A Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them Pronouns
Archie, a snarky genderqueer artist, is tired of people not understanding gender neutral pronouns. Tristan, a cisgender dude, is looking for an easy way to introduce gender neutral pronouns to his increasingly diverse workplace. The longtime best friends team up in this short and fun comic guide that explains what pronouns are, why they matter, and how to use them. They also include what to do if you make a mistake, and some tips-and-tricks for those who identify outside of the binary to keep themselves safe in this binary-centric world. A quick and easy resource for people who use they/them pronouns, and people who want to learn more! 

A Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them Pronouns Details

TitleA Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them Pronouns
Author
ReleaseJun 12th, 2018
PublisherLimerence Press
ISBN-139781620104996
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, Lgbt, Comics, Glbt, Queer

A Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them Pronouns Review

  • PattyMacDotComma
    January 1, 1970
    3.5★ “He/She went to the store. = They went to the store.It belongs to him/her. = It belongs to them.He said so himself. = They said so themself/themselves.She said so herself. = They said so themself/themselves.”This handy little graphic production can help us with language. At the moment it's a 5-star idea whose time has certainly come, but it's maybe a 3-star execution, so I'm splitting the difference. Genderqueer, genderfluid, non-binary, whatever label is used it means that an individual do 3.5★ “He/She went to the store. = They went to the store.It belongs to him/her. = It belongs to them.He said so himself. = They said so themself/themselves.She said so herself. = They said so themself/themselves.”This handy little graphic production can help us with language. At the moment it's a 5-star idea whose time has certainly come, but it's maybe a 3-star execution, so I'm splitting the difference. Genderqueer, genderfluid, non-binary, whatever label is used it means that an individual does not identify as male or female, no matter what they might have been born as. See there, what I did? I did what we often do as shorthand when we don’t want to keep saying “he or she”. . . avoiding saying: no matter what he or she might have been born as.It’s actually accepted practice in speech and becoming accepted in less than formal writing to use “they” as a singular, and it goes back to at least the 15th century and Shakespeare, in case you were wondering. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/gra...Okay, that part is pretty easy. It gets harder when you’re referring to a specific person who either chooses to be identified using gender-neutral pronouns (and they may let you know that when they are introduced – or not), or it’s a person whose gender you can’t identify by the usual visual clues. The book says if a person named Robert asks to be addressed as Bob, you probably do as you’re asked. The book suggests people will begin letting each other know when they prefer “they” or whatever. As I’m writing this, there’s a medical program on TV, and a person with a crewcut, dressed in navy scrubs, is speaking to the camera. I have the sound off, and when I glanced up, I wondered if the person was male or female. I couldn’t tell. When the captions came up, the person was identified as “Jen”, so I assume they’re female, but had the name been Sam or Kim or any number of foreign names that are unfamiliar to me, I couldn’t assume anything.So I might ask someone watching with me “Do you think they’re a man or a woman?” I might say “that person talking”, but I certainly wouldn’t say “it”.This little handbook has rough cartoons and tries hard to be light-hearted and funny about what is a pretty serious subject. Being “mis-gendered” is embarrassing, just as it’s embarrassing if you ask a woman with a pot-belly when the baby’s due. It happens! We assume a lot from appearances! People used to make fun of people who shaved their heads, but these days it could be anything from a fashion statement to the results of cancer treatment, and most of us are pretty careful not to assume anything.When I was about 12, I was on horseback high above the guys driving by me on the track who stopped to look up and ask directions. I had a duck-tail (or a DA, so-called in those days) and was in jeans and cowboy boots, so after I answered their question, one of them said “Thank you, sir or madam, as the case may be.” I said “It happens to be madam” and laughed, fancying myself a bit of a “cowboy” anyway. I thought it was funny, but if I’d been a boy, I probably would have been devastated! That’s a personal case of being mis-gendered. (These days, in Australia, they would just have said “Thanks, mate” and left it at that, since that’s handy for anyone.There are other made-up words that are accepted use instead of they/their, such as Ze, Ne, Xe, and there’s plenty of information on the internet you can google. Here’s one blog. https://genderneutralpronoun.wordpres...You may not know if there are people in your workplace, school, or community who would prefer gender-neutral pronouns, but this is happening, whether or not you’re ready for it. It’s not the same as the royal “we” or “one”, although that could occasionally be useful.It’s easy when addressing groups to say “folks” or “people” or “delegates” instead of “ladies and gentleman". And use “students” or “kids” instead of “boys and girls”. If you’re identifying someone in a crowd, you can say “the person in the blue shirt” instead of “the woman in the blue shirt”.See? But it gets awkward (to me) when you use the example they gave:”Archie spent all their money on candy. “Archie is eating so much candy that they are sick. Archie has learned nothing and they will continue to eat too much candy. What’s wrong with them?”In the first sentence, I might think Archie has spent more than just Archie’s money. It’s a bit ambiguous. I think I could learn to adapt if I were really unsure as to the gender of the person, like the one I just saw on TV. In that case, I’m pretty sure I’d say “That looks like a really easy hairstyle. I bet they don't have to spend any time getting ready for work."But if I were convinced they were a male or a female, I’m sure I’d slip and lapse into “he” or “she”.Food for thought. There are a few inaccuracies in the book at the moment, but I’m hoping they will be corrected. Thanks to NetGalley and Limerence Press for the preview copy.
