Enchantée
Paris in 1789 is a labyrinth of twisted streets, filled with beggars, thieves, revolutionaries—and magicians...When smallpox kills her parents, Camille Durbonne must find a way to provide for her frail, naive sister while managing her volatile brother. Relying on petty magic—la magie ordinaire—Camille painstakingly transforms scraps of metal into money to buy the food and medicine they need. But when the coins won’t hold their shape and her brother disappears with the family’s savings, Camille must pursue a richer, more dangerous mark: the glittering court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette.With dark magic forbidden by her mother, Camille transforms herself into the ‘Baroness de la Fontaine’ and is swept up into life at the Palace of Versailles, where aristocrats both fear and hunger for la magie. There, she gambles at cards, desperate to have enough to keep herself and her sister safe. Yet the longer she stays at court, the more difficult it becomes to reconcile her resentment of the nobles with the enchantments of Versailles. And when she returns to Paris, Camille meets a handsome young balloonist—who dares her to hope that love and liberty may both be possible.But la magie has its costs. And when Camille loses control of her secrets, the game she's playing turns deadly. Then revolution erupts, and she must choose—love or loyalty, democracy or aristocracy, freedom or magic—before Paris burns…

Enchantée Details

TitleEnchantée
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherFlatiron/Macmillan
Rating
GenreFantasy, Historical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult

Enchantée Review

  • jessica
    January 1, 1970
    merging historical fiction with fantasy is so IN right now and i am here for it!this is your classic les mis meets aladdin who is close friends with caraval and introduces them to glitter. its honestly just a great time for all involved, myself included. and although it feels like there are many elements gently borrowed from other familiar stories, this still has a fresh and unique feel to it.the magic system in this is really quite something. i do think it could have been developed a little bet merging historical fiction with fantasy is so IN right now and i am here for it!this is your classic les mis meets aladdin who is close friends with caraval and introduces them to glitter. its honestly just a great time for all involved, myself included. and although it feels like there are many elements gently borrowed from other familiar stories, this still has a fresh and unique feel to it.the magic system in this is really quite something. i do think it could have been developed a little better in some areas, but im hoping that the change from being a standalone to a series will allow more opportunities to do so down the line. but what is far from lacking is the setting. my goodness, it felt like i was immediately back in paris, smelling the bread baking on the corner boulangerie, being awed by the ornate style of versailles, and feeling the rising tension of the revolution. the exploration of the city and french lifestyle is really well done.because there is such a focus on the atmosphere of the story, the pacing can feel a little slow at times. there is a lot of page time dedicated to describing court life and all its intricacies and the emotion of the historical political drama that it doesnt feel like much is happening for the main characters. and although i didnt mind it, i know that might deter some readers.but i thought this was a really fun and magical read. i do kind of wish it had remained a standalone (i honestly cant keep up with all my unfinished series that i have started) but i am interested in how this story will progress from here!↠ 3.5 stars
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Flatiron in exchange for an honest review. “Remember—magic is a cheater’s game, and everyone who sees it wants to play.” Enchantée is a book that is set in historical Paris, during 1789, but this is a version of Paris unlike any other. Yes, the French Revolution is beginning, and the people are starving and rioting, while Marie Antoinette and other aristocrats ignore their pleas. But some people in this alternative history are able to wield magic to help make their lives a litt ARC provided by Flatiron in exchange for an honest review. “Remember—magic is a cheater’s game, and everyone who sees it wants to play.” Enchantée is a book that is set in historical Paris, during 1789, but this is a version of Paris unlike any other. Yes, the French Revolution is beginning, and the people are starving and rioting, while Marie Antoinette and other aristocrats ignore their pleas. But some people in this alternative history are able to wield magic to help make their lives a little easier. In this world, there are three different types of magic:➽ Magie Ordinaire - changing things➽ Glamoire - changing oneself➽ Magie Bibelot - making objects sentientThis book stars Camille, a young girl able to wield magic, but is very scared to get caught because the stakes are so high. Yet, she still turns magic into scrap metal so that they have a little money to live off of. But her younger sister Sophie is not in the best of health, and both of their parents have just died to smallpox. The only person who is supposed to be looking out for them is their older brother, Alain, who is drinking and gambling away what little money they do have. But when Camille helps out a couple hot air balloon makers, then she finds a magical dress that is hidden away in a secret trunk, and she ends up taking her and her sisters future into her own hands and will stop at nothing to ensure their health and safety. From there, she throws herself into a world of aristocracy, filled with nobles who do not even realize the food they are wasting while people in the streets are starving. I wanted to love this so much, friends. But sadly, it just fell so very short for me. I felt like the author was trying to cram so many important things that happened in France in that time into this book, while also trying to write her own story, and both elements just made this entire story feel disjointed and left a lot to be desired. And honestly? Even my synopsis of this book sounds a lot better than the book actually is. I was so bored throughout. I just kept waiting for something more exciting to happen, but it never did. The twists and turns were so predictable and so lackluster. And them ignoring the gross behavior that Alain displayed made me so angry. And their constant views on sex workers made my eyes almost roll out of my head completely. Oh, and the villain was straight up from a comic, twirling his mustache, I swear! I will say that one of the main side characters, Lazare, is biracial (Indian and French) and he does have a really good discussion about how he feels like the French never let him forget that he isn’t white. I really appreciated that. I also appreciated that Camille was willing to do whatever it took to care for Sophie. You all know I’m always here for good sibling relationships. But besides these two elements? I really didn’t enjoy this one. I’m so sorry, friends! I do feel like I’ve been really not enjoying a lot of the historical stories I’ve read in 2018, so maybe you will enjoy this a lot more than I did. A lot of my friends have actually given this one really high praise, too. But I’m wishing you all happy reading, always. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | TwitchThe quote above was taken from an ARC and is subject to change upon publication.Content and trigger warnings for degrading comments about women (I honestly feel like I read the word “whore” at least twenty times), slut shaming, physical abuse, emotional abuse, verbal abuse, illness of a loved one, alcoholism, gambling addiction, loss of a loved one, blood depictions. Buddy read with Mia at Pens and Parchment, Amy at A Court of Crowns and Quills, & Kayla at Books and Blends! ❤
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  • Brittney ~ Reverie and Ink
