The Ruin (Cormac Reilly, #1)
It's been twenty years since Cormac Reilly discovered the body of Hilaria Blake in her crumbling Georgian home. But he's never forgotten the two children she left behind...When Aisling Conroy's boyfriend Jack is found in the freezing black waters of the river Corrib, the police tell her it was suicide. A surgical resident, she throws herself into study and work, trying to forget - until Jack's sister Maude shows up. Maude suspects foul play, and she is determined to prove it.DI Cormac Reilly is the detective assigned with the re-investigation of an 'accidental' overdose twenty years ago - of Jack and Maude's drug- and alcohol-addled mother. Cormac is under increasing pressure to charge Maude for murder when his colleague Danny uncovers a piece of evidence that will change everything...This unsettling crime debut draws us deep into the dark heart of Ireland and asks who will protect you when the authorities can't - or won't. Perfect for fans of Tana French and Jane Casey.

The Ruin (Cormac Reilly, #1) Details

TitleThe Ruin (Cormac Reilly, #1)
Author
ReleaseJul 3rd, 2018
PublisherPenguin Books
ISBN-139780143133124
Rating
GenreMystery, Suspense, Cultural, Ireland

The Ruin (Cormac Reilly, #1) Review

  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    Surgical resident Aisling Conroy was happy with her life. Her desire to become a surgeon was within her grasp; her boyfriend Jack Blake was someone she knew she would spend the rest of her life with. The love they shared was deep and real. But after a long night in A&E, breakfast with Jack then waking late that afternoon to find Jack gone - not returning home overnight either - the knock on the door the next morning was a devastating shock. Aisling would not believe what the garda were telli Surgical resident Aisling Conroy was happy with her life. Her desire to become a surgeon was within her grasp; her boyfriend Jack Blake was someone she knew she would spend the rest of her life with. The love they shared was deep and real. But after a long night in A&E, breakfast with Jack then waking late that afternoon to find Jack gone - not returning home overnight either - the knock on the door the next morning was a devastating shock. Aisling would not believe what the garda were telling her...The fog of disbelief she still held at the funeral didn't lift - but when she learned Jack's sister Maude had turned up, she was shocked. Jack hadn't seen his sister in twenty years - their young lives had been terrible, but it wasn't something Jack had spoken about. But Maude was determined to find the answers to Jack's death; the garda weren't interested but she was sure there had been foul play involved.Detective Inspector Cormac Reilly had spent the last month investigating cold cases. Fed up, he jumped at the chance to look into the case he'd caught when he was new to the force, twenty years prior. The first dead person he'd seen - the two frightened young children had stayed in his mind throughout his career.Did the twenty year old case have anything to do with Jack's death? What would Cormac discover? Was there a cover-up? And what would happen with Aisling?The Ruin by Aussie author Dervla McTiernan is an outstanding police procedural set in Galway, Ireland. The first in the Cormac Reilly series, I'm already looking forward to the next (March 2019!) Gritty, filled with tension, twists and fast-paced action, The Ruin is an excellent debut which bodes only good things for this author's writing future IMO!! Highly recommended.With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for my digital ARC to read and review.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Some of my favourite police procedurals have been set in Ireland, and this one is definitely in that category! What makes my heart sing is that it is only the start of a (hopefully long) series, and that the author is already working on a sequel.What could be more intriguing than an old cold case with links to a current crime, especially when it tugs on your heartstrings, with the main characters being young children? I love novels that take you on a journey of discovery, one clue at a time, onl Some of my favourite police procedurals have been set in Ireland, and this one is definitely in that category! What makes my heart sing is that it is only the start of a (hopefully long) series, and that the author is already working on a sequel.What could be more intriguing than an old cold case with links to a current crime, especially when it tugs on your heartstrings, with the main characters being young children? I love novels that take you on a journey of discovery, one clue at a time, only ever knowing as much as the detective that leads the case – it makes the story so much more interesting than those where you already know the answers whilst the police are still completely in the dark. Well, that’s my personal preference anyway, and McTiernan’s book could not have played out any better. I absolutely LOVED DI Cormac Reilly, from his quintessentially Irish name to his approach to the cold case that has landed in his lap whilst trying to find his feet in his new workplace in Galway. Having moved from Dublin to give his partner a chance to pursue her career, Cormac is prepared to take a backward step in his own job. Being “initiated” into his new squad means having to do prove himself, and instead of being assigned fresh murder cases, he is tasked with slogging through file after file of cold cases. Cormac knows that most of these files will not yield any new information, until he is asked to look into a case he is very familiar with. Twenty years ago, as a young rookie, Cormac