Home for Erring and Outcast Girls
An emotionally raw and resonant story of love, loss, and the enduring power of friendship, following the lives of two young women connected by a home for “fallen girls,” and inspired by historical events.In turn-of-the-20th century Texas, the Berachah Home for the Redemption and Protection of Erring Girls is an unprecedented beacon of hope for young women consigned to the dangerous poverty of the streets by birth, circumstance, or personal tragedy. Built in 1903 on the dusty outskirts of Arlington, a remote dot between Dallas and Fort Worth’s red-light districts, the progressive home bucks public opinion by offering faith, training, and rehabilitation to prostitutes, addicts, unwed mothers, and “ruined” girls without forcibly separating mothers from children. When Lizzie Bates and Mattie McBride meet there—one sick and abused, but desperately clinging to her young daughter, the other jilted by the beau who fathered her ailing son—they form a friendship that will see them through unbearable loss, heartbreak, difficult choices, and ultimately, diverging paths.A century later, Cate Sutton, a reclusive university librarian, uncovers the hidden histories of the two troubled women as she stumbles upon the cemetery on the home’s former grounds and begins to comb through its archives in her library. Pulled by an indescribable connection, what Cate discovers about their stories leads her to confront her own heartbreaking past, and to reclaim the life she thought she'd let go forever. With great pathos and powerful emotional resonance, Home for Erring and Outcast Girls explores the dark roads that lead us to ruin, and the paths we take to return to ourselves.

Home for Erring and Outcast Girls Details

TitleHome for Erring and Outcast Girls
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 30th, 2019
PublisherCrown
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction

Home for Erring and Outcast Girls Review

  • Elyse Walters
    January 1, 1970
    Julie Kibler is a great writer. I fell madly in love with her book “Calling Me Home”, her debut novel published in 2013. Her irresistible novel often had me laughing or crying. Julie is gifted in her ability to portray the perceptions and emotions of her characters. She writes with sensitivity, and insights, rendering meticulous attention to details. This second novel....”Home for Erring and Outcast Girls”.....has been a long anticipated wait. Many of Julie’s fans...me included...are excited hap Julie Kibler is a great writer. I fell madly in love with her book “Calling Me Home”, her debut novel published in 2013. Her irresistible novel often had me laughing or crying. Julie is gifted in her ability to portray the perceptions and emotions of her characters. She writes with sensitivity, and insights, rendering meticulous attention to details. This second novel....”Home for Erring and Outcast Girls”.....has been a long anticipated wait. Many of Julie’s fans...me included...are excited happy campers with this new book. Its wonderful! The research is impeccable .....crafting is easy to follow ...and storytelling is vibrant. Julie - once again - delivers an evocative - emotional - sorrowful - captivating story.She engages and educates us about a little known time in history. A little background history:The Berachah Industrial Home for the Redemption of Erring Girls was a facility for unwed mother’s in Arlington, Texas. Reverend James T. and Maggie May Upchurch opened the home in 1903. It took in homeless, usually pregnant women from Texas and the surrounding states. Unlike other homes in the area for “fallen women”, women at the Berachah Home were required/ allowed to keep their babies. They were not forced to give their babies up for adoption. The home closed in 1935 but then reopened as an orphanage from 1936-1942. The University of Texas purchase a property in 1963. On March 7, 1981, a Texas Historical Marker was installed and dedicated at the graveyard that served Berache Home. Following several women from the early 1900’s..... to present daywe meet:.......Cate Sutton......modern day archival librarian at The University of Texas in the year 2017. We also meet Cate’s assistant, Laurel Medina, - a few of her personal friends ....learn about her past life and the work that occupies her every waking moment. It’s not legal to take the archives home - ( they must stay at the library)....but we can feel how Cate wishes she could spend her days-off from work snuggled up at home reading those archives.Her fascination and dedication - learning all she can about the women who lived in the Berachah House was her passion. Going out with a friend was almost a chore - she felt more at home with the dead. Cate often visited the cemetery when she was longing for something she couldn’t have: HOME. “Situations that require intimacy of any kind, however, topple the careful balance I’ve worked so hard to create. I accepted it years ago. And despite my therapist’s confidence, it remains painfully obvious when I attempt to engage on anything more than a surface level”. “I am a grown woman. I am a professional. I manage my life well. But I am broken. People sense it, and when they do, they walk away”. “Me? I run”. We’ll learn more about Cate .....and experience her growth.We also meet:.......Lizzie Bates. Lizzie is 19 when we first meet her in 1904. She has a baby name Docie. They come to live at the House....after some of the most devastating things she endured....really awful. My heart ached! In the beginning before the Berachah House...