Fireborne (The Aurelian Cycle, #1)
Game of Thrones meets Red Rising in a debut young adult fantasy that's full of rivalry, romance... and dragons.Annie and Lee were just children when a brutal revolution changed their world, giving everyone—even the lowborn—a chance to test into the governing class of dragonriders.Now they are both rising stars in the new regime, despite backgrounds that couldn’t be more different. Annie’s lowborn family was executed by dragonfire, while Lee’s aristocratic family was murdered by revolutionaries. Growing up in the same orphanage forged their friendship, and seven years of training have made them rivals for the top position in the dragonriding fleet.But everything changes when survivors from the old regime surface, bent on reclaiming the city.With war on the horizon and his relationship with Annie changing fast, Lee must choose to kill the only family he has left or to betray everything he’s come to believe in. And Annie must decide whether to protect the boy she loves . . . or step up to be the champion her city needs.From debut author Rosaria Munda comes a gripping adventure that calls into question which matters most: the family you were born into, or the one you’ve chosen.

Fireborne (The Aurelian Cycle, #1) Details

TitleFireborne (The Aurelian Cycle, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 15th, 2019
PublisherG.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780525518211
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, Dragons, Young Adult Fantasy

Fireborne (The Aurelian Cycle, #1) Review

  • Mary S. R.
    January 1, 1970
    [15 March 2019]There's a cover! I love the red, and that dragon can slay me :)) #CoverLoveAlso, can I just say that the comparison to Seraphina and Red Rising just undid me? I mean, when Rachel Hartman praises a book, I'm in—that woman has always impressed with the philosophy in her books...• • • • • • •[Initial review]Inspired by Plato’s Republic...Wow. That should be interesting for sure!...the story is pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons, set in the aftermath of a b [15 March 2019]There's a cover! I love the red, and that dragon can slay me :)) #CoverLoveAlso, can I just say that the comparison to Seraphina and Red Rising just undid me? I mean, when Rachel Hartman praises a book, I'm in—that woman has always impressed with the philosophy in her books...• • • • • • •[Initial review]Inspired by Plato’s Republic...Wow. That should be interesting for sure!...the story is pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons, set in the aftermath of a bloody revolution....Wait. What???? What kind of synopsis is that?! (The kind to make me add it, that's what kind it is 😐😂)I mean I don't even know what that bleeding means! What that bleeding means: What inspired you to write this particular story?The French Revolution, Plato's Republic, and before either of these, the Blitz......listening to an audiobook about the Battle for Britain, imagining dogfights as I drove, the beginnings of a story taking shape. Somewhere along the way, those fighter planes became dragons, and I never looked back.Well, I mean, that deserves a wow and a definitely-adding-it! Wait, it getts better:Later, working in Paris, I wandered streets whose legacy from the French Revolution was written in defaced tombs and unmarked sites of guillotines, and I knew I wanted to write about revolution. Not about the beginnings of one—the bloody aftermath. So many beautiful YA novels have been about kids starting a revolution, but I wanted to explore the other side of it. I wanted to write about kids who had to pick up the pieces afterwards. And I wanted to inverse a closely related trope......I wanted to imagine an orphaned aristocrat who has every reason to seek revenge, until he realizes that maybe, his family did wrong, too.And that is enough for me to know I absolutely need to read this! So many authors ignore the aftermath of the wars they write and I personally need more books on that topic!Besides, grey morality!! My fave thing to ever read! Thank you Ms. Munda! Thank youThat's not even considering the explanation to the synopsis:And then what pulled it all together was Plato's Republic, which I studied a bit in college. I was captivated by its dystopian/utopian approach to propaganda and meritocracy. What would a society look like that granted political power unequally according to intelligence, rather than unequally according to birthright?And—even more intriguingly—what would that look like in a society where rulers ride dragons? What if a revolution transformed hereditary dragonriding into a test-based selection process?That's a yes for me! Thank you very much I'd like it tomorrow?!That’s where Lee and Annie’s stories start. An aristocrat in hiding, and a former serf who meet in the orphanage, test side by side into their new regime’s dragonriding program, and have to decide if they really can leave the past behind them—and if the new regime really is better than what came before.I've always needed a book questioning a revolution rather than starting one!It looks like this book's gonna be everything I've ever needed ... I don't think anything more needs to be said on the matter: anticipated read
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  • Anja H.
