what he doesn’t know is that someone is watching..and Sandra is determined to track him down too..There were several things that worked for me in this novel – first and foremost Martin himself, who tells his own story, allowing the reader to see inside his head. It was refreshing to see an exploration of a dark personality who has channelled that darkness into something that could be termed a public service – hence, I suppose, the comparison to Dexter, certainly both those characters are dangerously attractive, but this is a very different kettle of fish. So to speak.Then we have Sandra, a divisive character, she is edgy and often annoyingly obtuse, yet you can see her side of things – wondering if this mysterious benefactor of closure for parents isn’t just working himself up to being the one who deprives said parents of their offspring in the first place. The yin yang between that and what you know of Martin makes for a fascinating reading experience, whose side you might take, whether you want Martin to “get away with it” or not…The mystery elements are very well done but this one is all about the character study in many ways, descriptively it is dark and gorgeous and I loved how it ended – I’m wondering if we will get a sequel, I do hope so I’d love to see what happens next following the closure of this cat and mouse tale, I really would love to go back into Martin’s world again, I had a good if somewhat terrifying time there.Recommended.
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  • Lisa Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    Hello book. Your blurb speaks to all the twisted parts of me. Let's be BFF's.I'm just going to put out into the universe how much l want to win an ARC for this book. SO. MUCH.Please and thanks Universe. Regards, Lisa (super excited fan girl w/ black heart).
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  • Jay G
    January 1, 1970
    Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer...I was sent a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for my honest review.Martin Reese buys stolen police files and uses the information inside to dig up the bodies of serial killer victims then calls the bodies in anonymously, taunting the police for not doing their jobs. A young Detective named Sandra Whittal has began call him 'The Finder' and has made it her personal mission Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer...I was sent a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for my honest review.Martin Reese buys stolen police files and uses the information inside to dig up the bodies of serial killer victims then calls the bodies in anonymously, taunting the police for not doing their jobs. A young Detective named Sandra Whittal has began call him 'The Finder' and has made it her personal mission to catch him. That's when Martin discovers he's in over his head when someone isn't very happy about him digging up his work... Martin finds his family in danger, but isn't able to turn to the police for help. How far will he go to protect the ones he loves?I love the concept of this book, I've always loved reading about serial killers so I was very excited to get my hands on this one! Unfortunately, this story fell a bit short for me. I wasn't able to connect with any of the characters and didn't care what happened to any of them in the end. I found the writing style to be too choppy for my liking and found it to be distracting from the overall plot line. I also did not like some of the language the author chose to use (i.e., the use of the 'R' word as an insult), but that is a personal preference. I did enjoy the multiple perspectives and found it interesting to be able to see the story from Martin, the Detectives' and the serial killers' perspective. I was going to rate this book a 2.5/5 stars but the ending was the redeeming factor for me. I found the book to be too slow paced for me, most of the time I was bored while reading and put the book down. As the climax approached, the pacing quickened and I was unable to call the ending, which was a bonus.Overall, I enjoyed the book, but it won't be anything memorable for me.
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  • Edward Lorn
    January 1, 1970
    Review and rating to be published closer to date of publication.