“How Lizzie had earned her keep out at a country farm, lately, cooking for Negro inmates. How the farm superintendent had taken her into his own shack to live in sin, feeding her heroin to subdue her, and then passed her to the chain gang boss when he tired of her. How’d she taken sick, and it crippled her so badly she couldn’t stand. And finally, how they’d sent her and Docie to jail, no regard for whether she lived or died”.Lizzie’s time at the house - the way she changes was really beautiful. I came to really treasure her goodness - the pure soul she was born with and passed on to her daughter .....and best friend Mattie.We also meet Mattie Corder.... 23 years at the ‘start’. I loved Mattie as much as Lizzie...but I worried about her differently. Mattie’s outer shell was more feisty than Lizzie. It looks like she is confident and strong...less sensitive than Lizzie. She’s definitely angry, sad, beaten down with grief —( her baby son died)... but her bark is bold, ruthless!. But really .... my opinion about both Lizzie and Mattie changed and inter-changed over time. I felt I grew with both of these women - and grew to understand them why Mattie might be sarcastic and Lizzie not. The history and real people ( Lizzie and Mattie), and others: Reverend James Toney, Maggie Mae Upchurch, etc..... was fascinating to learn about. Sad too....just can’t get away from the sadness. The author’s notes at the end are deeply felt...The entire book is excellent. I’ll continue to read anything Julie Kibler writes!Thank You Netgalley, Crown Publishing, and Big Congrats to Julie Kibler 💖
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  • Marilyn
    January 1, 1970
    Home for Erring and Outcast Girls was Julie Kibler's second novel and once again her writing was beautiful , insightful and meaningful. After reading Julie Kibler's first novel, Calling Me Home, I was thrilled to see she had written a second book. Thanks to Netgalley and Crown Publishing I was granted access to an ARC version and I was beyond thrilled. I had high expectations for Home for Erring and Outcast Girls based on my feelings after reading Calling Me Home and I was not disappointed. Juli Home for Erring and Outcast Girls was Julie Kibler's second novel and once again her writing was beautiful , insightful and meaningful. After reading Julie Kibler's first novel, Calling Me Home, I was thrilled to see she had written a second book. Thanks to Netgalley and Crown Publishing I was granted access to an ARC version and I was beyond thrilled. I had high expectations for Home for Erring and Outcast Girls based on my feelings after reading Calling Me Home and I was not disappointed. Julie Kibler had a distinct way of writing her books. In both novels, she introduced several characters and told some of their stories in present time and some were told in the past. I enjoyed getting to know the different characters in Home for Erring and Outcast Girls. By the time the story ended, I felt a real connection to them. While I read Home for Erring and Outcast Girls I laughed, cried, felt the pain some of the girls experienced and felt bewildered and frustrated at how women were treated back then. I was impressed how Julie Kibler, in both of her novels, was able to take meaningful and controversial times in our country's history and bring them alive and make them so believable and factual at the same time.Home for Erring and Outcast Girls followed the stories of two young women, Lizzie and Mattie, whose destinies brought them together at the Berachah Home for the Redemption and Protection for Erring Girls in 1904. Each came with a fragile past and nowhere else to go. Lizzie had suffered emotional, physical and verbal abuse when she arrived at the doorsteps of the Berachah Home. Mattie arrived sick and about to loose her beloved two year old son to the same illness she had contracted. Lizzie and Mattie latched on to one another and became as close to being sisters as they could be. The story followed their lives throughout the time they spent at the Berachah Home and continued even when Mattie chose to leave and ended up living in Oklahoma. Mattie and Lizzie's stories were revealed through the research of present day librarian, Cate Sutton. She worked as head librarian in Arlington, Texas at the University of Texas which was in close proximity to where the Berachah Home used to stand, giving her access to the Berachah Home archives. Cate's own troubled past was also revealed and linked in many ways to that of Lizzie's and Mattie's. I found myself captivated and drawn into all the injustices and lack of family support all three women suffered.I can' t recommend Home for Erring and Outcast Girls by Julie Kibler highly enough. It brought together the many themes of family, home, courage, heartbreak and pain. I can't wait for another book by Julie Kibler. I am now a big fan of her writing and story telling. Thanks to Netgalley and Crown Publishing for allowing me the opportunity to read this ARC version of Home for Erring and Outcast Girls.