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this one! It's a beautiful mix between historical fiction and fantasy, and it's easy to get lost right alongside Camille - a girl struggling with poverty - as she uses magic to thrust herself into the glittering world of the French Court. In fact, what I loved most about Enchantee was not only the high stakes that will keep you on the edge of your seat, but the constant tension thrust into every scene. I found myself turning those pages like none other.Camille is a fantastic MC - mostly I loved this one! It's a beautiful mix between historical fiction and fantasy, and it's easy to get lost right alongside Camille - a girl struggling with poverty - as she uses magic to thrust herself into the glittering world of the French Court. In fact, what I loved most about Enchantee was not only the high stakes that will keep you on the edge of your seat, but the constant tension thrust into every scene. I found myself turning those pages like none other.Camille is a fantastic MC - mostly because she's perfectly imperfect. She's an older sister, who has the weight of caring and providing for her younger sister on her shoulders. Both girls - along with their horrible older brother - were left with nothing when their parents died. And while the brother * could * have provided for the girls with his position in the military, he gambles everything he makes away. Thus, Camille is left with the one thing she does have from her family - a mysterious magic box. And while she knows it is dangerous, she'll do anything to get her and her sister out of poverty's choking grasp.Turns out, the box has a little something special that allows Camille to not only transform her appearance to that of a courtier, but she learns the art of illusion in full - including how to change the face of cards. Which means she can gamble... and win. The problem? The cost might be too high for Camille to play as she learns the consequences of her magic. I don't want to say much more, but alongside the high stakes, there's a romance behind the scenes that I quite enjoyed, and of course, when things get messy - they get REALLY messy. Overall, I loved exploring this world, and I'll definitely be hoping for another book from the author one day soon! My Blog ~ Instagram ~ Twitter
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  • C.G. Drews
    January 1, 1970
    This was like a visual war between intoxicating Parisian magical delights...vs extreme poverty and desperation. And books that blend such extremes so well just deserve total applause. It really took you to Paris! I love travelling through books (less expensive and also less jetlag, which is nice) but it's tricky to get that balance where you really feel in the story. Enchantee nailed it. ➸ It's set in 1700s Paris, mostly in Versailles.And oh wow, the COURTS. The mad richness of the aristocracy a This was like a visual war between intoxicating Parisian magical delights...vs extreme poverty and desperation. And books that blend such extremes so well just deserve total applause. It really took you to Paris! I love travelling through books (less expensive and also less jetlag, which is nice) but it's tricky to get that balance where you really feel in the story. Enchantee nailed it. ➸ It's set in 1700s Paris, mostly in Versailles.And oh wow, the COURTS. The mad richness of the aristocracy and how they just threw around money and favours and gambled and drank...while the poor people literally died in the streets of starvation. And we're also here on the brink of inventions, so the hot air balloon takes a huge part of the story (getting it, ya know, floating right) and Camille's dad used to run a printing press where he was determined to spread true news and free thoughts (lol that didn't go down well, thanks France) and the age of obscene rich people is teetering towards collapse. Ugh I loved this give me moar.➸ Camille is the Softest...but also has a total craving for power.She's a magician but she starts of turning bits of scrap metal into coins and that's it. But then she moves onto enchanted dresses and glamouring her face and changing cards to work in her favour for gambling...like she just loves that feeling of being in control. Which is so understandable?!? Her "real" life is extreme poverty + being abused by her older brother + trying to care for a sickly sister. So when she figures she can get into Versailles and gamble and WIN (through trickery mwhaha) she GOES FOR IT. Of course magic has a price = and it's eating away at her. But I loved how she kept her soul throughout all the book. She's so passionate about who she loves and protects. Eeep.Ok but I have to admit (1) I hated how they had this abusive brother Alian who constantly got forgiven, and (2) he literally puts a knife to Camille's throat, but Sophie was still going to trust him?!? Tf, ladies. You can't save this one. Throw the whole man out.Magicians need sorrow. And deep sorrow existed only because of love.➸ The romance is pretty much super cute.Basically Lazare crash lands a balloon and Camille sprints over to save him and ...aww what a meet cute! I'm here for it! I also liked the added tension of them both leading double lives and how that collided. And the romance was taut but not irritatingly angsty?! Bless.➸ And am here for loving diversity rep.Lazare is biracial, his mother is from India and his father is a French aristocrat. And he does get mocked for it. He even calls out Camille's white privilege at one point and I think it was an important moment. And there's also an adorable side queer couple who I ached for because they go through a lot. But it was so good to see diversity in magical-historical fiction!! Like PROOF to anyone who says "oh it wasn't historically accurate..." as an excuse for skipping it, that they have no grounds to stand on. ➸ And while i totally enjoyed being immersed in the story......it's still super long. 450 pages is l o n g. I could've done for it to be a bit tighter to keep the tension high.Because holy WOW that ending is stressful.This is such a magical story of deception and love, of how easy it is to fall into the glittering addictive lure of money and being in control. It's a beautifully written story and it totally swallows your whole attention while you root for Camille to beat back the unfair world and have the life she deserves.
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  • Jasmine from How Useful It Is
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading Enchantee on 10/30/2018 and finished it on 11/13/2018. This book is an excellent read! I enjoy reading about Paris life in 1789. It’s definitely sad to be among the poor and definitely fun to be among the rich. Nights at Versailles sounds magnificent. I like how gambling and hot air balloon is the excitement at that time. The fashion with silk dress and hats are interesting to read. The divide between rich and poor is sad, and somehow I didn’t think it exists in Paris because P I started reading Enchantee on 10/30/2018 and finished it on 11/13/2018. This book is an excellent read! I enjoy reading about Paris life in 1789. It’s definitely sad to be among the poor and definitely fun to be among the rich. Nights at Versailles sounds magnificent. I like how gambling and hot air balloon is the excitement at that time. The fashion with silk dress and hats are interesting to read. The divide between rich and poor is sad, and somehow I didn’t think it exists in Paris because Paris is always advertise as the glamorous tourist destination. I like that Queen Marie Antoinette play a role in this book.This book is told in the third person point of view following Camille Durbonne, 17, the responsible middle sister to drunken brother Alain, 19 and ill sister Sophie, 15. Camille can turn metal into coins using sorrow, but it weakens her when she overdoes it. They all are orphans living on minimum and behind on rent. It was the year 1789 in Paris, where the poor are abundant and aristocrats are wasteful. Sophie dreams of marrying rich to get out of the slump and Alain takes what little his sisters have to pay off his gambling debts. Camille dreams of a change, the forbidden magic or the hot air balloon explorer Lazare she met, may just give her the new life she craves.Enchantee is very well written. I enjoy the romance a lot, especially all those flirting. I like the magic, though it seems not something to celebrate as the magic conjures sorrows instead of happiness. I like the communication at the time because it’s proper and sophisticated even between teenagers. This book has great set of characters, main and supporting. I like Rosier and his passion for the balloons. I like the twist to the dark magic. I like learning some french terms from this read! I recommend everyone to read this book.Pro: fast paced, page turner, magic, Paris, hot air balloon, siblings, flirting, revolution, gamblingCon: noneI rate it 5 stars!xoxo, Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details