was called to the dilapidated farmhouse of a young mother, dead from a heroin overdose, leaving behind two young neglected children destined for foster care. One of these children, now a young man, has died a few days ago under suspicious circumstances. Could his death be linked to something that was overlooked all those years ago? Cormac makes the perfect protagonist to take us on a journey into some of Ireland’s darkest history. He is so “normal”! This is not a troubled, lonely soul drowning his sorrows in alcohol after a spade of failed marriages. Neither is he a rebel who is out to defy authority and flaunt all rules to get his cases solved. This is just a straight-forward, honest bloke who loves his job, but is selfless enough to take a backward step in his career to give his partner a chance to fulfil her dreams. He doesn’t even get snarky with all those office politics that would provoke a reaction in most other protagonists. I really liked him. That brings me to character development, and the simple joy of reading a book where each and every character is believable, and there are plenty of people to root for. I soon felt deeply invested in the storyline, and Jack and Maud’s story broke my heart. McTiernan has a knack of offering glimpses into the very hearts of her characters, until they feel so real that you think you have known them all your life. With a somewhat bleak setting, the author evokes an atmosphere of mystery and impending doom that haunts every page and lends the story an air of suspense that had me frantically turn the pages to get answers. Slowly, all the clues lay the foundation for a gripping finale and a fitting denouement to this riveting mystery. The Ruin is a brilliant debut from an exciting new voice in crime fiction that will appeal to readers looking for a new gripping crime series with an interesting main protagonist. With its Irish setting it reminded me of Tana French’s Dublin Murder Squad series, but McTiernan has her own very unique writing style that drew me in immediately and didn’t let go. I can’t wait to revisit this cast of enigmatic characters in her next book! Very highly recommended.Thank you to Netgalley and HarperCollins Australia for the free electronic copy of this novel and for giving me the opportunity to provide an honest review. *blog* *facebook* *instagram*
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  • Nadia King
    January 1, 1970
    The Ruin is a stunning debut from Perth author, Dervla McTiernan (McTiernan moved to Perth from Ireland but we’re claiming her as our own).Crime fiction is a relatively new reading genre for me but it’s one I find myself increasingly drawn to. The Ruin has all the hallmarks of a seasoned and talented crime writer. The complex story set in Ireland is told clearly with atmospheric writing and had me hooked from the outset.McTiernan has empathy for the broken and twisted and cracks a compelling, ch The Ruin is a stunning debut from Perth author, Dervla McTiernan (McTiernan moved to Perth from Ireland but we’re claiming her as our own).Crime fiction is a relatively new reading genre for me but it’s one I find myself increasingly drawn to. The Ruin has all the hallmarks of a seasoned and talented crime writer. The complex story set in Ireland is told clearly with atmospheric writing and had me hooked from the outset.McTiernan has empathy for the broken and twisted and cracks a compelling, chilling, and oh so real, storyline. DS Reilly is a detective determined to stay true to his own high standards of policing, but when he transfers to Galway he finds he has stumbled upon dark secrets and a haunting cold case from his early days as a detective.The Ruin is unexpected–it tackles the dark history of modern Ireland and delivers a powerful and chilling tale skilfully executed by McTiernan. It’s hard to believe The Ruin is her first book.Warning: this book will completely engross you and you may not suffer interruptions lightly!Many thanks to Harper Collins Australia for this review copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Little, Brown Book Group UK for an advance copy of The Ruin, a police procedural set in Galway.DS Cormac Reilly has recently taken a step down from the elite squad in Dublin he worked for to follow his partner to Galway. His welcome to Galway is less than warm and he is stuck with the coldest of cold cases despite his experience and ability. This does not change with the questionable suicide of Jack Blake, a man Cormac knew as a 5 year old when he discovered, I would like to thank Netgalley and Little, Brown Book Group UK for an advance copy of The Ruin, a police procedural set in Galway.DS Cormac Reilly has recently taken a step down from the elite squad in Dublin he worked for to follow his partner to Galway. His welcome to Galway is less than warm and he is stuck with the coldest of cold cases despite his experience and ability. This does not change with the questionable suicide of Jack Blake, a man Cormac knew as a 5 year old when he discovered, as a rookie in 1993, his dead mother, Hilaria. In fact Cormac is asked to re-investigate Hilaria's death from a heroin overdose. He can't understand the politics swirling around both these cases and the station.I thoroughly enjoyed The Ruin which is an excellent procedural with the requisite twists and turns, an honourable protagonist, tension and some heartbreaking history. Mostly told from Cormac's point of view it also has scenes from Jack's fiancée Aisling and his sister Maude's points of view. I'm not a big fan of the multiple point of view approach but it works extremely well here, rounding out the reader's knowledge and giving a