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  • Sharyn Berg
    January 1, 1970
    A lifetime apart, Cate Sutton discovers Lizzie and Mattie in the library where she works and in an old and unkempt cemetery nearby. What exactly was “The Home for Erring and Outcast Girls”? Was it a good option for young women and their mostly illegitimate children or something else? With only a handful of ancient records and the cemetery as a resource, Cate sets out to discover just that. While dealing with issues and struggles in her own life and mind, she takes on a young assistant with her o A lifetime apart, Cate Sutton discovers Lizzie and Mattie in the library where she works and in an old and unkempt cemetery nearby. What exactly was “The Home for Erring and Outcast Girls”? Was it a good option for young women and their mostly illegitimate children or something else? With only a handful of ancient records and the cemetery as a resource, Cate sets out to discover just that. While dealing with issues and struggles in her own life and mind, she takes on a young assistant with her own drama and delves into the lives of Lizzie and Mattie and the other young women and staff at the home. She comes to know and love them as much as one can without having ever met. This book took me back to another time and into the lives of some unfortunate young ladies and kept me there long after I finish the last page. If you enjoy hisstorical fiction, put this book on your must read list! Thank you to NetGalley for an advance read copy of this great book.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Let me begin with some personal prejudices. I was adopted and my biological parents weren’t married. It irritates me to no end when we put labels on people, women in particular who through no fault of their own end up in difficult situations. That said, I’m a huge fan of Julie Kibler’s first book, Calling Me Home.This story is told from three main characters point of view. Lizzy and Mattie are women who are In need of the services of the Berachah Industrial Home which took in women who were preg Let me begin with some personal prejudices. I was adopted and my biological parents weren’t married. It irritates me to no end when we put labels on people, women in particular who through no fault of their own end up in difficult situations. That said, I’m a huge fan of Julie Kibler’s first book, Calling Me Home.This story is told from three main characters point of view. Lizzy and Mattie are women who are In need of the services of the Berachah Industrial Home which took in women who were pregnant. Cate is a archival librarian in modern day who works at the university in Texas where many of the records of the Berachah home reside. The chapters alternate between these three woman and we learn about how they came to be in their current situation and how each handles their situation. The novel is divided in three sections. The first two seemed long and the alternating points of view seemed to keep the reader at a distance from the three women. The most engaged I found myself was when Maddie and Lizzie were engaged in conversation. I didn’t fully connect with Cate u til the third section of the book. This last part gained my full attention and kept me riveted. I wish I could say the same for the first two.Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for allowing me to read this advanced copy.
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  • Kimberly Mussell
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this novel! My favorite aspect of historical fiction is when the story switches from current day to the past. We see so many years which hold their own unique stories. These characters have so much to say. Beautifully written with very developed characters. Thank you NetGalley.
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  • Melyssa
    January 1, 1970
    Read all of my reviews at bit.ly/PageBedtimeI was fortunate enough to be granted a digital copy of the most final proof of Home for Erring and Outcast Girls by Julie Kibler. I read Calling Me Home by this author in 2013 and thoroughly enjoyed it. I loved Home for Erring and Outcast Girls 10 times more! The book is mainly set in Arlington and Austin, Texas as well as Oklahoma. Full disclosure: Many of the scenes take place on or about the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) campus, which is my Read all of my reviews at bit.ly/PageBedtimeI was fortunate enough to be granted a digital copy of the most final proof of Home for Erring and Outcast Girls by Julie Kibler. I read Calling Me Home by this author in 2013 and thoroughly enjoyed it. I loved Home for Erring and Outcast Girls 10 times more! The book is mainly set in Arlington and Austin, Texas as well as Oklahoma. Full disclosure: Many of the scenes take place on or about the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) campus, which is my alma mater. I think this is why the book piqued my interest and resonated with me. This historical fiction novel is based on the actual Berachah Home for the Redemption and Protection of Erring Girls, established by Reverend James Toney and Maggie Mae Upchurch in 1903. Many of the real women whom the fictional characters are based on are buried in a cemetery on the