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  • ⚔ Silvia ⚓
    January 1, 1970
    I was sent this book as an advanced copy by the publisher via NetGalley for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. I picked this up from the Read Now shelf on netgalley hoping to find something informative that I could recommend others, and that's exactly what this was. I knew almost everything that was in this short comic, but I still learned some new stuff. Since English isn't my first language, I found the quick guides on how to use gender-neutral language pretty useful because som I was sent this book as an advanced copy by the publisher via NetGalley for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. I picked this up from the Read Now shelf on netgalley hoping to find something informative that I could recommend others, and that's exactly what this was. I knew almost everything that was in this short comic, but I still learned some new stuff. Since English isn't my first language, I found the quick guides on how to use gender-neutral language pretty useful because sometimes I'm not sure what terms are gendered and which aren't or how to substitute a gendered noun etc.Throughout the book I was also trying to put myself in the shoes of someone who's completely new to the concept of non-binary people and read it through their eyes. I think the authors did a great job at summarizing both the technicalities of gender-neutral language and the effects that misgendering may have on genderqueer people. Everything was backed up by useful, everyday examples.The first part of the comic is directed at cis people who want to learn about gender-neutral language (especially using they/them when talking to/about someone who uses these pronouns) and want to support their enby friends. The second part is directed at non-binary people themselves, with advice on what to do in different situations. I feel weird judging a book like this because I don't think it's really my place, but I definitely recommend reading it if you're new to these concepts and also if you're cis and an ally but still want a reminder of what to do and not to do. It's also something great to buy (once it comes out as a physical copy) and leave at your workplace (like suggested in the book itself) or anywhere you might want to implement gender-neutral language to help your non-binary colleagues/friends feel included.
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  • Heather K (dentist in my spare time)
    January 1, 1970
    A fun, easy introduction to they/them pronouns with some pretty awesome graphics to boot.I'm no novice when it comes to trans issues, but I'll admit that I know much less about people who identify as genderqueer. I knew a person who identified as genderqueer when I was in college, but has since adapted she/her pronouns, so my first-hand knowledge of someone who is genderfluid or genderqueer is extremely limited. However, I'm always up to learn and grow as a person in this crazy world we live in, A fun, easy introduction to they/them pronouns with some pretty awesome graphics to boot.I'm no novice when it comes to trans issues, but I'll admit that I know much less about people who identify as genderqueer. I knew a person who identified as genderqueer when I was in college, but has since adapted she/her pronouns, so my first-hand knowledge of someone who is genderfluid or genderqueer is extremely limited. However, I'm always up to learn and grow as a person in this crazy world we live in, and understanding different people and different perspectives in a big part of that journey. My favorite part of this little book was the really skilled artistry of the comics. They were fun with informative with witty dialogue, and it easily kept me reading and engaged. I learned a number of things as well, and any take-away from a book like this one is meaningful. I like that this book furthers the dialogue between cis people and their trans/genderqueer acquaintances and friends, and I think it would be a good starter book for someone who wants to learn the basics of gender-neutral pronouns. *Copy provided in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Isaiah
    January 1, 1970
    I got an ARC copy of this book.Gender is my thing. Sexuality is my thing too. They both hold a very dear place in my heart. As soon as I saw the name of this book I pounced. There was no way I was passing up on this book. The cover was cutesy and it was something I might want to take lessons from for the class I teach. The book talks about pronouns. There is some technical talk, which one of the characters is really bored through. Then they start to break it down into real people talk. There is I got an ARC copy of this book.Gender is my thing. Sexuality is my thing too. They both hold a very dear place in my heart. As soon as I saw the name of this book I pounced. There was no way I was passing up on this book. The cover was cutesy and it was something I might want to take lessons from for the class I teach. The book talks about pronouns. There is some technical talk, which one of the characters is really bored through. Then they start to break it down into real people talk. There is discussion on how to use a pronoun, when to use pronouns, and why it matters. This book covers a ton and I learned a lot about language from it. If you already use gender neutral pronouns for someone you love or even yourself, then this book is just reaffirming things you understand. If you don't, it is a great introduction. There was purposeful misgendering of Archie to prove a point. That point is how damaging misgendering can be for someone. There is even talk about how it is ok to feel angry, cut people out of your life, and that sometimes people love you but will never get it. It was a wonderful section and that section is so important for queer people to read. Family is not blood for a lot of queer people. Family are the people who love you and the people on your side. This book validates that experience and allows someone to see just how hard pronouns can be on someone when you get them wrong. It was just so well done. The book is not just a book for beginners. If you already know your stuff, this book is still interesting. The art is cutesy and I adored it. Then there were some really funny sections like Tristan giving a new meaning to YOLO and his hat that made his life easier because it was a hat of ignorance. LOVELY. I was snorting. This book could have been super dry and dusty, something no one but supreme nerds (like me) would have read. Instead it was really approachable and helpful.To see more reviews check out https://mibookreviews.wordpress.com/ 
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  • Madalyn (Novel Ink)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great little intro guide to using they/them pronouns! It’s targeted toward both people who use they/them pronouns as well as their friends/family/coworkers/acquaintances/etc.