    January 1, 1970
    "Inspired by Plato’s Republic and told from a dual point of view, the story is pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons."I have no idea what that even means, but I gotta say I'm intrigued lol.
  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    January 1, 1970
    9/15/18 Oh, seems there's been a title change. The Dragonlord’s Son ---> FireborneNot sure, if which I prefer but it's fine. I just want a synopsis soon!---...the story is pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons... Like, I understand what all of those words mean separately. But collectively, I have no idea what to expect. But hopefully, it means cool dragons and kickass characters lol
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  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    “[...] was inspired by Plato’s Republic. Told from a dual point of view, the story is pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons, [...]”This is the most OUTRAGEOUS sentence I have ever read.
  • Cece (ProblemsOfaBookNerd)
    January 1, 1970
    "pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons, set in the aftermath of a bloody revolution"what does this like....... mean, though?
  • Kristen Ciccarelli
    January 1, 1970
    It's been a long time since a book made me this happy. FIREBORNE is my new favourite dragon book.
  • Mari
    January 1, 1970
    This book killed me dead. DEAD. I'm writing to you from the grave about how good this book is. It's a book about a group of smart, well-intentioned kids trying to deal with a world of inequality and violence. (With dragons. Can't forget the dragons). This makes the book incredibly engaging at both an intellectual and an emotional level. Intellectually--You know those far-ranging late-night conversations you had in college? Where you and your friends had the world at your fingertips, and the nigh This book killed me dead. DEAD. I'm writing to you from the grave about how good this book is. It's a book about a group of smart, well-intentioned kids trying to deal with a world of inequality and violence. (With dragons. Can't forget the dragons). This makes the book incredibly engaging at both an intellectual and an emotional level. Intellectually--You know those far-ranging late-night conversations you had in college? Where you and your friends had the world at your fingertips, and the night seemed long, and you just talked to each other, and tried to solve the world's problems. What would you do about....philosophy, morality, governance? And every time you thought you had the 'right' answer, some friend would say, well, sure, but what about....? This book feels like a continuation of one of those conversations. Instead of reducing issues into clear "good" and "bad" sides, it embraces their complexity. It presents its characters with circumstances that are impossible to simply overcome without causing someone somewhere harm. The characters make decisions based on their own individual backgrounds, beliefs, and capabilities. Then they deal with the consequences. It's a fascinating book. One of the enjoyable aspects of this structure is that the ambiguity of the situations necessarily invites you in and makes you think, well, what would I do? This isn't a book you'll just read, enjoy, and move on from. You'll still be thinking about it weeks later. Emotionally--Emotionally, though. The intellectual stuff was engaging, but the emotional consequences are why I am now dead. You get to know these kids. They feel kind of like friends. And then you have to watch them make some hard choices and do some pretty dark things, hurting themselves and some of the people or things they love. And you understand why they do them. It's a lot of feelings.I should emphasize that this is also just a very fun book. With dragons. It has plenty of scenes with adrenaline and excitement and sweetness, family, and friendship. If you like books that make you think, play out the consequences of hard situations, make you feel like you have a group of new friends in the characters you get to know, and also have excitement and dragons, then do yourself a favor and get this book. Note: I read an early draft of this book. Presumably it's even MORE awesome since I read it.
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  • Ashlee » Library In The Country
    January 1, 1970
    Plato, Targaryens and HERMIONE … what?*shrugs* I'll take it.