  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I found the premise of the book interesting. A person searching for the victims of long dead serial killers. Anonymously giving the location of his finds to the police for the families to finally have closure of losing their loved ones. But there is someone out there that isn’t happy about these long dead victims being found. With one cop suspicious of this so called Good Samaritan and a serial killer zeroing in on Martin Reese, he needs to race to protect his family or lose everything. The book I found the premise of the book interesting. A person searching for the victims of long dead serial killers. Anonymously giving the location of his finds to the police for the families to finally have closure of losing their loved ones. But there is someone out there that isn’t happy about these long dead victims being found. With one cop suspicious of this so called Good Samaritan and a serial killer zeroing in on Martin Reese, he needs to race to protect his family or lose everything. The book was fast paced and a quick book to read. There was some suspense and it kept you wondering how he was going to get out of this mess. But I found that the more I read, the less I liked the protagonist. He is rich and plays the stay-at-home dad to his daughter after retiring and selling his tech company. But he was the stereo typical rich guy that gets whatever he wants and is way smarter than everyone else. Everything seems to go his way. Even when it isn’t it somehow works out in his favor. He is arrogant and it made him not very likable. I received a copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Martin Reese has an unusual hobby. He finds the bodies of murder victims that have not yet been discovered. Using old case files for reference, he looks for seemingly random or unimportant clues that police working on the cases originally missed. He keeps photos of the bodies, along with detailed records of how he uncovered them, stored in his 'scrapbook', an old computer which is hidden away in a locked drawer in his house. Once he uncovers the remains he phones 911 anonymously on disposable ce Martin Reese has an unusual hobby. He finds the bodies of murder victims that have not yet been discovered. Using old case files for reference, he looks for seemingly random or unimportant clues that police working on the cases originally missed. He keeps photos of the bodies, along with detailed records of how he uncovered them, stored in his 'scrapbook', an old computer which is hidden away in a locked drawer in his house. Once he uncovers the remains he phones 911 anonymously on disposable cells, leading the police to where they are buried. Unfortunately for him, he has caught the attention of a serial killer who is not entirely happy with Martin's activities and is recently making those feelings known. Also hot on Martin's trail is police detective Sandra Whittal who believes he has escalated from being a 'finder' to a murderer.Martin and his wife Ellen appear to have a good marriage with arguments mainly revolving around her overprotectiveness of their daughter, Kylie. Ellen's sister Tinsley went missing twenty years ago and Ellen believes she was murdered. She's worried the same will happen to Kylie, so she sets heavy boundaries and rules for her. Martin looks specifically for female victims of serial killers in an attempt to find Tinsley and put his wife's mind to rest.The insight into Martin's personality is fascinating. There's a complexity to him as he conceals what he's doing from his wife and daughter to create some sort of balance within his life and family. He believes he is providing a public service for the victims’ loved ones. However, there might be another motivation that drives him other than providing closure and finding Tinsley's remains. Martin also has a history of secret impulses he's trying to suppress, so there could be an even deeper reason why he is digging up bodies.The dark and rainy streets of Seattle create the perfect backdrop for the narrative. Author Nathan Ripley conveys such a sense of unease, I was frequently looking over my shoulder as I was reading. Find You in the Dark is a disturbingly sinister novel with plenty of suspense, intriguing characters and a story that kept me riveted.
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  • Greg at 2 Book Lovers Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    *3.5 StarsThis book is marketed as being comparable to Dexter and The Talented Mr. Ripley. These are great tags to pull a reader like myself in, but you have to live up to your own hype. Once you get to know Martin Reese, the comparison of characters is there. Let’s see how the story holds up.Nathan Ripley has created a unique story arc. It has a lot of great twists and turns, with a couple of “I did not see that coming” moments. It was lacking a little something – something that would have kept *3.5 StarsThis book is marketed as being comparable to Dexter and The Talented Mr. Ripley. These are great tags to pull a reader like myself in, but you have to live up to your own hype. Once you get to know Martin Reese, the comparison of characters is there. Let’s see how the story holds up.Nathan Ripley has created a unique story arc. It has a lot of great twists and turns, with a couple of “I did not see that coming” moments. It was lacking a little something – something that would have kept me riveted to the pages. Perhaps it was where I was with my reading, but I felt familiar feelings with other books. Nothing stolen, by any means, just not unique enough.Find You in the Dark had an excellent cast of characters. They were all well developed and integral to the story, however, I lacked a connection to the protagonist. Martin Reese was rich, perceptive and intelligent, he was missing an idiosyncrasy/fatal flaw that I find helps me connect better with a protagonist who seems to have it all. In the end, I didn’t connect well enough with any of the characters. It dials down the suspense level when I don’t care who lives or dies.As a debut novel, Find You in the Dark was good enough. The writing was well done, it was just lacking certain elements that would bring the story up to the next level. Would I read a book by Nathan Ripley again? I’ll say yes, but with all of the great debuts I’ve read lately, he’s got a tough row to hoe.*I received a copy of the book from the publisher (via NetGalley).