  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    edit 18.06.15: I thought more about this book and realised that maybe 5 stars is too high, so I'm changing my review to 4. I still think it's a good start to learn about nonbinary pronouns for someone who doesn't know anything, though, and I think that's kind of the aim of it.I received a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.(Note: I am a nonbinary person who uses she/her and e/em pronouns.)This was truly a quick, easy and useful read, just as the title promises. "A Quick edit 18.06.15: I thought more about this book and realised that maybe 5 stars is too high, so I'm changing my review to 4. I still think it's a good start to learn about nonbinary pronouns for someone who doesn't know anything, though, and I think that's kind of the aim of it.I received a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.(Note: I am a nonbinary person who uses she/her and e/em pronouns.)This was truly a quick, easy and useful read, just as the title promises. "A Quick and Easy Guide" is a basic introduction to nonbinary people and gender-neutral pronouns (specifically they/them pronouns, although the same rules and examples can be applied to any gender-neutral pronouns).The book is written by Archie, a nonbinary person, and Tristan, a cisgender ally, and it can be useful for both allies, and nonbinary people who are figuring themselves out. Other than just explaining how to use gender-neutral pronouns, it touches on a lot of other topics, like what misgendering feels like, how you can help if your friend gets misgendered, how to act if you accidentally misgender someone, why phrasing such as "preferred pronouns" is not a good idea, etc.The section written for nonbinary people also addresses that while sometimes you might have to compromise or pick your battles, it's not worth holding on to people who consistently misgender and disrespect you. Which can be difficult to accept, especially if it's someone close to you, but trust me, it's true.This is obviously not a complete resource, because it's impossible to talk about every nonbinary experience in so few pages, but for a basic resource, I was surprised by how many things and concerns it included.tldr; This is a good introduction to gender-neutral pronouns for people who are new to the concept - it's a good place to start, and it also encourages further reading.
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  • Nostalgia Reader
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent introduction to gender neutral pronouns--how to use them, how to correct a mistake in using the wrong ones, and how to adapt your language to be more inclusive. By changing a few simple words to a few other simple words, you can not only make your language more inclusive, but also make sure you don't offend anyone by misgendering them. Jimerson introduced neutral language into his business and much of the advice could definitely be used in a training session at a business or any oth An excellent introduction to gender neutral pronouns--how to use them, how to correct a mistake in using the wrong ones, and how to adapt your language to be more inclusive. By changing a few simple words to a few other simple words, you can not only make your language more inclusive, but also make sure you don't offend anyone by misgendering them. Jimerson introduced neutral language into his business and much of the advice could definitely be used in a training session at a business or any other situation where a large group of people are working together. Much of the advice was stuff I had picked up from a variety of sources over the years, but it was nice to see all of that validated and compiled into a short comic like this!Definitely recommended for anyone who wants to be a better ally!Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a free copy to review!(Cross posted on my blog.)
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  • bianca
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley for providing a free copy of this book. Brief, concise and relevant. This book is so important, especially for those who are just finding out about gender-neutral pronouns. The authors tried to keep it simple and quick to read, and they succeeded. I loved the dynamics between the two narrators. It is funny and light-hearted but doesn't neglect the weight nor the significance of the topic at any time. Everyone should read this.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    This was a much needed, amazingly illustrated, perfect book on the use of they/them pronouns. Being a trans person myself, this made me feel good that my feelings and thoughts are similar to others and it just makes me feel so much more valid! This is definitely something I will find myself throwing at people who seriously need it, plus giving to friends and family!Thank you to the authors for making this, it's worth getting and reading!
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  • Paul Decker
    January 1, 1970
    *I received this book as an eARC from Oni Press and Limerence Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*I absolutely love that this is a comic! It's a comic that is made to educate and inform people on gender neutral pronouns, specifically they/them. The format is conversational with a few nice diagrams. This comic covers so many great topics including pronouns in general, misgendering, and gender neutral pronouns. It's told in a fun, and sometimes sarcastic way. The emphasis is on bu *I received this book as an eARC from Oni Press and Limerence Press via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*I absolutely love that this is a comic! It's a comic that is made to educate and inform people on gender neutral pronouns, specifically they/them. The format is conversational with a few nice diagrams. This comic covers so many great topics including pronouns in general, misgendering, and gender neutral pronouns. It's told in a fun, and sometimes sarcastic way. The emphasis is on building empathy."Nothing is as cool as being an empathetic and respectful person."I give this educational comic a 5/5. I HIGHLY recommend this. This comic would be a great gift for friends, family, AND co-workers.