  • ♠️ TABI ♠️
    January 1, 1970
    I have made the discovery that typing 'D R A G O N S' as your true reason for wanting this gets you an ARC from Edelweiss
  • Bridget Tyler
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get an early copy of this book, so I opened it up at 9pm and thought, oh I'll read for a little while. Cut to 1am where I'm still furiously turning pages and muttering to the characters about their life choices like a crazy person. This world is so addictively absorbing, it's hard to describe. It's beautiful. It's terrible. It's thrilling. It's way too real for comfort, but in all the best ways. It is a luscious dragon fantasy, and it is definitely Top Gun with Dragons (I'M I was lucky enough to get an early copy of this book, so I opened it up at 9pm and thought, oh I'll read for a little while. Cut to 1am where I'm still furiously turning pages and muttering to the characters about their life choices like a crazy person. This world is so addictively absorbing, it's hard to describe. It's beautiful. It's terrible. It's thrilling. It's way too real for comfort, but in all the best ways. It is a luscious dragon fantasy, and it is definitely Top Gun with Dragons (I'M SUPER JEALOUS SOMEONE ELSE CAME UP WITH THAT BEFORE I DID), but it's a deeply thoughtful and complex story that walks straight up to traditional hero tropes and punches them in the face. This is a two hander, and Munda uses the contrasting POVs of her two point of view characters in a truly beautiful way. She isn't just letting you see different aspects of the story -- Annie and Lee have a totally different perspective on the world and Munda twines those perspectives together to reveal not just how our experience color what we see but how a relationship evolves as two people learn to understand each other. Munda isn't afraid to let her characters grow either. It's far too common, especially in YA, to start out with characters who are basically perfect and amazing and grow into...being perfect and amazing. But Munda doesn't pull any punches. She puts her MC's through the ringer from page one and that affects how they see the world. Lee and Annie both have a lot to learn, and they do...through more harrowing experience and, beautifully, from each other. Lee particularly begins with a pretty stilted perspective, but thanks to Annie's perspective the book never gets lost in his narrow minded beginnings. We get to see WHY he sees the world this way, and why he's wrong, and then go along on the turbulent ride as he learns to see past his prejudices and understand things he couldn't possibly have grasped as a child. Annie has her own huge arc of character growth that is just as textured as Lee's, and perhaps even more unexpected and surprising. Fireborne moved me, it surprised me, it thrilled me, it enraged me, it made me cry, it made me think. I know my teenage self would have LOVED this, but its heady mix of fantasy, politics, philosophy, and yes, a dash of romance feels entirely fresh. This is like nothing you've read before, and trust me you want to read it...just don't start on a night when you have to get up early the next day!
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  • Ellie (faerieontheshelf)
    January 1, 1970
    oooh now the comps are Seraphina and Red Rising, which work marginally better *honestly I have no idea what they’re trying to sell this as and who they’re trying to sell it to (HP fans? GoT fans? Philosophers?) but damn if mentioning Plato’s Republic ain’t got me and my inner philosopher interested
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  • Crowinator
    January 1, 1970
    First line from my Booklist review: “What happens after a revolution, when the fire and fury of the righteous must turn from violence to governance?”Rosaria Munda shapes a compelling story around the fraught nature of building a new regime on the ashes of the old, one that may be objectively better but is always in danger of failing its own ideals. Minor spoilers below; mostly plot- and theme-related, without giving too much away.The story starts nine years after a bloody uprising against the tr First line from my Booklist review: “What happens after a revolution, when the fire and fury of the righteous must turn from violence to governance?”Rosaria Munda shapes a compelling story around the fraught nature of building a new regime on the ashes of the old, one that may be objectively better but is always in danger of failing its own ideals. Minor spoilers below; mostly plot- and theme-related, without giving too much away.The story starts nine years after a bloody uprising against the triarchy, the dragonborn families (i.e., royalty) that ruled by right of blood and enforced their tyranny with dragons. Now Callipolis is a fledgling meritocracy: everyone receives an education and is then tested into their class, with the most talented, skilled, and intelligent rising to the top regardless of where they started. Though some people remain poorer than others, resources are shared more fairly, so no one lacks work, food, or a home. It’s a heady idea with many inherent flaws and I think Munda does an excellent job of showing that without letting it become a political treatise. This is because she centers the story on two characters from different backgrounds and lets them discover and react to the ways in which the new regime, which they both believe in, is imperfect...but maybe worth saving. Lee and Annie are dragonriders-in-training, and after seven years of effort, they’re now competing to be Firstrider, an important position in the dragon army. The Dragonrider-in-Chief, so to speak. Lee is a Stormscourge, one of the dragonborn families slaughtered in the revolution. He was spared as a child and smuggled out (after witnessing the torture and murder of his entire family) but this is obviously a secret. Lee grew up in an orphanage pretending to be a slum rat, which is how he met Annie. Annie also lost her whole family at a young age; they were peasants who were burned alive by dragon fire for failing