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  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    Let me just take a quick second here to say that I finished four novels during the weekend. It feels like I’m binge-reading (so you know it won’t last), because I only recently got back into reading fiction so it’s like my subconscious (and body overall) is trying to make up for the ‘‘lost time.’’ That said, if this book had been awful, I would not have forced myself to read it. My experience reading it may be a little different than an Anglophone’s experience because I went to a Francophone sch Let me just take a quick second here to say that I finished four novels during the weekend. It feels like I’m binge-reading (so you know it won’t last), because I only recently got back into reading fiction so it’s like my subconscious (and body overall) is trying to make up for the ‘‘lost time.’’ That said, if this book had been awful, I would not have forced myself to read it. My experience reading it may be a little different than an Anglophone’s experience because I went to a Francophone school and we looked at the French Revolution again and again and again. I also studied Marie Antoinette in my Art History classes, which helped humanize her in my eyes, because her family portraits showed her love for her children. So I expected to understand this historical world well, regardless of the magic thrown in. I had no qualms with the world at all (thank God because after finishing The Gilded Wolves I could not have welcomed more confusion in that department). On the contrary, I enjoyed immensely the author’s descriptions of places. She writes beautifully—lushly. I would take a class in writing with her, that’s how much I think she can make it as a bestselling author. I do, sadly, believe that she should work on dialog and reactions better. Camille was lovely, and the way she cared for her sister Sophie touched my heart, but every single character in this book is so… dramatic. At times, this is entertaining because it means scenes are not DULL, but it’s a hard story to take seriously. This is unfortunate as Camille is often in precarious situations and yet… I never really feared for her life. A satisfying story in certain ways, but still a work-in-progress in others.Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Travel.with.a.book
    January 1, 1970
    Enchentée is a debut novel that will make you believe in magic, set in the most beautiful city of the World Paris, Gita merges magic and romance in a perfect way to give us an addictive and utterly delightful story! So the story takes place during 1789 or better known as The French Revolution, and the story elaborates very fascinating topics which we all want within a book, cheaters, people fighting in streets, magic, a bad government and French romance! Gita makes this a very unique and delight Enchentée is a debut novel that will make you believe in magic, set in the most beautiful city of the World Paris, Gita merges magic and romance in a perfect way to give us an addictive and utterly delightful story! So the story takes place during 1789 or better known as The French Revolution, and the story elaborates very fascinating topics which we all want within a book, cheaters, people fighting in streets, magic, a bad government and French romance! Gita makes this a very unique and delightful story to read for every reader!.As a debut book I really am speechless by Gita's experience to write such a masterpiece, she writes in a very professional way if I wouldn't see that this is a debut I would never believe it, her perspective in the book takes very interesting and important acts that you can't find it everywhere! Also the background settings are the best part which I loved so much, reading this made me think I was in Paris..The story follows the main character Camille who is a very strong and smart young girl who can do magic, she lives only with her sick sister and her useless brother!There are three types of magic in France and the story has different twists which will come in perfect times and the Author knows how to mix your feelings so fast, so all the book is with these three trying to survive in this miserable world!.Reading Camille's adventures will make you cry many times as she fights so much to keep her family safe as she is scared that she's becoming a different person, Gita's imagination is beyond perfection I really devoured ENCHANTÉE in maximum best way, she has created a World that is intriguing and intoxicating, every page will leave you speechless and wanting more from it, but the ending was a suprise for me, mostly I get dissapointed but this time I see a very clever ending which was so unexpected but looking throughout the journey Gita makes this a very unique and special book for all of us! If you love Caraval and Les Misérables than this book is perfect for you! I really give this a solid five star and I can say that it is one of the most powerful debut book of the Year also Gita as the best debut Author!!
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  • Ova - Excuse My Reading
    January 1, 1970
    Le Miserables meets with Caraval in this engaging Fantasy book set in 1700's Paris.It felt different to read a fantasy book set in pre-revolution Paris and I loved the atmosphere of this book. I am not generally a fan of the YA genre however the story pulled me in from the start. Trelease is a story teller for sure. I strolled the streets of Paris with Camille, brushed the corridors of Versailles. I loved the steam-punk soul of the book, and the magic system of the book might be simple but it wa Le Miserables meets with Caraval in this engaging Fantasy book set in 1700's Paris.It felt different to read a fantasy book set in pre-revolution Paris and I loved the atmosphere of this book. I am not generally a fan of the YA genre however the story pulled me in from the start. Trelease is a story teller for sure. I strolled the streets of Paris with Camille, brushed the corridors of Versailles. I loved the steam-punk soul of the book, and the magic system of the book might be simple but it was perfectly fitting to the story. The plot is a bit predictable but the way it's told is very engaging so I would be interested to read a sequel of this book. Would love to hear more about Camille and her new adventures!
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  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful writing but I just think historical fantasy is not for me. However, I love anything Marie Antoinette!
  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    Enchantée by Gita Trelease is a young adult historical fantasy that takes place at the time of the French Revolution. While the book has events and figures from this time in history it is a fantasy read with the use of magic being involved with the characters.Camille Durbonne’s family had never been rich but when her parents both pass away from smallpox Camille and her siblings are left to fend on their own. Camille’s older brother however only gambles away any little bit he gets a hold of and i Enchantée by Gita Trelease is a young adult historical fantasy that takes place at the time of the French Revolution. While the book has events and figures from this time in history it is a fantasy read with the use of magic being involved with the characters.Camille Durbonne’s family had never been rich but when her parents both pass away from smallpox Camille and her siblings are left to fend on their own. Camille’s older brother however only gambles away any little bit he gets a hold of and is often abusive to Camille and her younger sister.In order to protect herself and her sister, Sophie, Camille begins to dabble in the dark magic that had always been forbidden. Instead of only turning bits of metal into coins to survive Camille begins to transform herself to pass as a baroness to enter the high stakes gambling in the Palace of Versailles.First for the positive side of this one I would readily admit the author did a good job incorporating magic into the historical time frame and bringing it all to life. However, with this one being close to 500 pages yet again I felt as if it just wasn’t going anywhere. I’m not a huge fan of such a slow burning story and want way more action happening than I found in this one. While this one was just so-so to me though I’m sure those that prefer a slow build would love it.I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.com/
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  • Anissa
    January 1, 1970
    Wow wow wow. C’est dingue!
  • Jillian
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved this book , it’s about 2 sisters and a brother who’s parents have died from small pox . They are very poor but Camille can work magic so she does to try to earn money to make their situation better . There’s an evil villain, a romance and a little action. It’s taking place during the fall of the French monarchy it has bit of everything. It’s was very good I loved it.