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  • Tiger
    January 1, 1970
    Debut novel for Canadian Nathan Ripley (real name: Naben Ruthnum) and it was outstanding. Retired tech millionaire Martin Reece has a hobby. With a little (well paid) help from a disgruntled cop, he finds the remains of buried victims of serial killers and anonymously calls the location in to the police so the families can get some closure. However, someone close to the situation has been watching Martin and isn't very happy about having his work disturbed, which leads to some very macabre momen Debut novel for Canadian Nathan Ripley (real name: Naben Ruthnum) and it was outstanding. Retired tech millionaire Martin Reece has a hobby. With a little (well paid) help from a disgruntled cop, he finds the remains of buried victims of serial killers and anonymously calls the location in to the police so the families can get some closure. However, someone close to the situation has been watching Martin and isn't very happy about having his work disturbed, which leads to some very macabre moments. The first 1/4 of the book I wasn't really hooked as the author set the table but after that it really took off and I couldn't wait to pick it up to see what came next. There are 7 main characters and although this was a relatively short book (336 pages) they were all extremely fully written. They all felt very real and I empathized with each of their individual struggles. A very dark, yet hypnotic book, I loved it and look forward to more from this author. Thanks to Net Galley and the publisher for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sam Wiebe
    January 1, 1970
    It's pretty tough to come up with a new wrinkle in the serial killer genre, but Nathan Ripley does it. Find You in the Dark pits Martin Reese, a resourceful but secretive family man who spends his spare time searching for the bodies of unfound serial killer victims, against a brilliant killer and an equally brilliant detective who's hell-bent on uncovering his past. Morally complex and breathlessly paced. Patricia Highsmith would be proud.
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  • Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 40% I received an ARC from Netgalley so a warm thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada and Nathan Ripley. This was one of those books that I thought I would love but didn't work for me. I'm sure there's a fantastic story in there somewhere but I wasn't able to find it. I just could not get in to the story and although I made it almost half way, I really had to push myself to get to that point. The book is advertised as a mix between Dexter and The Talented Mr. Ripley. I see where they we DNF at 40% I received an ARC from Netgalley so a warm thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada and Nathan Ripley. This was one of those books that I thought I would love but didn't work for me. I'm sure there's a fantastic story in there somewhere but I wasn't able to find it. I just could not get in to the story and although I made it almost half way, I really had to push myself to get to that point. The book is advertised as a mix between Dexter and The Talented Mr. Ripley. I see where they were going with this comparison but the plot had a hard time keeping up. I was a Dexter fan but found this story to lack the qualities that made Dexter such a success. Most importantly, the characters were not very well developed.. As a result, I never connected with any of them so it was challenging to care what happened. This seemed to have an impact on my ability to engage with the story. It felt one dimensional and lacked any tension, build up or surprise elements. I was bored... I can't comment on the latter half of the book and if it gets better towards the end.....but if a story can't keep me invested within the first half, I have my doubts. There seem to be a number of higher reviews for this one so it could just be that this book and I were not meant to be.
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  • Luanne Ollivier
    January 1, 1970
    Find You in the Dark is Nathan Ripley's debut novel - and if you like suspense fiction, its one you're going to want to pick up!The premise is deliciously dark....... Martin Reese is obsessed with serial killers, specifically with the victims not found. He's been buying up police reports for many years and has managed to locate (and dig up) the bodies they couldn't find. But, he's doing all of it anonymously and taunts the cops with a tip off of each new body located. Oh, and he takes only photo Find You in the Dark is Nathan Ripley's debut novel - and if you like suspense fiction, its one you're going to want to pick up!The premise is deliciously dark....... Martin Reese is obsessed with serial killers, specifically with the victims not found. He's been buying up police reports for many years and has managed to locate (and dig up) the bodies they couldn't find. But, he's doing all of it anonymously and taunts the cops with a tip off of each new body located. Oh, and he takes only photos as souvenirs. Uh huh. He's been branded as The Finder by the cops. And it's all going along as it has for many years until.....you got it - a serial killer figures out who Martin is and what he's doing - and......I know, I couldn't wait to start reading either! Martin knew something would happen eventually with his 'hobby', but "I didn't know yet that I'd made deeper mistakes I wouldn't ever be able to put all the way right." Martin didn't engage me as a person, rather I found myself observing him, somewhat dispassionately.Now, someone else is after The Finder as well. Detective Sandra Whittal. I loved this description of her...."She was thirty-two and lacked the penis that functioned as a skeleton key to acceptance, but she had the competence and could properly talk shit, which went a long way." Whittal is clever, dogged and determined. This is the character I really liked.Find You in the Dark is a delicious cat and mouse game. It is a plot driven novel, with numerous twists and turns and some great foreshadowing. Now, yes there are some moments in the plot that I thought were a bit of a stretch, but I quickly let them go and kept turning page after page. For this reader, Find You in the Dark was definitely an entertaining read. I look forward to Ripley's next book. (And you know, I think this book would make a great movie.)