fuller picture than Cormac alone can. I was mostly glued to the pages wondering what would come next although there is a slight sag in the middle which seems a bit repetitive and doesn't really push the plot forward, hence the 4.5 rather than 5* rating. Apart from this dip the novel is well paced and tense, especially in the second half, with the reveals coming at regular intervals.Cormac Reilly is a great protagonist. He is smart, dogged, moral and very likeable but very much the outsider in Galway. I found it difficult at first to understand what he is doing in Galway and why his reception is so poor but the politics soon become apparent although his relationship with his girlfriend, Emma, remains ill defined throughout the novel. I also like the portrait Ms McTiernan paints of Ireland where the present day seems inextricably linked to the Church and the past. She takes a matter of fact, it is what it is approach and it works really well.The Ruin is a great read which I have no hesitation in recommending. 4.5*
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  • Hollis
    January 1, 1970
    THE RUIN was the kind of series opener that has you wanting more. And from a debut author no less! McTiernan was slow to reveal the twisted, complicated, threads of her mystery, and how many events and people were connected and caught up, but when it was all finally laid out.. wow. It was good. That being said, this didn't feel like a series opener. Much of our main character, Cormac Reilly, and his girlfriend's story, is only hinted at. I imagine we'll learn as the series progresses but it did THE RUIN was the kind of series opener that has you wanting more. And from a debut author no less! McTiernan was slow to reveal the twisted, complicated, threads of her mystery, and how many events and people were connected and caught up, but when it was all finally laid out.. wow. It was good. That being said, this didn't feel like a series opener. Much of our main character, Cormac Reilly, and his girlfriend's story, is only hinted at. I imagine we'll learn as the series progresses but it did feel a little like having accidentally missed a book or prequel installment. I didn't particularly like the detective as a character -- maybe because we don't get to know him, or her, very well at all -- but I liked his convictions, appreciated his confusion, and respected his commitment to the case. And it was especially fascinating to have his introduction to the events of the book tie back to his first case.I'm definitely looking forward to more of this author, her bleak and rainy Irish setting, and more from the Galway taskforce in the wake of the events of THE RUIN. ** I received an ARC from Edelweiss and the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. **
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  • Jeannette
    January 1, 1970
    Book blurb...Cormac Reilly is about to reopen the case that took him twenty years to forget ... The stunning debut novel from your new favourite crime writer. 'The Ruin is a terrific debut and a rare gem :a compelling crime thriller that delivers depth as well as twists, with everypage clearly written from the heart' Sara Foster, author of The Hidden Hours. Responding to a call that took him to a decrepit country house, young Garda Cormac Reilly found two silent, neglected children - fifteen-yea Book blurb...Cormac Reilly is about to reopen the case that took him twenty years to forget ... The stunning debut novel from your new favourite crime writer. 'The Ruin is a terrific debut and a rare gem :a compelling crime thriller that delivers depth as well as twists, with everypage clearly written from the heart' Sara Foster, author of The Hidden Hours. Responding to a call that took him to a decrepit country house, young Garda Cormac Reilly found two silent, neglected children - fifteen-year-old Maude and five-year-old Jack. Their mother lay dead upstairs. Since then Cormac's had twenty high-flying years working as a detective in Dublin, and he's come back to Galway for reasons of his own. As he struggles to navigate the politics of a new police station, Maude and Jack return to haunt him. What ties a recent suicide to that death from so long ago? And who among his new colleagues can Cormac really trust?This unsettling crime debut draws us deep into the dark heart of Ireland and asks who will protect you when the authorities can't - or won't. Perfect for fans of Tana French and Jane Harper.My thoughts…Wow! I have the utmost respect this author. What a mind! What an imagination! She has written a riveting plot that is so deep and with multiple points of view, with differing versions of the truth, that as a reader I was totally hooked from the start. Every page has something to keep me in my seat and reading until one of the most powerful final scenes I've read in this genre in a very long time.There is so much going on in this novel. I read everywhere, every chance I got, desperate to solve the mysteries, both present and past.The author's note says she became attached to the main characters. It's a true indicator of the story telling skill of this author that she transferred that attachment to me.I loved The Ruin. A TOP READ and surely an award winner in 2018. This review is also published on http://www.readroundoz.wordpress.com
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  • Sara Pearson
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous thrilling book - was gripped from the first page. Dervla McTiernan has created intriguing characters and is able to transport you to Galway instantly ! A must read in 2018. Can’t wait to see what is next for DetectiveCormac Reilly.
