Enchantée
Paris in 1789 is a labyrinth of twisted streets, filled with beggars, thieves, revolutionaries—and magicians...When smallpox kills her parents, Camille Durbonne must find a way to provide for her frail, naive sister while managing her volatile brother. Relying on petty magic—la magie ordinaire—Camille painstakingly transforms scraps of metal into money to buy the food and medicine they need. But when the coins won’t hold their shape and her brother disappears with the family’s savings, Camille must pursue a richer, more dangerous mark: the glittering court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette.With dark magic forbidden by her mother, Camille transforms herself into the ‘Baroness de la Fontaine’ and is swept up into life at the Palace of Versailles, where aristocrats both fear and hunger for la magie. There, she gambles at cards, desperate to have enough to keep herself and her sister safe. Yet the longer she stays at court, the more difficult it becomes to reconcile her resentment of the nobles with the enchantments of Versailles. And when she returns to Paris, Camille meets a handsome young balloonist—who dares her to hope that love and liberty may both be possible.But la magie has its costs. And when Camille loses control of her secrets, the game she's playing turns deadly. Then revolution erupts, and she must choose—love or loyalty, democracy or aristocracy, freedom or magic—before Paris burns…

Enchantée Details

TitleEnchantée
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fantasy, Young Adult

Enchantée Review

  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Flatiron in exchange for an honest review. “Remember—magic is a cheater’s game, and everyone who sees it wants to play.” Enchantée is a book that is set in historical Paris, during 1789, but this is a version of Paris unlike any other. Yes, the French Revolution is beginning, and the people are starving and rioting, while Marie Antoinette and other aristocrats ignore their pleas. But some people in this alternative history are able to wield magic to help make their lives a litt ARC provided by Flatiron in exchange for an honest review. “Remember—magic is a cheater’s game, and everyone who sees it wants to play.” Enchantée is a book that is set in historical Paris, during 1789, but this is a version of Paris unlike any other. Yes, the French Revolution is beginning, and the people are starving and rioting, while Marie Antoinette and other aristocrats ignore their pleas. But some people in this alternative history are able to wield magic to help make their lives a little easier. In this world, there are three different types of magic:➽ Magie Ordinaire - changing things➽ Glamoire - changing oneself➽ Magie Bibelot - making objects sentientThis book stars Camille, a young girl able to wield magic, but is very scared to get caught because the stakes are so high. Yet, she still turns magic into scrap metal so that they have a little money to live off of. But her younger sister Sophie is not in the best of health, and both of their parents have just died to smallpox. The only person who is supposed to be looking out for them is their older brother, Alain, who is drinking and gambling away what little money they do have. But when Camille helps out a couple hot air balloon makers, then she finds a magical dress that is hidden away in a secret trunk, and she ends up taking her and her sisters future into her own hands and will stop at nothing to ensure their health and safety. From there, she throws herself into a world of aristocracy, filled with nobles who do not even realize the food they are wasting while people in the streets are starving. I wanted to love this so much, friends. But sadly, it just fell so very short for me. I felt like the author was trying to cram so many important things that happened in France in that time into this book, while also trying to write her own story, and both elements just made this entire story feel disjointed and left a lot to be desired. And honestly? Even my synopsis of this book sounds a lot better than the book actually is. I was so bored throughout. I just kept waiting for something more exciting to happen, but it never did. The twists and turns were so predictable and so lackluster. And them ignoring the gross behavior that Alain displayed made me so angry. And their constant views on sex workers made my eyes almost roll out of my head completely. Oh, and the villain was straight up from a comic, twirling his mustache, I swear! I will say that one of the main side characters, Lazare, is biracial (Indian and French) and he does have a really good discussion about how he feels like the French never let him forget that he isn’t white. I really appreciated that. I also appreciated that Camille was willing to do whatever it took to care for Sophie. You all know I’m always here for good sibling relationships. But besides these two elements? I really didn’t enjoy this one. I’m so sorry, friends! I do feel like I’ve been really not enjoying a lot of the historical stories I’ve read in 2018, so maybe you will enjoy this a lot more than I did. A lot of my friends have actually given this one really high praise, too. But I’m wishing you all happy reading, always. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | TwitchThe quote above was taken from an ARC and is subject to change upon publication.Content and trigger warnings for degrading comments about women (I honestly feel like I read the word “whore” at least twenty times), slut shaming, physical abuse, emotional abuse, verbal abuse, illness of a loved one, alcoholism, gambling addiction, loss of a loved one, blood depictions. Buddy read with Mia at Pens and Parchment, Amy at A Court of Crowns and Quills, & Kayla at Books and Blends! ❤