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  • Truuss
    January 1, 1970
    It’s our responsibility as a decent human being to learn and use whatever pronouns they ask us to. A quick educating guide with nice graphic how to use pronouns.
  • Sam E
    January 1, 1970
    Bought two copies of this (one for me and one for my parents) and am so glad I did! As someone who uses they/them pronouns, this zine feels like a godsend to be able to give to people in my life. I found it to be funny, super helpful, and relatable. Thanks so much for making this!!!!!
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  • sofi
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley for providing a free advanced copy of this book!This was a short and witty comic guide that's a great place to start for anyone who doesn't know much about non binary gender identities. It explains everything very simply and with a light sense of humour. But it's also a good read for anyone who identifies outside of the binary, who is questioning, or who just wants to learn more and help build a more inclusive and safer world. Basically, it's for everyone and everyone should Thanks to Netgalley for providing a free advanced copy of this book!This was a short and witty comic guide that's a great place to start for anyone who doesn't know much about non binary gender identities. It explains everything very simply and with a light sense of humour. But it's also a good read for anyone who identifies outside of the binary, who is questioning, or who just wants to learn more and help build a more inclusive and safer world. Basically, it's for everyone and everyone should give it a go. The art was really nice and expressive, the information was put forth in a very precise and helpful way and it was really funny, in a sarcastic and snarky sort of way that I love. The dynamic that the two authors established was really entertaining and it honestly made the book so much more. It's supposed to be the first in a series of "Quick & Easy Guides" that'll go over different aspects of gender and sexuality and I can't wait to read more of these.
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  • Vicky Who Reads
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsEveryone needs to read this. This tiny, 64 page book is not only so important to not being a rude and immoral person, but it's also got cute illustrations & is funny. I do wish it talked more about gender neutral pronouns besides they/them, but this is a really good introduction to the topic. It's such a great guide for both introducing people to they/them pronouns or revisiting the topic on in a way that makes it fun and just a sweet, perfectly-timed-for-pride-month sort of read.I 4.5 starsEveryone needs to read this. This tiny, 64 page book is not only so important to not being a rude and immoral person, but it's also got cute illustrations & is funny. I do wish it talked more about gender neutral pronouns besides they/them, but this is a really good introduction to the topic. It's such a great guide for both introducing people to they/them pronouns or revisiting the topic on in a way that makes it fun and just a sweet, perfectly-timed-for-pride-month sort of read.I think one of the first things I need to start this off with is the illustrations and the book itself. I LOVE LOVE LOVE how it's small, simple, clear, and easy to read. It's also intentionally priced on the lower scale so you can buy multiple copies and share them, if you wanted to.I feel like this one quote from the book really sums it up well:Also, if education fails and folks are just being jerks, you can just throw this book in their face.See?! There's just one more use for it. It's purposely meant to be educational, but fun in a way that even if you are well-informed about they/them (and other gender neutral pronouns), it can still be an entertaining and relatable read. (As in agreeing that some people are assholes.)The illustrations are monochromatic in black, white, and shades of grey, and it is a comic, so it features cartoon sketches of both the authors as they talk and act out examples and circumstances for the reader.Where the half star fell off was just kind of me being picky about the book. I kind of wish the illustrations played a more important role to the text. It felt like you could read this whole book without looking at the pictures, and I wanted a little more interaction between words and graphics.Despite this, I feel like the graphics still added an extra layer to the work, making it fun and a little goofy and good for really emphasizing the point.This book is just so important in general because people need to be respectful about these things. It might not be able to convert the staunchest, stubbornest of people who hate anything that isn't cis het white, but I think it's really good if you wanted to introduce a friend who's not really exposed to these things a lot to just make them a little more "woke."It's undeninable that we should use the proper pronouns for people (anyone who thinks otherwise can unfollow me now; thank you for coming to my TED talk) and this book is a good way to help ensure that more people know about this.I guess I should mention that I found the book to be pretty spot on (if it's important to you to know, one of the authors is #OwnVoices) and it was fun and light and a speedy 30 minute read.The authors did a really good way of rationalizing some of the content for some possibly more stubborn readers, and I think it's really great that they're making this book, even though it's not their job to educate people. (Just like it's not POC's job to educate you about the POC experience).This was a really quick but fun read, even though I'm already aware of they/them pronouns and how to use them. Despite this, the authors introduce a couple of new ways of bringing up things like how to ask someone what their pronoun is, which I feel like I could use in the future. Overall, I definitely recommend you pick this up, whether it's on loan from a friend or ordering your own copy for less than $8.Thank you so much to Margot Wood and Oni Press for sending me an advance reader's copy in exchange for an honest review!Blog | Instagram | Twitter
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  • Aila