  • Keith Currie
    January 1, 1970
    Dervla McTiernan’s first novel is an accomplished police procedural set in the west of Ireland town of Galway. It is an atmospheric and moving piece of writing with an assured plot and a range of well-drawn characters, both the sympathetic and the odious.As a young policeman Cormac Reilly was the first on the scene at a ramshackle mansion where he encounters two neglected and abused children and their mother, lying dead in her bed. Twenty years later events of that night come back to haunt Reill Dervla McTiernan’s first novel is an accomplished police procedural set in the west of Ireland town of Galway. It is an atmospheric and moving piece of writing with an assured plot and a range of well-drawn characters, both the sympathetic and the odious.As a young policeman Cormac Reilly was the first on the scene at a ramshackle mansion where he encounters two neglected and abused children and their mother, lying dead in her bed. Twenty years later events of that night come back to haunt Reilly, now a successful detective. An apparent suicide, a missing young woman, child abuse and police corruption all combine to draw in a wide range of suspects and participants. There are many twists and turns in the story: Cormac finds it hard to know who to trust among his police colleagues and among the various other participants in the drama. If the novel has a fault, it is that the guilty party becomes obvious too early, although the motivation remains a mystery until the end.This was a very entertaining read and I would recommend it to lovers of crime fiction.
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  • Leah (Jane Speare)
    January 1, 1970
    In the ever-drizzling city of Galway, Ireland, two murders take place twenty years apart. The police are acting strangely and the survivors are demanding action. Are they even working on the same side? I was told this book is for fans of Tana French, a description I first raised my eyebrow at in disbelief, but it became clear from the first chapter there was never a more accurate statement. McTiernan is able to convey intense emotion in a concise manner, letting you put the pieces together witho In the ever-drizzling city of Galway, Ireland, two murders take place twenty years apart. The police are acting strangely and the survivors are demanding action. Are they even working on the same side? I was told this book is for fans of Tana French, a description I first raised my eyebrow at in disbelief, but it became clear from the first chapter there was never a more accurate statement. McTiernan is able to convey intense emotion in a concise manner, letting you put the pieces together without ever spelling it out directly. This creates an escalating pace and an intimate relationship between the reader and characters. The story is oppressive, gloomy, yet endearing. It is the cozy cup of tea by the fire, as well as the storm raging outside. I cannot wait for more Detective Cormac Reilly books.
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  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    The first in a new series by a new Australian author, I will definitely be looking out for her next book. This was very different, set in Ireland, the story starts 20 years beforehand where new officer Comac Reilly finds two neglected children in a house with their dead mother. Ffast forward to the present day when DI Cormac Reilly is now investigating cold cases. A suicide of a young man and the reemergence of his long lost sister become somehow linked with Cormac and his case. I did get confus The first in a new series by a new Australian author, I will definitely be looking out for her next book. This was very different, set in Ireland, the story starts 20 years beforehand where new officer Comac Reilly finds two neglected children in a house with their dead mother. Ffast forward to the present day when DI Cormac Reilly is now investigating cold cases. A suicide of a young man and the reemergence of his long lost sister become somehow linked with Cormac and his case. I did get confused at times with the different characters, especially as one minute they were introduced by the first name, then being called by their surname, it took a bit to figure out who was who, but overall a good crime mystery with some interesting twists.Thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Books for a copy in return for an honest review
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    It started a little bit slow but about halfway through things really started moving, there are a lot of characters and investigations that are linked leading to the final conclusion, I did figure out who the culprit was but got the motive all wrong. I highly recommend this for crime fiction fans and will definitely keep an eye out for the next instalment!
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  • Libby Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely the best book I have read. This will be the book to read for 2018. The character development is fabulous you really feel like you know each character personally. You just don’t want the book to end. Looking forward to the next one.