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  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    Martin Reese is a family man, but he has a dark secret - he's obsessed with murder and has been for years. He's been illegally buying police files on serial killers. He studies these files in depth and uses them as guides to find the missing bodies. He never takes anything except pictures that he stores on an old laptop. He calls the police and tells them where to look and he does it anonymously. When a crooked cop goes missing Detective Sandra Whittal zeroes in on the mysterious caller. She doe Martin Reese is a family man, but he has a dark secret - he's obsessed with murder and has been for years. He's been illegally buying police files on serial killers. He studies these files in depth and uses them as guides to find the missing bodies. He never takes anything except pictures that he stores on an old laptop. He calls the police and tells them where to look and he does it anonymously. When a crooked cop goes missing Detective Sandra Whittal zeroes in on the mysterious caller. She doesn't see the caller as helpful. She knows he isn't the killer, but she believes he'll start killing sooner rather than later. While on his latest dig, Martin digs himself into a hole that he may not be able to get himself out of.I love the cover. This book gripped me from the very first page and didn't let go until the very end. The concept is interesting - a husband and father leaves home for a bit every now and then to dig up bodies of missing women that the cops never found. Isn't that dangerous? How does he not get caught? Why is he doing it? This whole story was crazy but it also felt very real. Martin believed he was doing a good thing and he just got in way too deep. I was worried about him more than once. This was so well-written and such an intense page-turner that I felt like I was a part of it and not just sitting on the couch reading a book. Thank you to Netgalley and Simon & Schuster Canada for an ARC.
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  • Nadine
    January 1, 1970
    Find You in The Dark is marketed for fans of Dexter. I loved the books and the show, so I couldn’t wait to pick up something similar to fill the void Dexter left. Unfortunately, comparing Find You in The Dark to Dexter is setting up too high of expectations. The main character, Martin, is not who I wanted him to be until the end of the novel.Find You in The Dark follows multiple perspectives: Martin, Sandra, a police detective, and another perspective that is introduced about halfway through the Find You in The Dark is marketed for fans of Dexter. I loved the books and the show, so I couldn’t wait to pick up something similar to fill the void Dexter left. Unfortunately, comparing Find You in The Dark to Dexter is setting up too high of expectations. The main character, Martin, is not who I wanted him to be until the end of the novel.Find You in The Dark follows multiple perspectives: Martin, Sandra, a police detective, and another perspective that is introduced about halfway through the novel. This perspective is so long and drawn out that it effectively kills any momentum the story was able to muster with exposition given for seemingly no reason other than to convince the reader that the character is an evil person.I enjoyed Martin’s perspective for the most part. I thought his internal monologues were well written and engaging, however, because of the comparison to Dexter, Martin comes off as underwhelming. Martin is portrayed as incredibly intelligent, yet makes quite a few stupid decisions. Perhaps Ripley’s intention was for these decisions to be born out of Martin’s confidence; unfortunately this was not communicated through the text.Sandra’s character is portrayed as a stereotypical detective focused intently on the investigation. There was absolutely nothing special about her other than her relationship with her partner, Chris. The reversal of typical gender roles between Sandra and Chris was interesting, but, ultimately, leads nowhere. Overall, Find You in The Dark has an interesting premise that fails to deliver. If you’re an avid reader of thriller/mystery novels, you will most likely find this novel underwhelming.**I received an ARC from the publisher via Netgalley
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  • Bandit
    January 1, 1970
    Yet another thriller. There are so many out there. Never heard of the author, but looked interesting, nice name, why not. This one was in a word…competent. It just wasn’t enough. In fact the entire book in all its aspects was almost good enough in a pretty frustrating way. The only real success here was the representation of the Reese family, realistic dynamics, great dialogue. The rest…well, there’s the almost but not quite unreliable narrator, Martin, the man with serious sociopathic tendencie Yet another thriller. There are so many out there. Never heard of the author, but looked interesting, nice name, why not. This one was in a word…competent. It just wasn’t enough. In fact the entire book in all its aspects was almost good enough in a pretty frustrating way. The only real success here was the representation of the Reese family, realistic dynamics, great