grounds of UTA. The fictional story follows three strong female leads and their respective story lines that alternate with each chapter. In near present day, the reader first meets Cate who is a 30-something librarian at the university studying the history of the Home. Cate's story is told in present day in Arlington and flashbacks to her teenage years in Austin. Lizzie and Mattie's stories are also told at the turn of the century as residents of the Home. Over the course of the novel, we travel 30 years with Lizzie and Mattie. The overall theme of the book is forgiveness of self and recovery leading to personal discovery. I think the main characters in the book struggle with this as well as hesitance in letting other people get close. To be fair all of the major characters in the novel experienced some massive trauma that resulted in her respective emotional vulnerability. The author did an excellent job of illustrating these varied emotions through her descriptive language, driving tone, and exceptional prose. Some scenes made me smile while others made me cry and there was a character or two that made me angry. I really became invested in these characters, and they stuck with me long after I finished reading. My only critique of this story is the creative criticism of the church. I understand that this is the lens through which the author views things, and I respect it. However, it is an element that made me a little uncomfortable ... but that is what effective art does, right? It makes you dig deeper and question things, which is why reading and writing are so important to our societal growth. As a professional marketer, I know the greatest success is when you can drive a consumer to initiate or make a change in behavior. As a result of Kibler's beautifully told story, I have felt compelled to revisit my alma mater and seek out this hidden treasure that I'd never known until reading Home for Erring and Outcast Girls. Recommendation: I really enjoyed this book and hope to get a final, hard copy upon publication to include in my home library. I think my fellow Maverick alums would also appreciate this book. If you enjoy strong female protagonists who experience personal growth or the historical fiction genre, I would strongly recommend you pick up a copy of this book when it publishes this summer.Until next time ... Read on!*I received an advance reading copy (ARC) of Home for Erring and Outcast Girls from NetGalley. My copy was an uncorrected digital file. Regardless of whether I purchase a book, borrow a book, or receive a book in exchange for review, my ultimate goal is to be honest, fair, and constructive. I hope you've found this review helpful.Read all of my reviews at bit.ly/PageBedtime
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  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from Crown Publishing via Netgalley for an honest review.Truly interesting read based on historical events of unwed mothers or homeless women and pulls in nicely modern times with a college librarian who comes across old documents about the Baruchah Home of the early 1900’s. Occasionally it was hard going back and forth from the 2 historical characters, Mattie and Lizzie, but their stories become clearer as the book goes along. I found myself drawn in immediately and found all I received an ARC from Crown Publishing via Netgalley for an honest review.Truly interesting read based on historical events of unwed mothers or homeless women and pulls in nicely modern times with a college librarian who comes across old documents about the Baruchah Home of the early 1900’s. Occasionally it was hard going back and forth from the 2 historical characters, Mattie and Lizzie, but their stories become clearer as the book goes along. I found myself drawn in immediately and found all the main characters likable and interesting. It’s also great to learn a bit of history as well! I give it a solid 4 stars!
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  • Sara Smith
    January 1, 1970
    The little prologue at the start of the book seemed wordy and unnecessarily confusing. I almost closed the kindle screen right there, but I stuck it out and it improved quite a bit. This story is based partially on real people who believed that a "fallen woman" shouldn't be separated from her baby which was quite shocking for that time period. They took in women and nurtured them back to physical and emotional and spiritual health after childbirth. The POV changes between different women in the The little prologue at the start of the book seemed wordy and unnecessarily confusing. I almost closed the kindle screen right there, but I stuck it out and it improved quite a bit. This story is based partially on real people who believed that a "fallen woman" shouldn't be separated from her baby which was quite shocking for that time period. They took in women and nurtured them back to physical and emotional and spiritual health after childbirth. The POV changes between different women in the home as well as a modern woman growing up. These women all had compelling stories. In this #metoo world, we see jhow commonplace it was and still is in many ways for men to take what they wanted without any negative results for them while women bare the brunt of the scars.