  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    I'm really impressed by the quality of the writing and sense of atmosphere throughout this book. Cormac is the perfect gritty Irish detective and I thoroughly enjoyed him and all the characters in this page turner.
  • Tim Armstrong
    January 1, 1970
    Dervla McTiernan is a new writer, and a new star!!Not sure if this has been published anywhere in the world yet, but make sure you hunt it down when it's published in 2018, I hear. It's a first class thriller set in Galway, Ireland and I look forward to meeting Cormac Reilly again.
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  • Jillian Doherty
    January 1, 1970
    Tana French's setting and style, meets Paula Hawkins charactor immersion and equally thrilling suspense. A fast and complex story that keeps you hooked through every twist and time changing turn. It's a race to solve numerous murders, amongst all the players - you just don't know how they connect until the very end.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing debut this is from an Irish author living in Perth. The first in a series featuring Cormac Reilly a detective based in Galway. Reilly has moved to Galway from Dublin with his partner. He soon becomes involved in a case he first had dealings with 20 years before when, as a new recruit, he was called out to a death of a young mother. The two children he saw then, Maude and Jack, have haunted him since so when Jack commits suicide and Maude thinks the death is suspicious, Cormac sta What an amazing debut this is from an Irish author living in Perth. The first in a series featuring Cormac Reilly a detective based in Galway. Reilly has moved to Galway from Dublin with his partner. He soon becomes involved in a case he first had dealings with 20 years before when, as a new recruit, he was called out to a death of a young mother. The two children he saw then, Maude and Jack, have haunted him since so when Jack commits suicide and Maude thinks the death is suspicious, Cormac starts delving into their lives. There are many threads to this book and lots of interesting characters. Looking forward to the next instalment due 2018.
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  • Alisha Ophelia
    January 1, 1970
    Easy to read and a gripping story. Hopefully we get to learn more about Cormac & Emma in the next book...
  • Genevieve Gannon
    January 1, 1970
    This stunning crime debut will be one of the top books of 2018. Gripping and original. Masterfully told.
  • Chris Saliba
    January 1, 1970
    Dervla McTiernan's debut tackles dark aspects of Ireland's recent history in a page-turning crime thriller. Ireland, 1993. Young cop Cormac Reilly has been called out to a house in Kilmore, a “blink-and-you-miss it kind of village”. A young mother has died of a heroin overdose and her two children, Maude, a fifteen-year-old and Jack, a five-year-old, are waiting. The older sister, Maude, is quite self-assured considering all that has happened. Her younger brother, Jack, has been hurt and require Dervla​ ​McTiernan's​ ​debut​ ​tackles​ ​dark​ ​aspects​ ​of​ ​Ireland's​ ​recent​ ​history​ ​in​ ​a page-turning​ ​crime​ ​thriller. Ireland, 1993. Young cop Cormac Reilly has been called out to a house in Kilmore, a “blink-and-you-miss it kind of village”. A young mother has died of a heroin overdose and her two children, Maude, a fifteen-year-old and Jack, a five-year-old, are waiting. The older sister, Maude, is quite self-assured considering all that has happened. Her younger brother, Jack, has been hurt and requires medical attention. She directs Reilly to take them to the hospital. That night, as Jack is being attended to, Maude disappears. She is labelled and runaway and Reilly soon forgets about this sad but not unusual case.Twenty years later Jack is living with his girlfriend, Aisling, a professional woman who is training to be a surgeon. After the couple have a heated discussion Jack goes for a walk, but doesn't return. The police are soon involved, but Jack's sister, Maude, think they aren't doing a proper job. She has suddenly reappeared in Ireland after spending the best part of twenty years living in Australia. Confident and forthright, she practically takes over the investigation herself.Into this drama enters Cormac Reilly. He have given up his high profile detective job in Dublin for personal reasons and has returned to a lesser role in Galway. At the Mill Street Garda Station where Reilly has been assigned (garda is Irish for police, or guard) there is a thicket of workplace politics. Reilly's new colleagues seem to be pushing their own agendas and not everyone can be trusted. As incompetent and corrupt officers deal with the disappearance of Jack Blake, Reilly hovers on the periphery of the investigation, slowly being drawn further and further in, until he finds himself at the centre of an explosive murder plot.It's hard to believe that this is Dervla McTiernan's first novel, it's so accomplished (McTiernan moved from Ireland to Western Australia after the global financial crisis.) The characters, dialogue and settings are all compellingly believable. The plot has a wonderful richness and complexity that is backed up by nuanced psychological portraits of its key characters. This is a gripping page-turner that is greatly enchanced by its authentic sense of place and people. McTiernan creates a gloomy, moody atmosphere of moral decay as she tackles dark aspects of Ireland's recent history, most notably the consequences of its dire poverty and the sins of the church. This heady mixture of Irish social history and noir thriller makes The Ruin a winner in every sense. Sure to please crime aficionados, and even those (like this reader) who aren't.