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a fun little graphic novel that every reader should take a look at! Seriously, I read through the book in a solid 20 minutes and think it would be beneficial to give to friends and families and strangers. It’s educational, short, sweet, and to the point. Plus, the drawings are absolutely adorable and keep the content stimulating!I also appreciated the authors’ mentioning why they wanted to add the perspective of a cisgendered man (the other author is a non-binary artist) to a guide This was such a fun little graphic novel that every reader should take a look at! Seriously, I read through the book in a solid 20 minutes and think it would be beneficial to give to friends and families and strangers. It’s educational, short, sweet, and to the point. Plus, the drawings are absolutely adorable and keep the content stimulating!I also appreciated the authors’ mentioning why they wanted to add the perspective of a cisgendered man (the other author is a non-binary artist) to a guide on they/them pronouns. I think this perspective will also aid in other cisgendered readers to really GET why they/them pronouns should be used. Like I mentioned before, this adorable graphic novel should be shared with everyone! It’s a really handy tool in this time and age where people don’t bother Googling things because of ignorance and impudence. Of course, a guide does not take into consideration all situations, and this one certainly addresses that (for example, the topic of other alternative pronouns such as e or ze). But it’s perfect to start out with, and hopefully encourage more people to add they/them pronouns to their everyday vocabulary!Thank you Oni Press for the review copy!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This is a quick little book that is pretty much what it says on the tin. For those of you who have never heard of they/them pronouns, this is a quick and easy way to learn about it. For those of you who know about the use of these pronouns, and have used them the right way, you are free to skip this lesson. But for those of you know who not only don't know, but don't know why they should know, this is a great book to start with.The book is co-written by a Cis man, and a transgender gender fluid This is a quick little book that is pretty much what it says on the tin. For those of you who have never heard of they/them pronouns, this is a quick and easy way to learn about it. For those of you who know about the use of these pronouns, and have used them the right way, you are free to skip this lesson. But for those of you know who not only don't know, but don't know why they should know, this is a great book to start with.The book is co-written by a Cis man, and a transgender gender fluid person. Between the two of them, they explain why it is important to use the proper pronouns around people who request that. There are plenty of examples of how to ask and how to find out what pronoun to use, and the wrong way to ask.And while you may think this would never apply to you, you might be surprised. I currently know two transgender, gender fluid individuals, and I have to constantly make sure I am using their pronouns of choice. Once you get used to it, it gets easier.Below is an example of the style of the cartoons, as well as the writing.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
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  • Kirsten Tattersall
    January 1, 1970
    I received this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The concept of gender neutral pronouns isn't new to me but this comic was a great guide and I wish I had had it back when I was learning about gender neutral pronouns. I thought it was very well executed and I'd definitely recommend this to anyone confused by gender neutral pronouns, or anyone dealing with someone confused by gender neutral pronouns.
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  • Elaine White
    January 1, 1970
    Book – A Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them PronounsAuthor – Archie Bongiovanni & Tristan JimersonStar rating - ★★★★★No. of Pages – 64Cover – Bright, Fun, Cute Genre – LGBT, Non-Fiction, Informative, YA friendly** COPY RECEIVED THROUGH NETGALLEY **This is a really cute, fun book that explains and explores the various uses of They/Them and gender neutral pronouns. It's told in comic form, and tells you from the outset that it's made for all ages, for all abilities, and to be an informative a Book – A Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them PronounsAuthor – Archie Bongiovanni & Tristan JimersonStar rating - ★★★★★No. of Pages – 64Cover – Bright, Fun, Cute Genre – LGBT, Non-Fiction, Informative, YA friendly** COPY RECEIVED THROUGH NETGALLEY **This is a really cute, fun book that explains and explores the various uses of They/Them and gender neutral pronouns. It's told in comic form, and tells you from the outset that it's made for all ages, for all abilities, and to be an informative assistance guide for anyone who isn't quite sure how to use gender neutral pronouns properly.I really love that it deals with the use of pronouns from both perspectives – that of a non-binary person and that of a cisgender. Not only does it explain why, in the book, but it's a handy tip for all those reading to remember that educating others on what is right and acceptable doesn't have to be complicated or aggressive. It can be about informing rather than correcting.There are some beautiful, heartbreaking moments where Archie explores how it feels to be misgendered and just why it's so important to respect a person's right to be known by the correct pronouns. This was perfectly illustrated with the 'arrow of good intent'.This is a perfect educational tool, that should be in all school libraries, available to teach kids as they're growing up, so that they don't grow up with the expected use of language (discussed in the book) that allows a person to deliberately or accidentally misgender a person all because it's how they were taught. It's the teaching and education of having an open mind and an open heart – and an open vocabulary – that is most important.Overall, this is educational, eye-opening, and a much needed informative resource for every school, teenager, kid, and adult, who wants to know how to be a more inclusive and respectful person in everyday life. The tools provided are clear, easy to read, and well illustrated with examples and images that will make it easier to remember. There are also extra links at the end, for anyone who wants to do more reading.A perfect tool to inform and educate.~Favourite Quote“Fellow non-binary hunks and babes and hunkbabes:We are not asking too much.We are not demanding the impossible.We are worth respect and understanding.”