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  • Susan Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    When I read a book as magnificent as this one—written with the most beautiful prose, and a story that squeezed my heart so much that sometimes it was hard to breathe—it always takes me a while to put all my feelings together, doing justice to the story and its author. Home For Erring and Outcast Girls follows the lives of two young women, Lizzie and Mattie, who seek refuge from heartbreak, poverty, and illness at the Berachah Home for the Redemption and Protection for Erring Girls in 1904. I was When I read a book as magnificent as this one—written with the most beautiful prose, and a story that squeezed my heart so much that sometimes it was hard to breathe—it always takes me a while to put all my feelings together, doing justice to the story and its author. Home For Erring and Outcast Girls follows the lives of two young women, Lizzie and Mattie, who seek refuge from heartbreak, poverty, and illness at the Berachah Home for the Redemption and Protection for Erring Girls in 1904. I was emotionally involved with all of the girls and their stories, brought to tears many times by the injustices they suffered, but buoyed by feelings of hope and resiliency. I was equally moved by the story of Cate, our modern day heroine, a reclusive librarian who combs through the archives of the Berachah Home, connecting her own story to that of the outcast girls of the past. So many different themes are woven throughout this book but at the forefront are two of my favorites—family and home—in all of their iterations.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    I'm always intrigued by dual timeline novels that delve into an unknown and interesting piece of history. HOME FOR ERRING AND OUTCAST GIRLS sounded appealing because of that and because the author's other book (her debut, CALLING ME HOME, came out in 2013) was a personal favorite. I was eager, then, to delve in.Unfortunately, I soon found myself growing bored with HOME FOR ERRING AND OUTCAST GIRLS, even though I found the stories set in the past intriguing. The characters are sympathetic and the I'm always intrigued by dual timeline novels that delve into an unknown and interesting piece of history. HOME FOR ERRING AND OUTCAST GIRLS sounded appealing because of that and because the author's other book (her debut, CALLING ME HOME, came out in 2013) was a personal favorite. I was eager, then, to delve in.Unfortunately, I soon found myself growing bored with HOME FOR ERRING AND OUTCAST GIRLS, even though I found the stories set in the past intriguing. The characters are sympathetic and the setting interesting, but Kibler's prose is all tell and no show. The plot is episodic, unfocused, and kind of all over the place. Beyond survival, the characters had no real story goals, which made their "journeys" seem long and meandering. Cate's tale in the present feels almost completely irrelevant to the rest of the story. It strikes me as redundant and unnecessary. With all these elements mixing together, this novel just seems to drag on and on and on. I almost gave up on it 3/4 of the way through because I was just tired of it. So, yeah, overall I found HOME FOR ERRING AND OUTCAST GIRLS to be a big disappointment. It wants trimming, structure, and focus. While I appreciate the lessons it teaches, the book isn't nearly as good as I wanted it to be. Bummer.
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  • Franny Burd
    January 1, 1970
    *Thank you to the author and publisher for an ARC of this book in return for a fair and honest review. "Home for Erring and Outcast Girls" was not quite what I was expecting. Well, one of the the stories was, but I wasn't expecting the other two. This novel does tell the story of a group of women who lived at the home back in the day, but also weaves in two, more contemporary, stories (both contemporary stories are about the same woman, just at different points in her life). While I truly enjoye *Thank you to the author and publisher for an ARC of this book in return for a fair and honest review. "Home for Erring and Outcast Girls" was not quite what I was expecting. Well, one of the the stories was, but I wasn't expecting the other two. This novel does tell the story of a group of women who lived at the home back in the day, but also weaves in two, more contemporary, stories (both contemporary stories are about the same woman, just at different points in her life). While I truly enjoyed the historical piece about the actual Home, I really did not enjoy the two others. I believe this book would have been better if the author had just stuck with the one idea, and saved the other two for a different book. That said, it's worth the read simply for the true story of the Home and some of the women who resided there.
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  • Yolanda
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this one. It was a good historical fiction back spotlighting a little known history in this country. I felt the plot and characters were we’ll fleshed out. The author is a master at writing about hard subjects Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for letting me review this book
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  • Carissa
    January 1, 1970
    This book takes you on not just a journey through time, but through emotions. The lives you are made privy to in this very eloquently and respectfully written love letter of a novel are heartwarming and heartbreaking and so inspiring. It opens your eyes to struggles ancient and current with vast differences and scary similarities, especially given the length of time these injustices have had to be made right. Historical Fiction (in some cases fact in this book) aren’t what I’d call my “go-to gen This book takes you on not just a journey through time, but through emotions. The lives you are made privy to in this very eloquently and respectfully written love letter of a novel are heartwarming and heartbreaking and so inspiring. It opens your eyes to struggles ancient and current with vast differences and scary similarities, especially given the length of time these injustices have had to be made right. Historical Fiction (in some cases fact in this book) aren’t what I’d call my “go-to genre” of book, however with more and more books like this in the genre, I’m quickly becoming an insatiable fan.