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  • Brittney ~ Reverie and Ink
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this one! It's a beautiful mix between historical fiction and fantasy, and it's easy to get lost right alongside Camille - a girl struggling with poverty - as she uses magic to thrust herself into the glittering world of the French Court. In fact, what I loved most about Enchantee was not only the high stakes that will keep you on the edge of your seat, but the constant tension thrust into every scene. I found myself turning those pages like none other.Camille is a fantastic MC - mostly I loved this one! It's a beautiful mix between historical fiction and fantasy, and it's easy to get lost right alongside Camille - a girl struggling with poverty - as she uses magic to thrust herself into the glittering world of the French Court. In fact, what I loved most about Enchantee was not only the high stakes that will keep you on the edge of your seat, but the constant tension thrust into every scene. I found myself turning those pages like none other.Camille is a fantastic MC - mostly because she's perfectly imperfect. She's an older sister, who has the weight of caring and providing for her younger sister on her shoulders. Both girls - along with their horrible older brother - were left with nothing when their parents died. And while the brother * could * have provided for the girls with his position in the military, he gambles everything he makes away. Thus, Camille is left with the one thing she does have from her family - a mysterious magic box. And while she knows it is dangerous, she'll do anything to get her and her sister out of poverty's choking grasp.Turns out, the box has a little something special that allows Camille to not only transform her appearance to that of a courtier, but she learns the art of illusion in full - including how to change the face of cards. Which means she can gamble... and win. The problem? The cost might be too high for Camille to play as she learns the consequences of her magic. I don't want to say much more, but alongside the high stakes, there's a romance behind the scenes that I quite enjoyed, and of course, when things get messy - they get REALLY messy. Overall, I loved exploring this world, and I'll definitely be hoping for another book from the author one day soon! My Blog ~ Instagram ~ Twitter
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  • Jasmine from How Useful It Is
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading Enchantee on 10/30/2018 and finished it on 11/13/2018. This book is an excellent read! I enjoy reading about Paris life in 1789. It’s definitely sad to be among the poor and definitely fun to be among the rich. Nights at Versailles sounds magnificent. I like how gambling and hot air balloon is the excitement at that time. The fashion with silk dress and hats are interesting to read. The divide between rich and poor is sad, and somehow I didn’t think it exists in Paris because P I started reading Enchantee on 10/30/2018 and finished it on 11/13/2018. This book is an excellent read! I enjoy reading about Paris life in 1789. It’s definitely sad to be among the poor and definitely fun to be among the rich. Nights at Versailles sounds magnificent. I like how gambling and hot air balloon is the excitement at that time. The fashion with silk dress and hats are interesting to read. The divide between rich and poor is sad, and somehow I didn’t think it exists in Paris because Paris is always advertise as the glamorous tourist destination. I like that Queen Marie Antoinette play a role in this book.This book is told in the third person point of view following Camille Durbonne, 17, the responsible middle sister to drunken brother Alain, 19 and ill sister Sophie, 15. Camille can turn metal into coins using sorrow, but it weakens her when she overdoes it. They all are orphans living on minimum and behind on rent. It was the year 1789 in Paris, where the poor are abundant and aristocrats are wasteful. Sophie dreams of marrying rich to get out of the slump and Alain takes what little his sisters have to pay off his gambling debts. Camille dreams of a change, the forbidden magic or the hot air balloon explorer Lazare she met, may just give her the new life she craves.Enchantee is very well written. I enjoy the romance a lot, especially all those flirting. I like the magic, though it seems not something to celebrate as the magic conjures sorrows instead of happiness. I like the communication at the time because it’s proper and sophisticated even between teenagers. This book has great set of characters, main and supporting. I like Rosier and his passion for the balloons. I like the twist to the dark magic. I like learning some french terms from this read! I recommend everyone to read this book.Pro: fast paced, page turner, magic, Paris, hot air balloon, siblings, flirting, revolution, gamblingCon: noneI rate it 5 stars!xoxo, Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details
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  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful writing but I just think historical fantasy is not for me. However, I love anything Marie Antoinette!