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  • Malanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by publisher in exchange for an honest reviewI went into this with high hopes. It’s Paris! During the 1789! The ///French Revolution//// is about to OCCUR. I have a weird lowkey passion for the French Revolution. I think maybe it’s because lol it’s factual I’m in love with Sydney Carton???? I don’t know. But my hopes went downhill, exploded, and I could only look in horror at the sad remains. This book contains all the elements I look for. Rioting people. A bad government. A cascade ARC provided by publisher in exchange for an honest reviewI went into this with high hopes. It’s Paris! During the 1789! The ///French Revolution//// is about to OCCUR. I have a weird lowkey passion for the French Revolution. I think maybe it’s because lol it’s factual I’m in love with Sydney Carton???? I don’t know. But my hopes went downhill, exploded, and I could only look in horror at the sad remains. This book contains all the elements I look for. Rioting people. A bad government. A cascade of salty magic, falling upon the dish. But I just,,,,didn’t give a damn. I was completely indifferent to everything about this. What’s this book about? There are three types of magic in France. Magie Ordinaire (change things), Glamoire (change your sorry self), Magie Bibelot (Beauty and the Beast copyright? I’m still confused). Teenage girl Camille can do mgaic, but it comes at a price. If she continues to turn scrap metal into money,,,she might be ~caught~. Can I please state, for the record, that I’m tired of protagonists feeling bad about doing bad things. For the love of god, if you’re going to be bad, BE A BADASS about it. Don’t tremble at the sight of pastel morals!!! BE A PROPER VILLAIN, HAVE FUN WITH YOUR SINFUL WAYS. Will we ever get another Kaz Brekker from Six of Crows???? What about Andrew from The Foxhole Court?????????? I’m v sad bc our odds seem low. Give me recs in the comments pls. So, Camille’s parents are dead. I forget why. Her younger sister Sophie is always sick. Her big brother, Alain, is the least helpful human being to ever contain brain. God, if I were in a book I’d for sure be that one crazy person who poisons the annoying character’s tomato soup. I don’t even feel bad about it. The plot follows them all trying to make it in this big world. It’s tremendously boring. And the way sex workers are treated!!!!!! I’m v disappointed. Where is Michael from The Kiss Quotient, we need him? I’m tired of people depicting sex workers as universally poor, miserable, and desperate. Stop talking shit about sex workers. Thank you. Overall, I wasn’t….enchanted. c: c: c: c: TW: slut shaming, physical + emotional abuse, smallpox, alcoholism & gambling addiction|✨BLOG✨ |TWITTER✨ |
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  • Jessica | Booked J
    January 1, 1970
    Review also found here at Booked J. I was sent an eARC of this novel from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. This does not change my view in any shape or form.I'm calling it now Enchantée: is one of THE books that you can't miss in 2019. It's definitely one of my favourites so far and I'm so in love with the vision that Gita Trelease paints for us throughout this book. This was such an exhilarating, vivid read! I mean--sign me up, all day every day, for historical fictional that is Review also found here at Booked J. I was sent an eARC of this novel from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. This does not change my view in any shape or form.I'm calling it now Enchantée: is one of THE books that you can't miss in 2019. It's definitely one of my favourites so far and I'm so in love with the vision that Gita Trelease paints for us throughout this book. This was such an exhilarating, vivid read! I mean--sign me up, all day every day, for historical fictional that is written this beautifully.(And that cover. Oh-My-God.) Admittedly, I went into Enchantée full of intrigue but I wasn't certain I'd end up liking the book let alone loving it. When I started it, I was all in within a few pages. It's pure magic. In-fact, I'd imagine that Trelease herself used some sort of magical compulsion to get me lured into this story because I was completely captivated and could scarcely look away.What I found most enchanting (ha!) about Enchantée was the way in which Trelease portrays history. It reminded me, not wholly, of the way Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell presented that indulgent set of magical elements mixed with historical whims. The plots are, of course, highly different, but I got that same feeling of intrigue from both books.My experience reading it, too, felt very similar in tone and excitement. Curled up on a cold, rainy day, with a cup of piping hot coffee and a delectable read. Does it get any better than that?The answer is no. Not for a reader.Trelease took me by surprise. I devoured this book and am positively aching for (a) a physical copy of it and (b) more books from her. All I could think up of for my review of Enchantée was "wow" so I think I deserve a pat on the back for managing more than just one word. However, I stand by that wow, because this book certainly wowed me.There were some moments in Enchantée that I wasn't terribly keen on (the approach to sex workers and the general moments of slut shaming) but that I felt, still, were essential to the timeline and setting of the book. In short, the exchanges/thoughts/approach to these things were unfortunate and gross but not unrealistic for the times in which Enchantée takes place.Overall, I'm obsessed with this book and can't sing its praises enough. Although it won't be for everyone, it is definitely worth the read if you're into magic and historical fiction.
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  • Alana • thebookishchick
    January 1, 1970
    Enchan-TEA time:After sitting on whether I wanted to write a review on this or not, I've finally decided that I don't. I really don't have anything to say other than this had a whole lot of magic, ballgowns, and boredom. So, I'd rather not sit here and try to find a way to write a full review describing how bored I was. I hope this works out better for y'all than it did for me.Blog | Twitter | Instagram
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  • Umut Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Quite fun read and a solid debut. This fast paced, entertaining book is a Fantasy set in 1700's Paris.As a setting, it was really original and interesting to read about pre-revolution France. I loved reading about the etiquette, the class differences, the palace, the dresses, etc. It was very atmospheric. I usually find YA fantasies, especially series dragging on and on. But, this book was very fast paces, and full of action, which was great. I think Trelease is a very good story teller and I'll Quite fun read and a solid debut. This fast paced, entertaining book is a Fantasy set in 1700's Paris.As a setting, it was really original and interesting to read about pre-revolution France. I loved reading about the etiquette, the class differences, the palace, the dresses, etc. It was very atmospheric. I usually find YA fantasies, especially series dragging on and on. But, this book was very fast paces, and full of action, which was great. I think Trelease is a very good story teller and I'll be reading from her more in the future. I'm grateful that she wrote a stand a lone, not a series. It made this book very rich, otherwise the content would be spread through pages. I liked Camille as a strong female lead, and I loved the sisterhood between her and Sophie. The magic system was simple, but I liked it for that. It was a perfectly balanced book between atmosphere, characters and magic world. I really enjoyed, I'd recommend. Thanks a lot to the publisher for sending me an early complimentary copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rosalyn Eves
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful writing, slow burn romance, magic, courtly politics, revolution--like Victor Hugo and Georgette Heyer had a baby (but with more diverse characters). Loved it!