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  • Susan Cordeiro
    January 1, 1970
    Julie Kibler has written a wonderful novel. It is historical fiction at it's finest. A heartbreaking story of the trials that women in the early 1900's who were poor or outcast had to endure to survive. The story bounces back between present day and the past, I usually don't care for that in a book, but this one is so well written and the characters so interesting that it flows seamlessly together. Mattie and Lizzie's story is unearthed by present day librarian Cate Sutton as she struggles to un Julie Kibler has written a wonderful novel. It is historical fiction at it's finest. A heartbreaking story of the trials that women in the early 1900's who were poor or outcast had to endure to survive. The story bounces back between present day and the past, I usually don't care for that in a book, but this one is so well written and the characters so interesting that it flows seamlessly together. Mattie and Lizzie's story is unearthed by present day librarian Cate Sutton as she struggles to uncover what led them to the home. Cate has her own backstory and discovers herself as she researches the women. I have ordered this for my library and I think it would make an excellent choice for bookclubs. Thanks to NetGalley for allowing me the opportunity to read this novel early
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  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Home for Erring and Outcast Girls is a very beautifully written heart wrenching book. It is historical fiction at its best with a bit of mystery thrown in. This amazing story is well thought out and I found the characters remarkable and endearing . It examines the dark paths that lead to ruin, and the steps we must take to return. It showcases tremendous female courage and inner strength, difficult choices, heartbreak and unbearable loss. This a deeply moving, unforgettable book. I highly recomm Home for Erring and Outcast Girls is a very beautifully written heart wrenching book. It is historical fiction at its best with a bit of mystery thrown in. This amazing story is well thought out and I found the characters remarkable and endearing . It examines the dark paths that lead to ruin, and the steps we must take to return. It showcases tremendous female courage and inner strength, difficult choices, heartbreak and unbearable loss. This a deeply moving, unforgettable book. I highly recommend it. Thanks to NetGalley, the author and the publisher for the advance reader copy of this book in exchange for my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Sharyn Berg
    January 1, 1970
    A lifetime apart, Cate Sutton discovers Lizzie and Mattie in the library where she works and in an old and unkempt cemetery nearby. What exactly was “The Home for Erring and Outcast Girls”? Was it a good option for young women and their mostly illegitimate children or something else? With only a handful of ancient records and the cemetery as a resource, Cate sets out to discover just that. While dealing with issues and struggles in her own life and mind, she takes on a young assistant with her o A lifetime apart, Cate Sutton discovers Lizzie and Mattie in the library where she works and in an old and unkempt cemetery nearby. What exactly was “The Home for Erring and Outcast Girls”? Was it a good option for young women and their mostly illegitimate children or something else? With only a handful of ancient records and the cemetery as a resource, Cate sets out to discover just that. While dealing with issues and struggles in her own life and mind, she takes on a young assistant with her own drama and delves into the lives of Lizzie and Mattie and the other young women and staff at the home. She comes to know and love them as much as one can without having ever met. This book took me back to another time and into the lives of some unfortunate young ladies and kept me there long after I finish the last page. If you enjoy his Storico fiction, put this book on your must read list! Thank you to NetGalley for an advance read copy of this great book.
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  • Marie Bubilo
    January 1, 1970
    I love that the book tackled real life treatment of women and pregnant, unwed young women in the first half of the 20th Century, The timeframe in the book spanned from 1905-2017, from the point of view of 3 women. Two from the earlier time period. Girls who ended up in the Berachah Industrial Home in Arlington, TX. The third woman is from a more recent time and is the one digging into the past to know more about the first two. I found the narration based on the point of view of three different w I love that the book tackled real life treatment of women and pregnant, unwed young women in the first half of the 20th Century, The timeframe in the book spanned from 1905-2017, from the point of view of 3 women. Two from the earlier time period. Girls who ended up in the Berachah Industrial Home in Arlington, TX. The third woman is from a more recent time and is the one digging into the past to know more about the first two. I found the narration based on the point of view of three different women interesting. The author did a good job keeping the mystery about each woman’s past going, and also in giving all the characters realistic traits. The book reminds the reader just how far women’s rights have gone and that life isn’t wrapped up in a perfect little bow. There are some areas where I felt like the story dragged on, such as the Lizzie’s backstory towards the end of the book. Perhaps that could have been added early on or maybe shortened? The one thing that didn’t sit right with me is the revelation that Cate’s River was a girl. Why make her a girl?
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  • Danelle The Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    This novel is for anyone who enjoys a good historical fiction read. The novel moves between early 1900’s Texas and Texas of today. A century ago, a woman or girl who found herself penniless, “ruined”, raped, molested, pregnant etc often had nowhere to turn. Families would throw a girl out onto the streets. It was seen as her fault always. Mattie and Lizzie are young mothers on their own living in hard times. They are both told about the Home for Erring Girls and turn to it as a place of refuge. This novel is for anyone who enjoys a good historical fiction read. The novel moves between early 1900’s Texas and Texas of today. A century ago, a woman or girl who found herself penniless, “ruined”, raped, molested, pregnant etc often had nowhere to turn. Families would throw a girl out onto the streets. It was seen as her fault always. Mattie and Lizzie are young mothers on their own living in hard times. They are both told about the Home for Erring Girls and turn to it as a place of refuge. What Lizzie and Mattie do with their lives once they get there is part of the story. Then the story moves back and forth to modern day- Cate. Cate has more in common with the outcast girls then it may seem at first. She follows her own journey dealing with heartache and family betrayal.It is a thought provoking, sad, and touching book about how much life has changed for women for the better, but also how we still have the capacity to hurt the ones we love. But ultimately the protagonists speak their own truth to find their own happiness.