  • Ova - Excuse My Reading
    January 1, 1970
    Le Miserables meets with Caraval in this engaging Fantasy book set in 1700's Paris.It felt different to read a fantasy book set in pre-revolution Paris and I loved the atmosphere of this book. I am not generally a fan of the YA genre however the story pulled me in from the start. Trelease is a story teller for sure. I strolled the streets of Paris with Camille, brushed the corridors of Versailles. I loved the steam-punk soul of the book, and the magic system of the book might be simple but it wa Le Miserables meets with Caraval in this engaging Fantasy book set in 1700's Paris.It felt different to read a fantasy book set in pre-revolution Paris and I loved the atmosphere of this book. I am not generally a fan of the YA genre however the story pulled me in from the start. Trelease is a story teller for sure. I strolled the streets of Paris with Camille, brushed the corridors of Versailles. I loved the steam-punk soul of the book, and the magic system of the book might be simple but it was perfectly fitting to the story. The plot is a bit predictable but the way it's told is very engaging so I would be interested to read a sequel of this book. Would love to hear more about Camille and her new adventures!
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  • Anissa
    January 1, 1970
    Wow wow wow. C’est dingue!
  • Malanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by publisher in exchange for an honest reviewI went into this with high hopes. It’s Paris! During the 1789! The ///French Revolution//// is about to OCCUR. I have a weird lowkey passion for the French Revolution. I think maybe it’s because lol it’s factual I’m in love with Sydney Carton???? I don’t know. But my hopes went downhill, exploded, and I could only look in horror at the sad remains. This book contains all the elements I look for. Rioting people. A bad government. A cascade ARC provided by publisher in exchange for an honest reviewI went into this with high hopes. It’s Paris! During the 1789! The ///French Revolution//// is about to OCCUR. I have a weird lowkey passion for the French Revolution. I think maybe it’s because lol it’s factual I’m in love with Sydney Carton???? I don’t know. But my hopes went downhill, exploded, and I could only look in horror at the sad remains. This book contains all the elements I look for. Rioting people. A bad government. A cascade of salty magic, falling upon the dish. But I just,,,,didn’t give a damn. I was completely indifferent to everything about this. What’s this book about? There are three types of magic in France. Magie Ordinaire (change things), Glamoire (change your sorry self), Magie Bibelot (Beauty and the Beast copyright? I’m still confused). Teenage girl Camille can do mgaic, but it comes at a price. If she continues to turn scrap metal into money,,,she might be ~caught~. Can I please state, for the record, that I’m tired of protagonists feeling bad about doing bad things. For the love of god, if you’re going to be bad, BE A BADASS about it. Don’t tremble at the sight of pastel morals!!! BE A PROPER VILLAIN, HAVE FUN WITH YOUR SINFUL WAYS. Will we ever get another Kaz Brekker from Six of Crows???? What about Andrew from The Foxhole Court?????????? I’m v sad bc our odds seem low. Give me recs in the comments pls. So, Camille’s parents are dead. I forget why. Her younger sister Sophie is always sick. Her big brother, Alain, is the least helpful human being to ever contain brain. God, if I were in a book I’d for sure be that one crazy person who poisons the annoying character’s tomato soup. I don’t even feel bad about it. The plot follows them all trying to make it in this big world. It’s tremendously boring. And the way sex workers are treated!!!!!! I’m v disappointed. Where is Michael from The Kiss Quotient, we need him? I’m tired of people depicting sex workers as universally poor, miserable, and desperate. Stop talking shit about sex workers. Thank you. Overall, I wasn’t….enchanted. c: c: c: c: TW: slut shaming, physical + emotional abuse, smallpox, alcoholism & gambling addiction|✨BLOG✨ |TWITTER✨ |
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  • Umut Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Quite fun read and a solid debut. This fast paced, entertaining book is a Fantasy set in 1700's Paris.As a setting, it was really original and interesting to read about pre-revolution France. I loved reading about the etiquette, the class differences, the palace, the dresses, etc. It was very atmospheric. I usually find YA fantasies, especially series dragging on and on. But, this book was very fast paces, and full of action, which was great. I think Trelease is a very good story teller and I'll Quite fun read and a solid debut. This fast paced, entertaining book is a Fantasy set in 1700's Paris.As a setting, it was really original and interesting to read about pre-revolution France. I loved reading about the etiquette, the class differences, the palace, the dresses, etc. It was very atmospheric. I usually find YA fantasies, especially series dragging on and on. But, this book was very fast paces, and full of action, which was great. I think Trelease is a very good story teller and I'll be reading from her more in the future. I'm grateful that she wrote a stand a lone, not a series. It made this book very rich, otherwise the content would be spread through pages. I liked Camille as a strong female lead, and I loved the sisterhood between her and Sophie. The magic system was simple, but I liked it for that. It was a perfectly balanced book between atmosphere, characters and magic world. I really enjoyed, I'd recommend. Thanks a lot to the publisher for sending me an early complimentary copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Paulo Ratz
    January 1, 1970
    Preciso desse livro em português!