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Magic ripples through ENCHANTÉE. Gita Trelease’s imagination, the language she uses, the relationships she builds between characters—that is where the magic begins—and of course, there is la magie (both petty and dark) that the main character, Camille Durbonne, wields. This is my favorite kind of book to read, one where I am swept up in the writing, loving each line as much as the story itself. One where the characters take your hand and bring you into the pages with them. One where magic seems Magic ripples through ENCHANTÉE. Gita Trelease’s imagination, the language she uses, the relationships she builds between characters—that is where the magic begins—and of course, there is la magie (both petty and dark) that the main character, Camille Durbonne, wields. This is my favorite kind of book to read, one where I am swept up in the writing, loving each line as much as the story itself. One where the characters take your hand and bring you into the pages with them. One where magic seems entirely possible.Camille is a character both vulnerable and determined, driven by dire situations to make a better life for her and her sister—even by using dark magic. As she travels back and forth from Paris to Versailles, the contrast between her true life and her false life blur. Who she loves, who she befriends, who she makes an enemy, all collide. And because each character is so well-developed, I cared about their fates, and their relationships, as much as Camille’s.I would have to recite ENCHANTÉE from start to finish to share all the things I loved about this beautiful book!
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  • JenacideByBibliophile
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, Flatiron Books, via NetGalley for an honest review. Opinion: There once was a young French girl and her little sister,Who were poor beyond belief due to their gambling brother.The death of their parents turned their life quite tragic, That’s why the eldest sister Camille turned to gambling and magic. A dress that requires blood to enchant and disguise,Was all that she’d need to sneak into Versailles. But little was said about the toll on the Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the publisher, Flatiron Books, via NetGalley for an honest review. Opinion: There once was a young French girl and her little sister,Who were poor beyond belief due to their gambling brother.The death of their parents turned their life quite tragic, That’s why the eldest sister Camille turned to gambling and magic. A dress that requires blood to enchant and disguise,Was all that she’d need to sneak into Versailles. But little was said about the toll on the soul that trickery would take, Or the consequences that come from a life lived fake. Livres, love, ball gowns and hats,Hot air balloons so high, that one tip and you’ll splat. Versailles may be enchanting, with a Queen like Marie But nothing in Versailles is black and white, and nothing is free. Hold on to your wigs, there’s a new Versailles tale in town! My dear Vicomtes and Vicomtesses, Enchantée is EVERYTHING and MORE that you could EVER ask for in a historical fiction set in late 1700 Versailles!It is extravagant, it is DANGEROUS, and it is exactly what you would expect a palace of courtiers to be like. JEALOUSY is CLAWING at my insides, my brain is working mercilessly to assure me that I will never be able to step into this beautiful world, and it is taking EVERY bit of self-control to not throw myself on the ground and weep.Weep because I will never experience the abhorrent glory that was Versailles in 1789. OR a Versailles with magic and trickery.Enchantée was all the things I hoped for when I read its description: cinched waists, expensive dresses, powdered faces, dapper men with MANNERS galore, magic....and cake. But that’s a given. I think we can ALL agree that any and ALL Versailles retellings are welcome to us book lovers, especially when a Fantasy aspect is thrown into the mix. You had me at aristocrat and la magie. Though the beauty of Versailles may pull you in to reading this book, or even the cameo of Marie Antoinette, I can assure my lovelies…you will stay for the characters, plot and writing. Gita Trelease has outdone herself! This book is elegant and suave, delectable and enticing. I was swept away in the world that she presents on a golden platter smattered in frosting and wine, and I am horribly STRICKEN that it is over. The author has fused fact with fiction and given readers a story that is both historical, while also fantastical in that it is filled with magic. She included events leading up to the French Revolution, the prices in bread increasing and the eventual riots, while also capturing the voices of the rich and the poor beautifully. These courtiers are the typical snooty aristocrats that you know and love, so enjoy. Camille is the main character of this story, and her story is quite a sorrowful one at that. Her parents had both died from small pox, her brother is a drunk and gambling addict who cannot control himself, and she must work la magie to provide food for her and her youngest sister. Once things turn worse for Camille’s brother, she is forced to work la magie on a higher scale. She infiltrates the Palace of Versailles posing as a Baroness, in hopes of earning money through gambling by changing cards with her magic. She is quickly swept up in the allure of the courtiers and the palace, and who could blame her?! There are masquerade balls, endless parties and games in the gardens, and cakes and wines all around! Courtiers strewn every which way, running wild with little to no rules to hinder their wants and needs. Though a wonderfully created world, the truly amazing aspect of this story is the writing. The author has combined French words and phrases with this English version, and it made it THAT much more real and authentic. The reader will feel like they are in Paris in the late 1700’s, walking the streets with Camille or dining with her in Versailles! The creative writing was fantastic, and the setting was described impeccably. The characters were given such vast and comical personalities, while also proving to be well-versed in the etiquette and “ways” of the time period.Don’t worry darlings, there is INDEED a romance to be had. It is a truly touching and gentle romance at that, and one that I wish I could catch and put into my pocket. It will give you the audible *sigh*, the immense feels, and of course…make you wonder why the hell men aren’t this chivalrous anymore! I thought the author did a wonderful job of keeping the characters true to the era by ensuring proper rules for courting and attire, and even found it to be amusing at the modesty that was displayed back then. “If he took off his coat, she might expire”I wish I could say more! With all of that said, I think it’s obvious that I LOVED Enchantée to the gold-encrusted moon and back! It was an incredibly fun and creative read, and I only wish this was a series and not a stand-alone! I suppose I will just be here waiting and hoping that Gita Trelease will write another story that can compare and compete with this. Because I feel as I do at the end of every beautiful party, sorrowful and nostalgic.
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  • Gabrielle Byrne
    January 1, 1970
    The story of Camille Durbonne is like warm melted chocolate. It woos you with rich velvet details, excites your passions and lingers, so sweetly, on your senses. Her story is rags to riches, but the added twists of dark magic, hidden threats, and a secret double life makes it a heady and unique blend. From the cobbled shadows of the Paris streets, to wild and erudite experiments in hot air balloons, all the way to the lace and luxury of Marie Antoinette’s court, Trelease will deftly lure you thr The story of Camille Durbonne is like warm melted chocolate. It woos you with rich velvet details, excites your passions and lingers, so sweetly, on your senses. Her story is rags to riches, but the added twists of dark magic, hidden threats, and a secret double life makes it a heady and unique blend. From the cobbled shadows of the Paris streets, to wild and erudite experiments in hot air balloons, all the way to the lace and luxury of Marie Antoinette’s court, Trelease will deftly lure you through each scene, ramping up the romantic tension in perfect time with the danger. In each new scene, you’ll be betting on Camille to win the day, save her sister, and discover the true prince of her heart. And like all the best hot chocolates, it will leave you sated, but wanting more. Put this on your MUST READ list for 2018. You won't be sorry.