dialogue. The rest…well, there’s the almost but not quite unreliable narrator, Martin, the man with serious sociopathic tendencies, which are so under control, too under control, it basically makes you wait the entire novel for him to go off the rails and he just doesn’t. On the obverse there’s the real (actively so) sociopath that just isn’t that interesting or complicated or even fun. There’s a woman cop who’s too stereotypically tough as nails to take seriously and her male partner/lover, who’s too generic. There are some side characters, but nothing really special. In fact, nothing special is kind of the theme here. What is there is well done, sort of a mixture of man alone thriller and a procedural, but it’s the amount of unrealized potential is just too trying. Also the length of the story is quite trying, although it reads easily enough, it does go on. There was no redeeming last minute ending twist either, so this isn’t a mystery as such. There’s suspense, some excitement, murders (of course), but you won’t really have to use your brain for any guesswork. If only this one had been plotted as decently as it was written…what fun it would have been. The narrative was well done actually, drew and maintained the attention, passed the time. Just wished there was more to it than some mindless entertainment of the mediocre ish variety. Then again it’ll probably make a fun movie, seeing how the rights were sold. Thanks Netgalley.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a bit on the fence with this one. The story itself was really a very good one - a man who digs up the victims of serial killers - come on, how good does that sound?! But something about the writing just didn't pull me into the story and wondered if I would finish. I found the main detective character entirely too crass. I get that she was supposed to be bristly and independent but I thought the author took her to an unpleasant mean/rude, bitchy place. I also had some trouble with the transit I'm a bit on the fence with this one. The story itself was really a very good one - a man who digs up the victims of serial killers - come on, how good does that sound?! But something about the writing just didn't pull me into the story and wondered if I would finish. I found the main detective character entirely too crass. I get that she was supposed to be bristly and independent but I thought the author took her to an unpleasant mean/rude, bitchy place. I also had some trouble with the transitions from the current action of the story into the memories of the characters. I guess my problem was that I missed them and ended up confused. But again, let me emphasize the originality of the story and the twists in the path. They were phenomenally original and really got me thinking about how well we know people and what monsters really lay within
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  • Barb
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley, the publisher Simon & Schuster, and the author Nathan Ripley.Excellent cover.The book gripped me in the beginning but I lost interest off and on for about the first half (thus the ****star rating) then it became at real page turner and difficult to put down.Unique storyline with great character development and realistic dialogue throughout.I look forward to reading more from this author.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    if I hadn't just finished Hangman, this probably would've been a 5/5, and the most unique crime novel I'd read in a while.In fact it was still a very unique idea, overtones of Dexter, a kind of serial killer mentality protagonist, but with morals, and not a sociopath. Clever idea, not too grisly, highly recommended to crime fans looking for something a bit different!
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  • Kaycee Bowick (Off_The_Press)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the author, publisher, and NetGalley for providing me with a advanced DRC of this title in exchange for an honest review!Off The Press Reads: Blog ♦ Instagram ♦ Bloglovin'
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I'm giving this book 4 stars, but it's really more of a 3.5Y'all, this book is DARK. It is dark in a way that I, lover of true crime stories about serial killers and murderers, can appreciate. Is it unrealistic? Hell yeah. But you aren't going to feel comfortable about the characters in this book. You're going to to feel slightly sick about the ending. And maybe, most of all, you're going to read this book, you're going to feel all the feelings I described above, and you're going to still think I'm giving this book 4 stars, but it's really more of a 3.5Y'all, this book is DARK. It is dark in a way that I, lover of true crime stories about serial killers and murderers, can appreciate. Is it unrealistic? Hell yeah. But you aren't going to feel comfortable about the characters in this book. You're going to to feel slightly sick about the ending. And maybe, most of all, you're going to read this book, you're going to feel all the feelings I described above, and you're going to still think tracking down the victims of serial killers, like the main character, would be a really cool idea. Just, you know, don't move on to the second part.