  • Rosalyn Eves
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful writing, slow burn romance, magic, courtly politics, revolution--like Victor Hugo and Georgette Heyer had a baby (but with more diverse characters). Loved it!
  • Kayla Brunson
    January 1, 1970
    Before I start my review, I really want to say that this story was beautiful. While it didn't win me over, I have to say that it was well written. The author did her research on how life was like in this time period and it shows.I really don't know what I was expecting while reading this one. I expect the glam of Paris and to be thrown into magic and that's what I got. We have magic, romance, and friendship. Like I said before I really did enjoy the writing. Trelease really captured the setting Before I start my review, I really want to say that this story was beautiful. While it didn't win me over, I have to say that it was well written. The author did her research on how life was like in this time period and it shows.I really don't know what I was expecting while reading this one. I expect the glam of Paris and to be thrown into magic and that's what I got. We have magic, romance, and friendship. Like I said before I really did enjoy the writing. Trelease really captured the setting and made it vivid.I won't say that I liked Camille, but I respected her. She did what she had to do for her family. She endured so much to make a better life for her and her sister. The magic that she used while in Versailles wasn't simple magic. To use it was to give it a piece of yourself."She'd thought magic a simple thing, once."Seeing what she would go through to survive and for her family was amazing to read about. We also got to see her indifference. The more she used magic, the more she had to think about what was important to her. What was she willing to go through. Was she willing to lose herself completely? Was she willing to become a completely different person because of how she felt while using it magic?My favorite person in this book had to be  Lazare. He was struggling to find his place in the aristocratic court. He was of French and Indian descent and I was glad to see that here!"The court of Versailles says I'm Indian. Why is it either/or? Can I not be both?"I liked that we had questions of race and diversity here!  Even though Lazare was an aristocrat, that didn't make him immune from the whispers and racism. With that praise, I still couldn't give it more than three stars. I feel like this book could have been shorter. The beginning did take a bit to get into and it seemed to drag in some spots. Quite a few times I found myself really having to make sure I didn't skim over some parts. Overall, While it did fall flat for me in some areas, I did like the atmosphere and following Camille on her journey.This was a buddy read with Melanie at Meltotheany and Amy at A Court of Crowns and Quills 💖💖ARC provided for an honest review. Quotes are subject to change upon publication. Blog | Instagram | Twitter
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  • Namera [The Literary Invertebrate]
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received in exchange for an honest review – thank you! This book was BEAUTIFUL. The writing was lush without being stifling, the heroine was flawed without being unlikeable… honestly my gripes with this one are very minor.This one has a very fulsome blurb. 17-year-old Camille Durbonne is dealing with an alcoholic, abusive older brother and an ill younger sister, Sophie, so she needs all the money she can get. So far the family have just been using la magie ordinaire, little magic: it can t ARC received in exchange for an honest review – thank you! This book was BEAUTIFUL. The writing was lush without being stifling, the heroine was flawed without being unlikeable… honestly my gripes with this one are very minor.This one has a very fulsome blurb. 17-year-old Camille Durbonne is dealing with an alcoholic, abusive older brother and an ill younger sister, Sophie, so she needs all the money she can get. So far the family have just been using la magie ordinaire, little magic: it can turn scrap metal into coins for just long enough to push them onto unsuspecting vendors. But they can’t do this forever, because all the shopkeepers in their neighbourhood are wising up. The next step is to use glamoire, a bigger magic, which can disguise not petty objects but people.There’s just one problem. Magic always has its price. The petty magic uses sorrow and tears to fuel itself; glamoire uses sorrow and blood. But Camille has no choice, so she’s disguised herself as their ancestress Cécile, Baroness de la Fontaine and taken herself to Versailles. There she uses la magie ordinaire to win card games by cheating. I loved Camille’s no-nonsense attitude here. A lot of YA heroines you see are burdened by scruples, but not Camille. (Okay, I sound like a