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  • Paulo Ratz
    January 1, 1970
    Preciso desse livro em português!
  • destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    DNF @ pg120 Life is hard enough in 18th-century France, and few know that better than Camille, who's been forced to take care of her younger sister and older, alcoholic brother when their parents pass from smallpox. She uses small magics to convert scraps into coins, but they're barely making ends meet when Camille finally decides to explore a side of magic her mother always warned her away from — a type of 'la magie' that can change her very appearance, and win her a ticket into Louis XVI's pal DNF @ pg120 Life is hard enough in 18th-century France, and few know that better than Camille, who's been forced to take care of her younger sister and older, alcoholic brother when their parents pass from smallpox. She uses small magics to convert scraps into coins, but they're barely making ends meet when Camille finally decides to explore a side of magic her mother always warned her away from — a type of 'la magie' that can change her very appearance, and win her a ticket into Louis XVI's palace in search of riches and safety. As a reviewer who reads so much YA fantasy, I find that it's rare to come across a plot that is as unique and fresh as Enchantée. The setting alone is a rarity, but when you add in the aristocratic players such as Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, coupled with la magie and Camille's responsibility to her family, it's easy to see that Gita Trelease has crafted a genuinely original and creative story here. Little by little, magic was erasing her. Sometimes she felt it might kill her. Camille is unique in her own rights, too; she's got a level head on her shoulders because she's been forced to grow up so fast, but she wears her responsibilities sensibly and with a quiet acceptance. Rather than railing against her circumstances or trying to find an escape, she's committed every ounce of her being to protecting her younger sister and keeping them safe and sheltered. She's an easy protagonist to like, and she feels authentic; despite her commitment to her sister, she still allows herself to dwell occasionally on how hard her life is or how much she wishes certain things would change. She hated la magie ordinaire, but it was all she had. I was also immediately impressed by the quality of writing in this story. Gita Trelease is a total natural and she paints beautiful scenery. Her storytelling is lush and imaginative, with rich details. Unfortunately, it was almost too richly detailed at times, and that's where my struggles with this book began. "What else is there to do with a life than spend it?" Despite all of the positives I mentioned above, the problem I had with Enchantée is that this book is simply too long. It had potential to be a quick-moving, well-paced plot full of action and intrigue and the occasional suspenseful thrill, but instead, so much time was spent focusing on the opulence around Camille that, while it paints a pretty picture, it's hard to stay very invested in the goings-on. Though she'd tried so hard to hold it all, in the end it ran away like water through her fingers. Nothing stayed. While Enchantée wasn't a perfect score for me, I honestly believe it's a 'me, not you' situation, because this book has massive potential to be so many people's favorite release of the year, and I mean that with every fiber of my being. I actually fully intend to reread this at a later date (when I'm not struggling with the final vestiges of a reading slump), because I think, had I been able to move past the slow pacing, this would've been an easy winning title for me. I highly recommend anyone who enjoys historical fantasy to check this story out, because I believe it's going to be a massively successful release, and I can't wait to watch Gita Trelease blow us all away.All quotes come from an advance copy and may not match the final release. Thank you so much to Flatiron Books for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!
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  • julia ♥
    January 1, 1970
    FULL REVIEW ON MY BLOG: here 💖"This was the Paris of the strivers, of those who dwelt low, not high.This was not the Paris of balloonists. It was her Paris, and it was the same as it had been this morning.But she, perhaps, was not."I first heard about Enchantée in 2018, and fell in love with the cover (I mean, who wouldn't, come on...). I'm a huge history buff so the premise, set during the French revolution, sounded great to my ears! Enchantée did just what the title teased it would, this stor FULL REVIEW ON MY BLOG: here 💖"This was the Paris of the strivers, of those who dwelt low, not high.This was not the Paris of balloonists. It was her Paris, and it was the same as it had been this morning.But she, perhaps, was not."I first heard about Enchantée in 2018, and fell in love with the cover (I mean, who wouldn't, come on...). I'm a huge history buff so the premise, set during the French revolution, sounded great to my ears! Enchantée did just what the title teased it would, this story was an enchanting, magical fairytale.What is this book about?Enchantée follows Camille, who lives in the poor backstreets of Paris. When her parents die of smallpox, and her brother deserts the army to succumb to his alcohol addiction, Camille is left to take care of her ill sister. She uses tame magic "la magie ordinaire" to create an income, and give her sister and herself the care she needs. But when that no longer suffices, Camille has to go somewhere else for money. Using her mother's ancient darker magic, she transforms herself into Baroness de La Fontaine to blend in with the French high society at the court of Louis XVI. At first, providing for her and her sister is all that's on her mind, but when she meets a young balloonist by the name of Lazare, a dangerous hope starts breeding inside Camille that can't wait to get out. "Disorder is the beginning of change, Papa had said. When taxes rise, when the harvest fails, and bread prices rise: see what happens."What did I think of Enchantée?Enchantée was everything I hoped it would be and more. I know people say "don't judge a book by a cover" but I still kind of do that from time to time (don't blame me!). However, this gorgeous cover lived up to a gorgeous story. Paris during the French revolution has always insanely intrigued me. I love the rich atmosphere that the author describes when it comes to the lavish court in Versailles. This, in combination with the stark contrast to the gritty and dark streets of Paris really set the tone for this story.Plot-wise, this book reminded me of a Disney movie in the nicest way possible. Camille's quest in Versailles really had that Cinderella-esque feel. Mix this with the interesting, but relatively simple magic system, it worked very well. I'm always a little apprehensive when it comes to fantasy stand-alones because of the way it needs to wrap everything up in the span of one single book. Whereas duologies or series would have numerous books for world-building and setting up the plot, this all needs to be done within one when it comes to a standalone. Pacing is something I find extremely important in general, but more so when it comes to books like this. I can honestly say there wasn't a boring moment in this book. Because the magic system was relatively simple, there wasn't too much of the book devoted to explaining it, which I loved. The beginning pulls the reader right into 1789 Paris, and there isn't a dull moment since. Character-wise, I loved Camille's character. She's a great heroine, and a very human one at that. Her constant responsibility for her sister, as well as the selflessness and her imperfections made her really likeable to me. Also really nice was to see that her brother didn't actually get a redemption arc despite being her family. It bothers me when authors try to excuse abusive behavior, and there was none of that with this book. Beware that there's a trigger warning though when it comes to alcoholism and physical abuse!Romance-wise, I adored Lazare as a love-interest and as a character. I loved their romance together and I their interactions were SO CUTE! Lazare's kind, smart, and intelligent, which I much prefer to the broody dark male love-interest that is often presented in YA literature. Their dynamic felt really fresh, I loved it! Lazare is half Indian, and the book briefly addresses racial tensions, which I find not a lot of historical YA fantasies tend to do very often, so I thought that was refreshing! Because of how soon they met, there was a danger of the romance feeling a little insta-lovey, but because this is a standalone, and due to the fairytale-like atmosphere and feel of the story, this didn't necessarily bother me.Because the plot was so magical and well-paced, I wasn't bummed that there wasn't much of the actual revolution going on. As much as I love history, I don't go into historical fantasies for the historical accuracy. I thought this book was a really refreshing take on this time-period, and an absolute gem (especially considering this is a DEBUT novel, like whaaaat?) in the YA standalone department. I will 100% read Gita's next novel, and this book has now been added to my 'favorites' list! J'ADORE!