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  • Yzabel Ginsberg
    January 1, 1970
    [I received a copy of this book through NetGalley.]This is a very short book in the shape of a graphic novel/comics, so there’s no excuse not to read it. ;)While I’m not particularly vocal about it when I write book reviews, and while the name I use is ‘feminine’, I don’t identify as a woman—my sex is female, but my gender is non-binary (more specifically, agender). So, it’s always mildly annoying at best when people keep referring to me as ‘she’. Sometimes they just don’t know, and of course, i [I received a copy of this book through NetGalley.]This is a very short book in the shape of a graphic novel/comics, so there’s no excuse not to read it. ;)While I’m not particularly vocal about it when I write book reviews, and while the name I use is ‘feminine’, I don’t identify as a woman—my sex is female, but my gender is non-binary (more specifically, agender). So, it’s always mildly annoying at best when people keep referring to me as ‘she’. Sometimes they just don’t know, and of course, if I don’t tell them, they won’t know… therefore I tell them. Sometimes, too, other people just don’t care, or it forces them to reevaluate their paradigm, and, well, things don’t go so well in such cases.Therefore I truly appreciate such books as this one—short and to the point, again: no excuse—that explain what it’s all about, and why it matters. Because being called ‘she’ is as much incomfortable for me as it is for a man who identifies as a man to be called ‘she’, for instance. (Also, for the grammar purists who say that ‘there’s only he and she pronouns, and they as a singular isn’t right’: singular they has been in use since the 14th century or so. Just saying.)To be honest, I’m not entirely fan of the graphic style here; however, it is cute, with fun moments, and the art IMHO isn’t what matters the most in this book.Except for a couple of things I wasn’t too sure about, mostly the two characters (Archie and Tristan) run you through a quick explanation of non-binary vs. cisgender (‘quick’, because the whole thing detailed would take a book of its own), situations about how to use they/them pronouns, and examples of misgendering and how to react to it tastefully, whether you’re the one being misgendered or an ally. Among such situations, when loved ones misgender you, but you know they’re supportive in plenty of other ways, ranting is not useful. But sometimes, too, when people deliberately refuse to acknowledge you (binary or non-binary, this is part of your identity, after all), and make fun of you and/or are deliberately hurtful, it’s also good to be reminded that it’s OK to let go of what is, all in all, abusive. It’s not easy to accept… but it’s true.This book is a good introduction to the matter, easy to follow and understand, and one that you can also apply to other pronouns like ze/hir (yes, there are more than just the few mentioned here). Even though it’s not exhaustive, it paves the way for further reading for anyone who’s interested.
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  • Joshua
    January 1, 1970
    Plenty of people are going to talk about the relevance of this book as it pertains to intersex, non-binary, genderqueer, gender fluid, and trans individuals, so I'm going to take a different approach and argue that this book is a fantastic demonstration of the relevance and vital quality of the medium of comics.Archie Bongiovanni and Tristan Jimerson do an incredible job of using comics to explain memory, emotion, identity, and the complexities of human interaction in a simple little book, that Plenty of people are going to talk about the relevance of this book as it pertains to intersex, non-binary, genderqueer, gender fluid, and trans individuals, so I'm going to take a different approach and argue that this book is a fantastic demonstration of the relevance and vital quality of the medium of comics.Archie Bongiovanni and Tristan Jimerson do an incredible job of using comics to explain memory, emotion, identity, and the complexities of human interaction in a simple little book, that one might almost call a pamphlet. The scenes and moments of this book could almost surely be reproduced in prose, however by using comics in place of prose the reader is able to observe the emotions of Bongiovanni as they react to being misgendered, they are able to observe the emotions of Jimerson as he attempts to understand what his privilege, and the emotional rhetoric of these interactions are far more observable because of the visual medium. The reader is able to see that this is not just an empty collection of words, but real people expressing the real depth implied by an issue that many would probably scoff at.As a cisgender man, this book was fascinating to read, and as a lover of comics this book was a delight because it was a reminder that the medium can offer a dimension that other art forms cannot. This book is important and relevant, and the reader should take a moment to read this wonderful book.
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  • Mavence
    January 1, 1970
    "Practicing gender-neutral pronouns is both an exercise in language and a chance to grow as a more empathetic and respectful communicator." Honestly, I just flipped through this because I liked the cover art and I was fairly surprised that this strives to educate readers, not just about pronouns but also the struggles of misgendered folks in everyday life. This was an easy read for me and I liked how light the tone the author had set for educating us, readers. I'm grateful for the authors of "Practicing gender-neutral pronouns is both an exercise in language and a chance to grow as a more empathetic and respectful communicator." Honestly, I just flipped through this because I liked the cover art and I was fairly surprised that this strives to educate readers, not just about pronouns but also the struggles of misgendered folks in everyday life. This was an easy read for me and I liked how light the tone the author had set for educating us, readers. I'm grateful for the authors of this book and I recommend everyone to read this for future references.