total criminal right now, but honestly, I love the unrepentant bad-girl heroines). She has a problem, and by God, she’s going to get herself out of it. There’s no squeamishness – quite refreshing.But when she gets to Versailles she discovers she’s not the only cheater there – or even the only magician. She falls into a friendship with the aristocrats Chandon, his lover Foudriard, their friend Aurélie… and the Vicomte de Séguin, a dangerous, unpredictable young man. Incidentally, for anyone who’s read Les Liaisons Dangereuses, I could see the influence of the Vicomte de Valmont very clearly in Seguin. And I’m not just pulling that out of nowhere – Liaisons is actually referenced in the book!Seguin is a fascinating villain, charming and utterly opaque. I did knock a star off my rating because of him, though – one of his crucial actions at the end of the book seemed nothing like his character whatsoever, it felt very deus ex machina.But the sisterly bond between Camille and Sophie was nicely done. Camille’s not a perfect sibling; there were many times I wanted to scream at her for not showing more care about Sophie’s whereabouts and actions. I mean, this is Paris, 1789! She needs to look after her! But Camille’s kind of like one of those people who think they need to work more, earn just a little more money, and then their family will love them more – not realising it’s them the family loves, not the money. It doesn’t help that gambling holds an allure which Camille is not immune to.The romance was pretty cute. Slightly fast, perhaps, but I loved how it was complicated by all manner of disguises (and not just on Camille’s part). The setting was, mostly, very well realised. I sat a three-hour exam on the whole French Revolution a few months ago, so it’s still very fresh in my mind, and I do think Trelease has captured the dizzy atmosphere of Versailles well.In short, this is a strong debut (if not perfect, especially at the end).[Blog] - [Bookstagram]
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Magic ripples through ENCHANTÉE. Gita Trelease’s imagination, the language she uses, the relationships she builds between characters—that is where the magic begins—and of course, there is la magie (both petty and dark) that the main character, Camille Durbonne, wields. This is my favorite kind of book to read, one where I am swept up in the writing, loving each line as much as the story itself. One where the characters take your hand and bring you into the pages with them. One where magic seems Magic ripples through ENCHANTÉE. Gita Trelease’s imagination, the language she uses, the relationships she builds between characters—that is where the magic begins—and of course, there is la magie (both petty and dark) that the main character, Camille Durbonne, wields. This is my favorite kind of book to read, one where I am swept up in the writing, loving each line as much as the story itself. One where the characters take your hand and bring you into the pages with them. One where magic seems entirely possible.Camille is a character both vulnerable and determined, driven by dire situations to make a better life for her and her sister—even by using dark magic. As she travels back and forth from Paris to Versailles, the contrast between her true life and her false life blur. Who she loves, who she befriends, who she makes an enemy, all collide. And because each character is so well-developed, I cared about their fates, and their relationships, as much as Camille’s.I would have to recite ENCHANTÉE from start to finish to share all the things I loved about this beautiful book!
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  • Camile Souza (This Chamber of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    So, I heard high praise for this YA, and it does sound really interesting. I mean, not the typical YA fantasy powers? Historical Paris with known historical figures? Games in the Palace of Versailles? Balloon flights? Also I'm not gonna lie and say that the protagonist having essentially the same name as me doesn't affect me lolI'm definitely highly anticipating this.
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  • Kaya
    January 1, 1970
    THANK YOU SO MUCH FLATIRON FOR THE ARC!!!Magical Paris is honestly my Achilles heel.
  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    January 1, 1970
    8/4/18I don't mind the background, but I'm really not digging the title font =[---This sounds like my cup of tea ;) When a scheming courtier blackmails her and Lazare’s affections shift, Camille loses control of her secrets. Me right away, knowing next to nothing about Lazare:
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  • Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard
    January 1, 1970
    *exhales annoyed* WHY DID THEY CHANGE THE COVER?! WHY DID THE COVER SUDDENLY NEED A WHITE WOMAN'S FACE?! WHY?! UGHHHHH!