to follow their lord’s orders. They are rivals, friends, and potentially more, and while Annie knows who Lee really is, and Lee knows she knows, they never speak of it. This is definitely a story about them, and their history together, and their future, and it’s so passionate and lovely and full of pathos I almost can’t stand it.Look, if you’re into dragons, you’re not going to be disappointed by this novel. Dragons are omnipresent here; they are powerful, intelligent creatures emotionally and psychically bonded to their human riders. They serve in multiple roles: as animal companions, as loving friends/partners, and as weapons of war. They are also a symbol of the state; a point of pride and military might, one that is supposed to evoke stirring feelings of being safe and cared for by one’s government. But of course, the military is not always pointed at those outside, and this is why I love how Munda uses dragons in this novel, because they are simultaneously symbols of the old regime that oppressed people in terrible ways, and the new, trying-to-be equitable regime, that is supposed to bring fairness and opportunity to everyone. Imagine for years and years that whenever you saw a dragon in the sky on the way to your village you knew that the rider, a dragonborn noble, will take your crops and money and dole out fiery punishment and death, and you might get an idea of how conflicted the ordinary citizens are about dragons in this fantasy novel. Who’s to say that the new regime won’t become like the old, when those in power forget their promises?As it turns out, others from the old regime have survived and have been building their own dragon army on a nearby island. They are now ready to return and take back Callipolis. War is coming, and Lee and Annie have to examine their loyalties to family, friend, self, and city. Should Lee fight against his own relations for the leaders who subjected his family to such gruesome deaths? Even if he believes that their government is better? Should Annie trust that Lee won’t betray Callipolis and protect him from being found out, even if it puts her own future at risk? What if the noble government they are willing to fight for starts to lose its idealistic shine when threatened with war? For Annie and Lee (and, indeed, all of the other characters, but particularly the young ones), there are no easy choices, and no perfect answers, only striving to be better than what came before.I loved everything about this book: it’s exciting, it’s philosophical; it’s hopeful; it’s dark; it’s full of dragons and politics; it’s romantic in that grand, heroic tradition, without downplaying the ugly reality of governance and revolution and war. It talks about the cost of leadership, the weight of decision-making, and the responsibility of those in power to those without it. At the same time the story works as a close, intimate tale of friends who have been through fire together and what they will do for each other.I can't wait until this comes out and I can give it to all my library teens.
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  • ♔ Dark Lordette Jennymort ♔
    January 1, 1970
    if the dragons in this are mierly side pieces, i'm going to fucking riot. there had better be some rider-dragon loving relationship going on.
  • Amber (The Book Bratz)
    January 1, 1970
    The full review + more can be found at The Book Bratz *Thank you so much G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review Fireborne!* I wish I could scream from the rooftops about how much I loved this book. But I don't think my neighbors would appreciate that. So, I basically shrieked all over twitter about this book and pushed it at all my blogging friends instead. Munda did not disappoint in her thrilling and action packed emotional thrill ride that inc The full review + more can be found at The Book Bratz *Thank you so much G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review Fireborne!* I wish I could scream from the rooftops about how much I loved this book. But I don't think my neighbors would appreciate that. So, I basically shrieked all over twitter about this book and pushed it at all my blogging friends instead. Munda did not disappoint in her thrilling and action packed emotional thrill ride that incorporates the destruction and formation of new government. Told in the point of view of Lee and Annie, it gives an interesting view of two different sides of this revolution and how it strains their friendship. Lee and Annie were only children when a harsh and brutal revolution massacred the drangonborn who were the ruling class, changing the country. Now, people from all metal classes have the ability to test into the class of Dragon Riders. Lee, who is the son of Leon Stormscourge, survived The Palace Day murders of the three ruling families only to become a rising star in the regime. Only, no one knows his real identity. As a child Annie's family was killed by a dragon fire and she was sent to an orphanage where she grew up besides Lee. Now two best friends are pitted against each other for the top position in the dragon riding fleet. But then Lee is contacted by his cousin who survived Palace Day, with a threat of war on the horizon. The families are back and they want what is theirs. Lines are drawn, sides chosen, and a new firstrider rises.I loved all the dragons in Fireborne. I find a lot of time that books that have dragons in them, they aren't the main point of attention. But in Fireborne, Munda makes sure that her readers get to know these dragons, their weaknesses and their connections with their riders. Each dragon is described beautifully and characterized into their species of dragon and are beautiful magnificent creatures that play an essential role in the society that The Protector is trying to build. I found the characters to be super relateable. A lot of time in fantasy you find that the protagonist acts like they are in their 20s rather than their actual age. Lee and Annie and all of the other riders in Fireborne acted like they were teenagers, they