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  • Mary Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I caught a shiver in my right hand, the kind of shake an old man gets, or an alcoholic when he's waking up. It looked a little like it was being jostled by a small, irresistible, and invisible force. I pushed my thumb towards my index finger, imagining the needle there. The needle that had killed. This book was all kinds of creepy. I'm a tough sell on crime novels; when they're done well, they can be wonderfully absorbing, but all too often, they feel cliche or predictable. FIND YOU IN THE DARK I caught a shiver in my right hand, the kind of shake an old man gets, or an alcoholic when he's waking up. It looked a little like it was being jostled by a small, irresistible, and invisible force. I pushed my thumb towards my index finger, imagining the needle there. The needle that had killed. This book was all kinds of creepy. I'm a tough sell on crime novels; when they're done well, they can be wonderfully absorbing, but all too often, they feel cliche or predictable. FIND YOU IN THE DARK may not have been perfect, but it was one wild ride. We get three main POV chapters: Martin, Detective Whittal, and the Ragman. Martin was fascinating in a disturbing way, a successful entrepreneur and family man who happened to have a deep-seated obsession with murder. He's not unlikable, but there's something chilling about how familiar and how dangerous his character is. Whittal fell into the bad cop trope, so although her chapters were interesting, she felt a bit bland as a character. And the Ragman . . . well, he kind of fell into the serial killer psycho trope (obviously), but his motives were more unique. The three had a tense dynamic, and it made the story very readable. As with most novels of the genre, it's tricky to say too much without spoilers. It was a tad repetitive, it wasn't quite as atmospheric as I feel it had the potential to be, but it was an enveloping read. Even though some plotlines were resolved conventionally, others just got darker and darker until I couldn't tell where they were going. Basically, if the blurb appeals to you, the book probably will too! Rounded up to four stars. I received an ARC of this book through a Goodreads Giveaway; thank you to Nathan Ripely and Simon & Schuster.
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  • Jill Jemmett
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a great twist on a thriller. Instead of following the life of a serial killer, it follows the life of a man who digs up the victims of serial killers. He then tells the police where to find them, but this eventually leads him into trouble. This unique plot made the story unpredictable.There were multiple narratives in the story. One was from Martin’s perspective, where he talked about finding the bodies. There was another narrative that followed the detectives who were investigating This book is a great twist on a thriller. Instead of following the life of a serial killer, it follows the life of a man who digs up the victims of serial killers. He then tells the police where to find them, but this eventually leads him into trouble. This unique plot made the story unpredictable.There were multiple narratives in the story. One was from Martin’s perspective, where he talked about finding the bodies. There was another narrative that followed the detectives who were investigating the man who dug up the graves as well as the original murders. And another narrative was about the man who pulled the strings behind the killers.The pacing of this book was great. There were major plot points that happened in each chapter that made me want to keep reading. It was hard to put this book down.I really enjoyed this book. If you’re looking for a unique thriller, this is the one for you.I received a copy of this book from the publisher on NetGalley.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for advancing me a copy of “Find You in the Dark” by Nathan Ripley. Since I did not finish the novel, I'm unable to provide an honest review. Sorry people, half-way through was as far as I could go. It was a complete bore.
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  • Steve Tripp
    January 1, 1970
    I guess I was one of the lucky ones to get a free preview of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I don't think the publisher is going to like me much. I nearly shelved it (hard to do with an e-book) after 50 pages. The premise and story-line was far too dark, the "protagonist's" grave-digging "hobby" (where he gets in trouble) is about the most bizarre central premise for a thriller that I've ever read (and I have read a lot of that genre) I found the characterization far I guess I was one of the lucky ones to get a free preview of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I don't think the publisher is going to like me much. I nearly shelved it (hard to do with an e-book) after 50 pages. The premise and story-line was far too dark, the "protagonist's" grave-digging "hobby" (where he gets in trouble) is about the most bizarre central premise for a thriller that I've ever read (and I have read a lot of that genre) I found the characterization far too simple and every character was relatively unlikable.. I was "cheering" for no one at the end. The author also had tendency to tell the story in circular small glimpses backwards -- I found that also relatively annoying. So overall, this book gets a big failing grade from me.