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  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    This was a slow burner of a book that gradually enthralled me with its cast of characters and several investigations that are somehow linked. The Irish setting added to the appeal of the book and the descriptions were very evocative.The main protagonist is Garda Cormac Reilly who has moved from Dublin to Galway to fall in with his girfriend’s career plan. He is asked to investigate a number of cold cases whilst he is settling in but feels there is a rather strange atmosphere at his new police st This was a slow burner of a book that gradually enthralled me with its cast of characters and several investigations that are somehow linked. The Irish setting added to the appeal of the book and the descriptions were very evocative.The main protagonist is Garda Cormac Reilly who has moved from Dublin to Galway to fall in with his girfriend’s career plan. He is asked to investigate a number of cold cases whilst he is settling in but feels there is a rather strange atmosphere at his new police station.The story also focuses on Aisling a young doctor who has just heard some distressing news and is trying to come to terms with it.Cormac is then asked to look into a 20 year old case to which he is connected as he was the original investigating officer; he was new to the job and called out to what he perceived at the time as a domestic dispute and finding 15 year old Maude and 5 year old Jack, victims of child abuse home alone with a dead alcoholic mother, young Cormac takes them to the hospital but Maude subsequently disappears. This case has always stayed with him as he felt he never got the full story.20 years on and Cormac is asked to look at the case again but how is it linked to Aisling’s tragedy? There are many connections in this sad and at times heartbreaking story. The reader feels for young Maude and Jack and wants to get to the bottom of what really happened to them. Cormac is an interesting character and he obviously has a back story which is hinted at and which I’m sure will come out in future books as this novel has the feel of a series.The descriptions of Ireland and the small town community Cormac is serving had the feel of authenticity. This is a great debut novel, part mystery and part family story. It examines the ties that bind siblings and the lengths that some will go to protect or destroy their families. It will appeal to readers who enjoy literary thrillers . It reminded me a bit of Jane Harper’s The Dry but with an Irish setting as it examined some similar dark themes.Thanks to NetGalley and the publishers for my arc in exchange for an honest review. Highly recommended and suggest you look out for it when it is published in March.
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  • Jo-Ann Duff (Duffy The Writer)
    January 1, 1970
    For a debut novel, this one is a cracker. The opening chapter is unsettling and gripping as these two sad, neglected children are discovered by young Garda Cormac Reilly. That scene stays with you right through the next 370 pages as we skip forward twenty years and Detective Sergeant Cormac Reilly is forced to look back on a case that has haunted him.The writing is so detailed. You feel the clawing heat in tiny kitchens, the smell of fried pub food and the cluttered, tired houses of characters w For a debut novel, this one is a cracker. The opening chapter is unsettling and gripping as these two sad, neglected children are discovered by young Garda Cormac Reilly. That scene stays with you right through the next 370 pages as we skip forward twenty years and Detective Sergeant Cormac Reilly is forced to look back on a case that has haunted him.The writing is so detailed. You feel the clawing heat in tiny kitchens, the smell of fried pub food and the cluttered, tired houses of characters who appear to lead you one way, and the then another. I had no idea what really happened in that house until the reveals came, and I burned through The Ruin to get there. I won't leave spoilers here, but one of the minor characters in this book is actually one of the most clever and the thought of them 'sitting spider-like' in their house will stay with me for a good while.The plot is quite complex, so don't even think about skipping a paragraph, or a chapter to get to the end, you'll end up missing something big. The Ruin will be VERY popular and is a must-read for all lovers of crime fiction. I, for one, can't wait to read the next in the Cormac Reilly series coming in 2019!