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  • Deff✨
    January 1, 1970
    "A Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them Pronouns" is one of those reads that may be complementary for anybody who wants to learn more about how to be a part of today's society. In this book authors try to explain the gender neutral pronouns to the simple-minded folks (like myself) who aim to educate themselves in this field. With very cool illustration and easy to understand language it presents tips and trick for newbies and people who want to improve their knowledge. The simplicity of the artwo "A Quick & Easy Guide to They/Them Pronouns" is one of those reads that may be complementary for anybody who wants to learn more about how to be a part of today's society. In this book authors try to explain the gender neutral pronouns to the simple-minded folks (like myself) who aim to educate themselves in this field. With very cool illustration and easy to understand language it presents tips and trick for newbies and people who want to improve their knowledge. The simplicity of the artwork has been very useful and in my opinion correlates with the books overall theme. The pictures have a nice line and they don't mask the message. This was created to inform so any shenanigans in the illustration would ruin this book.I also really enjoyed the charts provided in the end of the book. This, in my opinion, made it very useful in the work environment were you need to quickly present the information.This book may as well serve as a handbook that will teach people how to effectively use They/Them pronouns without a judgement and doubt. I very much appreciated that.Copy was provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • kuzronk
    January 1, 1970
    As somebody who uses they pronouns from time to time, this guide is everything the name implies, with it's easy-to-read but informing mixed in with some comedy that doesn't take you out of message of the guide.While it's made for people who don't understand the pronouns, more so than people who use pronouns such as these, there is still some great tips for people who need help with people misunderstanding and coming out.The artwork feels like if Noelle Stevenson helped Scott McCloud on his non-f As somebody who uses they pronouns from time to time, this guide is everything the name implies, with it's easy-to-read but informing mixed in with some comedy that doesn't take you out of message of the guide.While it's made for people who don't understand the pronouns, more so than people who use pronouns such as these, there is still some great tips for people who need help with people misunderstanding and coming out.The artwork feels like if Noelle Stevenson helped Scott McCloud on his non-fiction books about comics, but that's a positive thing.This book was provided by the Publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Netgalley and Oni Press!
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  • Monika
    January 1, 1970
    This comic guide with a goofy, gently sarcastic sense of humor is all about gender neutral pronouns - how being misgendered feels, why pronouns matter, grammar, and examples of how to use these pronouns in real life.I was so glad the authors encouraged people to try to make their everyday language more inclusive by dropping words like ma'am, sir, guys, ladies, etc. and defaulting to "person" instead of assuming "man" or "woman" when speaking about someone you don't know.I wish the authors had ad This comic guide with a goofy, gently sarcastic sense of humor is all about gender neutral pronouns - how being misgendered feels, why pronouns matter, grammar, and examples of how to use these pronouns in real life.I was so glad the authors encouraged people to try to make their everyday language more inclusive by dropping words like ma'am, sir, guys, ladies, etc. and defaulting to "person" instead of assuming "man" or "woman" when speaking about someone you don't know.I wish the authors had addressed grammar pedants who get in a tizzy about singular they/them. They kind of allude to it when someone says "that just doesn't sound right to me", but this is such a common occurrence. I think people who balk at singular they/them really need it pointed out more directly, right next to the section that talks about respecting people and how it makes them feel to be misgendered.Surprisingly - and only because it's so short - this guide really gets into the nuances that come with existing in this world as a nonbinary person. Whether gender neutral pronouns are completely new to you or you already consider yourself a well-informed ally, you'll learn from this fun, engaging book.
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  • Sunny
    January 1, 1970
    Exactly as advertised. A quick and easy guide to they/them pronouns in comics. I'll be recommending this resource widely.
  • Ewa
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book from NetGalleyThis is very simple beginner's guide to they/them pronouns. I've already known pretty much all of those information but the thing is it took me a lot of TIME to learn that and while I do not think that time was wasted I wish I had a guide like this one back when I first learned that there are more than two genders. Coming from a conservative family, those concepts were completely new to me and I didn't know where to start - this book is a good st I received a free copy of this book from NetGalleyThis is very simple beginner's guide to they/them pronouns. I've already known pretty much all of those information but the thing is it took me a lot of TIME to learn that and while I do not think that time was wasted I wish I had a guide like this one back when I first learned that there are more than two genders. Coming from a conservative family, those concepts were completely new to me and I didn't know where to start - this book is a good start. It covers all the basic aspects in an approachable funny way and encourages to look up more information. This book not only gives practical information but also explains the emotions caused by being misgendered and Why You Should Care. The second part contains some advice to non-binary people on coming out, cuting people out, and reaching out for support.