  • Kate (GirlReading)
    January 1, 1970
    2.75* Enchantée promised so much potential. France, magic, history, revolution but for me, it simply fell flat. It was okay, enjoyable enough, but I left it feeling very indifferent. The chapters and plot were lacking... something, anything. There there was nothing to pull me in, nothing exciting or enthralling to hold onto. I liked the characters, although I still don’t feel I *know* them, neither did I care for them all too much and the I had the same issue with the plot. Sure, stuff happened 2.75* Enchantée promised so much potential. France, magic, history, revolution but for me, it simply fell flat. It was okay, enjoyable enough, but I left it feeling very indifferent. The chapters and plot were lacking... something, anything. There there was nothing to pull me in, nothing exciting or enthralling to hold onto. I liked the characters, although I still don’t feel I *know* them, neither did I care for them all too much and the I had the same issue with the plot. Sure, stuff happened but nothing was fleshed out to a point where I cared. There was too much and not enough. It felt as though the author was trying to cram in so many plot lines, so many historical tidbits, all of which became disjointed and lost amongst one another. I wanted to love this so much, the synopsis sounded wonderful and it had so much potential but in all honesty, I found myself bored at times.I did however enjoy the vivid depiction of Paris and Versailles and, as I said, I enjoyed it enough but overall, although I don’t doubt this will capture many readers, it was very much a mediocre read for me unfortunately.TW:• Racism• Slut shaming• Physical & emotional abuse• Alcohol & gambling addiction(Thank you MyKindaBook for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review.)
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  • Divine
    January 1, 1970
    This book is about an impoverished girl who uses dark magic to disguise herself as an aristocrat at Versailles during the French Revolution. And dear me, I'm not even ashamed that I just impulsively want to read this because I would get an enchanting tour in VERSAILLES!!!! Yes, I'm an architecture whore and I need my fill of books that could depict such beauties. Also, it's a historical fiction with lots of magic!!!!
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  • Gabrielle Byrne
    January 1, 1970
    The story of Camille Durbonne is like warm melted chocolate. It woos you with rich velvet details, excites your passions and lingers, so sweetly, on your senses. Her story is rags to riches, but the added twists of dark magic, hidden threats, and a secret double life makes it a heady and unique blend. From the cobbled shadows of the Paris streets, to wild and erudite experiments in hot air balloons, all the way to the lace and luxury of Marie Antoinette’s court, Trelease will deftly lure you thr The story of Camille Durbonne is like warm melted chocolate. It woos you with rich velvet details, excites your passions and lingers, so sweetly, on your senses. Her story is rags to riches, but the added twists of dark magic, hidden threats, and a secret double life makes it a heady and unique blend. From the cobbled shadows of the Paris streets, to wild and erudite experiments in hot air balloons, all the way to the lace and luxury of Marie Antoinette’s court, Trelease will deftly lure you through each scene, ramping up the romantic tension in perfect time with the danger. In each new scene, you’ll be betting on Camille to win the day, save her sister, and discover the true prince of her heart. And like all the best hot chocolates, it will leave you sated, but wanting more. Put this on your MUST READ list for 2018. You won't be sorry.
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  • Katherine Moore
    January 1, 1970
    *Warning: words en Francais may appear sporadically.This book is…enchanting. I didn’t have it on my radar until quite simply everyone seemed to be asking about this novel about two sisters living in Paris during the French Revolution, one with the gift of magic, and with the desperate need to get themselves out of the dire situation they are in. They are poor, with Camille using her magie to turn pieces of metal they find in the dirt into coins, while Sophie is ailing, weak with a terrible cough *Warning: words en Francais may appear sporadically.This book is…enchanting. I didn’t have it on my radar until quite simply everyone seemed to be asking about this novel about two sisters living in Paris during the French Revolution, one with the gift of magic, and with the desperate need to get themselves out of the dire situation they are in. They are poor, with Camille using her magie to turn pieces of metal they find in the dirt into coins, while Sophie is ailing, weak with a terrible cough. Their brother Alain is a drunkard and cruel, deeply in debt from his gambling, and the sisters just dream of finding a home away from their brother, Sophie perhaps marrying into aristocracy and money, while Camille has dreams of owning a print shop like her deceased father once did. I’m not usually swept up into a book such as this, one that is a spell-binding combination of magic, romance, historical fiction, and fantasy, but although it’s a long book (some parts seemed overly long, and I felt like the whole thing could have been quite a bit shorter), I was entranced by the characters, as well as the setting. Author Gita Trelease has painted a vivid portrait of Paris in the 18th century in ‘Enchantée’, when the contrast between the rich and the poor was stark, and Marie Antoinette was taking court. Readers will be pleased to know that they will served up ‘beacoup de’ servings of what it was like to live as a French aristocrat at that time, as Camille