made mistakes, they don't know how to deal with certain things and they learned through trial and error and endless hours of training as well as the ghosts of their past. They were flawed and far from perfect, but Lee and Annie both have their own unique story to tell and that story shapes who they are as characters. I wish I could discuss the Revolution with out spoiling it, but quite honestly it's going to be hard and confusing, so I am going to leave the Revolution up to the reader to learn about. But my heart breaks for Lee and Annie and everyone else who was affected by it. It brings into the question of change, if after so many years things can be different and fight of right and wrongs. Fireborne is an amazing debut novel and had made my list of top ten books that I have read this year. I am super excited to see what Munda has in store next for these characters because it can only get better from here. (Well, it's already amazing so even more so.) If you love dragons, politics, battles, war and angst filled romance then make sure that you add Fireborne to your TBR immediately! Initial thoughts: Not enough words for how much I love this book. I can’t wait to see what book two is going to bring!! Also, after learning this was inspired by Plato’s, The Republic I’m suddenly interested in reading it...? 😅
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  • Phil Dershwitz
    January 1, 1970
    I grew up reading Tamora Pierce, and after reading an advanced copy of Fireborne I'm confident teenage-me would have loved this book as well. It takes some common tropes--hidden identity, birthright vs meritocracy, children forced by circumstance into adult roles--and recasts them in novel and creative ways. The characters are nuanced and 3-dimensional, and I was genuinely invested in their character development. The protagonists are flawed people whose very lives represent a profound philosophi I grew up reading Tamora Pierce, and after reading an advanced copy of Fireborne I'm confident teenage-me would have loved this book as well. It takes some common tropes--hidden identity, birthright vs meritocracy, children forced by circumstance into adult roles--and recasts them in novel and creative ways. The characters are nuanced and 3-dimensional, and I was genuinely invested in their character development. The protagonists are flawed people whose very lives represent a profound philosophical quandary. And the antagonists, when it's even clear who the actual antagonists are, are human, with understandable motivations.All told, I really enjoyed the story, and book 2 can't come soon enough.Plus it passes the Bechdel test.
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  • Breanna
    January 1, 1970
    THIS REVIEW & MORE → Paws and PaperbacksARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley.There are not enough words to describe my feelings about this book. Finishing this book left me feeling utterly speechless. I’m awestruck that this is Rosaria Munda’s debut, because it was nothing short of amazing. Fireborne is a thrilling, thought-provoking, powerful, gripping story that I can confidently say is easily my favorite book of the year, hands down.Fireborn had been pitched as “Inspired by Pla THIS REVIEW & MORE → Paws and PaperbacksARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley.There are not enough words to describe my feelings about this book. Finishing this book left me feeling utterly speechless. I’m awestruck that this is Rosaria Munda’s debut, because it was nothing short of amazing. Fireborne is a thrilling, thought-provoking, powerful, gripping story that I can confidently say is easily my favorite book of the year, hands down.Fireborn had been pitched as “Inspired by Plato’s Republic…Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons, set in the aftermath of a bloody revolution.” This is literally the most accurate book description I’ve read in my life. The story is told from the dual POVs of Lee and Annie. Lee is the only remaining survivor of the previous aristocracy who were massacred during the revolution. Annie is a orphan whose family suffered at the hands of that former aristocracy, and thanks to the new regime is offered an opportunity that would have been previously been unheard of. I found both Lee and Annie’s characters to be extremely compelling and well-written, and the complexity of their relationship was one of the highlights of the story. Both characters also had tremendous character growth by the end of the book and I was totally invested in them.As for the book’s best feature: the political intrigue and turmoil. I’ve never said this before in a review – because in my opinion it’s in a league of its own – but if you enjoy the political intricacies and the grayness of which side is right/wrong, you will absolutely love this. This is a book in which the “good” guys do bad things, and the “bad” guys can be sympathized with. And books that have that aspect are my favorite, because in the real world there are no absolutes. Rosaria Munda does an excellent job developing those intricacies in her world and bringing adding an emotional depth to them.Another thing I absolutely loved was the dragons! Many times, there are so-called “dragon” books, but the actual dragons are barely featured within the pages. That is definitely not the case in Fireborne. The dragons are heavily present in the story, and there are plenty of action-filled scenes with them! I also liked that the action scenes were descriptive enough to follow along and picture the scene, but not overdone to the degree where they become tedious or confusing. There are plenty of heart-pounding, page-turning scenes to love in this book!I could go on and on about this book. I honestly had to force myself to put it down. My entire drive home from clinicals and work I fantasized about getting to read more chapters. I thought about the characters and the plot while I was in class. Fireborne is a politically-savvy, emotional, intoxicating story, and if it’s not already on your TBR, it needs to be.