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  • Krystal
    January 1, 1970
    THIS IS BASICALLY A GENDER-BENT, FRENCH ALADDIN AND I AM IN LOVE <3 Things you should know about me before reading this review:-Aladdin is my favourite movie of all time- I'm obsessed with anything French-My favourite genre is fantasy-I can be highly cynical when reviewing booksSo basically this had all the elements of a book I should enjoy, but if it had been written terribly, this would be a scathing, 1-star review.HAPPILY NOT THE CASE. I loved it. I was a little worried at the beginning, b THIS IS BASICALLY A GENDER-BENT, FRENCH ALADDIN AND I AM IN LOVE <3 Things you should know about me before reading this review:-Aladdin is my favourite movie of all time- I'm obsessed with anything French-My favourite genre is fantasy-I can be highly cynical when reviewing booksSo basically this had all the elements of a book I should enjoy, but if it had been written terribly, this would be a scathing, 1-star review.HAPPILY NOT THE CASE. I loved it. I was a little worried at the beginning, because for some reason I hate reading about poverty? That whole gnawing hunger, would-sell-my-hair-for-table-scraps desperation is just not something I like to read about. I think possibly because of how uncomfortable I am thinking about being that destitute. I mean, I like to talk about how poor I am and everything but I have a steady supply of bread and 2-minute noodles so really I have nothing to complain about. Whereas facing the harshness of real poverty when it was commonplace is something that bothers me. Also, it makes me hungry.So yeah, the opener was a bit scary. Camille is working pathetic magic to make ends meet for her and her sister but their older brother is drinking it all away and getting aggressive. So depressing. Poor kids.Enter the handsome Lazare and his merry band of aeronauts, who are obsessed with trying to get their own hot-air balloon up and running. He's a fun distraction from Camille's growling stomach and the heavy weight on her shoulders so Grace a Dieu for Lazare.Still, it's time for Camille to take action and what better way to get rich quick than to gamble? "Genie, (aka magic), I wish you to make me a fancy Baroness." So off she sneaks to Versailles and what do you know, this book officially reaches French Fever status.Did I mention I'm obsessed with anything French? Apparently I'm more obsessed with Historical French. Which makes perfect sense since this obsession sprung from my love of The Three Musketeers. But my obsession also led to me travel to France last year and I LOVED EVERY SECOND and now I like to be reminded of that trip as often as possible. Versailles is absolutely stunning. It's a magnificent palace filled with splendour and gold and art and is just *happy sigh*. This book brings it to life again, fills it with aristocrats instead of tourists and paints a picture of what the palace was once home to. I loved it so much. That's probably my favourite thing about this book: It brings Paris and Versailles to life. Even the Place des Vosges came alive for me, allowing me to fondly remember my own walk around the square. How I'd love to go back and picture this story taking place! This novel shows places so vividly, so even if you haven't been to Paris, you'll be able to picture it rather well as it was in the late 1700s.There's also a fabulous cast of characters, from the handsome Lazare to the fun-loving aristocrat, Chandon, and the delightfully snarky Aurelie. Seguin is an intriguing, mysterious fellow who instantly repulses, and then there's the pathetic figure of their useless brother, Alain. There's more, of course, and I love them all. All the gambling did make me a little anxious at times I must admit. I actually love gambling, but I always have a safe limit. How can these reckless people wager everything?! Guh, my anxiety skyrocketed through those scenes. But there are also parties and things as well so it's generally a lot of fun being in this rich world.There is a lot of French in the writing, which felt like maybe too much for the story but which I absolutely loved. Especially when I knew what it said (There is a handy glossary at the end, though, for those who are unfamiliar with Francais). Naturally, I have reinstated my Duolingo lessons after reading this. I love the language. It seems a little strange in places, since they're supposedly speaking French anyway, but I don't know how many people this will be a problem for because it certainly wasn't for me. To me it helped it feel more real, in a way. Also, very French. Did I mention this tiny French obsession that I have? :DThe story is a little long, but there's still plenty to entertain and it does all come together neatly at the end. I was impatient to get to the glitz and glamour of Versailles so my single complaint would be the depressing and slow start. The magic was a little underwhelming, as well, but I appreciated that it took kind of a backseat to the story. It actually slotted in nicely, I thought.Overall, this book captivated me pretty quickly and I'm so glad it was as brilliant as the blurb made it sound. I loved it with all my French-loving heart.Many thanks to Pan Macmillan for my ARC.
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  • Kelly Coon
    January 1, 1970
    What did I love about this book? EVERYTHING. Trelease transported me from 2018 to late 18th century France, and I was truly enchanted with every second of the ride. Her world-building is stellar as she moves us through Paris streets to the glamorous, but decaying, palace of Versailles sweeping us through Parisian fashion, print-making, hot-air ballooning, and parlor games. Woven into this story of magic, trickery, romance, and loss, is the history of the storming of the Bastille, which highlight What did I love about this book? EVERYTHING. Trelease transported me from 2018 to late 18th century France, and I was truly enchanted with every second of the ride. Her world-building is stellar as she moves us through Paris streets to the glamorous, but decaying, palace of Versailles sweeping us through Parisian fashion, print-making, hot-air ballooning, and parlor games. Woven into this story of magic, trickery, romance, and loss, is the history of the storming of the Bastille, which highlights the differences between social class that can drive a person to form dangerous alliances and dabble in dark magic. Add it immediately to your TBR list!