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  • Renee Nash
    January 1, 1970
    Find You in the Dark was an enjoyable read and I believe I found a new author for my growing list of favorites. The book description mentioned similarities to Dexter and The Talented Mr. Ripley. Full disclosure, I am not familiar with either, so I can't say if others who are would agree. I liked the central character, Martin, because, well he seems to want to provide closure for families of victims never recovered and what could be wrong with that. Even if a killer has confessed, without a body, Find You in the Dark was an enjoyable read and I believe I found a new author for my growing list of favorites. The book description mentioned similarities to Dexter and The Talented Mr. Ripley. Full disclosure, I am not familiar with either, so I can't say if others who are would agree. I liked the central character, Martin, because, well he seems to want to provide closure for families of victims never recovered and what could be wrong with that. Even if a killer has confessed, without a body, the families are left with the inevitable, “ maybe it wasn't my loved one, maybe he/she is still alive” hope. This was different to me and I do enjoy new ways of looking at a story.Martin studies old case files and interviews, and has an almost uncanny ability to dig up clues the police have missed, find bodies and end the uncertainty. Could anyone really be that much better than the police? Or does Martin have some additional insight into the killings? Those are the thoughts that nibbled at me while I was reading and with no spoilers here, you'll want to read the book the uncover the truth. This wasn't a book that kept me up all night, but to be honest, those are the exception, not the norm.It did make 40 minutes on my stair stepper fly by without my glancing once at the time! What it did have were good characters, a different perspective than the usual serial killer storyline which pits the killer against the police and/or victim. Throughout the story, I rooted for Martin to be the good guy he appeared to be, albeit one with an unusual obsession. There were numerous twists and turns along the way and I stayed invested in the story until the very last page.Thank you, Nathan Ripley, Text Publishing and NetGalley for the digital edition to read and review.
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  • Mcf1nder_sk
    January 1, 1970
    I received this debit novel from Atria Books, and was very impressed with the writing. Ripley is the nom de plume of Naben Ruthnum, who had won a Journey Prize, a Canadian award for a new and upcoming authors' short story published in literary magazines. As i have found to my dismay, sometimes the ability to write a short story does not translate well to novels, or vice versa. Ripley, however has successfully managed both formats quite well...Matthew Reese has a unique hobby. He finds the unfoun I received this debit novel from Atria Books, and was very impressed with the writing. Ripley is the nom de plume of Naben Ruthnum, who had won a Journey Prize, a Canadian award for a new and upcoming authors' short story published in literary magazines. As i have found to my dismay, sometimes the ability to write a short story does not translate well to novels, or vice versa. Ripley, however has successfully managed both formats quite well...Matthew Reese has a unique hobby. He finds the unfound bodies of serial killers' victims, then anonymously lets the police know where they are. His belief is to let the families of the victims get some closure. One of the families affected is his wife, whose sister was an unfound victim. Reese's actions, however, rile up a killer who does not like his victims being found...Ripley did an amazing job creating a storyline and atmosphere that could not help but grab the reader from the very first page. The character development was first-rate, with people portrayed with their virtues and flaws exposed. The pace of the tale was steady and smoothly executed, with very few parts that seemed extraneous tip the story. Even knowing who the killer was from the early part of this novel, there was no letdown until the last page. That was when I discovered the book was done..Nathan Ripley is one young author who has grown from the short story to the well-crafted novel seamlessly, and I look forward to seeing more of his novels soon.Thank you to Atria Books for introducing me to this talented author's works.
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  • 2shay
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This was quite a ride. I enjoyed every page! This ranks right up there with some of the best mysteries I’ve read...and I read a lot of mysteries. This is a completely new to me author, and a new to me hero/anti-hero. I loved Martin from the beginning, unlike Detective Sandra Whittal. I thought Martin is one of those unsung hero types that does a great service. Detective Whittal just thinks he’s a monster.You see, Martin is very wealthy after selling his tech company, and he has an agenda. H Wow! This was quite a ride. I enjoyed every page! This ranks right up there with some of the best mysteries I’ve read...and I read a lot of mysteries. This is a completely new to me author, and a new to me hero/anti-hero. I loved Martin from the beginning, unlike Detective Sandra Whittal. I thought Martin is one of those unsung hero types that does a great service. Detective Whittal just thinks he’s a monster.You see, Martin is very wealthy after selling his tech company, and he has an agenda. He has many reasons for searching for the bodies of serial killers, not just the one mentioned in the blurb. He’s pretty obsessive about it...and secretive. Maybe a little creepy. And still, I liked him.Speaking of creepy, I thought Sandra Whittal’s obsession with finding Martin was much more disturbing. I wanted to tell her to leave Martin the hell alone, Lady, he’s getting himself in enough trouble without you dogging his every step! That darn serial killer that discovered what Martin was doing? Oh. M. Gee! He’s very, very bad. And he has a terrible history.Is Martin a hero or a monster? You’ll have to decide for yourself. I’m sure that all mystery lovers will enjoy this book as much as I did. Grab a copy and...Enjoy!2shayARC provided by Atria Books and NetGalley for an honest and voluntary review.
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