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  • mith
    January 1, 1970
    Well well well, would you look at that. My first DNF of the year. Listen. I, like many of you, probably, had high hopes for this book because anything involving dragons has me eye emoji. What doesn’t have me eye emoji, though? Boring writing and two POV that sound the same and have zero voice. No thanks! I’m tired and I don’t need a book to make me feel more so.
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  • Tink
    January 1, 1970
    I've read my fair share of books with dragons and...color me impressed.🐉🐉🐉First off, the cover draw me in. Love it. Also, I loved the way the dragons are introduced at the beginning of the story. Caught my attention right away. Very interesting characters and the plot sounds promising. I wish the pacing was faster though.
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  • Nadhira Satria
    January 1, 1970
    OH MY GOD I NEED THIS
  • M_nesfield
    January 1, 1970
    I like political intrigue, emotional depth, and character development. After reading an advanced copy of this book, I can confidently say that it has all 3. The setting of a new regime and all the baggage, intrigue, and mixed loyalties that brings with it ensured that I couldn’t put the book down. I am very excited to see the final version and looking forward to consuming the rest of the series.I identified with Annie’s struggles, as an intelligent but not initially confident character, to grow I like political intrigue, emotional depth, and character development. After reading an advanced copy of this book, I can confidently say that it has all 3. The setting of a new regime and all the baggage, intrigue, and mixed loyalties that brings with it ensured that I couldn’t put the book down. I am very excited to see the final version and looking forward to consuming the rest of the series.I identified with Annie’s struggles, as an intelligent but not initially confident character, to grow into leadership roles and take control of situations on her own terms. Her challenges to find a place in a male dominated environment felt honest, and I became invested in her success.
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  • Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard
    January 1, 1970
    OH HELL YES TO THIS SUMMARY: "Inspired by Plato’s Republic and told from a dual point of view, the story is pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons, set in the aftermath of a bloody revolution."Edit Mar 16: say what you want about me but I need to say that is a sexy cover. I don't know if it's the dragon or the colours. Whatever. It's sexy.
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  • Mara Rutherford
    January 1, 1970
    If you like dragons, political intrigue, slow-burn romances, and brilliant writing, you'll love this book! Munda's cast of characters - fighter pilot dragon riders! - are complicated and fully realized. This is a layered, multi-dimensional YA novel that will appeal to fans of dragon novels and Game of Thrones.
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  • nova ryder ☼
    January 1, 1970
    i see dragons, i add to my tbr. it’s that simple
  • Malayna Evans
    January 1, 1970
    If you like dragons, you're going to LOVE this book. Scratch that. Even if you don't like dragons, this book has political intrigue, teen romance, plot twists that keep you flipping through page after page. It's loaded with all the things that make a YA fantasy book sing, including character you'll fall in love with. A truly riveting read. Trust me, you want it!
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  • Julie (HufflepuffGirl90)
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, thank you to NetGalley.com, author Rosaria Munda, and my friends at PENGUIN GROUP Penguin Young Readers Group for the opportunity to read this Advanced Readers Copy for free in exchange for a honest review. This book will be published on October 15, 2019. The tale is full of intrigue and passion. Dragons abound with their riders, protecting the town of Callipolis.But all is not well, there are rumours that some of the ruling class of before have survived. They have been hiding in a First of all, thank you to NetGalley.com, author Rosaria Munda, and my friends at PENGUIN GROUP Penguin Young Readers Group for the opportunity to read this Advanced Readers Copy for free in exchange for a honest review. This book will be published on October 15, 2019. The tale is full of intrigue and passion. Dragons abound with their riders, protecting the town of Callipolis.
But all is not well, there are rumours that some of the ruling class of before have survived. They have been hiding in a nearby city called New Pathos, and have been biding their time to make a stand for the future of Callipolis. They want their city back, and will do anything to make that happen.
Lee, a hidden member of the last ruling class and a dragon rider, must make a choice. Does he stand with his friends and self-made family; or does he turn on them all and join his blood relatives to take down those that massacred the dragon lords? How do you make the choice that has no good answer?
Dragons and politics, love and honour. I recommend this book to all that have a dream of flying and who can empathise with the struggle of doing what is right when everything is falling down around you.