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  • Cody Roecker
    January 1, 1970
    I've been thinking about this book almost every day since I've read it so I have to update my thoughts a little: Gita Trelease's debut is strong and beautiful, much like the main character, Camille. With France as a backdrop, a gorgeous bloodthirsty dress, card games, high-class balls, and a boy who flies hot-air balloons Enchantée deftly defies all expectations of reality by wowing you at every turn. Magical. dark, twisty, and wholly inspired, Enchantée sings with a deep vibrato, and is complet I've been thinking about this book almost every day since I've read it so I have to update my thoughts a little: Gita Trelease's debut is strong and beautiful, much like the main character, Camille. With France as a backdrop, a gorgeous bloodthirsty dress, card games, high-class balls, and a boy who flies hot-air balloons Enchantée deftly defies all expectations of reality by wowing you at every turn. Magical. dark, twisty, and wholly inspired, Enchantée sings with a deep vibrato, and is completely unforgettable. One you won't want to miss. Get ready to meet some favorite characters and my sweet precious boy Chandon. <3 <3
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  • Logan LeDuc
    January 1, 1970
    This fantastic retelling of Les Miserables was a powerful and fabulous journey. I am so grateful for this incredible novel. The main character was a powerhouse and I loved the diversity of the characters both sexually and racially. The descriptions were flawless and this was an absolute joy to read.
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  • Joshee Kun (조수아)
    January 1, 1970
    Magicians needed sorrow. And deep sorrow existed only because of love.What's great about historical fiction is that it removes, if not embellishes, the "boring" or pedantic aspects of the past. Add a touch of magic, and it becomes even better. Following this train of thought, I hoped to thoroughly enjoy this novel, which was a clever combination of Cinderella and Les Misérables.Set in 18th-century France, Enchantée depicts the miserable life of Camille Durbonne. After her parents died of smallpo Magicians needed sorrow. And deep sorrow existed only because of love.What's great about historical fiction is that it removes, if not embellishes, the "boring" or pedantic aspects of the past. Add a touch of magic, and it becomes even better. Following this train of thought, I hoped to thoroughly enjoy this novel, which was a clever combination of Cinderella and Les Misérables.Set in 18th-century France, Enchantée depicts the miserable life of Camille Durbonne. After her parents died of smallpox, she and her sister Sophie become desperate to make ends meet. Sophie can magically turn scrap metal into gold, but the effect is temporary. To make things worse, Alain, their older brother, is too debaucherous to save them from poverty. Dreading the idea of being evicted from their home, Camille decides to step up her game. Through blood magic, she disguises herself as a beautiful baroness and infiltrates the court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. There, Camille learns two important things. First, affluence doesn't necessarily equate to happiness. Second, as stated by Rumpelstiltskin in Once Upon a Time, "All magic comes with a price."If I were an elementary student, I would give this book perfect marks because of its "moral lessons" (the redundancy makes me cringe to this day). After all, reading should be not only for pleasure but also for enlightenment or self-improvement. I particularly resonated with Camille, who felt that she had a void in her heart. She managed to fill it for a time through magic and gambling, but she eventually realized that such addictions would only make her feel emptier in the end. The Palace of Versailles provided for Camille's needs and wants. On the other hand, it alienated her from Sophie, who was worth more than gold. In this world of sex, drugs, and other vices, Camille's life story is very relevant.Lazar, Camille's love interest, was similarly inspiring in terms of character development. Since he was a person of color, many people disrespected him. Some even treated him like an exotic animal that they wished to keep as a pet. It didn't matter that he was half French and very inventive; his Indian blood was more important to his peers. Our society now claims to be "progressive," but I'm sure that some people are more than willing to regress to the harsh racism of the olden days.I also liked the author's atmospheric writing, which was perfect for the historical setting. The remarkable places and weirdly dressed royals were vividly described, so I could imagine them without difficulty. Enchantée rekindled my desire to visit France even though I became familiar with its dark past. Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were annoying rulers, enjoying a lavish life at the expense of the common people. Considering their disregard for those "beneath" them, I strongly supported the French Revolution (the demolition of the monarchy). My only issue with the writing was the abundance of French terms. Really, I wish that I had studied French so that I didn't have to keep on checking the glossary. Doing so was such a hassle!Regardless of how much I loved the book's themes, I decided not to give it a higher rating because of its disappointing climax. The buildup to the confrontation was incongruous to what actually happened. The villain wasn't so powerful after all. And he/she was defeated so quickly like the author was forcing a happily ever after. In other words, the climax spoiled some of my fondness for the story.Nonetheless, don't let my 3.75 stars discourage you from reading Enchantée. As far as "moral lessons" are concerned, it's one of the most meaningful novels in my library. If you want to immerse yourself in the glittering (yet dirty) city of 18th-century Paris, you already know what book to pick up.
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  • Menna van Praag
    January 1, 1970
    I'm on page 16 of Enchantée: I don't usually comment on a book before I've finished reading it. But I loved this from the first sentence & am so excited to read more that I just had to say so!UPDATE: I knew I’d love this book just from the blurb - magical realism set in Versailles just before & during the French Revolution. I wasn’t disappointed! Strictly speaking, it’s YA but I never felt I was reading a book for teenagers. The story spun along & the prose was a delight.I started to I'm on page 16 of Enchantée: I don't usually comment on a book before I've finished reading it. But I loved this from the first sentence & am so excited to read more that I just had to say so!UPDATE: I knew I’d love this book just from the blurb - magical realism set in Versailles just before & during the French Revolution. I wasn’t disappointed! Strictly speaking, it’s YA but I never felt I was reading a book for teenagers. The story spun along & the prose was a delight.I started to squeal with delight when things took a darker and more magical turn. The line (slight SPOILER alert) from when the protagonist, Camille, has to perform a glamour on herself using her mother’s enchanted dress to enter the court, gave me gorgeous goosebumps: “But the drops of blood disappeared into the dress, as if it had licked them up.” Fabulous!!So, Enchantée did indeed enchant me. And the cover is exquisite too! Plus I got to eat all these gold coins after taking the pic 😉😋
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  • Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard
    January 1, 1970
    Y'all! I actually liked this WAY more than I thought I would! The asshole brother doesn't get to be an asset and then just get a pass (I've read so many damn books like that. Where it's just never challenged or anything). I liked the mc and her sister. I think the politics and magic needed a bit more fleshing out and I think the use of Marie Antoinette was less of a climax than I had expected. Good twist ending and lots of character development. Was actually impressed with everything Release did Y'all! I actually liked this WAY more than I thought I would! The asshole brother doesn't get to be an asset and then just get a pass (I've read so many damn books like that. Where it's just never challenged or anything). I liked the mc and her sister. I think the politics and magic needed a bit more fleshing out and I think the use of Marie Antoinette was less of a climax than I had expected. Good twist ending and lots of character development. Was actually impressed with everything Release did in one book under 450 pages.I loved the inclusion of the hot air balloon. I don't know why but it was unexpected, fun and I just love seeing women involved with inventions and STEM.
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