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  • Rhonda
    January 1, 1970
    Home for Erring and Outcast Girls is an amazing historical fiction book of the Berachah Home. The story connects the past history with the present life of Cate. She is a librarian researching the history of the Berachah Home, which helps her come to terms with her past. I loved the characters and Julie Kibler clearly researched the past history on the home. I definitely recommend this book, especially for historical fiction lovers.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    “Home for Erring and Outcast Girls” is a thoughtful and touching story not to be missed! It flawlessly weaves together the history of the Berachah Home for Erring Girls (a home for unwed and troubled women in Texas in the early 1900’s) with Cate, a present-day University librarian. Throughout the novel, the author ever so skillfully examines not only the social impact of being an unwed mother but also the devastating personal impact. And by connecting the past history of the Berachah Home with t “Home for Erring and Outcast Girls” is a thoughtful and touching story not to be missed! It flawlessly weaves together the history of the Berachah Home for Erring Girls (a home for unwed and troubled women in Texas in the early 1900’s) with Cate, a present-day University librarian. Throughout the novel, the author ever so skillfully examines not only the social impact of being an unwed mother but also the devastating personal impact. And by connecting the past history of the Berachah Home with the present day story of Cate, we see that as far as we have come in accepting that there is not simply one way right way to live to unlock the doors to happiness, we still have much much farther to go! The fact that the novel was so well researched and steeped in fact as evidenced in the Author’s Notes made the book so much richer and meaningful for me. “Home for Erring and Outcast Girls” is a well researched, well written and thought-provoking story that will stay with you long after you have read the last page! I was honored to receive a free advanced copy from NetGalley and the Publisher, Crown Publishing in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    This novel was an emotional, interesting and detailed journey that takes place in two different times periods. It tells the story of three women who all have experienced significant traumas in their lives. The journeys that take place in the 1900's are based off the Berachah Home. I liked that the novel was based off real places and people.
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  • Tanya
    January 1, 1970
    I was terribly disappointed in this novel. I read an ARC on my kindle from Netgalley. Kibler's first book was brilliant and one I absolutely loved but this second novel was a letdown for me. The first chapter was filled with sentence fragments and read choppy for me. The story, going back and forth in time, about these unwed and 'outcast' young women was such a compelling plot and I appreciate any and all historical research the author did on the subject but her delivery to a fiction piece was n I was terribly disappointed in this novel. I read an ARC on my kindle from Netgalley. Kibler's first book was brilliant and one I absolutely loved but this second novel was a letdown for me. The first chapter was filled with sentence fragments and read choppy for me. The story, going back and forth in time, about these unwed and 'outcast' young women was such a compelling plot and I appreciate any and all historical research the author did on the subject but her delivery to a fiction piece was not on par with her writing as shown in her first book, Calling Me Home. Some of the bits turned me off completely and I didn't feel invested in any of the characters.
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  • MicheleReader
    January 1, 1970
    I’m always drawn to stories of resilient women and Home for Erring and Outcast Girls delivers. I was immediately captivated by the horrific predicaments of Lizzie and Mattie, two “broken” women in turn-of-the-20th century Texas, as well as modern day librarian Cate, whose own back-story is also deeply emotional. Julie Kibler shares a little known part of history in a sensitive and moving manner which adds to the appeal of this book. Always nice to learn something new. Thank you NetGalley and Cro I’m always drawn to stories of resilient women and Home for Erring and Outcast Girls delivers. I was immediately captivated by the horrific predicaments of Lizzie and Mattie, two “broken” women in turn-of-the-20th century Texas, as well as modern day librarian Cate, whose own back-story is also deeply emotional. Julie Kibler shares a little known part of history in a sensitive and moving manner which adds to the appeal of this book. Always nice to learn something new. Thank you NetGalley and Crown Publishing for allowing me to read this wonderful book early. Rated: 4.25!