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  • Julie Lacey
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book but I was drawn in very quickly and really liked the main character, Cormac Reilly. He’s the new man in town and is finding it hard to connect with fellow Gardas but someone he’s worked with before is there so he sticks with him at first. It soon becomes clear to Cormac that Danny has done something to upset his colleagues but he can’t get to the bottom of what this is. Tasked with going through cold cases Cormac has time to try and work out what’s goi I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book but I was drawn in very quickly and really liked the main character, Cormac Reilly. He’s the new man in town and is finding it hard to connect with fellow Gardas but someone he’s worked with before is there so he sticks with him at first. It soon becomes clear to Cormac that Danny has done something to upset his colleagues but he can’t get to the bottom of what this is. Tasked with going through cold cases Cormac has time to try and work out what’s going on with Danny but then he’s asked to re-open a murder investigation from 20 years ago. Cormac is familiar with this case as he worked on it when he first joined the Garda but soon matters are taken out of his control and he has to find out why. This is a gritty crime thriller which will keep your interest throughout as there’s constant revelations as the story progresses I really enjoyed this book and will read the next one in the series. Thanks to Sphere and NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read this book.
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  • Elisabeth Soane
    January 1, 1970
    Cormac Reilly is the protagonist in this debut novel. Transferring back to Galway where his welcome by fellow officers is decidedly chilly.Tasked with looking at cold cases Cormac finds himself investigating the death of a woman from twenty years ago when he was first on scene. What happened to the siblings he found at the house? With politics and rumours circulating how far will Cormac go to solve the mysteries.I loved this as a first novel and hope that it won’t be the last involving Cormac Re Cormac Reilly is the protagonist in this debut novel. Transferring back to Galway where his welcome by fellow officers is decidedly chilly.Tasked with looking at cold cases Cormac finds himself investigating the death of a woman from twenty years ago when he was first on scene. What happened to the siblings he found at the house? With politics and rumours circulating how far will Cormac go to solve the mysteries.I loved this as a first novel and hope that it won’t be the last involving Cormac Reilly as it’s a foregone conclusion that I would read book 2. I was hooked from page one and liked how the story unfolded. The characters were varied and interesting. I did not see the end coming which I liked as I hate when I guess the ending. Thanks to Net Galley and Little Brown book publishers for an ARC.
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  • Alison Eden
    January 1, 1970
    #TheRuin #NetGalley I do love being able to be in at the beginning of a new detective/crime series, particularly those set in the UK. This one certainly did not disappoint and the added bonus of it being set in Ireland. This was a fabulous start to the new series and really gripped me from page one. I loved the way that the story intertwined with modern day and flash back to when Cormac was a new garda. The characters were really well developed and whilst I guessed early on that Danny was not to #TheRuin #NetGalley I do love being able to be in at the beginning of a new detective/crime series, particularly those set in the UK. This one certainly did not disappoint and the added bonus of it being set in Ireland. This was a fabulous start to the new series and really gripped me from page one. I loved the way that the story intertwined with modern day and flash back to when Cormac was a new garda. The characters were really well developed and whilst I guessed early on that Danny was not to be trusted, I did not see the twists and turns that came with his character. Easy to read with plenty of dialogue which I like. I can't wait to read more of this series and what a brilliant debut from this new author!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    A really good thriller. The story was well paced, starting off steady and progressively building up as it progressed. In some ways there weren’t any surprises in terms of style and characterisation, but it stuck nicely to its genre without being inflexible.The story hinted at many issues that are in the current zeitgeist (child abuse, the church, poor institutional responses to it), but ultimate it boils down to one fatally flawed person who is the architect of their design, notwithstanding thei A really good thriller. The story was well paced, starting off steady and progressively building up as it progressed. In some ways there weren’t any surprises in terms of style and characterisation, but it stuck nicely to its genre without being inflexible.The story hinted at many issues that are in the current zeitgeist (child abuse, the church, poor institutional responses to it), but ultimate it boils down to one fatally flawed person who is the architect of their design, notwithstanding their tragic childhood.I’m very interested to see where Sgt Cormac Reilly goes in the next instalment.