Full review at: http://bookshelfadventures.home.blog/...
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  • Jeff Bishop
    January 1, 1970
    TOP GUN with dragons!Have you ever thought to yourself, "Hm, maybe we should eat The Rich"? Then do I have the book for you! I had the privilege of reading an early version of this book and it really blew me away. Fantasy's not usually my thing, but I'll make the biggest of exceptions when it comes to aerial dog-fighting with dragons.If that isn't enough, there's also just a HINT of a love quadrangle. Not overpowering, like when Tostitos says "Hint of Lime" then your whole mouth tastes like moji TOP GUN with dragons!Have you ever thought to yourself, "Hm, maybe we should eat The Rich"? Then do I have the book for you! I had the privilege of reading an early version of this book and it really blew me away. Fantasy's not usually my thing, but I'll make the biggest of exceptions when it comes to aerial dog-fighting with dragons.If that isn't enough, there's also just a HINT of a love quadrangle. Not overpowering, like when Tostitos says "Hint of Lime" then your whole mouth tastes like mojito mix. This book is definitely politics and action first, and it's soooooo much better for it. The fact that everyone has to wait a whole year for this book is a travesty--A TRAVESTY!
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  • Tova
    January 1, 1970
    "Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons." I don't know what that means, but it sounds epic AF.
  • Shera (Book Whispers)
    January 1, 1970
    Inspired by Plato’s Republic and told from a dual point of view, the story is pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons, set in the aftermath of a bloody revolution. That is a horrible hot mess of NO! The dragons has me. Why can't a book stand on it's own merit anymore? So just pulling stuff out of my head from all that crappy synopsis. Here's mine: A man with questionable heritage, and stunning locks, must find justice for some tragic events in his youth. Enter a savvy book Inspired by Plato’s Republic and told from a dual point of view, the story is pitched as Aegon Targaryen and Hermione Granger with dragons, set in the aftermath of a bloody revolution. That is a horrible hot mess of NO! The dragons has me. Why can't a book stand on it's own merit anymore? So just pulling stuff out of my head from all that crappy synopsis. Here's mine: A man with questionable heritage, and stunning locks, must find justice for some tragic events in his youth. Enter a savvy book smarts dragon rider who has an agenda of her own and may hinder him! In a world reeling from a bloody revaluation where know one is safe! DRAGONS!!! Queue amazing banter and will they want they moments that will leave you thrilled and frustrated at the same time! DRAGONS!So I'm being silly, but still. I really am hoping for some new dragon rider fiction.
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  • Grace ⭐️confirmed book addict ⭐️
    January 1, 1970
    Seraphina meets Red Rising? That TBR button won’t know what hit it.
  • Laureen Bonin
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone who misses the excitement, longing, magic, danger, conflict, friendship and love from JK Rowling novels will live for you again in FIREBORNE, but with high-speed, empathetic dragons. I didn't want to put it down, but work kept interfering, so I read it in three days instead of two! I found myself thinking that this was HARRY POTTER meets THE HUNGER GAMES meets LORD OF THE RINGS meets ERAGON meets ... I might even throw in some ANNE OF GREEN GABLES. Ms. Munda has enthralled with a story of Anyone who misses the excitement, longing, magic, danger, conflict, friendship and love from JK Rowling novels will live for you again in FIREBORNE, but with high-speed, empathetic dragons. I didn't want to put it down, but work kept interfering, so I read it in three days instead of two! I found myself thinking that this was HARRY POTTER meets THE HUNGER GAMES meets LORD OF THE RINGS meets ERAGON meets ... I might even throw in some ANNE OF GREEN GABLES. Ms. Munda has enthralled with a story of come-from-behind (and in one case, ahead) heroes and heroines; of selflessness, courage, and commitment; of plots and characters vivid in the imagination; and of the complexities of war, leadership, honor, morality, and justice in the hands of young adults who have experienced more than they should have, but also, not enough. The male and female protagonists--Lee and Antigone--will draw readers who can relate to their ideological, philosophical, emotional and very physical battles, which they handle as impressive teenagers might when they have worlds to save, or not. The poetic names and language betray a writer in love with the classics and add to its overall enchantment; not only do the dragons glow when "sparked," but the whole life of the book glows as you read. I had the privilege of reading an advanced copy, and am already impatient for the next two in the trilogy. Already looking forward to the rest of the series in the hands of this very talented writer.
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