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  • Maria Cristina
    January 1, 1970
    This is a comprehending, yet easy (and necessary) to absorb account on the importance and use of pronouns, that manages to be fun and visually engaging, while tackling a serious topic, and offering great guidance for everyone. People tend to take certain things for granted and being correctly gendered is high up on that list. I am a girl who was born a girl so I've had it quite easy contrary to the experinces of so many queergender and non-binary people. However, I remember something that happen This is a comprehending, yet easy (and necessary) to absorb account on the importance and use of pronouns, that manages to be fun and visually engaging, while tackling a serious topic, and offering great guidance for everyone. People tend to take certain things for granted and being correctly gendered is high up on that list. I am a girl who was born a girl so I've had it quite easy contrary to the experinces of so many queergender and non-binary people. However, I remember something that happened a while ago and that impacted me enough to still be able to picture the whole scene clearly. When I was little, I used to have my hair cut very short and as I was rollerblading through the park one day this confused a lady who identified me as "a young boy". You think it would be no big deal. Everyone makes mistakes. And I'm inclined to say you are right in this particular case, but I still remember the frustration, the distance that formed between me and my own body. Gender isn't and is important in the sense that you shouldn't take decisions based on it or attribute each gender expectations or roles, but you should get it right. So go read this. And give it to your friends and family, neighbours and coworkers. Because yeah, being a respectful and empathetic human being is truly the coolest thing around.
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  • Y
    January 1, 1970
    Hey, cute book! Saw it in the library and snatched it up. It's definitely what it advertises itself at, and the lack of a 5th star is just because at times the book does seem to assume we live in a sort of utopia-- I mean, people don't introduce themselves with their pronouns. It strongly depends on where you are, and I don't think an intro to they/them pronouns should treat using gender neutral pronouns specifically in the case of people who ask for them as equal to introducing yourself with yo Hey, cute book! Saw it in the library and snatched it up. It's definitely what it advertises itself at, and the lack of a 5th star is just because at times the book does seem to assume we live in a sort of utopia-- I mean, people don't introduce themselves with their pronouns. It strongly depends on where you are, and I don't think an intro to they/them pronouns should treat using gender neutral pronouns specifically in the case of people who ask for them as equal to introducing yourself with your pronouns, using gender neutral pronouns whenever someone doesn't tell you their gender, etc-- because while these are all great things to do, they're not as necessary as the very specific request to just address people as they tell you, and if I handed this off to my parents they would DEFINITELY not take it as seriously as a result of the equalization of a lot of different levels of acceptance.THAT SAID: I personally loved it, and I think people in the community will love it! I just don't know if people who aren't 'woke' will.[note: am nonbinary.]
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  • Elise
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from Limerence Press, an imprint of Oni Press. I just started an LGBTQ+ club at my library for teens. I have many students that use our teen room on a daily basis who have identified themselves as non-binary or pansexual and prefer to use non-gendered language. It's a foreign concept to me but one that I want to be more informed about and this book is a great place to start. Written from the perspective of both a cisgender (born male, identifies as male) individual and a non- I received this ARC from Limerence Press, an imprint of Oni Press. I just started an LGBTQ+ club at my library for teens. I have many students that use our teen room on a daily basis who have identified themselves as non-binary or pansexual and prefer to use non-gendered language. It's a foreign concept to me but one that I want to be more informed about and this book is a great place to start. Written from the perspective of both a cisgender (born male, identifies as male) individual and a non-binary individual who prefers to be called by their name or by they/them pronouns. Structured like a conversation, it's a great way to present contemporary information in an easy-to-understand method. This book does get very preachy and I'm not sure if it's going to open the minds of readers that are from a different mindset, but it will appeal to readers who are interested in being more inclusive. Despite the at-times over the top preachy nature of the graphic novel, it's a very important subject to understand today.
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  • MissBecka
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley & Oni Press for the early release copy.This was a short, informative and easy read.I wasn't familiar with Ze and Hir prior to this and it's always exciting to learn new EVERYTHING!!!!From the description I envisioned a graphic novel with a storyline that introduces and educates through the characters experiences. This book kinda does that though the delivery is a bit more dry than I expected.Archie & Tristan do break down the pronouns and how to start inserting them i Thank you NetGalley & Oni Press for the early release copy.This was a short, informative and easy read.I wasn't familiar with Ze and Hir prior to this and it's always exciting to learn new EVERYTHING!!!!From the description I envisioned a graphic novel with a storyline that introduces and educates through the characters experiences. This book kinda does that though the delivery is a bit more dry than I expected.Archie & Tristan do break down the pronouns and how to start inserting them into everyday life, I was just hoping for something a bit more fun to give to the tiny humans in my life. I'm always on the lookout for fun and educational books to give them. All the tiny humans in my life are currently under the age of five, so they need more excitement and colour in the books I read/give them. If i'm being honest so do I...who doesn't love an eye catching colour palette bouncing along the pages with you?
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