Our Wayward Fate
Seventeen-year-old Ali Chu knows that as the only Asian person at her school in middle-of-nowhere Indiana, she must be bland as white toast to survive. This means swapping her congee lunch for PB&Js, ignoring the clueless racism from her classmates and teachers, and keeping her mouth shut when people wrongly call her Allie instead of her actual name, pronounced Āh-lěe, after the mountain in Taiwan.Her autopilot existence is disrupted when she finds out that Chase Yu, the new kid in school, is also Taiwanese. Despite some initial resistance due to the "they belong together" whispers, Ali and Chase soon spark a chemistry rooted in competitive martial arts, joking in two languages, and, most importantly, pushing back against the discrimination they face.But when Ali’s mom finds out about the relationship, she forces Ali to end it. As Ali covertly digs into the why behind her mother’s disapproval, she uncovers secrets about her family and Chase that force her to question everything she thought she knew about life, love, and her unknowable future.Snippets of a love story from nineteenth-century China (a retelling of the Chinese folktale The Butterfly Lovers) are interspersed with Ali’s narrative and intertwined with her fate.

Our Wayward Fate Details

TitleOur Wayward Fate
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 15th, 2019
PublisherSimon Pulse
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult

Our Wayward Fate Review

  • Rachel Solomon
    January 1, 1970
    WOW. I adored AMERICAN PANDA, and while this sophomore novel has Gloria Chao's signature incisive, humorous voice, it's a much darker, more intense book. The prose is at turns stunning and visceral, and every character is complex and three-dimensional. An intricate story of identity and family that's impossible to put down.
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  • Gloria Chao
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote Our Wayward Fate to explore:-what it's like to grow up as a teen POC in a mostly white Midwestern town-stereotypes and racism-miscommunication between parents and children, especially children of immigrants who don't wholly feel like they belong anywhereIn this book, you can expect humor, romance, banter, martial arts, and so. many. secrets! (One of which is pictured on the cover!) This is a contemporary story, but a 19th Century retelling of the Chinese folktale, "The Butterfly Lovers, I wrote Our Wayward Fate to explore:-what it's like to grow up as a teen POC in a mostly white Midwestern town-stereotypes and racism-miscommunication between parents and children, especially children of immigrants who don't wholly feel like they belong anywhereIn this book, you can expect humor, romance, banter, martial arts, and so. many. secrets! (One of which is pictured on the cover!) This is a contemporary story, but a 19th Century retelling of the Chinese folktale, "The Butterfly Lovers," is interspersed. You can read the first chapter on Bustle here!And advanced eARCs can be requested on Edelweiss here.
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  • faith ✨
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't realize Gloria Chao had a book coming out this year until now, but as I'm aware of this atm, "I need this" is a major understatement
  • caitlin
    January 1, 1970
    Review copy courtesy of Edelweiss.After abandoning Gloria Chao’s first book, I decided to give a try to this book, and I’m really glad I did because I found a charming, compulsively readable YA novel. Ali is living in whitebread Americana, where her Taiwanese heritage has all but been hidden by her classmates. Things become complicated when Chase Yu arrives, as he is also Taiwanese and everyone expects them to start dating. Their hilarious romance gets complicated by a mystery that Ali is trying Review copy courtesy of Edelweiss.After abandoning Gloria Chao’s first book, I decided to give a try to this book, and I’m really glad I did because I found a charming, compulsively readable YA novel. Ali is living in whitebread Americana, where her Taiwanese heritage has all but been hidden by her classmates. Things become complicated when Chase Yu arrives, as he is also Taiwanese and everyone expects them to start dating. Their hilarious romance gets complicated by a mystery that Ali is trying to solve to discover her parents’ history. Funny, thought-provoking, compelling, and a diverse read to put on any high school library shelf.
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  • Gabrielle
    January 1, 1970
    3/20/19 Giving this author a second try.
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