takes on a new persona, as the Baroness de la Fontaine, when she uses her ‘magie glamoire’ to gain entry to Versailles to play and turn cards. While there she rubs elbows with the rich she would otherwise detest, but ends up making friends as she makes enough money to change things for herself and Sophie. She internally struggles with her use of magie and the differences between the rich and the poor at that time, even though she is using it to change her fortune. There’s a ‘rags-to-riches’/Cinderella tale here, a face-off between the handsome suitors (the handsome, devilish rogue, Seguin, and the more reserved but romantic ingenue, Lazare). The book provides a wonderful look at the culture of the time (I absolutely loved all the research obviously done regarding the use of hot-air balloons; that was probably my favorite part), as well as our protagonist wrestling with so many ideals and virtues. This gives a fantastic deeper edge to the book, and gives a real nod to climate preceding the Revolution. The poverty that was experienced by the ‘poor’ thanks to the disparity created by taxes and wheat prices, is fervently clear throughout, and it’s the thing that drives Camille all the way through her saga at Versailles, and pushes her use her magie. But the question is always, is it worth it? And does this make her just like the aristo? I think the answers are a bit murky at the end, despite the ‘happy ending’. I would very much imagine that many of those who have fallen particularly for the setting of belle Paris, have not had the privilege, like myself, of visiting France, and may not even speak much French; the book is addled with short French phrases, for which, Trelease has put a glossary in the back of the book. It may remove a little enjoyment to keep looking things up, if you don’t know the meaning of those words, but my guess is you have rudimentary French knowledge to have interest in the book in the first place. I appreciate the explanation of all the historical facts and figures as they appear in the book, as they are fascinating. The pace of the book picks up rapidly at about half way through the book, which I felt could have been a lot plus rapide; I feel as though a historical fiction/romance is a bit extravagant at close to 500 pages. If you’re looking for a book with lots of action and adventure, this one isn’t it, and thanks to the coy teasing nature of the romantic flirting, even that isn’t super juicy and doesn’t take up a wild amount of those pages. But of the ones that it does, they’re not overdone or too sickly sweet.‘Enchantée’ is a fabulous romantic story set in Revolutionary France and I’d say ‘vas-y’ (that means go for it), if you’re enamored by historical romance at all. This has a sumptuous setting, unique voice, and made a change in all the YA I’d read lately. By the way, Paris remains one of my most favorite cities today; take a plane and read ‘Enchantée on the way (sorry that you have to wait until February for it, malheureusement)!
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  • Adri
    January 1, 1970
    ***4.5 STARS****
  • JJ || This Dark Material
    January 1, 1970
    Enchantée transports you right to the heart of 18th Century France. The comparison to Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is quite apt. Practically nothing differentiates Trelease's Paris and Versailles from those of history, except a fine thread of magic that runs through all manner of places, people, and things. Camille, if you'll pardon the expression, enchants. A perfectly ordinary girl, she must learn quickly to survive and thrive in Marie Antoinette's court. She and Lazare have wonderful chem Enchantée transports you right to the heart of 18th Century France. The comparison to Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is quite apt. Practically nothing differentiates Trelease's Paris and Versailles from those of history, except a fine thread of magic that runs through all manner of places, people, and things. Camille, if you'll pardon the expression, enchants. A perfectly ordinary girl, she must learn quickly to survive and thrive in Marie Antoinette's court. She and Lazare have wonderful chemistry together that stretches through the entire book, but ultimately this is a story about every part of Camille's life. Enchantée will immerse you in the contradictions of France during the waning days of Marie Antoinette's reign: the luxury and poverty, the manners that gloss over all manner of cruelty. It's a lovely and indulgent story that soars just like Lazare's hot air balloon!
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  • Kelly Coon
    January 1, 1970
    What did I love about this book? EVERYTHING. Trelease transported me from 2018 to late 18th century France, and I was truly enchanted with every second of the ride. Her world-building is stellar as she moves us through Paris streets to the glamorous, but decaying, palace of Versailles sweeping us through Parisian fashion, print-making, hot-air ballooning, and parlor games. Woven into this story of magic, trickery, romance, and loss, is the history of the storming of the Bastille, which highlight What did I love about this book? EVERYTHING. Trelease transported me from 2018 to late 18th century France, and I was truly enchanted with every second of the ride. Her world-building is stellar as she moves us through Paris streets to the glamorous, but decaying, palace of Versailles sweeping us through Parisian fashion, print-making, hot-air ballooning, and parlor games. Woven into this story of magic, trickery, romance, and loss, is the history of the storming of the Bastille, which highlights the differences between social class that can drive a person to form dangerous alliances and dabble in dark magic. Add it immediately to your TBR list!