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  • Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    I know that this book will stay with me for a long time to come. Dervla McTiernan's Irish locales and locals are dynamic, gritty and real. Having become a sort of Irish crime buff, I am thrilled to have read an ARC of this novel. Cormac is the consummate detective, and his exploits in this novel are exciting to read about. This is a pitch-perfect Irish crime novel, and I know that those in the community will love this debut. I hate to compare authors, but those who are fans of Tana French and De I know that this book will stay with me for a long time to come. Dervla McTiernan's Irish locales and locals are dynamic, gritty and real. Having become a sort of Irish crime buff, I am thrilled to have read an ARC of this novel. Cormac is the consummate detective, and his exploits in this novel are exciting to read about. This is a pitch-perfect Irish crime novel, and I know that those in the community will love this debut. I hate to compare authors, but those who are fans of Tana French and Declan Hughes will appreciate this addition to the canon.I received this novel through Edelweiss, from Penguin Publishing Group, in exchange for an honest review. #TheRuin #IrishCrimeFiction
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  • Ned Frederick
    January 1, 1970
    The Rùin is a grand example of Irish noir. Dervla McTiernan's prose can be pedestrian and her descriptions of Galway and surrounds a bit flat, but, and this is a BIG BUT, her knack for weaving a multi-treaded thriller is second to none. Not the deepest of characters mind you, but engaging and serviceable to a plot that pulls you along at a steady pace. The very Irish rhythms of speech and expression and the repartee give The Ruin an authentic feel and allow splashes of sunshine into this otherwi The Rùin is a grand example of Irish noir. Dervla McTiernan's prose can be pedestrian and her descriptions of Galway and surrounds a bit flat, but, and this is a BIG BUT, her knack for weaving a multi-treaded thriller is second to none. Not the deepest of characters mind you, but engaging and serviceable to a plot that pulls you along at a steady pace. The very Irish rhythms of speech and expression and the repartee give The Ruin an authentic feel and allow splashes of sunshine into this otherwise gloomy tale. Comparisons with Tana French abound, but I would just say, not yet. Let’s see what she puts Cormac Reilly up against in the next one.
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  • Malvina
    January 1, 1970
    Senior Detective Cormac Reilly is given a cold case he was originally involved with twenty years ago as a rookie garda: the old, unsolved death of a mother and her two neglected, abused children. One of those children, now adult, is an alleged suicide in Galway, Ireland. Freshly back in Galway from Dublin, Cormac begins to unravel the cold case and stumbles on an ominously bigger picture involving paedophilia, murder, drugs, and police corruption. Slowly the awful puzzle begins to fit together; Senior Detective Cormac Reilly is given a cold case he was originally involved with twenty years ago as a rookie garda: the old, unsolved death of a mother and her two neglected, abused children. One of those children, now adult, is an alleged suicide in Galway, Ireland. Freshly back in Galway from Dublin, Cormac begins to unravel the cold case and stumbles on an ominously bigger picture involving paedophilia, murder, drugs, and police corruption. Slowly the awful puzzle begins to fit together; it's life and death high stakes. This is a gripping Irish police procedural, happily the first of a series featuring Cormac Reilly. Terrific read.
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  • Kevin Shinners
    January 1, 1970
    I don't normally leave book reviews, but in this case I had to make an exception. From the gripping opening chapter all the way to the unexpected end (without giving anything away), I was totally immersed into this complex, thought provoking thriller which reads like a movie! Rich, deep language and characters portray a complex storyline that is often lacking in crime novels and create a real page turner.This was a fantastic, engrossing read from a first time author and I am really hoping that D I don't normally leave book reviews, but in this case I had to make an exception. From the gripping opening chapter all the way to the unexpected end (without giving anything away), I was totally immersed into this complex, thought provoking thriller which reads like a movie! Rich, deep language and characters portray a complex storyline that is often lacking in crime novels and create a real page turner.This was a fantastic, engrossing read from a first time author and I am really hoping that Dervla McTiernan has a few more like this up her sleeve.
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  • Tim Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely loved 'The Ruin.' A very well written crime mystery set over a number of years but so gripping. The way that the characters are entwined, the twists and turns make you just want to keep reading late into the night (and early morning). Up against opposition at every turn the main detective investigates on a new level we haven't seen before. Unbeknown to him he has been involved with this case from the very beginning of his career. A fantastic first novel, totally unique. Can't wait for Absolutely loved 'The Ruin.' A very well written crime mystery set over a number of years but so gripping. The way that the characters are entwined, the twists and turns make you just want to keep reading late into the night (and early morning). Up against opposition at every turn the main detective investigates on a new level we haven't seen before. Unbeknown to him he has been involved with this case from the very beginning of his career. A fantastic first novel, totally unique. Can't wait for the next book in the series.Jacqui Dymocks Subiaco
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