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  • Pat Welte
    January 1, 1970
    This was both an endearing, wonderful book but also a heart-breaking story. I was sobbing while I read this story. I touched my heart, I loved the characters and I cared about what happened to them all. That includes the women in the current time and in the past. I have never read any books by this author but I will definitely be looking for more by her.I would like to thank NetGalley, the publisher and the author for allowing me the opportunity to read an early copy in exchange for an honest re This was both an endearing, wonderful book but also a heart-breaking story. I was sobbing while I read this story. I touched my heart, I loved the characters and I cared about what happened to them all. That includes the women in the current time and in the past. I have never read any books by this author but I will definitely be looking for more by her.I would like to thank NetGalley, the publisher and the author for allowing me the opportunity to read an early copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Pat Welte
    January 1, 1970
    This was both an endearing, wonderful book but also a heart-breaking story. I was sobbing while I read this story. I touched my heart, I loved the characters and I cared about what happened to them all. That includes the women in the current time and in the past. I have never read any books by this author but I will definitely be looking for more by her.
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  • Robbie White
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed reading this book and learning about the home and couldn't wait to get to the end to find out if it was real. I thought the dual timelines were well done and both told great stories of historical "sins". Today we look at these things differently and I know that there is still bigotry and hatred in the world but i believe every day hearts are won to love.
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  • Nicole Thomas-Newman
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book! Easy read but very well written.
  • Carissa
    January 1, 1970
    This book takes you on by just a journey through time, but through emotions. The lives you are made privy to in this very eloquently and respectfully written love letter of a novel are heartwarming and heartbreaking and so inspiring. It opens your eyes to struggles ancient and current with vast differences and scary similarities, especially given the length of time these injustices have had to be made right. Historical fiction (in some cases fact in this book) aren’t what I’d call my “go to genr This book takes you on by just a journey through time, but through emotions. The lives you are made privy to in this very eloquently and respectfully written love letter of a novel are heartwarming and heartbreaking and so inspiring. It opens your eyes to struggles ancient and current with vast differences and scary similarities, especially given the length of time these injustices have had to be made right. Historical fiction (in some cases fact in this book) aren’t what I’d call my “go to genre” of book, however with more and more books like this in the genre, I’m quickly becoming an insatiable fan.
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  • Susan Setash
    January 1, 1970
    Home for Erring and Outcast Girls was certainly unexpected. I found the characters to be a little cliche' The three part story, covering three different eras, was well thought out providing a glimpse into the changing roles of women and the changing social stance on same sex relationships. I was disappointed in the attitude toward the Church's leadership and compassion. Nevertheless, it was an interesting read.
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  • Jessi
    January 1, 1970
    I was thrilled to receive a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. Once I got started, I had a hard time putting this book down. Julie Kibler's "Home for Erring and Outcast Girls" is a heartbreaking story of love, loss, and redemption spanning a century. Kibler brings readers into the lives of Mattie and Lizzie, once residents of the Berachah Home for the Redemption and Protection of Erring girls, as the try to recover from horrors of their past. Lizzie, molested by people she should have be I was thrilled to receive a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. Once I got started, I had a hard time putting this book down. Julie Kibler's "Home for Erring and Outcast Girls" is a heartbreaking story of love, loss, and redemption spanning a century. Kibler brings readers into the lives of Mattie and Lizzie, once residents of the Berachah Home for the Redemption and Protection of Erring girls, as the try to recover from horrors of their past. Lizzie, molested by people she should have been able to trust and turned out by those who should have protected her, comes to the home as a last resort, her young daughter in tow. Mattie, abandoned by her lover and worried over her sickly son, arrives hoping to save at least one of them. The two women bond over their losses, their rocky pasts, and the newfound sense of home that neither of them have ever had. A century later, all that remains of Berachah is a small cemetery on the campus of the University of Texas at Arlington. Cate Sutton, a librarian with a past she has worked hard to bury, stumbles upon the small collection of grave markers one afternoon, and soon embarks on a journey to learn all she can about Lizzie and Mattie. Cate feels a mysterious connection to these women and as she uncovers more about each girl's past, she begins to face the demons of her own. This book was a rollercoaster of emotions for me. I found myself laughing along with Cate as she spent carefree days with the mysterious River. I cried with Mattie as she clung to her ailing son. I worried myself to bits along with Lizzie, and wished I had her heart. I felt the anger and the confusion and the questions that each of these women faced in their respective lives. Though my life has been nothing like that of Mattie or Lizzie or Cate, I feel a connection to these girls. I feel anger and heartbreak on their behalf. Julie Kibler has crafted a powerful and revelvant novel that will resonate with anyone who takes the time to dig in. I am so glad that I had the opportunity to read it.
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