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  • Cody Roecker
    January 1, 1970
    I've been thinking about this book almost every day since I've read it so I have to update my thoughts a little: Gita Trelease's debut is strong and beautiful, much like the main character, Camille. With France as a backdrop, a gorgeous bloodthirsty dress, card games, high-class balls, and a boy who flies hot-air balloons Enchantée deftly defies all expectations of reality by wowing you at every turn. Magical. dark, twisty, and wholly inspired, Enchantée sings with a deep vibrato, and is complet I've been thinking about this book almost every day since I've read it so I have to update my thoughts a little: Gita Trelease's debut is strong and beautiful, much like the main character, Camille. With France as a backdrop, a gorgeous bloodthirsty dress, card games, high-class balls, and a boy who flies hot-air balloons Enchantée deftly defies all expectations of reality by wowing you at every turn. Magical. dark, twisty, and wholly inspired, Enchantée sings with a deep vibrato, and is completely unforgettable. One you won't want to miss. Get ready to meet some favorite characters and my sweet precious boy Chandon. <3 <3
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  • Daphne (Illumicrate)
    January 1, 1970
    Enchanted by the rich historical world that Trelease writes. Unique form of magic and loved the POC representation in 18th century Paris.
  • Nadhira Satria
    January 1, 1970
    i want this and i want this now
  • Logan LeDuc
    January 1, 1970
    This fantastic retelling of Les Miserables was a powerful and fabulous journey. I am so grateful for this incredible novel. The main character was a powerhouse and I loved the diversity of the characters both sexually and racially. The descriptions were flawless and this was an absolute joy to read.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    YA historical fantasy is exploding and I am 150% here for it. Bring on more books like this beauty, please and thank you. Reminds me of A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray meets one of my all time favourite series (The Beautiful and the Cursed by Page Morgan) set in the early days of the French Revolution. One to watch, read and devour!
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  • Iryna Khymych
    January 1, 1970
    I received this galley via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you publisher!3 out of 5 starsEnchanteé is a beautiful written novel about two young women trying to survive in pre-revolutionary Paris. It is a novel of magic, love, sisterly affection, family, splendors and squalor. Camille and Sophie come from a poor family, their parents are dead and their brother has turned into a drunk. Camille - is the only one brave enough to do magic and try to save her younger sister. While t I received this galley via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you publisher!3 out of 5 starsEnchanteé is a beautiful written novel about two young women trying to survive in pre-revolutionary Paris. It is a novel of magic, love, sisterly affection, family, splendors and squalor. Camille and Sophie come from a poor family, their parents are dead and their brother has turned into a drunk. Camille - is the only one brave enough to do magic and try to save her younger sister. While trying to come up with a plan to make money, the two sisters discover their mother’s magic dress which lets the wearer become beautiful and transforms them into some else. With a plan to win at cards in Versailles - Camille sets off and adventures begin. With romance, absolutely beautiful scenery, sisterly love and quarrels I found the whole book to be shallow and wanting. Every single male is described as “ridiculously good looking,” (which made me think of Zoolander and laugh) the whole plot was predictable and uninspiring, and the ending was just dull. Camille’s sister soon turns from loving to jealous, Camille goes from cautious to arrogant, falls for every man she sees, and think she knows better than everyone else. Honestly, the whole book is Caraval rewritten with a better magic system. While I have my issues with this book I will acknowledge that it is very well researched, the magic system is very interesting and Miss Trelease gives voices to marginalized characters. Lazare, a young man of French and Indian descent struggles in aristocratic France where he is neither French nor Indian, yet both and his struggle is beautifully portrayed here and honestly made me love him a lot. Imagine living in a world where you did not know where you belonged - it is painful, lonely and sad and I felt for him. Here colonialism can be felt first hand and it’s ramifications - children without nations or homes. In France he is called a savage, yet in India he would be called French. I would recommend this book to anyone who liked Caraval by Stephanie Garber.
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